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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, January 01, 1892, Image 13

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MUNICIPAL FINANCES.
SEVERAL INTEREBTINGr TABLES
CONCERNING THEM.
The City Tax Levy—Valuations of the
City Assessor-A Complete Exhibit of
the City's Expenses.
Some interesting tables relating to
municipal financial affairs will be found
below. Tbe first is a statement of the
tax levy for 1891-92, with a comparison
during tbe past decade. It gives the
total tax rate, together with the appor
tionment to the different funds, and the
amounts produced by the levy. The
second , table indicates the valua
tions put upon the city property
luring tbe past ten years, tbe same
mowing a steady and healthy increase.
Fhe third table is a complete exhibit of
he disbursement of tbe public moneys:
THE CITY TAX LEVY.
Tear.
O
P
B-
B
8 00 12 (*
7 00 f> <K
9 20 711
17 00 11
13 00 lfrOi
16 70 12: »<
10 00 IO »
19 00 5 W
13 40 11 *
12 40 11 »
4
4
3
2
1
2
2
2
I 5 60
120 00
MOOO
!20 00
i 20 Oo
120 OO
13 40
110 76
00 1
15 00
5 60
6 50
1 r o
p
55
p
190
8 70
6 10
......
B*
o
P
B
a
00
" ' 96 I
600
2 70
3 00
2 80
2 40
2 30
150
10
o
a
OC
H
14 20
OD
B-
o
g
B
8 01
600
3 Oo
1 SO
1 30
30
a
CO
B
P

I"""
6 00
2
CD
ti
1 00
5 30
3 60
3 60
1 . 1
a
a
p
OD
OD
00
7 30
B
B
00
GO
700
5 60
400
3 50
3 40
300
800
1 20
' V 1'i
80
10 60
p.v.. .
110
80
4
9
a
0.
a
c
M
B
a
"'24
■ p
B
3D

s
OD
OD
1 80
700
P
a.
00
OD
OD
7 40
500
480
1' 00
9 80
7 90
5 05
3 20
""35
Da
P
a
a
OD
3 80
3 10
2 80
2 90
J.00
100
100
70
10 00
58
"471
m
§
i
p.
8 32
B
00
CD
P
B
CO
B" S
iboo
18 10 I8 60
5 60
i 24
$100 00
76 00
1OOO0
170 00
12OO0
3 60 00
130 00
150 00
110 00
12OO0
Total.
VALUATION—CITY ASSESSOR.
Total
Amount of Assessment
after Equalization
Amount of Tax Levy.,..
Franchises
Money
Personal Property
Improvements
Real Estate
75,749.26
7 574,926
$7,627,632
240,691
38,300
* 1,124,643
2,179,935
$4,043,935
70,626.81
9,294,074
$9,303,447
180,228
1,370,221
59,642
2,538,013
$5,160,283
1882-83.
12,232,853
$12,235,053
1883-84.
14,781,865
$14 721,215
65,955
3,977,123
$8,284,475
1884-85.
195,282.30
16,272,535 j
$17,432,435
173,915
2,347,720
4,570,185
128,107
$9,212,508
1885-86.
285,209.48
18,458,535
$18,451,525
60,900
2,398,122
4,948 030
$11,948,815
1886-87,
27,875,388
$29,108,148
50,200
3,145,711
523,368
6,615,870
$18,722,999
1887-88.
563,999.39
39,479,172
339,497,938
1,396,954
4,217,001
6,048,415
$27,832,408
1888-89.
46,999,101
516,968 10
144,871,073
131,095
211,387
3,993,464
8,809,190
i 3!,675,937
1889-90.
49,320,670
117 443 945
201,730
10,610,390
$33,791,935
1890-91.

317,418
3,283,099
$29,931,'
1891-A2.
■•i m
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD FRIDAY MORNING, JANUARY 1, 1892
CITY EXPENSES.
Total
January
Fe,' ruary
March
April
May
June.
July
August
September
October
November
December
Months.
1893.
Cash Fund.
'.1
1890.
Salary Fund.
155,197.:
1890.
Fire Fund.
158,322.78
School Fund.
23,437.70
22,091.99
4.084 04
19,4 ii-58
38,182.' 4
19,903.05
387.18
4,203.0 1
5.540.00
26.409.91
28,104.47
28 200.00
( » 27,
Fork Fund.
28.067.25 i
1890.
Library Fund.
II.'
5
20,607,77
*
Sprinkling Fund.
57,
1891.
1890.
* 48,446.35 * 1,802.20 $ 412.54
I I
Gas Fund.
""10.50
4(5 ou
*
1890.
City Hall Fund.
*....
' 412 54
a*
t
Dog Fund.
346 OS
" 183 00
25.00
* 102.00
200.00
1891.
New Water Fund.
U7,105.54' U7,
I
$ 331.00
1 563.62
33.30
2;740.79
4,757.51
1,5 4.22
1 024.65
762.40
3 504.00
524.50
159.55
175.00
1890.
Deposit Fund.
i..
19,827.'
1890.
Redemption Fund.
$ 694.21
1,727.25
164.30
145.93
117.-2
273.33
177.90
1,016.12
642.72
404.49
350.50
Tax Fund.
469.49
328.67
300.00
S 360/ 0
1,597.00
3,775.20
3.15
" 15.01
2'4.4'
78.00
1390.
General Sewer Fund.
1 492.92
2.00
102.16
I
' 29 00
1891.
$17,255.08
$ 2,117.53
15,137.50
Public School
Improvement
Fond.
1890.
7'.95
a n
j
I 7,067.6<
1890.
ADVICE TO YOUNG MEN.
"BUBINESS" IS NOT BY ANY MEANS
THE CHIEF AIM IN LIFE.
The Tooth la Under No Obligation to
Imitate Other* or to Oo as Others Do.
Respect the Sanctity of the Soul and
Beware of Superfluous Friends.
Here are some extracts of William
Winter's address before the Staten Island
academy:
What will you do with your lives?
We, who are older, who have lived long
er and traveled further, are usually
ready enough with our counsel; but it is
your ideal that must lead you now, and
not the advice of others. Honor and
truth we take for granted. "I would be
virtuous," said an old philosopher,
"though no one were to know it, just as
I would be clean, though no one were to
see me."
The book of commonplace precept
need not be opened here. Yet there is
one word of counsel which now more
than ever—in this Pagan age of denial
and democracy—ought to be spoken to
the youth of America. Be yourselves,
and never abandon your noble aspira
tions!
You cannot live in absolute independ
ence of the world. You must have
affiliations with other persons. But it i 8
not imperative that those affiliations
should be numerous, and you have it
within your power to make them select.
You are under no obligation to imitate
others or to do as others do.
You ought never to permit your
minds to be inundated with the igno
rance, the crudity and the vapid chatter
of commonplace persons. Do not too
much reverence the past. Old burdens
that have rolled from the shoulders of
weary and dying men and women should
not be taken up again by you.
It is your life that you must live; it is
not theirs; aud now that they rest from
their labors, let their works follow them.
Neither must you suppose yourselves en
joined to assume the burdens that other
persons have created in the present day.
AVOID TOO MANY FRIENDS.
Let those attend to grievances who
have them, and do not allow your spirits
to be dejected, your hopes darkened and
your lives encumbered with the vices,
the errors, the follies and the weakness
of failures and of fools. It is, no doubt,
pitiable and deplorable that failures and
fools should exist and suffer; but they
must not be permitted, merely because
they exist and suffer, to drag you also
into failure and folly. Respect the sanc
tity of your souls, and beware of super
fluous contact with other lives.
For it is only the temporary and the
expedient that is gregarious. In every
great moment of life —in every time gf
insight or inspiration or crisis—the hu
man being is alone. The object of edu
cation, therefore, should be the develop
ment and building of an original, noble,
adequate character—not simply a prep
aration for industrial pursuits, but an
armament for everlasting life.
The occupations of this world, how
ever important, are transitory. The soul
of man is immortal. Other views, lam
aware, are commonly entertained. Peo
ple who claim to be practical but are
only narrow are never weary of declar
ing that education must be sensible and
not visionary. An effort to worry the
public mind on this subject is a part of
the errant activity of the complacent
man of business, all the world over, and
has been so, at periodic intervals, for
many years.
I remember its pernicious existence
long ago—the jealous sneer at what was
called "book learning," as opposed to
what was called practical knowledge of
affairs; meaning thereby cotton, iron,
coal, the Stock exchange and the Re
vised Statutes.
BOMB SNEER AT EDUCATION.
Not long since—in 1890, in the news
papers of New York—that epidemic of
mean commonplace burst forth with un
common virulence, and various individ
uals, in every case possessed of more
wealth than sense, apprised us that
scholastic training is superfluous, be
cause it aims to furnish an equipment
wholly in excess of what is requisite for
business.
My dear old friend, William Warren,
the comedian, used to tell, in his inimit
able way, a story about a pompous
tradesman of the conventional kind,
who once was addressing the pupils at a
Sunday school. "I knew a little boy,''
he said, "who always obeyed his mother,
always washed his face in the morning,
always came early to Sunday school,
never stole an apple. And where do
you think that good boy is now?" To
this inquiry a small voice piped out an
answer, "In heaven, sir." "No, sir,"
cried the disgusted orator, "not in
heaven I He's in a store!"
That is the mental drift of those ene
mies of tho higher education. To their
minds the chief end of man is to get him
self employed in a store. They are what
Joseph Jefferson calls "the selfish made
men of'our time." Certainly the fact is
significant that the sensitive feeling is
all on one side.
Educated men are not worried. If
education has not always given them
wealth, it has given them blessings that
no prodigality of wealth can buy, and
by this token they know that the prov
ince of education is not to train young
people for business, but to embark them
upon life —of which business is only an
incident. The best wisdom of the wis
est of mankind has always taught that
lesson.
Make your business tributary to your
mind, and not your mind subservient to
your business. —New York Tribune.
Plurals of Several Words.
Knight errant is not written as one
word, and need not be even connected
with a hyphen —indeed, is not so gener
ally. Therefore the plural, of course, is
knights errant. Lookers on is not one
word. Once that usage has soldered
two words, the resultant word will form
its plural with a final s. The plural oi
bootjack is not bootsjack.—Notes and
Queries.
My daughter was troubled with neuralgia in
her v ck and back and was cured by i-alvation
Oil. I endorse this remedy fully and cheer
fully recommend It G. FIFER.
100 North Poppletou st, Baltimore, Md.
BHII.OHB CATARFH REMEDY, a marvel
ous cure tor Catarrh, Diphtheria, Canker
mouth, and Headache, with each bottle there
Is an ingenious nasal injector for the more suc
cessful treatment of these complaints without
extra charge Price 50c. Sold wholesale by
Haas, Baiuch A Co., and all retail druggists.
Wild Run of an Empty Ca».
There was a lively commotion at the
Telegraph Hill end of Kearny street, and
that no one was injured was almost a
miracle. Near Valejo street, on Kearny,
is a wine saloon. The proprietor left a
huge empty wine cask on the outer edge
of the sidewalk. That part of Kearny
street is on Telegraph Hill, the steepest
block in the city.
A man fell against the cask and
started it rolling. A second later it was
making great bounds through the air
and covering twenty feet of street at a
single flight. People seeing the danger
shouted to those down the street to get
out of the way. Broadway was cleared
at a single bound, and the cask narrowly
missed crushing a laundry wagon into
splinters. On it went at a Palo Alto
speed, scattering people right and left.
A Union street cable car was stopped in
time to prevent a collision. The running
cask evidently meant mischief, and, ap
parently to prove the superiority of wine
over water, it headed for Dr. Cogswell's
fountain on Kearny street and Mont
gomery avenue.
A bundle that a frightened pedestrian
dropped turned the cask aside so that it
barely missed the cold water resort.
However, it tcok its revenge by smash
ing a small fruit stand all to pieces, scat
tering the fruit in every direction. The
lower deck of a bootblack's stand was
carried away, and a cigar stand got a
blow that rattled down tbe boxes on the
shelves.
At last the cask was stopped near
Jackson street by colliding with a hitch
ing post. The bootblack immediately
claimed the cask for the damage to his
stand. The owner of the cask stood at
the top of the hill and wisely decided
that it was better to stay where he was
than to venture among those whose
places had been wrecked. —San Francis
co Chronicle.
Hound to Bo Caught.
What is to be done when a fish which
onght not to be caught, and which one
does not wish to catch, perversely insists
upon being captured whether or no, and
actually forces itself into one's posses
sion? That was the question that stared
Mr. J. U. Gregory, of Quebec, full in the
face when he was fishing for trout at
Tadousac one line day of the past season.
The trout were lawful game, but salmon,
in the same waters, forbidden fruit. It
was then with a sigh of sincere and un
feigned relief that the angler saw a
hooked salmon after a bit of magnificent
play break away with the hook and
parted leader.
But satisfaction was changed to dis
may when the leaping fish came with
one grand vault after another directly
for the boat, and at last lay stunned and
helples l ! in the canoe. Mr. Gregory
promptly solved the problem by regain
ing his fly and assisting the fish back
into its element, there, like the patriotic
orator, to sink or swim, live or die, sur
vive or perish.—Forest and Stream.
The vexing question of this Vexlnz age is:
How did Noah and his family survive that
long damp spell without Dr. Bull's Cough
Syrup '!
Basil's Forge.
From reports it would appear that the
sSfe of Basil's forge at Grand Pre is no
lesger a mystery. Mr, W. C. Archi
bald, while cutting away a sandy knoll
about two miles west of the village of
Wolf ville, came upon what is supposed
to be the remains of tho ancient black
smith shop, under about four feet of
soil. Foundation stones, charcoal and
slag wore discovered in large quantities,
so unless the Acadian Grand Pre could
boast of more than one smithy, this is in
all likelihood the spot where Basil lived
and worked. It looks as though Wolf
ville was the heart of the ancient village
of Grand Pre.—Nova Scotia Bulletin.
Sure to relieve. There is no failure in Sim
mons Liver Regulator.
% £hea Baby was sick, we gave her Castorla,
When she was a Child, she cried for Castorla.
When she became miss, she clung to Castorla
When she had Children, she gave them Castorla.
Answer This Question.
Why do so many people we soe around us
seem to prefer to suffer and be made miwerable
by Inoigestion, Constipation, Dizziness. Loss
of Appetite, Coming up of the Food, Yellow
Hkin, when for 75c we will sell them Shiloh's
Vitalizer. guaranteed to cure lliem. B old
wholesale by Haas, Baruch £ Co., and all re
tall druggists.
THE NEW ERA, No. 6 Court street. Fine
wines and liquors. Ed Wene-er. nr«T>rW/»r
OPEN
YOUR EYES
When you ask for a bottle
. of Wolff's Acme Blacking
see that you get the genuine.
The real article made by us
cannot be bought for less
than 20c. a bottle. It is good
material and worth its price.
There are imitations offered
claiming to be "Just as good"
for less money. Don't buy
them. If the " Just as good "
has any merit it ought to Sell
without invoking the aid of
comparison with our Acme
Blacking.
WOLFF & RANDOLPH, Fhiltdalphlr.
PI K-RON
is the name of a paint which does work
that no other paint can do. Olast painted
with it looks liko colored glass. A 10c.
i>ottle of Pik-Ron will decorate a snorkel
basket full of glassware. All retailers sell if.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
INSTATE OF ELIJAH D. FILLMORE, DE
j ceased.
Notice is hereby given by the undetslqned,
administrator of the estate of Elijah D Fill
more, deceased, to the creditors of, and all
persons having claims against tho snid de
ceased, to exhibit the same with the necessa r y
vouchers, within ten months after tbo first
publication of this notice to the said Millard
Fillmore, administrator of the estate of said
decedent, at. tbe office of A B Yonng, attorney
at law, in the < ity of Pomona, in the count; of
Los Angeles, the plsc* where the undersigned
administrator will transact the businCiS of
snid estate
Dated this 21st day of Deoemher. A. D. 1891.
AIILLABD F LLMORF,
12-31 thuriit Administrator,
VIA SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA RAILWAY,
ON THURSDAY AND FRIDAY.
ONLY $5 FOR THE ROUND TRIP !
The Cruiser "SAN FRANCISCO" now in the Harbor.
Receptions to visitors on board, Thursday, Friday
and Saturday.
Trains leave First-street Depot 8:15 a.m. and 3:05 p. m.
TROY LAUNDRY,
Wo'rh, 511, 573 ni |ft North Sain Street, Telephone Sc, M
MAIN OFFICE, UNDER LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK, FIRST AND SPRING STREETS
Dress ShlrU
SEPIA ENLARGEMENTS!
The moat beautiful work ever shown in Loa Angelea, carrying firat prize at Fair,
ending October 24th. Also, first prize for fineat photographs over all competitors.
Bronze Medal and Diploma awarded by the Photographer' Association of
America, Buffalo, New York, July, 1891.
Also, Diploma for Excellence of Photography, awarded Boston. 1889.
Strangers are cordially invited to call at Studio and compare work,
220 SOUTH SPRING STREET,
OPPOSITE L. A. THEATER.
HOLIDAY NOVELTIES!
fiiO Men's Furnishing Goods,
/ffi ALv Fine Neikwear ' Smoking Jackets and Gowns,
Fancy Suspenders, Gloves, Umbrellas,
muds uu Canes, Silk Handkerchiefs, Etc,
(Formerly Evan B. Ivans.) Reliable goods, Reasonable Prices.
6c ALL EN
106 SOUTH SPRING ST.,
OPPOSITE HOTEL NADEAU. LOS ANGELES, CAL.
SUPPLIES
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Photographic materials of all kinds. Detective, View and Kodac cameras. Amateur outfits
at Eastern prices. Developing, printing and finishing tor amateurs. Orders Ailed promptly.
Send for catalogue.
JAS. M. DEWEY,
SUMMONS.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF LO3 ANGE-
Ics county, Mate of California.
No. 16,092
Wm. M. Burr, plaintiff, vs. Fielis Emery
McMillan, defendant.
Action brought in the Superior Court of Los
Angeles county, State of California, and the
complaint filed in said county of Los Angeles.
In the office of the clerk of said Superior Court.
The people of the State of California send
greo.ing to Fields Emery McMillan, defend
ant.
You are hereby required to appear in an
action brought against you by the above named
plalntilf in the superior Court of the county
of Los Angeles, State of California, and
to answer the complaint filed therein,
within ten days (exclusive of the day of
service), after the f crvicc on you of this sum
mons, if served within ttiis county: or, if
served elsewhere, within thirty days, or judg
ment by default will be taken against you ac
cording to the prayer of said complaint.
The said action is brought to obtain a decree
of this C ; iurt for the foreclosure of a mortgage
described iv the said complaint, ond executed
by John McMillan on the '/Stli day of June. A.
1) 188 K. to secure tbe payment of bis certain
prouiissory note of tha'- date for the mm of
'■600 and interest thereon at the rote of 13 per
,'ent per annum, payable semi-annually, that
the premises conveyed by said mortgage may
be sold, and the proceeds applied to tt.e pay
ment of said promissory note and a reasonable
attorney's fee to be fixed by the court, and
costs of suit, and in case such proceeds are not
sutlieieutto pay the same, then «<> obtain an
execution against said defendant for the bal
ance remaining due, and also that tho defend
ant, and all pemms claiming by, through or
under him, may be barred and foreclosed of all
right, title, claim, HeD, equity of redemption
and inteieU iv and to said mortgaged prem
ises, and for other aud. further relief. Refer
ence is had to complatht for particulars.
And you ore he_riby notified that if you fa 1
to appear and answer the said complaint as
above required* the >aid plaintiff will apply to
the (tour*, for (lie relief demanded in the mil
complaint.
Given under my hand and the seal of the
Superior Court of the county of Lo« Angeles,
Slate of Call ornia.t is IHth dsy of November,
in the year of our Lord oue thousand eight
hundred and ninety.
Isbal/ T. H. WARD, Clerk.
By J. B. Fanning, Deputy.
Eudorted: Jones & t'arleton, Attomevs for
rialntlff. narTFVi-iot
THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIAN. & c, i n n
I the growth and development of Southern
* California is requested to send his or her
address to the Fallbrook Printing Co.,Fallbrook.
Kan Diego county, California, In return for
which a free o»py of The Southern Callfor
ntan will b» -ent weekly for three months from
October 1, lb9l. 9-27-eod Sin
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE.
MAIN STREET SAVIKGS BANK AND TRUST
Company, a corporation, plaintiff', vs.
Frank 8 Elder and William Mayes, defendant,
f Sheriff's sale No. 14,635.
Order of sale and decree of foreclosure and
b sale.
i Under snd hy virtue of an order of sale aud
dec Tee of foreclosure and sale, issued out of
the Superior Court of the county of Los An
-1 geles, of the State of California on the 10th day
- of December, A. D. 1891, in the above entitled
action, wherein Main Street Pavings Bank and
i Trust Company, a corporation, the above
-1 named plal:itiff«, obtained a Judgment and
i decree of foreclosure and sale against Frauk
I h. Eldtr et al , defendants, on the 9th day of
. December, A D 1891, for the sum of $2576.31
f dollars, gold coin of the United States.
• which said decree was, on the 10th day of
f De. ember. A. D. 1891, recorded in judgment
book 26 of said court, at page 2' 9, I am com
manded to sell all those certain lots, pieces,
or parcels of land situate, lying and being In
> the city of Los Anveles, county of Los An
i gelcs, State of California, and bounded and
I described as follows:
, Lots numbered fifty-five (55) and fifty-six
i (1«), of the Park Villa tract, as the same are de
scribed and shown upon a map of said Park
Villa tract, recorded in book 12, page 41 of the
; miscellaneous records of Los Angeles county,
made by Fred Katon, surveyor; said lots being
situated upon the westerly side of BousaJlo av
i eDue, between Washl; gt< n and York streets.
I Together with all and a ngular the tene
; ments, hereditaments ai d appurtenances thero
i unto belonging, or iv anywise appertaining.
Public notice ishereby given, that on Satur
day, the 2d day of January, A. D. 1892, at 12
I o'clock M. of that day, in front of the court
, house door of the couuty of Los Angeles
Broadway entrance, I will, in obedience
to said order of sale and decree of
foreclosure and sale, Bell the above de
scribed property, or so mu«b thereof
as may be necessary to satisfy said judgment,
with interest and costs, etc., to the highest and
be-it bidder, for cash, gold coin.
Dated thlß :oth day of December, 1891
E D. GIBSON,
Sheriff of Los Angeles County.
ByF C. Hannon Deputy Sheriff
Graves, O'Melveny <fi Shankland, attys for
plaintiff. 12-11-ffUt
DR. WONG HIM,
Chinese Physician and Snrgeon, has resided in
Lo» * ngelos seventeen < 17, years. His reputa
tion as a thorough physiciaD has been fully es
tablished and appreciated by many. Hie lame
practice Is sufficient proof of his ability and
honesty.
Tbe 'doctor graduated In the lnremost col
leges also practiced in toe larg»st hospitals of
< nmop. China. The doctor speaks f-Danish
flui-Mly.
t'FFiOK: New number, 8W; old number
117 irpjjer Main street. I. 0. box 504,
Slat. an c. 12-17 lm
13

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