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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, February 07, 1892, Image 10

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10
POINTS ABOUT TIME.
VARIATIONS AND THE CAUSES WHICH
PRODUCE THEM.
ttt Earth* Revolutions on Ita Axis, To
gether with Its Journey Around the
I Sun, Are the Disturbing Factors —No
' Watch Is Perfectly Reliable.
If there is one single scientific problem
upon which more than another people
appear to get mixed that problem is
time. Standard time, local time, son
time are exceedingly difficult problems
for the public to puzzle over, and when
sidereal time enters the calculation t\ie
case is hopeless indeed. 1 have fre
quently of late seen so many letters, ad
dressed this and other journals, all
touching upon one or the other ofthese
chronological questions, that 1 have con
eraded a short note explaining the main
paints of difference would bo, at any
sate, timely. If it only suggests to the
young men in the business offices the
idea of going to work at 9». m., local
-mean time, and leaving off promptly at
4pm., Pacific standard time, the ques
tion will have been shown to possess a
practical side. The application of it,
however, is purely a matter of taste.
Well, to come to time, the great chro
nometer and regulator in chief to the
business, social and scientific world is the
earth itself. Turning upon its axis in the
period which we divide into twenty-four
hours, the sun appears to cross the me
ridian of each place on the globe once in
that interval. The moment at which it
creeses the meridian of any place (Green
wich), for example, is termed "local ap
parent noon" at that place. This would
he all very well if the earth and sun re
mained fixed in their relative positions;
or if the earth, completing, as it does, an
Krmnal revolution about the sun, did so
uniformly in a perfect circle and that
circle were in the same plane with the
motion of daily rotation. Then the suc
cessive intervals between the meridian
passages of the sun at Greenwich would
all be equal, and a perfect chronometer
met at 12 hrs., 0 mm., 0 sec, when the
sun transited today would indicate pre
cisely the same instant for "apparent
noon" at every date.
MOTIONS OF THE EARTH.
But the earth's path around the sun is
■ot a perfect circle; it is an ellipse, and
the motion in one portion of the ellipse is
more rapid than in another, and this
causes a slight variation in the intervals
between the solar passages. Again, the
plane of the earth's path around the sun,
«r the elliptic, is inclined 23>£ degs. to
Ihe plane of the equator in which the
<Utily rotation takes place, and conse
quently twice a year the intervals of
"apparent noon" are each about twenty
seconds greater and twice a year about
twenty seconds less than twenty-four
hours. To explain just why this results
-would require more of an investigation
into astronomical principles than is here
contemplated; but it is so, nevertheless,
and any text book will elucidate the rea
sons. A combination of the two effects
causes the sun to be apparently slow
fourteen minutes in February and fast
sixteen minutes in November. But in
fi>e course of a year the average comes
out all right, and therefore a "mean
solar day" of exactly hours
is adopted in the almanacs and used for
all purposes. This accounts for the dif
ference between mean time and sun time.
A regulator keeps the former; a sun dial
indicates the latter.
A few years ago (or prior to 1S84) every
large city in the United States had its
own local time, and this was for each
place the true mean solar time, obtained
as above indicated.
REGULATING TIME.
Consequently, a man traveling west
■ward from Washington would find his
watch fast, as follows: At Chicago, 42
minutes ; at Omaha, 1 hour 16 minutes;
at Denver, 1 hour 52 minutes; at Halt
Lake City, 2 hours 20 minutes, and final
ly, at San Francisco, 3 hours 2 minutes.
It will readily be recalled how much
annoyance was occasioned by all these
various corrections, both to trainmen
and travelers. About the year men
tioned a great reform was inaugurated.
Nowadays a traveler going westward
finds his watch fast from time to time,
but only the hour hand is in error. All
the clocks in the country indicate the
mm ate and second of Greenwich mean
time, bnt the hour is changed for each
15 dogs, of longitude. Washington time
is 5 hours slow of Greenwich; Chicago,
< hours; Denver, 7 hours. In San Fran
cisco we are 8 hours slow of the prime
meridian. All the intermediate cities
and towns are run on one system or an
other, according to their location in
longitude, the standards being eastern,
central, mountain and Pacific time. All
tiie time pieces on the coast are set by
Pacific standard time, which is 8 hours
alow of Greenwich mean time. There
fore, a watch which is set at San Fran
cisco solar time by means of a corrected
sun dial is still 9 minutes 42 seconds
slow of a Pacific standard time clock,
because we are that much in longitude
weat of the 120 th meridan, which forms
the eastern bonndary of northern Cali
fornia and on which only is the "Pacific
time" coincident with "local mean time.'
—San Francisco Examiner.
A Lord in a Ditch.
Lord Mnlgrave was distinguished by
a singularity of physical conformation,
having two distinct voices, the one
strong and hoarse, the other weak and
querulous, of both of which he occa
sionally availed himself. So extraordi
nary a circumstance probably gave rise
to a story of his having fallen into a
ditch on a dark night and calling for aid
in his shrill voice. A countryman com
ing up was about to help him, but Lord
Mulgrave, addressing him in a hoarse
tone, the peasant immediately exclaimed,
**Oh, if there are two of you in the ditch
you may help each other out of it"—
London Tit-Bits.
The most useful domestic pet of the
natives of Greenland and other Arctic
climes is a peculiar looking animal, to
which the name of Eskimo dog has
fcaen given.
O, What a Cough.
Will yon heed the warning? The signal per
haps of the sure approach of that more terrible
disease, Consumption. Ask yourselves if you
can afford for the sake of saving 50c. to run
tbe risk and do nothing for it We know from
experience that Shlloh's Cure will cure your
cough. It never falls. This explains why
more than a Million Bottles were sod the nasi
year. It relieves croup and whooping cough at
once. Mothers, do not be without tt. For
mate back, side or chest, use Shlloh's Porous
Plaster. Sold wholesale by Haas, Bar.ich &
Co.. and all retail druggists.
Stories That Bishop Hare Tells.
Bishop Hare, of South Dakota, is fond
of telling stones nbuul himself to illus
trate the point which he playfully makes
that a man who lives long on the phr M
comes to be a good deal of a barb att
Once, so one of the stories fee hSK j
the misfortune while entering H dicing
room in this city to step tn6
a lady'B dress. he stiid,
"You know that been living with
the Indians lately-and have, grown, some
what awkward."
The lady. Miss Potter, quickly replied,
"I don't think that, bishop; but I <im sur
prised at one thing, that after living so
long with the Indians you shouldn't be
better at following up a trail."
A few evenings later another little af
fair occurred, the story of which the
bishop tells as follows:
"I was talking with a charming wom
an when up came a gentleman who
claimed her attention for a moment in
another part of the house. As she wont
away she gave me her ice and asked me
to keep it for her. She had hardly gone
before a brother clergyman engaged me
in a talk oe the Indian question.
"Now, if there is any subject in which
1 am more interested than 1 am in the
Indian question I can't think of it just
now. At any rate, 1 became absorbed
in my talk with my friend. Suddenly 1
was aroused by an inquiry addressed to
me in a woman's voice.
" 'Where is my ice, bishop? was the
question.
"Upon my word, I had eaten every bit
of it."—New York Times.
Great Men from an Accident.
The history of a certain American
family furnishes several examples of a
beneficent result of disabling accidents.
The young son of a farmer in a small
town in Massachusetts had his hand
crushed in his father's cider mill, and
being thus unfitted to gain his livelihood
by farming was sent in due time to the
academy to commence a preparation for
a professional life. He died a member
of the United States senate.
A boy who belonged to another branch
of the same faroily, in the vicinity of
Boston, cut hia r-oee badly and was long
confined to tk? fVjuse. His kind pastor
supplied him with books, and perceiving
that he had a natural aptitude for study
taught him Latin and finally induced
his parents to send him to college.
The young man was graduated at Har
vard and became a minister of the gos
pel. One of his sons was a general in the
army of 1812; another served his coun
try in congress.
The son who entered college had six
sons who were college educated men, all
prominent in their profession—one a
judge of the superior court of New
Hampshire and another a professor for
forty years in a New England college
and eminent as an author.
All this life of education and useful
ness, extending through three genera
tions, may be said to have started in a
little boy's cutting his legl—Youth's
Companion.
One Child's Dream.
Harriet Martineou relates that, of her
many childish fancies, perhaps none
was so terrible as a dream she had at
four years old. "I dreamed," she says,
"that we children were taking a walk
with our nursemaid. Out of the public
house there came a stag with prodigious
antlers. Passing the pnmp, it crossed
the road to us and made a polite bow,
with its head on one side, and with a
scrape of one foot; after which it pointed
with its foot to the public house, and
spoke to me, inviting me in. The maid
declined, and turned to go home. Then
came the terrible part.
"By the time we were at our own door
it was dusk, and v/e went up the steps
in the dark; but in the kitchen it was
bright sunshine. My mother was stand
ing at the dresser, breaking sugar, and
she lifted vie up and set me in the sun.
and gave me a bit of sugar. Such wad
the dream whic;-. tx>ze me with horror!
Who shall say concludes the nar
rator, looking back from ber strong
minded maturity to that vividly remem
bered childish (.ream, and utterly un
able to understand "what the fright was
about. "—Argosy.
Discouraging the Use of Tobacco.
Professor Smith, formerly of Bowdoin
college, did not like to have the students
chew tobacco during recitations and
took effectual means to break up the
practice. A boy who was called upon
to recite one day, not expecting to be
"pulled," as the saying goes, on the next
day in succession, would go into the
class and chew tobacco during the hour.
Whenever "Cosine" noted this he was
morally certain to ask that student a
few questions, and by keeping him up
fifteen minutes or so would manage to
put him in a position where he would
either have to swallow a copious amount
of tobacco or else choke. Silch vigorous
treatment had a beneficial effect.—Lew
iston Journal.
A Neat Way of Patting It.
A neat compliment was uttered once
by General Romaine. Meeting Lady de
Brientz, whom he had known and ad
mired in the loveliness of her youth, he
commenced complimenting her. "You
forget that 1 am an old woman," she
said at length. "Madame," returned
the gallant soldier, "when our eyes are
dazzled by a diamond it never oc
curs to us to ask a mineralogist for its
history."—Loudon Standard. •
Hill of Calvary.
The hill near Jerusalem, where the
crucifixion of Jesus occurred, is formed
of limestone. The shores of the Dead
sea are lined with pumice stone, show
ered out of some volcano that destroyed
Sodom and Gomorrah, which cities
finally sank beneath the waters of the
Dead sea.—Medians' Monthly.
Naught Never Comes to Grief.
Hobson—l'm tired of life, ye see, and
yet if 1 blow out my brains, don't yon
know?—the world would condemn me
as a suicide.
Dobson—No, 1 believe the general
verdict would be justifiable homicido. —
Now York Epocn.
As a proventlve Dr. Henley's Celery, Beef
and Iron has no equal.
Ice Cream Season, 1898.
Christopher & Billings are determined to
manufacture he finest en am, sherbets, etc.,
i vcr made on the co st. Old patrons know
what this means. At Germain's, 123 Somh
Spring. Tel. 414.
Hot Sea Water Baths
At Hotel Arcadia, Sania Monica, Physicians
recommend them for health and vigor.
THE "* LOS AKGIdTLES HERALD: SUNDAY MORNING, FEBRtjary 1 im
A LESSON OF LIFE.
,toug'<\ay'» journey there lay tWnre*
lcrtnued tho meadow at breaking morn;
Isaxv the road wind by bill aud moor—
Beyond tho hills waa my distant bourne.
I thought of the greetings I should wln-
What was it moaned at my feet meanwhilt
A pooroM terrier, lame ami thin;
1 stooped and helped him over the stile.
Then would have crossed; but a dreary yelp
Arrested me. and I turned, to view
A limping poodle, whose need of help
Was manifest: and 1 helped him, too.
Of every nation and tribe are thoy.
And each has a fresh, resistless wile;
Each says iv his own peculiar way,
"Just help a lumcdng over the stile!"
They're greyhound. Skye. Pomeranian;
They limp along in an endless tllo;
They'ro smooth or curly, they're black ant
tan.
They all are lame and would cross the stile.
The shadows «ee[>en o'er bill and plea.
Dim is my pathway of many a mile-
Yet will I renew my Journey when
The last lame do;; Is over tbe stile.
—May Kendall in Longman's Magazine.
Tl*e Horses Knew the Tune.
A relation of mine, who has spent
many years in India, remembers well
how. when Living in Lucknow and en
joying the evening drive with other
English residents in the Indian city, the
carriage horses would toss their heads
and paw the ground imiKitiently when
the fir3t notes of "God Save the Queen'
were played by the military band every
evening. It was the last tune played,
the signal for dispersion.
A skeptic—or, perhaps, more than one
—having insisted that the horses only
knew the tune because it was always
played last, and they were able to calcu
late time, the experiment was tried of
playing "God Save the Queen" in the
middle, instead of at the end of the
evening. Instantly there was the same
excitement in the horses standing round
"the course." The same impatient toss
ing of the head and prancing of the feet,
the same general stampede and eager
ness to start homeward.
No one could any longer doubt that
they knew and recognized the air: in
fact, that they could tell one tune from
another. —London Spectator.
A inijte rteciivers Speech
Alphnfc Hcmphling, ol Summit township,
Butler county. Penti., madean affidavit that bis
twelve-year-old sen. who had bad St. Vitus
Dance for twelve jer.rs, lost his ipecch, wss
completely cured sf er nting three bottles of
Dr. Mllr-s' Restorative Neivine, aid alto re
cover' d his socech. Thousands testify to won
derful cures from using it :or nervous diseases,
dyspepsia.if rvusdebllitr, dullness, confusion
ot mind, headache, etc. Four doses of this
Nervine cured Mrs W. E Bums. South Bend,
Ind., who hr.d been suffering witb constant
headache for three months. Trial bottle and
elegsnt book free ate. H. Hance,
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castoria.
Jm PENETRATES L__| jjk
STOPS PAIN 55=>
j wood's r
M Penetrating |k
PLASTER W
A PAR IN ADVANCE OF Ik
£m ORDINARY POROUS
AND OTHER PLAGTERS
Sold by Druggists Everywhere
New York Depot: 92 William Street
WHY IS THE
W. L. DOUGLAS
$3 SHOE cENtm. EN
THE BEST SHOE IN THE WORLD FOR THE MONEY?
It is a seamless shoe, with no tacks or wax thread
to hurt the feet* made of the best fine calf, stylish
und easy, and because we make more shoes of this
grade than any other manufacturer, it equals hand
sawed shoes costing from 84.00 to $5.00.
fl!|E 00 Genuine Hand-Hewed, tho finest calf
•»»*»■ shoe ever offered for $5.00; equals French
imported shoes which cost from $S.oi)to $12.00.
00 Iluud-Sewcd Welt Shoe, fine calf,
fi»"»n stylish, comfortable and durable. The best
shoe ever offered at this price ; same grade as cus
tom-made shoes costing from $6.00 to $€00.
<EO 30 Police Shoe; Farmers, Railroad Men
<*»•»■ and Letter Carriers all wear them; tine calf
seamless, smooth Inside, heavy three soles, exten
slon edge. One pair win wear a year,
ffi O «0 flno calf t no better shoe ever offered at
this price; one trial will convince thoso
who want a shoe for comfort and service.
CO '-iS an d 82.00 Workingmun's) shoes
*ptm*m are very strong and durable. Those who
have given them a trial will wear no other make.
Rnve' 82.00 and 81.75 school shoes are
•*yj«» worn by the boys everywhere: they sell
on their merits, as the Increasing sales show.
I nHiee 83.00 Hand-ncwed shoe, best
r a r?r B Dongola, verystyllßh; equals French
imported suoes costing from $4-00 to $6.00.
Ladles' 2.50, 82.00 and 81.75 shoo for
Misses are the best fine Dongola. Stylish and durable
Calltlon.—See that W. L. Douglas' name and
price are stamped on the bottom ofeach shoe.
fITTAEI NO 8n BSTTTTTTK. -*SrJ
Insist on local advertised dealers supplying
you. W. L. DOUGLAS, Broehtnn, Masa.
Bold by L. W. GODBN, 104 N. Spring Bt.
WEBB'S hj:mony.
Almost Incredible.
Merced, Cal.
De. C, H. Webb:
Dear Sir—l have been a great sufferer from
Inflammatory Rheumatism ever since I was
eight years old, am now thirty-six; have tried
everything under the sun but found no relief
whatever until I tried WEBB'S HiEMONY.
At the time was confined to my bed, could not
help myself at all. I cannot begin to describe
my sufferings on paper After taking half a
bottle conld move myself and put on my
ciotheß, when the remainder was taken could
go about anywhere. People here could hardly
believe your medicine performed such a cure
Have had several calls for it. Will cheerfully
recommend it te any one troubled with Inflam
matory Rheumatism. Respectfully yours.
A. C. HALL,
Prop. Pioneer Milk Dairy.
P. S.—l wißh you would send me three more
bottles of your Harmony as I want to keep it
by me.
FOB SALE BT
J. J. BUEHLER & CO.
PHARMACIBTB,
247 E. FIRST ST., LOS ANGELES, CAL ,
GENERAL AGENTS.
For sale by all druggist?. 10-18-12 m
A CURE GDARANTEED;
DR. BELL'S GERMAN EXTRACT
Cures all private, syphilitic, cbroulc, urinary,
Bint and blood diseases; catarrh, lurg affec
tions, female complaints, and all such diseases
as are brought about by md is retion and ex
cesses. $1. No cure no pay.
DR. BELL'S Frcnce Wash cures all private
diseases, blood poison, old sores and ulcers, G
&G, in two or three days, $1. No preparation
on earth equal to it For sale only at the old
reiabft BKRLIN DRUG STORK. 505 South
Spring street, Los Angeles, Cal Headquarters
for prescriptions, trus" s, supoorters, and fine
rubber goods, etc. at low prices.
Consultation free and strictly confidential.
j; <• WORTH A GUINEA A BOX." ? |
II A Wonderful Medicine for j;
1 1 Indigestion, Want of Appetite,, Fullness 11
; after Meals, Vomitings, H Irkness of \
i ihe Stomach, Bilious or lA—-,- Com- |>
Ij! jutainfn, -Sick llmdaehe. Cold Chills, <'
Flushings of Heat, Loutness ofSpir- j |
its, and All Xervous Affections. ,
To cure these complaints we must re- J>
move the cause. The principal cause is i >
generally to be round in the stomach and J
liver : fut these two organs right and alt A
will oe well. From two to four Pills twice t'
a day for a short time will remove the evil, J [
and restore the sufferer to sound and last- Ji
ing health. Ii
Of all drusrristr-. Price SB cents a boi. *
J New York Depot, 3155 Canal St. 61 J
LUMBER YAItDS.
J. M. Orifflth, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pros, and Treas.
T. K. Mchois, Secy. S. L. Chandler, Supt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOOItS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS,
Mill work of every description.
934 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles.
ml tf
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Asusa, Burbauk. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes iurnished to order.
CLARK & HUMPHREYS,
Wholesale and Retail
Luirifoer : Dealers,
REDONDO BEACH
AND
LOS ANGELES.
Head office, Los Angeles—l23U W. Second st.
12-27-3 m
PERRY. MOTT <&. OO'S
LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING WILLS,
No. 3IH Commercial Street lul
ALE3SANDRO
RAPIDLY COMING TO THE FRONT!
We no longer hear the inquiry :
Where Is Alessaidro ?
Now the People Know, and it has
Become the Objective Point of
all those looking for a Home
Among the Orange Groves of
Southern California
WHERE BOTH
Heal and Profit
ARE ASSURED.
Of the 21,000 Acres Kearly 10,000
Acres Have Been Sold.
5,000 ACRES
ARE OR WILL BE PLANTED
THIS SEASON.
A Town Has Been Started !
HOTELS ARE OPEN!
A Bank Is Talked Of!
of Families
are today living at
ALESSANDRO
Enjoying all the comforts of a Home.
Buy Your Tickets Direct for Red
lands. Call on
THEODORE CLARK,
Manager Land Department,
Bear Valley Irrigation Company.
See Alessandro for yourself. You will never
regret it. 12-3 tf
CALIFORNIA
Sewer Pipe Co.
Salt-glazed Sewer and
Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe,
Fire Brick and Drain Tile,
Vitrifled Brick for Paving, etc.
MAIN OFFICE:
248 SOUTH BROADWAY,
Tel. 1009. Cor. Third and Broadway.
LOS ANGELES. CAL. 12-13-3 m
Security Savings Banft, CapiiL^l^2oaOo6
NO. 148 SOUTH MAIN BTREET, LOB ANGGLKS, CALIFORNIA.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
ISAIAS W. HELLMAN;'PresMeni'Nevada Bank/ San Fr'anciiooi' President" Me?
.m, cc- . chants Bank, Los Angeles.
„ '' R E™/• I ?? WNK .President Fourth.Natlonal Bank, Grand Rapids, Mlch
£t f,,,,>rVi.' MAN Vice-president Farmers and Merchants Bank, Los Angeles
M I v\ SwtiU VICE-PRESIDENT
AC R Capitalist, Los Angeles
a, v. v UIIK3 Physician Los An teles
A . UR .',PF,. I LF KLLMAN 0f Hellman, Waldeck'i cd!,' Wholesale stationers', Los Angeles
r5" i\r.\Y, KB -: Ui. • • ;„ °' Braves, O'Melveny & Shankland. Attorneys, Los Angeles
ia 'Li 1 n ! !h, LA , I ! I) oi Gr » vee ' O'Melveny 4 Shankland, Attorneys, Los Angeleß, Cal.
JAMES Capitalist Boston
J. F. SARTORI CASHIER; also Vice-president First National Bank, Monrovia, Cal.
FIVE FER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS.
_ „ THE NOTICE OF THE PUBLIC IB CALLED
To the f.-ft that this bank has the largest paid up capital and surplus combined of any savings'
bank in Southern California, and only loans money on approved real eßtato security; that
amort its stockholder are some of the oldest and most responsic-le citizens of tbe community:
tnat under the State law, the piivate eßtates of its stockholders are pro rata liable for the total
Indebttdness of the bank. These facts, with care exercised in making loans, insure a Bale
dej ository for saving accounts. School teachers, clerks, mechanics, employees in fsctorios and
shops, laborers, etc.. will find it convenient to make deposits in small amounts. CHILDREN'S
SAVINGS DEPOSITS received in sums of Scents and upward. Remittances may be sent by
drait or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express. 3-1 6m
5 PEE CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS.
MAIN-STREET SAVINGS BANK AND TRUST CO,
420 S. MAIN BTREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL, - $200,000.
The design of this institution is to afford a safe depository for the earnings of all persons
who are desirous of placing their money where it will be free from accident, and at the same
time be earning for them a fair rate of Interest. Depoßits will be received in sums of from SI to
J5OOO. Working men and women should deposit at least $1 per week from their wages. This
will form a nucleus that will ultimately euable you to purchase a home or begin business
Children can purchase 5-cent stamps In all parts of the city and county. It is the best education
you can have iv saving and caring for money.
B. LANKERSHIM, PBBS'T. CHAS. FORMAN, Vicb-Pbes't FRANK W. DE VAN, Casbibb
* DIRECTORS.
Chas. Forman, Geo. H. Pike, I. N. Van Nuys, E. Germain, A. Haas, J. J. Schallert,
J. H. Jones, H. W. Hellman, J. B. Lankershim.
INCREASE OF TOTAL RESOURCES.
January 1. 1890 $115,871 37
JiUUary 1, 1891 389,453 86
January 1, 1892 523,504 14
Money loaned on Mortgages.
Los Angeles Savings Bank,
236 NORTH MAIN BTREET,
CAPITAL STOCK 85100,000
SURPLUS $10,000
I W. HELLMAN, President J. X, PLATER, Vice-President.
W. M. CASWELL, Secretary.
T „ „ , STOCKHOLDERS:
I. W Hellman L. C. Goodwin, J. K. Plater.
R.S.Baker, J. B. Lankershim, A. A. Curtis,
G. W Prescott, C. E. Paxton, H. H. Paxton.
• * l f - Five Per Cent. Interest Pnld on Term Deposits.
German-American Savingfs Bank,
114 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL RAID IN GOLD, - - $100,000.00.
m res compounded quarterly to depositors at the rate of 5 per cent on term and 3.6 m per cent
on ordinary deposits.
E. ... MCDONALD, Pres't L. LICHTENBERGER and W. M. SHELDON, Vice-Pres'ts.
Vlt TOR PONET, Treasurer. M. N. AVERY, Secy. P. F. SCHUMACHER, Asst. Secy.
tUmT" Open every Saturday evening for deposits.
Southern California National Bank,
10l 8 BPEINQ ST., NADEAD BLOCK..
L. N. BREED. President. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, Vice-President, 0. N. FLINT, Cashier
Capital Paid in Qold Coin 8(300.000
Surplus and Undivided Profit*. .t... 38.000
Authorised Capital 800.000
DIRECTORS—L. N. Breed, H. T. Newell, Wm. H. Avery, Silas Holms*, tV.
H. Holliday, E. O. Bosbyshell, M. Hagan, Frank Rader, D. Remick, Thos. Gobs,
William F. Bosbyshell. lnl . u
AND MERCHANTS BANK OF
LOS INGELKS, CAL.
Capital paid up) 1500,000
Surplus nd Fronts 749,000
Total 11,249,000
omens:
Isaiab W. Hellman President
Herman W. Hellman Vice-President
John Milner Cashier
H. J. Fleishman Assistant Cashiei
BI HECTORS.
W. H. Perry, Emeline Childs, J. B. Lanker
shim, (!. E. Thorn, C. Ducommun, H. W. Hell
man, T. L. Duque, A. Glaasell . W. Hell
man.
Exchange for Bale on all the principal cities
of the United States. Europe. China and Japan.
OS \NGKLEB NATIONAL BANK,
Oor. First and Spring streets,
V. 8. DEPOSITORY.
CAPITAI $500,000 00
80RPLUB 82,500 00
Total $582,500 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE President
JOHN BRYSON, SR Vice-President
F. G. HOWES Cashier
E. W. COE Assistant Cashier
No interest paid on deposits.
DIRECTORS.
Dr. W. G. Cochran, H. H. Markham,
Perry M. Green, John Bryson, Sr.,
Dr. H. Sinsabaugh, F. C. Howes,
George H. Bonebrake. Warren Gillelen,
No Interest paid on deposits.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States and Europe. m 8
QaUFOBNIA BANK,
Cor. Broadway and Second 81.., Los Angeles
Subscribed Capital $500,000
Paid up Capital $300,000
Surplus $ 20,000
J. Frankenfleld President
Sam Lewis .Vlce.Prosidr.nt
J. Witmer Assistant Cashier
directors:
J. Frankenfleld, G. W. Hughns. c sm. Lewis.
J. 0, Kayo, E. W. Jone». I. B. Newton,
Hervoy Lindley.
General Banking and Exchange Business
transacted. m4-4m
Main-street Savings Bank & Trust Go.
NO. 426 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
DIVIDEND NOTICE:.
FOR THE HALF YEAR ENDING DECEM
ber 31st, 1391. a dividend has been de
clared by the Directors of this bank, at the rate
of 5 per cent per annum on term deposits and
3 per cent per annum on ordinary deposits,
payable on and after Monday, Jan. 11,1892.
FRANK W. DeVAN, Secretary and Cashier
of the Main-street Savings Bank and Trust Co.
1-3 lm
JpiRST NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANGELES.
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000
RESERVE $260,000
E. F. SPENCE President
J. D. BICKNELL Vlce-Presjlent
J.M.ELLIOTT Cashier
G. B. SHAFFER. Assistant Cashier
Directors—E. F. Spence, J. D. Bicknell, 8. H
Mott, Wm. Lacy, H. Mabury, J. M. Elliott. D. M.
McGarrv iul
QITIZENB' BANK OF LOS ANGELES,
Corner Third and Spring streets.
Capital $200,000.00
T. W. BROTHERTON President
T. 8. C. LOWE Vice-President
Directors: T. 8. C. Lowe, L. W. Blinn, Ja
bcz Percival, 0. F. C'rouin, T. W. Brotherton.
T. D. Stimson, Robert Hale.
General banking business. Bonds for sale
and other first-class Investments. n 2 12m
rpHK NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA,
Corner of Spring and Second streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL PAID UP $250,000
BOABD OF dibectobs:
Dr. W. L. Grave", E. F. C. Klokko. O. T. John
son, W. Hadley, E. N. McDonald, M. H. Sher
man. Fred Eaton, John Wolfskin, Thos. R.Bard.
J. M. C. Mabble, President,
O. H. Churchill, Vice-President,
Pebrt WildmaN, Cashier.
10-31 A. Hadlky. Asst. Cashier. ,_
E. F. SrKNCE, F. C. Howks, John N. Hunt,
Pres't. Vice- Pres. Secy and Treas.
Savings Bank of Southern California,
Southeast corner Spring and Court streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL, - - - $100,000
DIRECTORS.
Geo. H. Bonebrake, J H. Braly. H. L. Drew,
J. M. Elliott, C. N. Hasson, F. C. Howes, M. W.
Stimson, Hiram Mabury, E. F. Spence. Warren
Gillelen. 8-2612 m
BANK OF AMERICA
FORMERLY
LOB ANGELES COUNTY BANE,
Temple Block.
Capital Stock Paid Up, 1300,000,
OFFICERS.
JOHN E. PLATER President
ROBT. 8. BAKER Vice-President
BXO. H. STEWART Cashiei
DIRECTORS
Jotham Blxby, Chas. Forman,
L. T. Garnsey, Levrellyn Blxby,
R, 8. Baker, John K. Plater,
Geo. H. Btewart.
State Loan id Trust Co.
OF LOS ANGELES.
Subscribed Capital 51.000,000.
Capital Paid TJp •685.000.
BANKING ROOM. N. W. CORNER BPRINO
AND SECOND STREETS, BRYBON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
GEORGE H. BONEBRAKE, President
W r fffi S,K i Vice-Presidents
A. E. FLETCHER, Cashier.
J. F. TOWELL, Genl. Manager.
W. G. Cochran. P. M. Green.
H. J. Woollacott, Wm. H. Crocker.
O. T. Johnson, San Francisco,
Judge W.P. Gardiner, A. A. Hubbard.
We act as trustees for corporations and estates
Loan money on first-class real estate and
collaterals Keep choice securities for sale.
Pay interest on sayings deposits. Safe de
posit boxes for rent. Applications for loans
received from borrowers in person or by mail.
npHE CITT BANK,
X 37 South Spring street
Capital Stock $300,000
A. D. CHILDRESS President
JOHN S. PARK Cashier
DIRECTORS.
W. T. Childress, Poindexter Dunn
J. J. Schallert, h. E. Crandall,
John 8. Park, R. G. L-ut,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof safe
eposit boxes rented at from $3 to $20 per an
num. m 26 12m
THE UNIVERSITY BANK OF LOB ANGELES,
No. 317 New High street.
Capital stock fully paid up. .$lOO,OOO
Surplus 40,000
R. M. WIDNEY President
D.O. MILTIMORE Vice President
GEO. L. ARNOLD Cashiei
DIRECTORS.
R. M. Widney, D. O. Miltimore. 8. W. Little, 0.
M. Wells, John McArthur, C.A.Warner, LJ.P.
Morrill.
General banking business, and loans on first
class real estate solicited. Buy and sell first
class stocks, bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to invest In first-class securities on either
long or short time can be accommodated.
STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION OF
the
LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
Of Los Angeles, Cal., at the close of business,
December 31,1891,
After Having Made a Dividend of
820,000.
RESOURCES:
Loans and discounts f 7 7 ?'SS 7 * S
Banking bouse and fixtures 173.954 64
Government bonds, * per cent... 429,000 00
Cash on hand $357,873 80
Cash In banks 233,690 20
591,464 06
Total 11,089,676 25
LIABILITIES:
Capital. $ 500,000 00
Surplus 85,000 00
Undivided profits 620 07
National bank notes outstanding 135 000 00
Deposits 1,219,056 18
Total $1,909,676 25
State of California, j
County of Los Anueles, j ° 8 -
George H. Bonebrake, president, and F C
Howes, cashier, of the Los Angeles National
Bonk, being severally sworn, each for him
self, says tho foregoing statemout is true to
the best of his knowledge and belief
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE, President.
F. C. HOWES, Cashier.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this sth
day of January, 1892.
. [seal | E. W. COE,
1 7 lm Notary Public.
QUEEN RESTAURANT,
St. Charles Building', 316 N. Main St.
This well-known Restaurant has passed into
the hands of Nicho'as Mercadante, wbo will
hereafter conduct it. Everything neat and
attractive. Patrons will be served wlsh the
best the market affords at tbe most reasonable
prices. Give this restaurant a trial and you,
will go nowhere else. 1-31 am

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