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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, January 01, 1892, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025968/1892-01-01/ed-1/seq-12/

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12
THIS IS BUSINESS.
Exports and Imports Tia the
Railroads.
A Gain of Seventy-five Million
Pounds.
The Freight Business of Southern
California.
Statistics from the Southern Pacific
aud Santa Fe Companies—A Great
Gain In the Shipments or
Onr Products.
The annual compilation ot freight
statistics by the auditor of the Southern
Pacific road tells an interesting tale of
the enlargement of the freight receipts
and shipments at the city of Los An
geles. The figures given are based on
ten months of 1891, while the compara
tive figures quoted for the preceding
year cover the entire twelve months.
In 1890 the freight received here aggre
gated 50,660,210 pounds, and the ship
ments east from here 71,668,500 pounds.
For the ten months of the past year the
receipts were 51,602,910 pounds, and the
shipments from Los Angeles 116,658,500
pounds. This showß a sain of over
45,000.000 pounds in the shipments from
this city for ten months atone, and a
gain of 942,700 pounds in the receipts.
The remarkable increase in the ship
ments is a most gratifying feature,
showing, as it does, the development of
local industries and the rapid expansion
of our horticultural interests.
The following table gives a compara
tive statement covering the staple
articles of product and the increase in
shipments as contrasted with the
previous year:
THEOCGn FREIGHT, EAST-BOUND, PROM LOS AN
ELKS, FOR THE YEAR le9l.
Pounds
Aspha'tum 4, 72.410
Beans 22 709,190
Borax 5*8.960
Brardv 7i.5,»6c>
Canned goods 2,0 9.070
Empty packages ' 295.320
Fruit, dried 1,841,860
Fruit, green, citrus 36,621.290
Fruit, green, deciduous 1,637,460
Hidesaud pelts 560.010
Honey 455,530
Horses 126.000
Household goods and personal
effects 357 600
Nuts 1,010,500
Ouiuns 1,061,520
Potatoes 18.989,300
Raisins 1.550670
Vegetables 7,256,390
Wine :-',129 0(i0
Wool 2,629,900
Miscellaneous 8 732.760
Grand total 116.658,500
THROUGH FREIGHT, WEST BOUND TO LOS ANGE
LES, FOR THE YEAR 1891:
Pounds.
Agricultural implements 911540
Alcohol £5,500
Ale aud beer 89 1,250
Alkalies •.. 153,090
Bacon and hams 49,560
Bags and bagging 96,230
Baking and yeast powder 272,170
Beef and pork 45,670
Boo»s—Printed 130,790
Boots and shoes 558 460
Brushes 33,830
Butter 356 330
Candies 133,750
Canned gouds 606,020
Carpets 382 640
Cheese 136.370
Cigars 228 700
Clothing 169,200
Coffee—Roasted 303,960
Con ectionery 167 830
Cordage and rope 452,580
Drugs 461,700
Dry goods 1,442.180
Furnishing goods 334 690
Farthenware, etc 3»3,250
Kg;s 12-<,OOO
Engines 77,300
Fish—Lried anl salted 14\950
Fruit-Dried 23,96)*
Fruit—Green 610.140
Furniture 228 610
Glassware 934,320
G'ass—Window 167,87"
Hara.rare 1,248.810
Hats and caps 125,570
Horseshoes ... $ 375,210
Household goods and personal ef
fects 2,488.190
Iron—Bar, sheet, etc 6,334.460
Lard 184,260
Liquors ... 303,8 0
Livestock 288,00)1
Living plants and trees 1,809,960
Lumber 397,190
Machinery .... 1,751,470
Marble 66 310
Mea—Corn and oat 917,530
Kent 1" bulk 452,720
Mineral water 32.100
Molasses 326,990
Musical instruments 186.110
Nails H23.130
Oil—Coal 4,525,820
Oil—Linseed 340,140
Oil—Lubricating 43,860
Paper 1,387,280
Preserves and pickles 91,550
Plumbers' toods 112 32(1
Primed matt-r 38.070
Bail road material 216 980
Refrigerators 45.4'>0
Kesin 279,060
Saddlery and harness 69.010
Scales snd beams 12 020
Seed—Farm and garden 202,220
Sewing machines 208,880
Soap common 127,200
Starch ... 11.1,020
Stationer-- 274,450
Slaves and heading 320,420
Steel 1,360,920
Stone 118,210
Steves and ranges 436,730
Syrup 142,960
Telegraph material 59,640
Tin pUte 667,820
Tobacco 466,400
Toys 79,600
Twine and netting 43,660
Vehicles 644,420
Wagon material 205,480
Windmills 64.740
Wire fence 548,8(0
Wire and wire goods 280,770
Woodenwtre 259,680
Merchandise 8,637,390
Grand t0ta1.... 51,002,910
SHIPMENTS OVER THE S. P. CO., EAST.
Article. 1890 - 1891 -
Article. Pouuds. Pounds.
Potatoes and vegeta
bles 11,051,000 33,352,000
Bai.-lns. 1,184,000 1,374,000
Walnuts 1.151,000 880,000
Canned Coeds 2,690,000 1,950,000
Wine aud brandy 3,360,000 2,825 000
Wool 2,9.0,000 2,170,000
Oranges. 38.100,000 .17,600.000
Beans 19,300.000 15,300,004
The above figures for 1891 represent
only the first ten months, while the
figures of 1890 are complete. The total
gain in the shipments of the staple pro
ductions of Southern California from
tlii-s city by both the Southern Pacific
and the Santa F6 roads was 72,537,200
pounds.
THE SANTA FE.
Statistics of Shipments During the Past
Year.
The statistics of shipments by the
Santa road f*"m Los Angeles during
the past twelve months show that there
has been a very marked increase in the
products of this section of the state.
The total shipments or oranges, lemons,
other fruits and vegetables and honey
for the year were 101,323,000 pounds,
an increase of 27.473,000 pounds. The
shipments were classified as follows:
Pouudr.
Onntea 64,435.000
Lemon* 378,000
Other fruits and vegetables 41,300,000
lion, y 2,150,000
Total... 101,323,000
THE LOS ANGELE9 HERALD: FRIDAY MORNING JANUARY 1, 1892-
The increase in the orange shipments
over 1890 was 7,460,000 pounds, and the
increase in lemons 203,000 pounds,
while the showing for other fruits and
vegetables is 19,810,000 pounds in excess
o last year.
Tbe following is a statistical statement
of the freight business for the year end
ing December 31st, 1891:
Commodities. Weight in Lbs.
Grain 69,960,200
Floor 10,541 600
Other mill productt 8,447,4t0
Hay 20,*S5,MM>
Fruits and vegetables 126.644,400
Live stock 12,037,600
Dressed meats 46.1 4tio
Other packiu boose products 7.106,600
Poultry,gim fish 2,617 400
Woo .... 3,276,000
Hides n 1,047,000
Hiiumi 136,633,800
Ores. 1,2.10,200
ston; „ tlcies 44,819 400
ium 88 207.:M4.600
pa ,i« ' .... 21,292,2 O
Su ™ 1.555.000
Iro„ ,".. 1,246,000
Sir"- '9 6<i,400
OtVeVov, .-.machinery:::
Bar and shee. ...etal |2f«o'S)o
Cement brick and lime 89,06-.800
Agricultural implements
Wasons carriages tools, etc .H^'kk)
Wines, liquors and beer »' ™i anii
Household goods and furniture.. Jio
Merchandise Vo'li q 800
Miscellaneous 19.913.8Q0
Tot al 968,939,200
December, 1891, estimated.
The following statement shows the
shipments of dried fruits, raisins, wineß
and liquors, boney, grain and wool, by
counties, during the year 1891:
Totals
Wool, "
Wines and llq'ra,"
Grain,
Honey, "
liaising,
Raisins. "
Dried fruit, in pounds
Commodities.
les county.
Los Ange-
,772,000
150,000
52,000
county.
Orange
22,069,000 j 28,193,000
340,000
2,996,000
825,000
7,332,000
ardlaoco. county.
Ban Bern- San Diego
I
700,000
112,000
23,156 O00
975,000
2,938,000
2,312,000
WWWV W W V i
December, 1891, estimated.
Below will be found statements qf
passengers carried during year ending
December 31,1891:
Number.
Eastward 308,035
Westward 416,754
Both directions 724 789
The mileage o' tbe Southern California
Railroad company is diyided as follows:
o Na ional City
irdino to Lob Angele»
ies to Junction n-ar Ocean-
rside to Orange
latdine valley branch, San
lixo to Mwu.nii;
and Hallou* branches—Los
; to R»dondo and Ballona
0 branch — Junction near
de to Escondido
jto valley branch—P nis to
into
1 branch—Highland junction
Highland
211
63
83
46
17
21
21
19
9
Total
iuhu > f m.co
Average number oi poisons employed, 1000.
Dread for tho 'Russians.
Mr. Squills (looking over the paper)—
The Russian army is almost in a state of
mutiny because the soldiers have to eat
wheat bread.
Mrs. Squills (a famous housekeeper)—
That's too bad. I suppose it's because
they don't know how to fix it. You
must write to the czar this very day and
tell him.
Mr. Squills (starting)—Eh?
Mrs. Squills—Yes,, tell him that he
must be sure to furnish the army with,
good butter; get print butter if possible;
it's often as low as fifty cents and never
over a dollar a pound. Then, on baking
days, when tho bread is fresh, tell the
soldiers to spread the butter on thick
and it will be delicious. The following
day, when it is a little dry, give each
soldier a bowl of rich cream and tell
him to crumb it in. I'm sure they'll like
it.—New York Weekly.
Executors Responsible.
Judge Holmes, of the supreme court,
has decided in the case of Gertrude P.
Sheffield against Horatio Q. Parker and
Francis J. Parker, that the defendants,
executors of the estate of the late Judge
Joel Parker, will not be allowed in their
accounts as executors the sum of $10,0OC,
expended in the purchase of stock in a
mortgage company, which, since the
purchase, has gone into liquidation. The
executors invested in the stock at par,
and at the time i£ was paying 7 per cent,
dividends. After the purchase it stop
ped paying dividends, and has gone out
of business. —Boston Traveller.
The Man and the Sruto.
Before Judge Utley William Crowley,
of Leicester, was charged with assaulting
his wife, Johanna Crowley. He knocked
her down, she says, and kicked her. She
freed herself from him and ran into the
street. He followed. She managed to
break away for the third time and tried
to make her escape. Crowley started in
the chase, but was held back by the firm
grip of a dog's teeth upon his trousers.
The household pet had grown tired of
the household disturbance.—Worcester
(Mass.) Ixazetto.
Seat and Carp.
A 700 pound seal was captured alive
off Fort Point the other day, and was
purchased by the Spring Valley Water
company and placed in their Lake Mer
ced reservoir. Tho company already
have thirteen seals that are useful in de
stroying the carp that abound there in
such numbers as frequently«to fill the
outlet pipe. The big seal will be a great
help in reducing the number of fish in
the reservoir.—San Francisco CalL
A tobacco dealer in New Haven, whose
trado in the'main is with the Yale boys,
says that the sale of cigarettes is falling
off. Three years ago he sold 860,000
packages of one brand; last year he sold
200,000 packages of all brands. He now
sella fifty pipes where be formerly sold
one.
The way to make money is to save it. Hood's
Barsaparllla is the jrost economical medicine
to buy, as It is the only medicine of which can
truly be said "100 doses one dollar." Do not
take any other preparation tf yon have de
cided to buy Hood's Sarsaparilla.
AN OLD FRIEND.
All About Our Noted Glorious
Climate.
Figures Covering the Past
Fourteen Years.
Meteroelogical Statistics Which Tell
the Story.
Fnll Reports Regarding Temperature—
The Rainfall—A Remarkable
Showing or Kg nobility and
Clear Hays.
The record of the weather in Los An
geles for the past fourteen years cer
tainly presents a most potential argu
ment in favor of this city as the garden
spot of the American continent. With
the assistance of Weather Observer
Franklin the Herald is enabled today
to present a series of statistical tables,
covering a period of fourteen years, in
all of which period there was not a va
riation of over 5 per cent in the mean
temperature of any month. Tbe high
est temperature during the year was in
July, whtjn the mercury rose to 109 de
grees. There were no days during the
year when the temperature fell below
the freezing point. The number of
clear days for 1891 exceeded those of the
past five years. The tables also show
that the wettest months of the year are
January, February, March and Decom
ber. The statistical tables are given be
low.
HIGH AND LOW TEMPERATURE.
The following table shows the num
ber of days in each month, and each
year, on which the temperature was
above 90 degrees or below 32 degrees
(the freezing point of water, Fahren
heit):
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
188S
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
Year.
s
cr r»
© CO
o to
a
cr
> ta
cr £.
- Co
© to
K
cr »
2 o
CO CO
o to
2 °
C9 CO
© to
t Si
SS co
o to
•n co
o to
o o
CP W
>
2 o
© CO
2 9
s $
CO
i
S 09
55
o
'O CO
to CO
© to
6
18
2
17
10
19
26
27
17
30
20
32
cr
o
CP
5
TABLE SHOWING MONTHLY, ANNUAL AND
AVERAGE RAINFALL.
Precipitation, including deposit from
fog and dew, in inches and hundredths.
Table showing the monthly, annual and
average precipitations:
T indicates in precipitation.
19. ..
10
18
to
16
IT....
tu
14
15
13
10....
II
12 ....
9 ....
Year.
7.8
3 3
1 3
14
1.0
1 6
3 I
1.0
7.7
.1
6 0
p
c
.01
1 .41
9.25
.97
1.56
n
P
7.68
.97
2 66
2 87
12 36
.0'
2.52
.29
3.17
6.48
.66
.41
er
2 57
.49
1 45
.66
.4
1.8
3.5
2 0
3.3
2.3
1.7
11
5 0
~3
p
3
SJ 1
>
in
cn
a
ST
H
o
I
I.'
5 :
1.
1 I
.1
o
tr
2 e
ti ,s
2 5
4 t;
1 e
S
D
P
THE PRECIPITATION.
The following table shows the number
of days on which .01 of an inch or more
precipitation occurred, including fog
and dew :
1»78
1879
1880
1881. ....
1882..:....
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1S88, ....
1881
1890
1891
Year.
S
a
I >
a
s
1
THE MONTHLY TEMPERATURE.
The following table shows the month
ly temperature for fourteen years, with
the highest, lowest and mean tempera
tures for each month:
1878. .
1879.
1881.
1 188>. .
| 18*3. .
I 1884...
i 1885. .
1886. .
: 1837...
I 18-8...
1889
18S0.
1891...
Year.
H. L. M.
72 0 37 0 54 9
73 7 36 0 52 2
76 0 30 0 51 3
7i 0 7 0 51 7
71 2 32 0 40 4
82 0 30 0 53 5
78 O 33 7 53 0
71 6 38 O 53 9
75 3 3« 0 54 7
79 6 33 1 55 4
71 0 30 0 50 0
71 0 32 O 52 0
67 0 31 0 49 0
80 0 31 0 56 0
January.
H. L. M.
71 0 41 0 55 0
80 5 38 6 55 5
70 5 33 5 50 I
FB 0 42 5 57 9
76 7 32 O 50 3
1-2 0 28 0 52 3
81 0 38 5 55 1
81 0 36 5 56 6
81 0 5' 1 59 5
8' 5 35 4 51 6
73 5 39 2 54 4
84 0 33 0 56 0
81 0 35 0 54 0
71 0 73 0 53 0
February.
76 0 42 0
79 0 4 ! 5
73 5 36 0
89 0 37 0
87 8 35 3
84 0 42 6
82 5 37 o
95 1 42 3
76 0 37 2
85 0 41 '
79 0 35 0
81 O 410
810 40 0
82 0 40 0
H.
L.
March.
M.
80 0 41 5 57 0 89 0 47 0 62 2
88 5 4' 2 58 7 97 0 4 1 0 61 0
83 0 40 0 55 9 97 0 42 0 61 1
94 0 48 0 61 4| 89 3 41 0 62 7
1-0 0 40 0 5a 4 86 1 42 I 61 7
89 0 3SO 57 3 100 0 39 5 62 1
80 0 41 5 57 21 79 0 47 O 616
88 6 *4 8 6i 9 8o 0 48 6 63 5
80 0 42 3 57 2 89 0 44 2 62 4
87 0 40 3 59 1 9 2 0 41 5 61 1
99 0 44 0 U 9| 83 0 45 0 60 8
93 0 46 0 33 0, 94 0 56 0 63 3
94 0 42 0 59 0 96 0 43 0 63 O
86 0 42 0 59 0 74 0 47 0 62 0
H.
I..
M.
April.
May.
L.
M.
81 0 47 0 65 i
103 5 50 5 65
83 0 50 0 63
88 0 48 0 65
87 1 49 6 61
100 0 5 2 0 68
9-> 0 49 5 f 5
90 1 47 0 65
91 6 4* 2 66
10 ■ 1 46 7 66
94 0 50 5 67
81 O 510 66
105 0 48 0 68
i 89 0 49 0 66
June.
88 0 52 0 67 7 89 0 54 0 68 6
84 5 52 0 66 8 97 5 53 0 69 5
85 O 5! 0 64 2 87 o 52 0 66 4
96 I 52 1 68 8 1 P8 8 5 2 1 69 4
98 9 52 3 68 0 93 9 57 0 71 o 1
On 0 f 2 5 69 8 93 <> 50 0 69 8
F» 0 51 5 7<> 2 101 5 52 5 71 3
93 5 5 3 4 70 0 105 6 51 2 7 I 7
98 1 50 4 69 5 ', 98 1 53 7 71 «
98 1 51 1 69 5 93 6 52 1 68 5
95 0 49 » 67 9, 97 0 51 3 67 6
»P 0 54 0 71 Ol 95 O F5 0 70
97 0 55 0 73 0 ; 99 0 56 0 73 0
109 0 54 0 74 0; 96 0 54 0 75 0
H.
L
M.
July.
H.
h. M.
August.
103 0 50 0 65 6
I'll 0 47 0 67 2
91 0 44 0 64 5
102 0 50 0 67 9
1"0 0 46 0 67 6
03 5 53 0 71 9
9 -• 5 45 5 65 5
H>8 5 51 3 69 5
913 48 3 65 6
91 0 49 2 68 2
98 2 55 0 68 4
1- 3 0 52 0 73 O
94 0 54 0 710
100 0 52 0 73 9
L.
September,
M.
91 O 43 0 63 O
96 5 42 5 64 3
89 I) 44 0 62 0
82 3 43 O 60 9
88 O 44 O 63 0
8* O 43 5 61 0
89 1 42 9 62 3
102 3 41 6 61 8
82 2 41 1 59 3
93 2 47 2 65 0
98 0 41 0 61 9
89 O 50 O t*6 O
99 0 46 0 68 O-
89 0 46 O 66 0
H.
L.
October.
81 0
8* 5
85 0
80 8
81 O
84 0
88 0
78 5
84 9
86 0
84 0
82 0
96 0
85 0
H.
Novsmber.
L.
58 3
55 2
55 5
50 5
57 3
59 2
f 9 6
59 5
56 6
60 0
57 0
ft 0
6 0
61 0
M.
-
88 2 30 <
76 0 30 £
80 O 38 (
79 3 35 f
82 O 35 (
8(1 0 3 ' (
75 6 45 £
82 O 40 i
84 8 37 i
73 2 35 5
79 0 41 <
62 6''43 <
38 2
76 0
30 O
79 3
«a o
30 0
;5 e
32 0
34 8
73 2
79 0
32 6
H.
December.
30 <
30 £
38 (
35 f
35 C
3' (
45 £
40 I
37 S
35 5
41 (
43 C
Ik
0 54 4
5 51 9
0 55 6
3 54 7
0 57 4
0 56 3
5 52 3
3 57 9
3 55 7
2 53 7
0 55 0
6 61 2
M.
NUMBER OF CLEAR, FAIR AND CLOUDY
DAYS.
The following table shows the number
of clear, fair and cloudy days in each
month and each year:
1878
1879
1880
1881
1832.
1883
1881
188)
1886
1837
188*
183:»
l-<9<>
18J1
o"ao 2"*2 2^2
P * B P t fi P •» O
13 10 8 13 6 9 7 H 6
16 10 5 6 13 9 16 5 10
20 10 1 16 8 6 16 10 4
17 9 5 14 12 2 15 13 3
18 6 7 16 9 3 15 5 11
21 6 4 13 9 6 6 14 11
17 8 6 H 8 10 8 11 1
17* lo* 4 16 11 1 14 12 8
13 6 11 20 4 4 14 11 6
21 10 0 13 9 6 18 12 1
14 8 9 11 8 7 10 12 9
19 6 6 18 8 2 9 18 4
10 13 8 : 15 9 4 13 13 5
18 11 2 10 7 11 11 10 7i
2 2
p » a
2^2
** a
2^2
p i b
9 13 9
13 12 5
8 10 12
6 13 11
16 9 5
19 13 2
11 13 7
11 12 7
13 10 1
11 10 fl
11 8 8
11 13 6
6 20 4
10 13 7
11 10
22 9
15 11
9 15
12 11
12 15
7 16
4 21
14 14
44 11*
»5 18
9 19
5 18
4 20
2^2
p * c
i 3 15 1
I 3 21 :
7 22
12 16 '
; 11 14 1
is 12 I
8 9 i;
li 14
i 10' 16* :
. 17 io :
i 17 12
!' 1 28
9 21 i
11 14
p e
June.
5 3! 0 10 19 2 15 14 1 17 13
12 18 0 17 14 0 IS 12 0 19 9
5 23 3 12 16 3 6 23 1 9 16
11 19 1 12 18 1 17 11 2 19 9
0 22 O 16* U" 1 2.1 2 2 20 9
11 19 1 12 18 1 *1 8 0 3 14
; 24 7 o 23 18 0'20 8 2 25 4
It 16 1 1« 14 1 18 12 O 21 10
i: 15 11 2 21 8 ? !5 1-4 0 15 11
1 13 13 5 11" 20 0 15 12 3i2l 6
117 17 1 2.1 8 0 22 7 2JC 10
15 16 0 14 16 1 ill 18 ! I 6 2
120 -1 OllO 2 1 lll2 12 6|25 2
i 8 23 0 9 22 • 17 13 0 10 2J
ST E. o
P t S
■4
P H-
July.
2^2
P "I B
p *i c
V
11
10
12
5
8
11
7
8
7
9
8
8
4
10
2
3
1
0
6
1
2
8
1
3
7
1
o
22 4 5
10 10 8
10 10 11
15 14 2
22 8 1
22 7 2
13' ll> 6
21 5 6
18 12 1
! 21 7 3
'118 6 7
i 13 12 6
2 ** 2
« ? I
Dece mber.
141 359 65
173 146 46
14i 171 54
172 1 54 39
197 109 51
183 143 39
189 1)0 66
181 145 48
190 131 43
196 129 39
184 118 64
163 1&3 47
p
«s 2
2. o
THE HUMIDITY.
The following table ahowa tbe
monthly and annual mean relative hu
midity :
OUXCBXXQOXXXXXXCCX
tD *C XCDoV CC OP US X CX X T-J J
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Total?
October
November...
December....
September..
January. .
February ..
Ma'ch
April
May
June
July
August
51
51
Number Nominal.
46'
883
1.3
1886.
1888
1891.
* 528,153 4
484,485 8
766,239 3
1,098,840 1
760,705 8
1,019,644 6
5*6,248 1
631 171 5
588,91-1 0
794 796 8
965 548
914,665 0
' 9,148,131 5
733,5 • 0 68
634,036 Od
1,003.901 02
l,02v>,264 3i
840.505 18
678,218 77
552,982 14
544,381 59
583 961 08
493 098 18
543.102 98
696,991 00
1884.
604 350 00
694,136 00
902, H52 00
696.566 ( 0
7 82,8>-3O0
751,340 00
1,234,964 OC
511,188 00
1.109,122 00
812,176 00
748.263 00
1,182,412 00
1885. '
1886
1
1887.
62 847
1888.
1889.
■li
19.344 1
S 1
1890.
1831.
.11
; ESS
The City Won't Pay for tne xrousers.
There; was quite an ■ audible smile in
the board of aldermen -tshcn a communi
cation was received from Officer Milton
C. Morse, asking for five dollars damages
for a pair of pants while arresting a
prisoner. Alderman Watson moved that
the claim be allowed, but Alderman Ar
nold jumped up and remarked that he
thought that tho policemen earned salary
enough to pay for their own pants, and
moved that the request be refused. A
minute later he withdrew his motion,
but the request was not granted.—Hav
erhill (Mass.) Gazette.
A Hen That Lays Golden Eggs.
There is danger of a breaking out of
the gold fever in West Stockbridge. A
thoroughbred hen up there laid a few
days ago an egg with a shell that fairly
glittered with tiny specks of gold. If
the place where the hen found the metal
can be found there is a party already or
ganized to seek paying dirt. —Newbury-
port (Mass.) News.
The Whipping Deserved.
Miss Susie Gardner, teacher in the
Pales school, near Roachdale, Ind., whip
ped Albert Coonkright, an unruly pupil,
and his mother prosecuted the teacher
for assault. The defendant was tried by
jury and acquitted, the jury holding the
ounishment well deserved.—Exchange.
Don't suffer from dyspepsia. Take Simmons
Regulator. It always cures. .v
ONE OF A VANISHING RACE.
He Hunts Over Wide Areas and Is at
Home Wherever There Is Wilderness.
The professional hunters and trappers
who at one time comprised the whole of
the white inhabitant class in this sec
tion are becoming so few that a real old
time solitary woodsman who plunges
into the forest and divests himself of
human companionship is becoming a
rare sight. Joe Thomas is one of the
best examples that remain of these men,
and a study of his characteristics is in-
teres ting.
Thomas is a man of about forty. He
is slightly below medium height and is
not heavily built. He appears like a full
blooded negro, although he says that his
mother was a half breed Indian. He has
sparse, tightly curled -whiskers and does
not look like a Nimrod and fcirlighty
man among coons and deer. Thomas
follows as near the life of the red man
as any one can in these days, arid has an
antipathy to human society, though he
is nothing of a misanthrope, and talks
well to any one who questions him.
In the summer time Thomas works at
whatever he can get to do about the
cities in this vicinity and through to
Ohio. When tho squirrel season opens
he is In Ohio, and puts in the first few
weeks of |he autumn shooting squirrel.
As the deer season opens, he emigrates
northward, and for the rest of the win
ter lives the life of the solitary hunter,
shunning human habitations and sleep
ing in the woods in the mc%t inclement
weather. His domestic outfit consists of
a tent, blankets and a small stove, and
he declares that he is more contented in
the woods than he would be in town.
When the night is cold he lights his £re,
chains his dog up in the tent and sleeps.
While the deer run, Hopkins follows
them tirolessly, and when night over
takes him on the trail he lies ,down in
the woods to sleep, confident that the
deer is as tired as he and will not move
during the night unless disturbed, and
in the morning will be so stiff that the.
second day's chase will be a compara
tively easy matter.
After tho deer season is over Thomas
starts for the open, and traps skunks and
otter and all other fur bearing animals
for the rest of the winter. At all times
he is ready in case old Zip Coon comes*
racking around, and his dog he alleges
to be one of the best coon dogs in the
country. The animal is a liver and
white hound, slightly larger than a fox
hound, and with no more fat on him
than is required to grease his joints.
Thomas said that the dog got him more
than fifty dollars' worth of coonskins in
one season, and he would not part with
him for three times that amount. Joe
tells a story to illustrate the sagacity of
the dog.
He says that one winter the dog treed
a coon in a big tree. Joe always carries
climbing irons, and he skinned up the
tree. He followed the coon out on a
branch and shook him off, and he heard
him squeal as the dog nabbed him.
When Joe got to the bottom of the tree
there was no coon in sight and no dog.
He heard the dog running and called to
him; the dog came out of the bushes a
moment and then ran back. Joe fol
lowed and found that the dog was run
ning around a skunk, keeping it from
going into its hole. Mr. Dog did cot ,
want to interview the skunk closely, but
the skunk was not sure of that, and bo
kept his eye on the dog, circling around,
and the dog was gradually getting him
away from his hole. Joe killed the
skunk, but he could find no trace of the
coon, and concluded that the dog had
lost it.
The next morning he reproved the dog,
saying: "You didn't do right about that
coon last night; you lost him. Now you
go get him." The dog looked kind of
ashamed and moved off. Joe followed
him, and they went back to the place
where the trouble occurred on the pre
vious night. After nosing around a
while the dog unburied the coon from
where he had buried it, having been
afraid to leave it while he went after the
skunk, so he buried it, leaving the tail
sticking out of the snow so he could find
it again.
Some one asked Thomas if he was not
afraid that the bears would eat him some
night. He said that the only thing that
made him mad was that the bears kept
away from him and didn't give him a
chance. Joe says that the houses are
getting altogether too thick, and when
he meets up with a house he wants to
get as far away from it as he can and as
quick as he can.—Oil City Derrick.
Cheaper in the End.
Boutton —So you are not going to
housekeeping when you get married?
De Boarder—No. We shall take board
for a year.
"Isn't that rather an extravagant way
to begin?"
"Not at all. I desiro my wife to study
economy of my landlady. Then we will
start housekeeping, and I will make her |
an allowance of as much a week as we
paid for board."
"Wliat do you think will be the re
sult?"
"Well, by the time we are old she
ought to have about a million."—New
York Weekly.
Tree Toads in Demand.
Tree toads are in big demand by young
doctors and chemists, who are anxious
to learn something of the circulation of
the blood. The tree toad has legs that
are almost transparent. The young doc
tor takes the leg, spreads it out under a
microscope and can see the blood cor
puscles chasing each other hero and
there in the veins of the leg of tho toad.
We sell hundreds of tree toads for this
purpose every month. — Interview in
New York World.
«
Not to lie Taken Literally.
"Is it your opinion," said the theolog
ical professor, "that the portion of the
parable which represents tho prodigal
son as feeding among swine is to be
taken literally?"
"Perhaps not," the thoughtful young
man replied; "maybe it is a reference to
the meals he ate at a railway lunch
counter." —Washington Star.
Shtloh's Consumption Cure.
This Is beyond question the most successful
Cough Medicine we have ever sold, a few "doses
invariably cmc the worst oases of Cough,
Croup and Bronchitis, while its wonderful
success in the cure of Consumption is without
a parallel in tbe history of medicine. Since it's
first discovery it has been sold on a guarantee,
a test which no other medicine can stand. If
you have a cough we earnestly ask yon to try
It. Price 10c, 50c aud 11. if yonr lungs are
sore, chest or back lance, use Shllob's Porous
Plaster. Bold wholesale by 3«a», Baruch A-
Co., and all retail druggists.
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

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