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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, January 30, 1892, Image 10

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10
TWO MEN.
Two men tolled side by aide from sun to sun.
And both were poor;
Scth st! with children, when the day was done.
About their door.
One saw tne beautiful in crimson cloud
And shining moon;
The other, with his head in sadness bowed,
Made night of noon.
One loved each tree and flower and singing bird
On mount or plain;
No musio In the soul of one was stirred
By leaf or rain.
One saw the good in every fellow man,
And hoped the best;
The other marveled at his Master'a plan.
And doubt confessed.
One, having heaven above and heaven below.
Was satisfied;
The other, discontented, lived in woe
And hopeless died.
—Boston Transcript.
P SALLIE.
Tom Clarkson waa not considered a
great actor by any one. He was a re
liable man—always gave an intelligent
reading of any part he undertook, but
never seemed to create in his audience
that intensity of attention, that "creepy
sensation up the back" which comes to
one when listening to an actor of great
talent or genius.
Tom was leading man at the old Hol
born theater in London some fifteen
years ago. That was before it was
burned down and when it was devoted
tb the production of sensational melo
dramas. I think it was then under the
management of Clarence Holt, but am
not sure ef this.
Tom played heroes. He was a fine
looking, handsome fellow, and when he
enacted the part of a Jack Tar, and just
as the Villain (with a capital V please)
waa about to rush oil with the sweet
heroine, weighing a hundred and sixty
pounds, after having instructed his
band to carry off the treasure and mur
der the old "patients," Tom always
was jure of a tremendous roar of ap
plause from tbe gallery by rushing down
the stage from some unexpected locality,
shouting: "Never! Unhand the girl,
ruffian 1 Never shall it be said that a
British sailor deserted his ship or failed
to rescue a pretty girl in distress 1" Then
he would go for the villain and beat him
and his "dastardly crew" off the stage.
Tom Clarkson was a married man
with one little daughter, a poor, delicate
little thing of six years, who worshiped
her father in a way simply rivaled by
hia own adoration. There could not be
many more completely attached families
than Tom Clarkson, his wife and little
Sallie. It was positively beautiful to see
them sometimes when at rehearsal Tom
would bring little Sallie "to keep her
out of harm's way," as he said, "while
the wife is doing the marketing." It waa
a question which loved Sallie more, the
father or the mother, and it was pretty
to notice how the child endeavored to
share her favors equally between them.
So sweet, too, were Sallies ways and
so amiable and loving was she, and so
patient when all knew how she must
Buffer at being unable to romp and play
like other children, for her mind was as
bright aa a star, that every member of
the company down to the meanest super
and smallest stage hand was in love with
her and ready to go to the other end of
London, or England for that matter, for
the sake of "Mr. Clarkson's Sallie."
"Onr little Sallie" most of them called
her, for she seemed to belong to them.
Two years ago, when in London, the
story was told me by a prominent actor
at the Adelphi, who had been a member
of the Holborn at the time Clarkson waa
"in the lead."
"We were going to produce a new
play,that night," he said, "and Tom was
in high feather, for he had a part which
suited and pleased him and he thought
his chance had come at last. Something
else excited pleasurable feelings within
his breast. He had obtained a couple of
dress circle tickets, and his wife and our
little Sallie were to be in front to see the
first performance.
"Tom came down to the theater in
great spirits. "We all knew in a very
short time what was the matter. He
had all sorts of funnylike yarns to tell
about Sallie and her excitement and de
light at the idea of coming to see father
act. He told us fellows in the dressing
room how she had pat her little arms
around his neck and had insisted upon
giving him the last Mas before starting
him off to bis work. 'That's for good
luck, father; don't you wipe that off.
I'm corning to see you tonight; mind,
you make a big hit.' And Tom laughed
with delight as he imitated the baby
voice using the quaint theatrical slang
expressions.
"The play was a highly sensational
one, and Tom's big voice and line figure
had plenty of opportunity to make capi
tal for themselves. This was always a
source of great fun in the theater, for
we knew Tom to be the most gentle
hearted fellow that ever breathed. As
the saying goes, he wouldn't have hurt
a fly. Why, he was tender and kind as
a woman, and a kinder nurse never
lived. 1 was only playing 'walking on'
parts at the time, but he had always a
kind word, a gentle suggestion of advice
for me*and I had been to his little home
in Holloway several times. He was like
a big elder brother to me. Little Sallie
used to call me her sweetheart.
"Tom was dressed quickly that even
ing and down on the stage looking
through the peephole to see his darlings
arrive. It is not always so very easy to
distinguish people in the front of the
house from the stage, though, and when
the first act was called Tom had not yet
been able to find them. He knew they
were there, though, and full of the feel
ing that he was acting for their delight
he did his very best
"I never saw him act so well before.
The manager was heard to remark that
he 'didn't believe it was in him.' We
fellow actors knew all about it, though,
and when the applause came at the end
of the act, and Tom, nervous and ex
cited, stepped before the curtain, he and
we felt sure we could hear above all the
noise the clapping of a tiny pair of
hands in the dress circle, and a little
baby voice saying: 'Look, mother!
There's fatherl Isn't he beautiful! Oh.
I'm so happy I'
"By and by some of the rest of the
company began looking through the
peephole for Tom's wife and child, but
no one could see them.
"Then as the play went on we noticed
that Tom himself was getting anxious.
He had not been able to find them either
and he had begun to wonder why they
HERAXIH SATUBDAY MORNING, JANUARY 30, 1892.
were not there and what had become of
them Still hope had not left him. He
felt sure that somewhere in the vast au
ditorium a pair of bright brown eyes
werw following his every movement and
he did his very best, though with a
somewhat heavy heart
"He had a big change in dress to make
before the fifth act, and as he had been
on the stage up to the last moment of
the fourth he had very little time to
make it in. Therefore he did not get
time to take a last peep at the auditorium,
I think some kind of a presentiment
must have filled his mind, for he seemed
to have grown careless and did not act
with the same spirit aa heretofore. His
thoughts seemed anywhere but on the
stage, and every now and then we could
hear him heave a great sobbing sigh.
"The audience, however, had grown
lenient. Tom had caught their sympa
thies in the earlier acts, and anything
he did was good enough now.
"The act was nearly over; Tom was
in the middle of his laat speech when
wo noticed a woman standing in the
wing with a note in her hand. It was
Mrs. Clarkson's servant girl.
"Almost hurrying through his words,
for Tom had caught sight of her, too,
we came to the 'tag,' the last words of
the play. They were soon spoken, and
amid an outburst of applause the cur
tain came down. Scarcely waiting for
tbe roller to thump upon the stage Tom
rushed at the girl and tore the note from
her hands.
"I saw it afterward—this is how it
read:
" 'Tom, dear Tom, our darling has
fallen and hurt herself; come home
quickly.'
"Without waiting to change his dress,
without waiting to wash off the grease
paint and mascaro, in his stage costume,
wig and all, just as he was, just as he
had made the first and biggest success
of his life, he rushed from the stage,
pushing aside every one who stood won
dering in his way; with eyes staring like
a madman's, all the terror and grief
that was eating at his heart looking out
from his face, he ran headlong down the
staircase and passage to the stage door,
crying: 'Get me a cab! For God's sake,
a cab! Ohl my God! my darling! my
darling! be quick! She may be dead!'
"Just as he reached the threshold
something seemed to give way. He
tripped and fell forward on his face, and
a great gush of blood spurted from his
mouth and nose.
"They picked him up so tenderly,
those supers and stage hands standing
round about, and carried him into the
doorkeeper's room and sent for a doctor.
But when the doctor came poor Tom
Clarkson was dead.
"Well, no, that is not the whole of
the story. The whole company sub
scribed, and the manager gave a benefit
for Mrs. Clarkson, and a nice little sum
was raised. We have never let her be
in want, besides Tom had always been
a thrifty man. But the most interesting
part of this anticlimax to me is yet to
come. Sallie did not die. We had good
doctors for her, and she grew up straight
and strong and tall, and if you will
come to the Adelphi this evening you
will see my little wife make her debut
on the stage. We have been married
eighteen months."—Tracy L. Robinson
in New York Recorder.
The Question of Pare Paying:.
Two ladies got into a Broadway car a
day or two ago and both at once opened
their purses. "I have the change," said
one, and at the same moment the other,
being nearer the conductor, dropped a
coin into his outstretched hand. Where
upon the first woman, supposing she had
been forestalled, put away her pocket
book. But the conductor came on and
asked for her fare.
"Why," said her friend, seeing that
the other supposed she was paid for, "1
beg your pardon. I did not pay your
fare, though I should have been pleased
to do so. My long residence abroad has
made me unmindful of our American
habit of this little exchange of financial
courtesies. You know in Europe every
body pays his own way and expects
everybody else to do the same. Nobody
thinks of franking you over there. I
really believe it saves time and trouble."
"Yes," replied the other, "and money
too. I have a great deal of company
from out of town, and I don't know why
they should, but most of them expect
me to do all the fare paying. When
we go about, two or three together,
for a few days, it is easy to use up an
appreciable amount of change in car
fares." A statement few will dispute.
It is to be wished that this„European
practice might obtain here.—-New York
Times.
New Principles in Physics.
A Mr. Lewis, of this city, claims to
have discovered some new principles in
the laws of physics, and is prepared to
demonstrate that there are errors in
Newton's "Principia." It has long been
considered an established fact that the
pressure of the atmosphere could only
raise a column of water in a vacuum
about twenty-two feet, and in practice
it has not been found possible to raise
water quite that distance by means of a
suction pump. Mr. Lewis claims that
he can raise water fifty or sixty feet by
means of a suction pump.
He has a large lot of mathematical
calculations bearing on this matter, and
is now studying up the rise and fall of
the tides on this coast with a view of
ascertaining what influence the attrac
tion of the moon exerts upon the earth.
He is preparing an account of his studies
and discoveries to be sent to the Colum
bian exposition. If he can exhibit there
a suction pump which will raise water
fifty feet he will, it is safe to say, at
tract more attention than any other ex
hibitor at the exposition, not omitting
Edison.—Portland Oregonian.
La Grippe t
The tendency of thia disease toward
pneumonia ie what makes it dangerous.
La grippe requires precisely the same
treatment as a severe cold. Chamber
lain's Cough Remedy is famous for its
cures of severe colds. This remedy
successfully counteracts the tendency of
tbe disease to result in pneumonia,
provided tbat proper care be taken to
avoid exposure when recovering from
the attack. Careful inquiry among the
many thousands who have used this
remedy during the epidemics of the
past two years has failed to discover a
single case that has not recovered or
that has resulted in pneumonia. Fifty
cent and $1 bottles for sale by C. F.
Heinzeman, 222 North Main street.
Use German Family Boas.
Take water
and a little Pearline, and you
have the best preparation in
the world for washing and
cleaning. It will do everything
except harm. Use it on your
clothes, your dishes.your paint,
and your person. Try it on
something that you think is
too delicate or too difficult. It
will silence your doubts in
the one case, and save your
strength in the other.
j Peddlers and some unscrupulous
Send grocers will tell you "this is as
good as* or " the sameas Peari
it- TJ 1 " ne -" IT'S FALSE—Pearline is
It never peddled, andif yourgrocer
sends you something in place of
Pearline, do the honest thing— setui it back.
331 JAMES PYLE, New York.
ALESSANDRO
RAPIDLY COMING TO THE FRONT!
We no longer hear the inquiry:
Where Is Alessandro ?
Now tha People Know, and it has
Become the Objective Point of
all those looking for a Home
Among the Orange Groves of
Southern California
WHERE BOTH
Health and Profit
ARE ASSURED.
Of the 21,000 Acres Nearly 10,000
Acres Have Been Sold.
6,000 ACRES
ARE OR WILL BE PLANTED
THIS SEASON.
A Town Has Been Started !
HOTELS ARE OPEN!
A Bank Is Talked Of!
Hundreds of Families
are today living at
ALESSANDRO
the comforts of a Home.
Buy Your Tickets Direct for Red
lands. Call on
THEODORE CLARK,
Manager Land Department,
Bear Valley Irrigation Company.
See Alessandro for yourself. You will never
___ regret it. 12-3 tf
I CURE ¥\TSI
When I amy cure I do not mean merely to atop them
for a time and then have them return again. I mean a
radical cure. I have made the disease of FITS. EPI
LEPSY or FALLING SICKNESS a life long study. I
warrant my remedy to cure the worst oases. Because
others have failed ia no reason for not now receiving- a
cure. Send at once for a treatiso and a Free Bottle ot
my infallible remedy. Givo Express and Post Office.
H. O. ROOT. M. C. 183 Pearl St., N. Y.
LVDIISEU YARDS.
J. M. Griffith, President.
_ _ _ H. G. Stevenson, Vlce-Prea. and Treat.
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L. Chandler, Bupt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STATUS,
If Ul work of every description.
VS4 N. Alameda Street, Los Angelee.
Inltl
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Offloe: LOS ANGELEB. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Asusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
CLARK & HUMPHREYS,
Wholesale and Retail
Lunqtoer : Dealers,
REDONDO BEACH
AND
LOS ANGELES.
Head office, Los Angeles— W. Second st,
12-37-3 m
PERRY. MOTT tU GO'S
LUMBER YARD 3
AND PLANING MXU.B,
No. Sl« Conunorclal Street Jul
THE MOST
POPULAR %S
e)ONG fm
Tobacco is a luxury—a quieting,
restful friend to mankind.
The better the quality, the
sweeter and milder the smoke.
In all these good qualities mas
tiff plug cut stands at the heac"
of smoking tobaccos.
J. B. Pace Tobacco Co., Richmond, Virginia.
REDLANDS!
BEFORE or after looking at all other orange
growing sections in Southern California,
come and take a good look at Redlands, and let
your own good judgment tell you whether this
is, or is not. the choicest spot in California for
growing oranges.
Free from scale, freest from fogs, freest from
wind, freest from frost. Live people in a live
place. Half a million dollars' worth of new
residences in the past year, and the building
still goes on. Call on the undersigned, who win
be glad to show you the beauties of the place
and all improved property for sale, and will not
annoy you by urging you to buy. Three snap
bargains in bearing groves for quick Outers.
T. H. BHARPLEBB,
Agent for Redlands real estate,
State street, near Hotel Windsor.
ALESSANDRO !
A BEAUTIFUL VALLEY that has all the ad
vantages of Redlands, excepting the fact
that it is a newer country. Exclusive agents
for over lOOOacres. Agent< foroverGOOO acres.
Have sold 430 acres to sharp and well-posted
buyers in the past few months. Prices from
$85 to $150 an acre.
SHARPLESS & BROWN,
Agents for Alessandro lands
B. W. Brown, Moreno.
T. H. Sharpless, Redlands.
GOOD BUYS FOR SOMEBODY!
10 acres eight-year-old bearing orange trees,
$12,000.
20 acres, 12 acres bearing orange trees, bal
ance Improved, $17,000.
20 acres, 8 acres bearing orange trees, balance
improved, $10,000.
acres, all in good bearing oranges and
raisins, $13,500.
Sole agents for all of above properties, all be
low regular prices. Agent for improved prop
erties from $3500 to $100,000 each. Unim
proved land in tracts to suit purchasers, from
5 acres up to 5000 acres each.
T. H. BHARPLEB3,
State st, near Hotel Windsor, Redlands, CaL
1-19 6m
CALIFORNIA
Sewer Pipe Co.
Salt-glazed Sewer and
Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe,
Fire iirick and Drain Til*,
Vitrified Brick for Paving, etc.
MAIN OFFICE;
248 SOUTH BROADWAY,
Tel. 1009. Cor. Third and Broadway.
LO3 ANGELES. CAL. 12-13-3 m
TO THE UNFORTUNATE
tablshed^\ B n°iBs4, foi
Seminal Diseases^sucb
Weakness, Impotency and Lost Manhood per
manently cured. The sick and afflicted should
not fail to call uoon him. The Doctor has trav
eled extensively In Europe and inspected thor
oughly the various hospitals there, obtaining a
great deal of valuable Information, which he is
competent to Impart to those in need of hit
services'. The Doctor cures where others fall.
! Try him. DR. GIBBON wIH make no charge
1 unless he effects a cure. Persons at a dlstancc-
OURED AT HOME. All communication!
strictly confidential. AU letters answered 1b
plain envelopes.
(Jail or write. Address DR. J. F. GIBBON, Bo*
1,957, Ban Franoisoo, Cal. ,„,„„„
Mention Los Angeles Hbbald. 12-17-lZm
asaa. sane. gWm, mm ■mm If in any business,
nDfiP iT«^ y,^ yo «" d^
UHtll I I Fncubator. PetaIUIM
MORE d MONEr
PETALUMA MUBATOR CO,, P»ALDIA, CAL.
"cheap_fuelT
Brown and Black Brea!
A SOLID RESIDUUM OF PETROLEUM.
A splendid fuel. Makes hotter Are than coal.
Delivered promptly anywhere in cits.
Per ton $4 00
Per half ton 2 50
Per sack 30
F. A. ODELL,
4d2 South Broadway.
TELEPHONE 470. 1-1G im
DR. WONG HIM,
Chinese Physician and Surgeon, has resided It
Los Angeles seventeen '17; years. Hisreputa
tion'as a thorough physician has been fully es
tablished and appreciated by many. His large
practice is sufficient proof of his ability and
honesty.
The doctor graduated in the foremost col
leges, also practiced iv tne largest hospitals of
Canton, China. The doctor speaks Spanish
fluently.
OFFICE: New number, 639; old number
117 Upper Main street. P. 0. boi 664,
Station C. 12-17 tf
PChieheeter'e Enallah Dlaaaend Kraut.
ENNYROYAL PILLS
Original wad Only Genuine. A
~/*jt£ B \ SAFE, always reliable, ladies ask ASXX
71 VSawS Oruggi.t for Chichester » English £fc-jffV\
11 r Brand in Red and Void tuetall!o\\aS/
sealed wfth bin. Hbbou. Take \Br
IB vtra no other. Refute dangerou* tubttitu* V
I" / — fg lions and imitation*. At Druggists, ar send 4a.
I t*» 'm in stamps for particulars, testimonials and
lea* k% *• Kelief for Ladles," m letter, by return
_\ gF Mail. 10,000 Testimonials. Name Paper.
x rChlehe»terCneiitleaHDo.,Madl«on«lqnnre,
Sold br all Local Drusgiatt. PkJladav* Pa.
BANKING HOUSES.
Security Savings Bank, Capital, $200,000
NO. 148 BOPTH MAIN STREET, 1.08 AKGBLE9, CALIFORNIA.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS^
F. N. MYERS '. VRESIIiKNT
IBAIAB W. HELLMAN. President Nevada Bank, San Francisco';' President' Farmers and* er
chants Bank, Los Angeles
n N u X n», J ,-» ?^ NII -iTi^flJif nt . I 'S urth ' Natlon » l B »nk. Grand Rapids, Mich
?'i T,n , nnl' MAl) Vice-president Farmers and Merchants Lank, Los Angeles
M T fFSm?™ VICE-PRESIDENT
AC Ri GERS Capitalist, Los Angeles
5' ii' §£^$ a \ nnid ol ? MelTen £ * Shankland. Attorneys, Los Angeles
wi» II S^ N , Dof GraVe " 0 M elven y & Shankland, Attorneys, Los Angeles, Cal.
JAInKS * rnnltnllHt Ttnfcton
J ' SAKTOEI FIVB
THE NOTICE OF THE PUBLIC 18 CALLED
To the fact that this bank has the largest paid up capital and surplus combined of any savings
bank in Southern California, and only loans money on approved real estate security, that
f,^? r " J ts B £°d£olueis are some of the oldest and most responeiole citizens of the community:
f »nder the State law, the piivate estates of its stockholders are pro rata liable for the total
Indebtedness of the bank, these facts, with care exercised in making loans, insure a safe
derository for saving accounts. School teachers, clerks, mechanics, employees in factories and
Bhops, laborers, etc., will find it convenient to make deposits in small amounts rim tihrN'R
SAVINGS DEPOSITS received In sums of 5 cents and upward Remittee*f may bescut by
drait or Wells, Fargo A Co.'s express. ' 3-1 6m '
German-American Savings Bank,
114 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL
CAPITAL PAID IN GOLD, . . $100,000.00.
ni ret compounded quarterly to depositors at the rate of 5 per cent on term and 3 limner cent
on ordinary deposits. »•»«►• r**
E. r .. MCDONALD, Pres't L. LIC HTKN BE ROE R and W. M. SHELDON Vice-Pres'ts
VIl TOR PONET, Treasurer. M. N. AVERY, Secy. p. F. SCHUMACHER, Asst. Secy.
§)§f Open every Saturday evening for deposits.
Los A-nsreles Savings Bank,
336 NORTH MAIN STREET,
CAPITAL STOCK 8100,000
SURPLUS 8) 10,000
I W. HELLMAN, President. B . PLATER, Vice-President.
STOCKHOLDERS:
I. W Hellman L. C. Goodwin, j, g Plater
R. 8. Baker, J. B. Lankershim, A a' Curtin'
G. W Prescott, C. E. Paxton, H. H. Paxton.
6 5 tf. Five For Cent. Interest Fald on Tern? Deposits.
Southern California National Bank,
10l 8 BPHINQ ST.. NADEAU BLOCK..
L. N. BREED. President. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, Vice-President. C. N. FLINT, Cashier
Capital Fald in Gold Coin • fflaoo 000
Surplus and Undivided Profit* 3S 000
Authorized Capital '.'.'.'.'.*.'.'. esoo'ooo
DIRECTORS —L. N. Bieed, H. T. Newell, Wm. ii! Avery, Silas Holinar,, *Y.
H. Holliday, E. C. Bosbyshell, M. Hagan, Frank Rader, D. Remick, Thos. Gobs,
William F. Bosbyshell. lul . tf
pARMERS AMD MERCHANTS BANK OF
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
Capital paid up) 1600,000
Surplus nd Profit. 749,000
Total ,1,249,000
orncKßs:
Isaias W. Hellman Presldont
Herman W. Hellman Vice-President
John Milner Cashier
Hi J. Fleishman Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS.
W. H. Perry, Emeline Childs, J. B. Lanker
shim, C. E. Thorn, C. Ducommuu, H. W. Hell
man, T. L. Duque, A. QlasseU . W. Hell
man.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States, Europe, China and Japan.
LOS tNGELEB NATIONAL BANK,
Oor. First and Spring streets.
TJ. S. DEPOSITORY.
Capital 1500,000 00
surplus 82,500 oo
TOTAL 1682,500 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE President
JOHN BRYSON, SR Vice-President
F. C. HOWES Cashier
E. W. COB Assistant Cashier
No Interest paid on deposits.
DIRECTORS.
Dr. W. G. Cochran, H. H. Markham,
Perry M. Green, John Bryson, Sr.,
Dr. H. Slnsabaugh, F. C. Howes,
George H. Bonebrake. Warren Gillelen.
No interest paid on deposits.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States and Europe. m 8
BANK OF AMERICA
FORMERLY
LOB ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Temple Block.
Capital Stock Paid Up, 1300,000,
OFFICERS.
JOHN E. PLATER President
ROBT. S. BAKER Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART Cashier
DIRECTORS
Jotham Bixby, Chas. Forman,
L. T. Garnsey, Lewellyn Bixby,
R. B. Baker, John B. Plater,
Geo. H. Stewart.
QaUFORNIA BANK,
Cor. Broadway and Second st.., Los Angeles
Subscribed Capital |500,000
Paid up Capital $300,000
Surplus f 20,000
DIRECTORS!
HerveyL idley, J.C.Kays, E.W.Jones,
.W. Huges, Sam. Lewis.
H.O. Wit er President
J. Franke teld Vice-President
T. J. Weldon, Cashier.
J. M Witmer, Assistant Cashier.
General nklng and Exchange Business
transacted. m4-4m
rsiHE CITY BANK,
. X 37 South Spring street.
Capital Stock 1300,000
A. D. CHILDRESS President
JOHN 8. PARK Cashiei
DIRECTORS.
W. T. Childress, Poindextsr Dunn
J. J. Schallert, h. E. CrandaU.
John 8. Park, R. G. L- ut,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof salt
eposit boxes rented at from 13 to $20 per an
linn. in 211 12m
JfIRST NATIONAL BANK OF LOB ANGELES.
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000
RESERVE $200,000
K. F. BPENCE Presldou.
J. D. BICKNELL Vlce-P<nsidenl
J. M. ELLIOTT Cashiei
ft. B. SHAFFER. Assistant Cashiei
Directors—X. F. Spenee, J. D. Bickpcll, 8. H
Mott, Wm. Lacy, H. Mabury, J. M. Elliott, D. M.
MeGarry Inl
rjIHE NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA,
Corner of Spring and Second streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL PAID UP 1250.000
BOARD OF DIBBCTOBS:
Dr. W. L. Grave", E. F. C. Klokke. O. T. John
son, W. Hadley, E. N. McDonald, M. H. Sher
man. Fred Eaton, John Wolfskin, Thos. R.Bard
J. M. C. Marble, President,
O. H. Churchill, Vice-President,
Perry Wildman, Cashier.
10-31 A. Hadley. Asst. Cashier.
E. F. Bfence, F.C.Howes, John N. Hunt,
Pres't. Vice- Pres. Secy and Treas.
Savings Bank of Southern California,
Southeast corner Spring and Court streets,
LOB ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL, - - - 6? 100,000
DIRECTORS.
Geo. H. Bonebrake, J H. Braly, H.L Drew,
J. M. Elliott, C. N. Hasson, F. C. Howes, M. W.
Stimson, Hiram Mabury, E. F. Spenee, Warren
Gillelen. 3-26 12m
THE UNIVERSITY BANK OF LOS ANGELEB,
No. 317 New High street.
Capital stock fully paid up. 1100.000
Surplus 40.000
R. M. WIDNEY President
D.O. MILTIMORB Vice President
GEO. L. ARNOLD Cashiei
DIBBCTOBS.
R. M. Widney, D. 0. Miltlmore, 8. W. Little, 0.
M. WeUs, John McArthur, C.A.Warner, L.J. P.
Morrill.
General banking business, and loans on first
class real estate solicited. Buy and sell first
class stocks, bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to invest In first-class securities en either
long or short time can be accommodated.
State Loan and Trust do.
OF" LOS ANGELES.
Subscribed Capital •1,000,000.
Capital Paid Up «00'.»,ooo.
BANKING BOOM. N. W. CORNER SPRING
AND SECOND STREETS, BRYSON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
GEORGE H. BONEBRAKE, President
JOHN BRYSON, SB. ( t,«..,,,,„„,.
W. H. PERRY. j Vice-Presidents
A. E. FLETCHER, Cashier.
J. F. TOWELL, Genl. Manager.
W. G Cochran. P. M. Green.
H. J. Woollacott, Wm. H. Crocker.
O.T.Johnson, San Francisco,
A. A. Hubbard.
We act as trustees for corporations and estates
Loan money on first-class real estate and
collaterals Keep choice securities for sale.
Pay Interest en savings deposits. Safe de
posit boxes for rent. Applications for ioaus
received from Borrowers in person or by mall.
QITIZENS' BANK OF LOB ANGELES,
Corner Third and Spring streets.
Capital $200,000.00
T. W. BROTHERTON President
T. S. C. LOWE Vice-President
Directors: T. 8. C. Lowe, L. W. Blinn, Ja
bes Peroival. C. F. Cronln, T. W. Brotherton.
T. D. Stimson, Robert Hale.
General banking business. Bonds for sale
and other first-class investments. 7 -212 m
STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION OF
the
LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
Of Los Angeles, Cal., at the close of business,
December 31,1891,
After Having; Made a Dividend of
820,000.
RESOURCES:
Loans and discounts $ 776,257 88
Banking house and fixtures 173.954 04
Government bonds, 4 per cent... 429,000 00
Cash on hand $357,873 86
Cash in banks 233,690 20
591,464 06
Total $1,969,676 25
LIABILITIES:
Capital $ 500,000 00
Surplus 85,000 00
Undivided profits 620 07
National bank notes outstanding 135 000 00
Deposits 1,249,066 18
Total $1,969,676 2*
State of California, J
County of Los Angeles, j 8 •
George H. Bonebrake, president, and F. C.
Howes, cashier, of the Los Angeles National
Bank, being severally sworn, each for him
self, says the foregoing statement is true to
the best of his knowledge und belief.
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE, President.
F. C. HOWES, Cashier.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this sth
day of January, 1892.
[seal | ' F. W. COE,
1 7 lm Notary Public.
Main-street Savings Bank & Trust Co.
NO. 426 SOOTH; MAIN STREET.
DIVIDEND NOTICE.
FOR THE HALF YEAR ENDING DECEM
ber 31st, 1391. a dividend has been de
clared by tho Directors of this bank, at the rate
of 5 per cent per annum on term deposits and
3 per cent per annum on ordinary deposits,
payable on and after Monday, Jan. 11,1892.
FRANK W. DeVAN, Secretary and Cashier
of tbe Main-street Savings Bank and Trust Co.
IMIIIIiaSIIV 'nSISSIIM lIMISI
ILLICH'S
RESTAURANT.
Everything New and First-class,
146 and 147 N. main Street.
ap29-tf JERRY It.LIOH Proprietor,
Naud's Warehouse.
GRAIN, WOOL,
—AMD-
General Merchandise Warehouse.
ADVANCEB MADE ON WOOL. 7-11-tf
STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING.
THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE BToCK
holders of Tho Los Angeles Wind Mill Co.
will be held at tbe; offl' c of the company, 223
East Fourth street. Los Angeles, Cal., Monday,
February 8,189' i, for the purnoseof electing a
board of direct', rs, Rnd for the transaction of
such other bin lues* as may come before tho
meeting.
1-28 lOt F. BAMKBBERGER, Secretary
EAGLE STABLEST
122 South Broadway.
Good Teams at Reasonable Rates. Telephone
No. 246.
3m W. v. WHITE, Proprietor.
PIONEER TRUCK 00.
uccessors to McLain & Lehman,)
pbopbibtors of the
Pioneer Truck & Transfer Co.
Piano and Safe Moving a Specialty.
Telephone 187 8 Market St Los Angeles' Oal

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