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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, February 13, 1892, Image 10

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10
MRS. LESLIE SPEAKS.
BHE IS HURT BY THE WAY THE
NEWSPAPERS TREAT HER.
Mr. WilUe Wilde and His Collection of
CUpplngs — Mrs. I.esll e-Wllde's Ac
quaintance with Albert Hope and
What Has Been Printed About It.
(Copyright, 1882, by American Press Associa
tion.)
Great is the penalty of celebrity! Let
a woman but brush its outskirts and
down come the sledge hammers! Her
life, her business, her name, her friends
—aye, her home and her husband are no
longer her own, to say nothing of snch pre
rogatives as her age and her love affairs.
These were my thoughts as I sat chat
ting not long ago with Mr. Willie
Wilde and his wife, Mrs. Frank Leslie-
Wilde, in hearing them laugh and talk,
seeing them smile and frown over the
newspaper clippings which recorded
their genealogies, incomes, "age, sex
and previous condition of servitude."
Of coarse I had met Mr. Wilde with
my American citizenship's worth of prej
udice. In fact, I think I prefaced my con
gratulations by calling him a transatlan
tic pirate, a poacher, and so forth, but
had the edge taken off my sword by the
nicest of smiles, the heartiest of hand-
KB. WILLIE WILDE.
shakes, and the gallant assurance that
America, instead of having lost a daugh
ter, had shared the fate of all good moth
ers-in-law and gained a son. At this
time—not long after his marriage—Mr.
Wilde was the manner of man in one's
mind on hearing that good old rousing
chorus from "Pinafore:"
For he ia an Englishman!
Big, brawny, square shouldered, free
fisted—not a bad man by any means to
stand between a woman and the sledge
hammers 1
Mr. Wilde is anything bat a young
man. His hair is streaked with gray,
his beard so trimmed as to cut out the
gray about the chin, and under his good
blue eyes are the footprints of late
hours and high living. There is the
portly figure and the heavy veins of the
hands showing the culmination, not the
incipiency, of manhood.
Mrs. Leslie is no longer young. It
were an insult to her work and experi
ence to call her such. She is better than
young—she is the full grown, capable
woman. Her skin is clear and smooth,
her eyes bright and quick to fill with
tears, and her figure almost girlish in
its rounded symmetry. At her worst,
in the untempered glare of day and her
office dress, she looked fully young
enough for Mr. Wilde.
"These notices must be very amusing
to you, Mr. Wilde," I said, referring to
the clippings.
He smiled, then frowned. "Yes," he
answered, "if they were only not vul
gar. Vulgarity in journalism, like vitu
peration in argument, weakens the
point."
Among these clippings was one from
a London paper, which, in speaking of
Mr. Wilde as a "commoner," went on
to say that he was no "common com
moner, but a gentleman, a journalist, a
musician and a man of marked individ
uality."
The gross misconstruction which the
papers have put on Mrs. Leslie's remark
that her devotion to Lady Wilde had
much to do with her marrying her son
is most unjust. It is a well known fact
that Mrs. Leslie and Lady Wilde have
been the warmest of friends for eight
years. It is a friendship of which Mrs.
Leslie, as a much younger woman, a
visitor to England and a fellow jour
nalist, may well be proud. Her refer
ence to it as bearing upon her marriage
to Mr. Wilde was the natural tribute of
friend to friend, daughter to mother.
A pretty incident showing the oneness
of these famous women was the joint
appearance of their biographies and pic
tures in a Dublin magazine called "The
Lady of the House," dated Sept. 15,
when neither they nor the public knew
that they were ever be more closely
united. In this article Mrs. Leslie is
spoken of as "the beautiful newspaper
queen," and Lady Wilde as " 'Speranza,'
who still queens it in her magnificent
drawing rooms at 146 Oakley street,
London, where come together men and
women of all nationalities, each one dis
tinguished in his or her way, the Ameri
can element, perhaps, predominating
and numbering among its representa
tives such women as Mrs. Frances
Hodgson Burnett, Louise Chandler
Moulton. Mrs. Frank Leslie, Mrs. Proc
tor," etc.
This article then goes on to mention
Lady Wilde's latest book, a collection of
essays bearing the title, "Men, Women
and Books," and dealing with such sub
jects as Jean Paul Richter, The Giron
dins, Miss Martineau, Lady Blessington,
George Eliot, Lord Lywbn, Disraeli,
Thomas Moore, Leigh Hunt, Words
worth, Alfred Tennyson, etc.
Besides being able to write charmingly
of all these distinguished personages,
Lady Wilde knew and entertained
Browning, Carlyle, Petrie, Lever, Fa
ther Prout, Thackeray, Denis Florence
McCarthy, etc. ,
I don't blame Mrs. Leslie for being
proud of the friendship of such a woman
and marrying her son.
But the interview I have written of was
more than a month ago. Since then the
light of the honeymoon has waned for
this happy couple and sickness and worry
have cast their dark shadow over them.
Mr. Wilde has been prostrated by
a serious attack of hemorrhage of
the stomach, a malady which came
near ending his life more than a year
ago and to future and fatal recurrence
of which his physicians say he is liable
THE LOS T ANGELES HERALD: SATURDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 13 1892.
at any time. The evidences of (raftering
and night vigils are on Mrs. Wilde's fine
face and the pallor of death and appre
hension on his. Yet their home is Lib
erty Hall, where aspiring artists—Amer
ican, English, German or Kamschatkan
—are welcomed with true democratic
equality, to meet each other and feel the
cheeriness of home and hospitality.
As for the "worry" referred to, it is
the connection of Mrs. Leslie's name —
however creditably—with the recent
sensation of young Albert Hope, the
forger and debauche.
Said Mrs. Leslie: "This is the cut
from my country's papers which has
rent my heart. It is the recoil of an in
verted good deed which almost tempts
me never to do another. From my first
meeting with that unfortunate boy I
have been to him what I would bless
any good woman to be to a misguided
brother of mine adrift in a city of temp
tations, beset by the curses of an inher
ited fortune and bad associates. When
I saw, more than a year ago, that he
was falling from his former state of
worthiness and reliability I withdrew
from him my friendship and indorse
ment. I made him a present of a sum
of money he asked me to lend him, and
expressed my surprise and disapprobation
at his continuing to support himself in
luxurious idleness by borrowing money
which he had no sort of resources to re
pay. He was only an innocent, weak
lad, so far as I could judge.
"I no more suspected him of crime and
debauchery than I suspected his pure
minded and child faced friend, Tommy
Russell. Yet, when the worst came and
Hope was in prison in Philadelphia,! came
once more to his rescue. I forgave him
the offenses he had committed against
me in using my name for the purpose of
inducing loans, and the forged check
upon my bankers which he then had
upon his person, and offered to help him
out by effecting a compromise with the
Philadelphia bank upon whose charge
he was then under arrest. Before these
negotiations could be effected it was my
unpleasant task to see the infamous book
which he had written for Tommy Rus
sell, and which was in the hands of the
authorities. Though touched by his
grateful references to myself and my
past kindness to him, I was shocked
and disgusted with the horrible revela
tions of the book as touching his own
life and habits. I felt that there was no
hope for a soul, much less a life, steeped
in such wickedness and unhealthfulnees.
I directed my agent to stop negotiations
in his behalf, and sorrowfully washed
my hands of the whole affair.
"Oht lam hurt to the quick by the
papers' treatment of me in this matter.
Every word I have said in friendly ex
culpation of the boy has been grossly
misconstrued. What have I done to de
serve such unfraternal consideration? I
love the papers, and have tried to show
my appreciation of their past goodness
to me. They stood by me through my
dark times, encouraging me to stand up
under the heavy load of wrongs and per
secution and to go on inch by inch, re
deeming my dead husband's financial
honor.
"My recent marriage seems to have
opened upon me the vials of my coun
try's wrath. I was alone (for a good in
come and friends do not fill a woman's
heart), I wanted a home and protection
and love and peace as other women
have. I have no mother, father, sister,
brother, child or any near and dear kin.
Why should the newspaper people make
one of their own profession ridiculous?
"In all my newspaper work—and I am
now writing for several syndicates and
of course my own publications—l have
never lowered my pen to say aught
against man or woman. Of course I
could have done so. My ears are not
alone holden to Dame Rumor's voice and
the rattle of family skeletons. These
swords of persecution are generally two
edged. Few of us mortals are able to
accept the Master's pitying challenge,
'Cast ye the first stone.'
MRS. LESLIE-WILDE.
"See here, how the papers change!"
and Mrs. Wilde got up and handed me
a scrapbook of clippings. "Here is one
from one of our most conservative and
important dailies. It goes on to say of
me at the time of my reputed engage
ment to the Marquis de Lenville: 'Mrs.
Leslie was seated in her luxurious apart
ments at the Gerlach. She was dressed
in black silk with some rare lace about
her throat and wrists and looked even
younger than the London records had
made her out^thirty-eight.'
"That was in 1890. Now, in 1891,1 am
made out by this same paper, in an edi
torial, to be old enough for Mr. Wilde's
mother—about seventy."
Alas! the world goes on, and business
is business. Belle Hunt.
The only picture of the president
which Mrs. Harrison has in her room is
a small unframed lithograph which oc
cupies a shelf on the side of the dressing
case. The only likeness of Baby Mc-
Kee displayed in the White House is a
9 by 10 inch oil painting in the library
up stairs.
Doing Penance.
An old woman has taken up her abode
in a wood on Lord Annaly's estate at
EUdysart. She has made a bed of fern
leaves between the trunks of trees, sticks
and ferns forming a rude thatch. The
only article of furniture is a crucifix.
She subsists on bread and water, and
says she has resorted to this wretched
mode of existence as a penance.—Lon
don Letter.
Lt Grippe)
The tendency of tbis diaeaae toward
pneumonia Is what makeß it dangerous.
La grippe requires precisely the same
treatment as a seven cold. Chamber
lain's Cough Remedy is famous for its
cures of severe colds. This remedy
successfully counteracts the tendency of
jJAMESPYiEj] The Success
*IMp the Original
PEARLINC su PP orts limitations and there's
COMPOUND a crowdoft hem hanging to Pearl
thecreatimventiom me. It saves work for them a«. it
does for everybody. It saves them
l P talk, too. It's the one cry of the
, M peddler that his imitation is "the same
f as Pearline," or "as good as Pearline."
V. It isn't true, but it shows what hethinks
of Pearline. He knows that Pearline
is the standard—the very best for its
iflp4l\ purpose. So does everybody who
Jfq 'kf\ has used it.
Beware °^ tnfe basket gang—be sure
/ you get Pearline. Get it from your
{jfihl S rocer ~ an d send back any imita
vSyjL 'ion he may send yo.u.
Pearline is never peddled, and
\J is manufactured only by
I7S JAMES PYLE, New York.
■aaitjciiftrcMgiM cures I
: ANY \0
L^r^AVI3 HE ADACHE|
WW ■ "X\ 4$ While Ycu Wait," I
mSB l__V" vBHHERKa but cures
ELSE. J
the disease to result in pneumonia,
provided that proper care be taken to
avoid exposure when recovering from
the attack. Careful inquiry among the
many thousands who have used this
remedy during the epidemics of the
past two years has failed to discover a
single case that has not recovered or
that has resulted in pneumonia. Fifty
cent and $1 bottles for sale by C. F.
Heinzeman, 222 North Main street.
The Progress of Volapuk.
It ia a very interesting fact that tho
world language, Volapuk, is not only
coming to be spoken conversationally by
its enthusiastic votaries, but is to be
made a medium of interlingual commu
nication at the World's Columbian fair.
A complete record of progress made in
spreading Volapuk since that delightful
national convention of its votaries was
held in Boston, considerably more than
ft year ago, would astonish all but the
few who keep closest watch on the move
ment. A significant circumstance is
that recently the Young People's Society
of Christian Endeavor of the People's
church, Boston, formally adopted Vola
puk as a study for that organization,
and a class of forty members (expected
to double shortly) was formed, to meet
each Monday evening in the church's
reading room for instruction.
Other noteworthy instances are as fol
lows: The people of Newton, quite at
their own request, are to have a lecture
on Volapuk under the auspices of a
ladies' association there. Salem and
Gloucester are to have lectures in Janu
ary, and the interest all over the coun
try is similarly manifested. Newspaper
lessons, published simultaneously all
over the maritime provinces, Canada
and the United States, have been given
weekly since Oct. 10. The students
write out the exercises of the lessons and
send them to convenient points, as desig
nated, for annotation, and immense
numbers of young and old of both sexes
are following the lessons. —Boston Ad
vertiser.
Area of the Canadian Dominion.
In the last issue of the Statisti
cal Year Book of Canada, com
piled by Mr. Sydney C. D. Roper
of the statistics branch of the de
partment of agriculture, we find that
the total area of the dominion is com
puted to be 3,456,383 square miles. In
this estimate 140,736 square miles are
assigned to water and 3,315,647 to land
surface. The table which yields this
total is said to be an entirely new one,
having been specially prepared at the
request of the compiler of the Year
Book by tho Topographical Survey
branch of the department of the in
terior. •
"The measures have all," wo are told,
"been made anew and checked, and
may be depended on, in so far as war
ranted by tho present geographical
knowledge of the country. No change
will be made in these figures unless
based upon new information." As this
is a question on which there has been a
good deal of discussion and much differ
ence of opinion, it is satisfactory to
receive this assurance from what we
may regard as the highest official and
professional authority.—Montreal Ga
sot«.
Dead Sea Fruits. •
They slay multitudes when they are the
product ol neglect of incipient disease. A
■ slight" cold, a fit of indigestion, bilioußntes
or constipation, each or any of these "minor
ailments" advance in many cases with "leagi e
destroying strides." Give them a swift, early
defeat with Hostetter's Stomach Bitters anil
avert the danger. Abernethy administered an
alarming rebuke to the man who informed him
that ho had "only acold!" "Only a cold," re
peated tbe doctor. "What would ye have—the
plague!" Rheumatitm and la grippe are easily
extinguishable at the start. Why, then, allow
them to get up a lull head ol sieam? Put on
the brakes with the Bitters. The genial
warmth which this superb medicine diffuses
through the system, the impetus it gives to the
circulation of the blood, its soothing and
strengthening effect upon the nervous, specially
recommend it to the enfeebled and sick. Tis
the great specific for malaria.
O, What a Cough.
Will you heed the warning? The signal per
haps of the sure approach of that more terrible
disease, Consumption. Ask yourselves if you
can afford for the sake of saving 50c. to run
the risk and do nothing for it. We know from
experience that Shiloh's Cure will cure your
cough. It never fails. This explains why
more than a Million Bottles were sold the past
year. It relieves croup and whooping cough at
once. Mothers, do not be without it. For
lame back, side or chest, use Shiloh's Porous
Plaster. Sold wholesale by Haas, Barich &
Co., and all retail druggists.
Onr Home Brew*
Maler & Zoebleln's Lager, fresh from the
brewery, on draught In all the principal sa
loons, delivered promptly in bottles or kegs
Office and Brewery. 444 Aliso st, Telephone 91,
laUHBTO YARDS.
J. M. Griffith, President.
_ H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pres. and Troas.
T. B. Nichols, See'y. E. L. Chandler, Supt
J. M*. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOOBS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS,
Mill work of every description.
984 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles.
Inltf
Kerckhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANQELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Atusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes lurnlshed to order.
CLARK & HUMPHREYS,
Wholesale and Retail
Lumber : Dealers,
REDONDO BEACH
AND
LOS ANGELES.
Head office, Los Angeles—l23W W. Second St.
12-27-3 m
PERRY. MOTT &. COS
LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING WILLS,
No. 316 Commercial Street jnl
/1\ JAPANESE
CURE
A new and Complete Treatment, consisting of
Suppositories, Ointment in Capsules, also in
Box and Pills; a Positive Cure for External,
Internal, Blind or Bleeding Itching Chronic,
Recent or Hereditary Piles. This remedy has
never been known to fail. Jl per box, 6' for $5;
sent by mail. Why suffer from this terrible
disease when a written guarantee is positively
given with « boxes. To refund the money if
not cured. Send stamp for free sample. Guar
antee issued by 0. P. HEINZEMAN, druggist,
sole agent, 222 N. Main street, Los Angeles. Cal.
eoNsumPTioN.
I have a positive remedy for the above disease; by its
use thousands of cases of the worst kind and of long;
standing have been cared. Indeed so strong is my faith
in its efficacy, that I will Bend two bottles free, with i
aVAXUABLE TREATISE on this disease to any suf
ferer who will send me their Express and P. O. address.
T. A. Slocum, M. Cm 183 Pearl St., N. V.
nil HP I™ y oif/an d i r S
UnUr 11 rncubato, PetalumB
PETALUIA IWCUMTOR C(T/p7tAIUIBA, CAL •
A CURE GUARANTEED.
DR. BELL'S GBKMAN EXTRACT
Cures all private, syphilitic, chronic, urinary,
skin and blood diseases; catarrh, lutg affec
tions, female complaints, and all such diseases
as are brought about by indiscretion and cx
cerscj. SJI. No cure no pay.
DR. BELL'S Frence Waßh cures all private
diseases, blood poison, old sores and ulcers, G
&G, in two or three days, $1. No preparation
on earth equal to it For sale only at the old
re.iable BERLIN DRUG STORE, 505 South
spring street, Los Angeles, Cal.
We have over 31,000 testimonials of wonder
ful cures.
Consultation free and strictly confidential.
Notice of Dissolution of Copartner
ship.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
partnership lately subsisting between T. J.
Cuddy and|August Basler, under the firm name
of Cuddy & Basler,was dissolved on thefirstday
of February, 1892, by mutual consent. Mr.
Basltr having acquired the interest of Mr.
Cuddy in said business. All debts owing to
the said firm are to be received by said August
Basler. and all demands on the said partner
ship are to be presented to him for payment.
Dated L,os Augeles, Cal., February 1,1892.
T. J. CUDDY,
2-9 4t A. BA3LER.
EAGLE STABLES,
122 South Broadway.
Good Teams at Reasonable Rates. Telephone
No. 246.
11-5 3m W. F. WHITE, Proprietor.
HANKING HOtJBES.
Security Savings Bank, Capital, $200,000
NO. 148 BOOTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS
r. N. MYERS , FRESIDENT
ISAIAS W. HELLMAN, President Nevada Bank, San Francisco; President Farmers and leer
chants Bank, Los Angeles.
ANDREW J. BOWNE President Fourth; National Bank, Grand Rapids, Mich-
H. W. HELLMAN Vice-president Farmers and Merchants Bank, Los Angeles
T. L. DUQUE ... .VICE-PRESIDENT
M. L. FLEMING Capitalist, Los Angeles
A. C. Rt.GERS Physician, Los Angeles
MAURICE S. HELLMAN Of Hellman, Waldeck & Co., Wholesale Stationers, Los Angeles
J. A. BRAVES Of Graves, O'Melveny & Shankland. Attorneys, Los Angelts
J. H. SHANK LAND of Graves, O'Melveny <k Shankland, Attorneys, Los Angeles, Cal,
JAMES RAWbOiJ . Capitalist, Boston
J. F. BARTORI CASHIER; also Vice-president First National Bank, Monrovia, Cal.
FIVE PER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS,
THE NOTICE OF THE PUBLIC IS CALLED
To the fact that this bank has the largest paid up capital and surplus combined ot any savings
bank in Southern California, and only loans money on approved real estate security; that
amo;)K its stockholders are some of the oldest and most responsible citizens oi the community;
teat under the State law, the private estates of its stockholders are pro rata liable for the total
indebtedness of the bank. These facts, with caro exercised In making loans, insure a safe
dei ository for saving accounts. School teachers, clerks, mechanics, employees in factories and
shops, laborers, etc., will find it cosvenlent to make deposits in small amounts. CHILDREN'S
SAVINGS DEPOSITS received in sums of 5 cents and upward. Remittances may be sent by
drait or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express. 3-1 6m
5 PES CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS
MAIN-STREET SAVES BANK AND TRUST CO.,
486 S. MAIN STREET, LOS ANGEI.KS, CIL.
CAPITAL, - $200,000.
The design of this institution is to afford a safe depository for the earnings of all persons
who are desirous of placing their money whore it will be free from accident, and at the same
time be earning for them a fair rate of Interest. Deposits will be received in sums of from $1 to
J5OOO. Workiug men and women should deposit at least |1 per week from their wages. This
will form a nucleus that will ultimately enable you to purchase a home or begin business.
Children can purchase 5-cent stamps in all parts of the city and county. It is the best education
you can have in saving and caring for money.
B. LANKERSHIM, Pbes'T. CHAS. FORMAN, Vich-Pres't FRANK W. DX VAN, CASHIEB
DIRECTORS.
Chas. Forman, Geo. H. Pike, I. N. Van Nuys, E. Germain, A. Haas, J. J. Schallert,
J. H. Jones, H. W. Hellman, J. B. Lankershim.
INCREASE OF TOTAL RESOURCES.
January 1, 1890 $115,871 37
January 1, 1891 389,453 80
January 1, 1892 523,504 14
Money loaned on Mortgages.
Los Angreles Savings Bank,
236 NORTH MAIN STREET,
CAPITAL STOCK $100,000
SURPLUS $19,000
I W. HELLMAN, President J. E. PLATER, Vice-President.
W. M. CASWELL, Secretary.
STOCKHOLDERS:
I. W Hellman L. 0. Goodwin, J. E. Plater.
R. S. Baker, J. B. Lankershim, A. A. Curtis,
G. W Prescott, C. E. Paxton, H. H. Paxton.
6 5 tf. Fire Fer Cent. Interest Paid on Tern> Deposits.
German-American Savings Bank,
114 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL. PAID IN GOLD, - - $100,000.00.
Nt i res compounded quarterly to depositors at the rate of 5 per cent ou term and 3.Cm per cent
on ordinary deposits.
E. MCDONALD, Pres't L. LICHTENBERGER and W. M. SHELDON, Vice-Pre*'.?.
VII TOR PONET, Treasurer. M. N. AVERY, Secy. P. F. SCHUMACHER, Asst. Secy,
MMT~ Open every Saturday evening for deposits,
1 ' '' ''' "' I ■ wm
Southern California National Bank,
10l 8 BPKINQ ST., NADEAU BLOCK,
L. N. BREED. President. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, Vice-President. 0. N. FLINT, Cashier
Capital r*fvld in Gold Coin $200,000
Surplus and Undivided Profits 28.000
Authorized Capital BOO.OOC
DIRECTORS—L. N. Bieed, H. T. Newell, Wm. H. Averv, Silas Holmaa. tV.
H. Holliday, E. 0. Bosbyshell, M. Hagan, Frank Rader, D. Remick, Thos. Gobb,
William F. Bosbyshell. \m-ti
AND MERCHANTS BANK OF
LOS ANBELES, CAL.
Capital paid np) 1500,000
Surplus nd Profits 749,000
Total 11,249,000
OFFICERS:
Ibaias W. Hkllmaj* President
Herman W. Hellman Vice-President
John Milner Cashier
H. j. Fleishman Assistant Cashiei
BISECTORS.
W. H. Perry, Emellne Childs, J. B. Lanker
shim, C. E. Thorn, C. Ducommun, H. W. Hell
man, T. L. Duque, A. QlasseU . W. Hell
man.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States, Europe, China and Japan.
Ob \NGKLKS NATIONAL BANK,
Oor. First and Spring streets.
0. S. DEPOSITORY.
CAPITAL. $500,000 00
Surplus 82,500 00
Total (888,800 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE President
JOHN BRYBON, SR Vice-President
F. G. HOWES Cashier
E. W. OOK Assistant Cashiei
No Interest paid on deposits.
DIRECTORS.
Dr. W. G. Cochran, H. H. Markham,
Perry M. Green, John Bryson, Sr.,
Dr. H. Sinsabaugh, F. C. Howes,
George H. Bonebrake. Warren Gillelen.
No interest paid on deposits.
Exchange for sale on all the principal citlea
of the United Mates and Europe. m 8
QaLLFORNIA BANK,
Cor. Broadway and Second St.., Los Angeles
Subscribed Capital 5500,000
Paid up Capital 1300,000
Surplus t 20,000
J. Frankenfield President
Sam Lewis Vice-President
J. ia. Wltmer Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS;
J. Frankenfield, G. W. Hughes. Ham. Lewis.
J. 0. Kayß, E. W. Jones. I, B. Newton,
Hervey Lindley.
General Banking and Exchange Business
transacted. m4-4m
Maki-utreet Savings Bank & Trust Co.
NO. 426 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
DIVIDEND NOTICE.
Ir»OR THE HALF YEAR ENDING DKGEM
-1 ber 31st, IS9I. a dividend has been de
clared by the Directors of this bank, at tho rate
of 5 per cent per annum on term deposits and
3 per cent per annum ou oidinary deposits,
payable on and after Monday, Jan. 11,1892.
FRANK W. DeVAN, Secretary and Cashier
of the Main-street Savings Bank and Trust Co.
1-3 lm
NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANGELKsT
CAPITAL STOCK. $200,000
KKSXRVK $230,000
<£. F. SPENCE Presldeut
.CD. BICKHELL Vice-President
J. M. ELLIOTT Cashier
'3. B. BHAFFEK Aotiißtant Cashier
Dlrsolors—H. F. Spence, J. D. Ilicknell, 8. H
Mott, Wm. Lacy, H. Mabury, J. M. Elliott. D. M.
McGarrv iul
QITIZENS' BANK OF LOS ANGELES,
Corner Third and Spring streets.
Capital 1200,000.00
T. W. BROTHERTON President
T. 8. C. LOWii ...Vice-President
Directors: T. 8. C. Lowe, L. W. Blinn, Ja
bez Percival, C. F. Cronin, T. W. Brotherton.
T. D. Stimson, Robert Hale.
General banking business. Bonds for sale
and other first-class investments. n " 12m
rpHE NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA,
Corner of Spring and Second streets,
LOS ANGELES, OAL.
CAPITAL PAID UP J250.000
BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
Dr. W. L. Graves, E. F. C. Klokke. O. T. John
son, W. Hadley, E. N. McDonald, M. H. Sher
man. Fred Eaton, John Wolfskin, Thos. R.Bard.
J. M. C. Marble, President,
O. H. Churchill, Vioe-Presldent,
Perry Wildhan, Cashier.
10-31 A. Hadley. Asst. Cashier.
S. F. Spence, F.C.Howes, John N. Hunt,
Pres't. Vice- Pres. Secy and Treas.
Savings Bank of Southern California,
Southeast corner Spring and Court streets,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
CAPITAL, ... $100,000
DIRECTORS.
Geo. H. Bonebrake, J. H. Braly, H. L. Drew,
J. M. Elliott, C. N. Hasson, F. C. Howes, M. W.
Stimson, Hiram Mabury, E. F. Spence, Warren
Gillelen. 8-2612 m
BANK OF AMERICA
FORMERLY
LOS ANQELES COUNTY BANK,
Temple Block.
Capital Btock Paid Up, {300,000.
OFFICERS.
JOHN E. PLATES, President
ROBT. 8. BAKER Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART Cashier
DIRECTORS
Jotham Bixby, Chas. Forman,
L. T. Garnsey, Lewellyn Bixby,
K. S. Baker, John B. Plater,
Geo. H. Stewart.
State Loan and Trust Co.
OF" LOS ANQELES.
Subscribed Capital 81,000,000.
Capital Paid Up •885,000.
BANKING ROOM, N. W. CORNER SPRING
AND SECOND STREETS, BRYBON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
GEORGE H. BONEBRAKE, President
JOHN BRYSON.Sr. I ™ „
W. H. PERRY. j Vice-Presidents
A. E. FLETCHER, Cashier.
J. F. TOWELL. Genl. Manager.
W. G. Cochran. P. M. Green.
H. J. Woollacott, Wm. H. Crocker,
O.T.Johnson, San Francisco,
Judge W. P. Gardiner, A. A. Hubbard.
We act as trustees for corporations and estates
Loan money on first-class real estate and
collaterals Keep choice securities for sale.
Pay Interest on savings deposits. Safe de
posit boxes for rent. Applications for loans
received from Borrowers in person or by mail.
r»"<HB CITY BANK.
JL 37 Sooth Spring street.
Capital Stock 7300,000
A. D. CHILDRESS President
JOHNS. PARK Cashier
' directors.
W. T. Childress, l'nindexter Dunn
J. J. Schallert, i,. K. Crandall,
John S. Park, K. G. L"nt,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof safe
epoeit boxes rented at from $3 tos2oper»,n
-pn - m 26 12m
THE UNIVERSITY B ANK OF LOS ANGELES,
... . „ No. 317 New High street.
oapital stock fully paid up tIOO.OOO
Surplus 40,000
R. TJ. WITNEY President
¥ U §3% E ,F Vloe President
GEO. L, ARNOLD Ccehiei
DIRECTORS.
.AiKv* 1 ???*! n - °- Miltimore, 8. W. Little, 0.
M. We Is, John McArthur, C.A.Warner, L.J.P.
Morriu.
Gerieral banking business, mid loans on first
class real estate solicited. Buy and sell flrst
ciass stock;., bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to invest in first-class securities on either
long or short time can be. accommodated.
STATEMENT OF THE CONDITION OF
0 the
LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK.
01 Los Angeles, Cal., at the close of business,
December 31,1891,
After Having- Made a Dividend of
820,000.
RESOURCES:
Loans and discounts $ 775,257 55
Banking house and fixtures 173,954 64
Government bonds, 4 per cent... 429,000 00
Cash on hand 1357,873 86
Cash iv banks 233,590 20
591,464 Ot
Total 51,969,676"25
LIABILITIES:
Capital S 500,000 Of
surplus 85,000 f
Undivided profits 620
National bank notes outstanding 135 00' , X,(
Deposits 1,249,0' } q jjj
Total SI pgr 7"
State of California. ( „ 25
County of Los Angeles, j " 8 -
GiorgeH. Bonebrake, president „„,, „
Howes, cashier, ol the Los Ange °.
Bank, being severally sworn, c £ Rational
self, says the foregoing stateir — {VT nlm
the best of his k i owiedge anil' 'f. n i ia true to
GEO. I!. BONFBR/ S»l . .
F. 0. HOWES, Cns' ,!„ ' Pr esident.
Subscribed and sworn to > „'<
day of January, 1892. je/ore me 'his sth
17 B fm ' B - OE -^P
— Notary Public.
!u
4HJrcures o»» i "" , i n,f remedy 7ct
OggVl ToSDAYf m "OnwryKnter, <fc t, Jsset
/WHWUuMmtMdnr . lo lH inoonly sate rcmt'iiv foi
MOT "■"» s»i«> m » Xoueo»ph«»o»rWhite (
ftm mm onr.,* I Prescribe it and feei

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