OCR Interpretation


Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, September 01, 1892, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025968/1892-09-01/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 4

4
-LOS ANGELES HERALD
rUBLISHCD
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.
Josew D. Lynch. Jams J. Avast.
AVERS & LYNCH, PUBLISHERS.
__ %
• Entered st the pottcffice st Los Angeles as
second-class matter.]
DELIVERED BY CARRIERS
_t JlOo'Far Weak, or Hoc Per Month.
TERMS BY MAtL, INCLUDING POSTAGE:
Daily Herald, one year $8 00
Daily Hkbald, six months 4 25
Daily Herald, three months 2 25
Daily Hbbald, one month 80
Weekly Hkbald, one year 2 00
Weekly Hbbald, tlx months 1 00
Wbb*ly Hbbald, three months 60
Illustrated Hbbald, per copy 20
Office of publication, 223-225 West Second
street. Teh phone 156.
■Notice to Mall Subscriber*.
The papers of all delinquent mall subscribers
to \he Los Angeles Daily Hbbald will be
promptly discontinued her. after. No papers
will be sent to subscribers by mail unless the
same have been paid for in advance This rule
is inflexible. AYER3 &. LYNCH.
The Hkbald is sold at the Occidental Hotel
new< stand. San Francisco, for 5c a copy.
THTJKSDAY, BKPTKMBKK 1, 1803.
Senator Quay, of Pennsylvania, says
that he is not sulking in his tent, but
that he and his friends will put in their
best work for Harrieon when the proper
time comi-s. It will be a case of day
after tomorrow, we fear.
If the numerous campaign lies of the
Republican oratois as to the prosperity of
the country could only be all published
in one book and then compared with
the records of tho bankruptcy courte
from Maine to California, what a show
down there would be.
Telegrams from Fresno would indi
cate that a popular uprising is net far
off. People who have long been patient,
under laxity of law, are contemplating
the taking of the law into their own
hands. Vincent, the wife murderer, is
beginning to feel very uncomfortable in
his cell.
These is talk of sending an American
man-of-war to the Sarooan islands to
preserve order there. As Germany has
gobbled all the commercial facilities of
those islands, let her preserve order
there herself. England and America
may yet become allies against Germany
on account of this Samoan question.
Tiiky had a great time yesterday at
Ophir farm, near White Plains, the for
mer country Beat of bluff old Ben Hol
laday. Benjamin, of the Hat, called upon
Whitelaw, the- Eat, accompanied by
"Prince Buss" and Tommy Carter. It
is said that "Me too Piatt," who is now
called "Yo Tambien" for the sake of
euphony, was also among tbe visitors at
Ophir farm during tbe day.
Geokoe William Curtis, known to
the world of literature as the "How
adji," and in later years as editor of
Harper's Weekly, died in New York
yesterday, after a two/ years' attack of
dropey. The Democratic party owe a
debt of gratitude to his memory, for two
reasons: First, because he contributed
largely to the election of Mr. Cleveland
in 1884, and secondly, because he re
fused to accept an office for himself.
French bankers appear to be a very
unfortunate lot, of late years. The Baron
Ferdinand Seilliere, oi the house which
started up Pioche, Bayerque & Co., in
Ban Francisco, forty years ago, died in
New York last week, in abject poverty.
And now it is said that Hypolite Belloc,
who failed two years sgo for $300 0110, is
skulking through this state and seeking
to avoid arrest for the forgeries that
the bankruptcy of Henry
Barroilhet in 1890.
AccoaniKa to the latest financial
authorities on the silver question, the
United States government, now the
largest holder of silver in the civilized
world, is loser to the extent of $40,000,
--000 in the short space of twelve days,
by the decline of that commodity to
82? a cents in New York. Out of all the
fog and smoke that surrounds the prob
lem, we can see but one issue—to enact
a law forbidding tbe issuance of any
paper money of less denomination than
$10. That would soon renionetize silver,
in America at least.
There ia a great war of railroad
freight rates not far off—and that may
possibly lead up to a cut-rate in the
passenger tariff on the Southern Pacific
and Santa Fe. Mr." Huntington, ordi
narily the most conservative of men, is
a man that becomes perfectly reckless
in his expenditures of money if he once
gets into n hot fight; and if the cut-rate
gets into the passenger traffic, we shall
have a boom here before the world's
fair, instead of immediately after it, as
most of our real-estate prophets have
predicted.
j. The little village of Elk Grove, in
Sacramento county, is agitated by a
clerical absquatulation, the "goner" be
ing the Rev. Mr. McCallum. It seems
that about $100 was collected last week
by the congregation and turned over to
that g«utltman, who is now missing,
and the money also. The reverend gen
tleman heard, probably, that the collec
tion was taken up for the benefit of the
poor and could think of no person poorer
than himself. He had evidently over
looked that touching little hymu of Dr.
"Watts', which reads:
"He who takes what Isn't his'n,
Sooner or later will go to Saa iiuentln."
It ia less than seven years since the
first so-called Bankers' convention was
held at Saratoga; and what was the oc
casion for calling that convention was,
to borrow a Dundrearyism, "one of those
things that no fellah can find out."
Most people supposed that its object was
to secure a uni'ormity of systems relat
ing to exchange, loans and other fea
tures of the banking business as carried
on in our large cities. The aspect of the
LOS AZOTES HERALD: THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 1, 1898.
money market today conveya the im
pression that the whole affair waa a
deeply-laid scbeme.having for its ulterior
object tbe demonetization of silver, just
as they demonetized greenbacks during
the war. Old Napoleon Bonaparte, had
such a thing occurred in his day, would
have Bolved the problem by sentencing
about have a dozen prominent bankers
to be shot, after whicn the question
would have regulated itself.
OUR LOCAL TAX DEVOURERS.
The attention of thinking people is
moat respectfully directed to the fact
that the election of yesterday, on the
sewer bonds question, resulted in an
overwhelming majority for the issuance
of tbe aforesaid bonds. Now we do not
object to this proposition because we
know that the sewer is a physical ne
cessity to the well-being of the city and
cannot be much longer dispensed with.
But what we wished to direct the peo
ple's attention to, is tbe fact that this
sewer building is going to increase the
burden of taxation upon a people wbo
are already taxed to maintain a city and
county government, which is costing at
the rate of $17,280 per day, $720 per
hour, and $12 per minute. This style of
expenditure would not bankrupt New
York, but it is a severe strain upon Los
Angeles.
It is only too plainly to be seen, by
anybody who will take the trouble to
look it up, that we are being governed
altogether too much. The careful ob
server who enters into a close examina
tion of the offices of the city and county,
will fiud that the Union League govern
ment, under which we are groaning, has
converted the city hall and the court
house into two asylums for partisan
favorites ; that an enormous amount of
money is being annually wasted in the
salaries of people who do not begin to
render any just or valuable equivalent
therefor; and that in every department
of the city and county government there
are eight people hired to do the work
that should be performed by three. This
is the way the machine keeps its wheels
greased for future elec ionß.and in many
departments four nonentities are draw
ing salaries for performing the clerical
labor that, in years gone by, was accom
plished by one competent person.
Do these tax-devourers stop to consider
that in providing clothing and fodder
for tho "Pinafore" relations of every
prominent Republican, regardless of
any valuable service rendered or to be
rendered in return therefor, they are
"killing the goose that lays the golden
egg?" Do they realize that, out of our
total population at least one third are
invalids, come out here to our de
lightful climate, and having no commer
cial or industrial interest in our city?
And do they further realize that these
invalids, being mostly from the older
settled portions oi the republic, where
taxation is moderate, are liable to sell
out their residences here and emigrate to
other counties along the coast where
taxation is lighter? These people who
have, of late years, come among us and
been the fractions of the great unit we
cali a city, are intelligent and reasoning
beings. They are beginning to ask if we
are not governed too much? Whether
an army of office-holders, to be sup
ported solely by taxation of real and
personal property, is an element of
positive strength? And whether, on
the other hand, it does not create a
bureaucracy like those of England and
Germany, in which the offices descend
from father to sou, instead of being
filled by the vote of the people froni.
time to time ?
On this question of feeding an army of
people simply because they are the rela
tives of influential men in the dominant
party, and without regard to any actual
need for their eervicee, the Herald is in
line with the massts of the taxpayers.
It took its stand by the side of the peo
ple in the earlier days of its existence,
and has never yet had cause to regret
that step. We hail their integrity with
joy, we love their bioad eenße of justice,
and we rejoice in their Btrength. The
people are always honest, generally
right, and never unpopular.
PERJURY, AS A FINE ART.
An Arizona paper, of recent date, re
marked sententiously in its editorial
columns that there was a prevalence of
altogether too much perjury and Buborn
atioD of perjury in the courts of the
county wherein it is published; and
added that if the courts did not furnish
an adequate remedy for this growing
evil, the people would, some day or
other, find a remedy of their own.
Nor doea this evil, which iB some
times called "swearing at a mark," con
fine itself to the sand wastes and cactus
thickets of Arizona. The great
metropolis of San Francisco is over
shadowed with the presence of a certain
clasß of men dignifying themselves with
the appelation of brokers, who stand
ready to furnish men for a consideration,
who will swear- to anything. The San
Francisco Examiner, in speaking of a
recent case in that city, says :
The exposure of last night shows in
what manner much of this kind of testi
mony is brought into court. Attorneys
of litigants buy testimony to suit their
case. In plain words, they bribo wit
nesses to perjure themselves. Some of
the jury bribing and jury-fixing, that is
equivalent to bribery, comes Iroin the
same tource. Yet, with all the frequen
cy of the crime, few are caught, and
none punished.
Of all crimes known to the law, per
jury is the hardest of which to convict.
But it is not the falee-sworn witness
alone that should bo punished. The
attorney who is guilty of subornation
should serve his term in the peniten
tiary as well as the mercenary scoundrel
who has taken his gold as the reward of
a false oath. The so-called bar associa
tion, which was organized to purge the
legal profession of Buch evils as these,
has so far proven wholly inadequate to
its avowed purpose.
Governor Mabkiiam has got into a
snarl with three little politicians who
comprise the board of railroad commis
sioners in and for this etate, just because
he will not act apart a large sum of
money to defray the expenses of an in
vestigation of railway abuses at the be
hest of some crank or other, whose com
plaint was made in the intereat of some
boodler or other in that board. There
ia need of just one investigation—that
of the official acts of the railroad com
mission, by the next legislature, with a
view to abolishing their offices.
"The worlddo move," says Brer Jas
per. We of this by the
fact that yesterday's election on the
sewer bonds, developed a great deal of
intelligence in the toughest ward of tbe
city and a proportionate display of ignor
ance at the abode of "culchaw," in the
vicinity of Figueroa and Adams streets.
In the Eighth ward seven ballots were
thrown out for irregularity, and in the
kid-g!oved Third, there were twenty-five
similarly excommunicated. It appears
as if there bad been a tide of immigra
tion from Australia, setting into the
purlieus of Alameda street.
And bo James ti. Blame is really com
ing here to live, after all. Well, he will
find that either Redondo or Santa
Monica can ''give spadeß" to all such
barren places as Bar Harbor, without
half trying. With Blame a resident of
Southern California, we should have
here every winter a galaxy of all the
brillant men in the Republican party,
of which galaxy the late premier would
be the "bright, particular star."
_______
PASADENA PARAGRAPHS.
KEPUBLICANB NOMINATE TH Kill
PRIMARY TICKETS.
The Peregrination* of a Happy Fool.
Prohibitionist* Will Have a Love
Meeting—Prof. I.owe'a Trip
to the East.
Pasadena, Aug. 31. —A portion of the
Republicans of Pasadena met this even
in Williams's hall to nominate delegates
to be voted on at the coming primaries,
to be held next Friday. The hall was
well filled and much interest was taken
in tbe meeting. H. J. Vail was elected
chairman and C. W. Bell,!sec-etary. Mr.
Vail opened the meeting with a short
speech, placing in nomination men who
would favor Mr. Arthur's candidacy.
In referring to the course pursued by
the friends of Captain Simpson, he
stated that in his long political career,
this was the first time he had ever met
any faction ot the Republican party
which was afraid to meet in open cau
cus. The selection of delegates was then
proceeded with, each ward separately
voting for its own representatives.
REPUBLICAN nominations.
The following is the result of the vote:
First ward—C. Chase, T. D. Allen, H.
Newby, W. S. Lacy, C. C. Brown.
Second ward —Wiiliam Mosher, J. 8.
Cox, W. E. Cooley, J. G. Rossiter, J.T.
Buchanan.
Tnird ward—H. C. Hotaliug, J. 8.
Mills. W. H. Wiley, A. H. Conger, C.
' W. Bell.
Fourth ward—W. B. Rowland, C. H.
' Rhodeß, W. Banbury, C W. Swan, J.W.
; Wood, W. S. Gilmore.
The meeting then adjourned.
A HAPPY IDIOT.
A harmless imbecile by the name of
McClure, was picked up on the street
this afternoon, by Constable Slater, and
brought to the police station. On being
questioned, it was learned that he had
strayed from the county poor farm, to
which he will be returned. He said
his purpose in visiting Pasadena was to
join the Universalist church, as be
heard there is a good one located here.
' While waiting at the station, he passed
the time by singing songs and dancing
jigs, and seemed as happy as a lark.
LOCAL MENTIONS.
The ladies of the W. R. C. gave a very
enjoyable social laßt evening at the resi
dence of Mrs. J. Buchanan, on West
Walnut Btreet, which was largely at
tended.
The Prohibitionists meet tomorrow
evening at Strong's hall. Rev. T. D.
Garvin will make an address, and music
will be furnished by the glee club. A
feature of the evening will he a campaign
song composed by a Pasadenian, to be
sung by Mr. Burnham.
The public Bchools will reopen on
Monday, September 12tb.
PERSONALS.
Prof. Lowe goes east tomorrow, in
company with General Manager Bur
nett, of tbe Terminal road. This trip is
made in the interest of the mountain
railroad, and an influx of eastern capi
tal may be looked for.
Charles Fife leaves today for Stanford
University, where he will continue his
studies.
IN SOCIETY.
Yesterday noon the family and a few
friends gathered at the residence of Mr.
and Mrs. J. 8. Perry, on South Main
Btreet, near Pico. The occasion was
that of the marriage of their daughter,
Miss Norah, and Mr. J. D. Newman, of
Flagstaff, Arizona. Rev. D. A. Wagner
was the officiating minister. The bride
was tastefully attired in a drab colored
gown, trimmed in silk gimp.
The ceremony and congratulations be
ing over, the company adjourned to the
dining room and partook of a bountiful
repast prepared for the occasion. Bid
ding adieu to the friends, Mr. and Mrs.
Newman took the traiu for San Fran
cisco, and will spend some weeks there
and Southern Oregon. Returning to Flag
Btafl'thf y will make tbat place their future
home, where Mr. Newman has had, fur
eeveral years, business interests.
#*#
Last evening the Misses McCarthy
gave a progressive whist party, at their
home, in honor of their sister, who is
here from San Jose, on a short visit.
Mrs. A. E. Baker won the first prize
for the ladies, while Mr. Baker carried
off the honors for the gentlemen. Misa
M. A. Jordan and Mr. J. V. Hannon
took the booby prizes. Those present
were Mrs. McCarthy, Mrs. Wood, Mrs.
Baker, Misses McCarthy, M. A. Jordan,
S. Raeder, K. Desmond, A. Desmond,
A. Barrack, Messrs. A. E. Baker, R.
Lowe, C. E. Crowley, P. M. Moroney,
J. V. Hannon, P. Marion, J. F. McEle
heny, J. H. Foley, La Sage, J. F. Burns,
a&d W. Weaver.
»*#
Mies Minnie L. Thomas, who has been
one of the most popular ladies cl Ava
i ion, has returned home, after six weeks
j of pleasure.
THE WOMAN GOT AWAY.
Detective Bosqui's Efforts to
Arrest Her Failed.
A Case Which Presents Some Very
Peculiar Features.
A Churic* of Felony Brought by the
Keeper of a Uouie or 111 Fum g |
Against Ono of the Inmate*.
An Kxcltlug Cliaae.
"You can't take her, I will protect my
passengers," pugnaciously remarked
Conductor House of the Santa Fe over
land train, Tuesday, to Detective Bosqui,
of the police department.
They stood in the aisle of the last car
of the train, whioh was about to pull
out, and in a seat before them sat a
young woman, with defiance written on
her face, and her feet braced around the
seat legs, while a number of passengers
were starting to their feet, and looking
on with considerable excitement at the
unusual scene.
"I have put this woman under arrest,
upon a charge of felony," replied Officer
Boequi, "and while I have no warrant
with me, I want your assistance in re
moving her from the train."
"I won't do it," said Conductor
House.
"And I won't go without a warrant,"
said the woman, tossing her head back.
Just at this moment the train began
to move, and an animated discussion
took place between the officer and the
conductor, during which the woman
slipped out of her seat and locked her
self in the closet.
Mr. Bosqui explained to Conductor
House that the woman had been an in
mate of a house of ill fame at the corner
of New High and Marchessault streets,
conducted by Daisy Foster, and that she
bad stolen a number of articles from ber,
which would constitute a felony if the
factß were proven. He had boen in
formed so late that she was on the train
that he had not had time to get a war
rant. After his explanation, Conductor
House said that he would assist him to
secure his prisoner when the train
reached Pasadena.
At Paeadena, however, the conductor
kept out of the way o the officer, and as
station after station was reached, De
tective Bosqui could not understand
what his actions meant. The woman
still remained locked up, and no at
tempt had been made to take up her
ticket.
When Pomona was reached, Mr: Bos
qui found the conductor, and asked
him what he meant. The latter said he
could not get in when the woman had
barricaded herself, but that at San Ber
nardino he would see that she was dis
lodged. The train went rushing along,
and the officer's feelings were anything
but comfortable. He informed Con
ductor House that if he did not assist
him at San Bernardido be would break
in the door. The interest of passengers
in the affair was at fever heat by this
time, although both officer and conduc
tor had only spoken in ordinary conver
sational tones.
The woman, who has gone by the
came of Georgie, still remained mistress
of the situation, and it looked very much
as if the conductor was not exceedingly
anxious to place her within the strong
arm ot the law. She had bought a
ticket to Arizona, and was booked
through, bo that tho arrest, if made at
all, must be before the train left the
state.
Finally the train pulled into San Ber
nardino, and Officer Bosqui prepared for
business. Conductor Hone left the
train, and Officer Bosqui, following him,
asked him if he was going to open the
closet door. The conductor replied that
he would not.
"Well," remarked Bosqui, "I will be
compelled, then, to break it in."
He went back to the train and braced
himself to force the door, when a brake
man approached aud said:
"If you break that door, I will smash
you."
"We will not have any trouble," re
plied Bosqui. "Now, I have got tbe
whip hand of you all. I will not break
the door. You and your conductor
have interfered with an officer in the
discharge of his duty."
He then left the train, and Conductor
House came to him and asked him to
come up-stairs and see the superintend
ent, which he did, and was introduced
by the conductor. Their stories were
told, and the superintendent asked
I louse if be had taken up the woman's
ticket. He replied that he had not
done so. The stories of both were iden
tical, save that the conductor said that
he did not know Detective BoEqui. He
based bis action on the officer not hav
ing a warrant.
The conductor was directed to open
the door and allow the officer to do his
duty, and tbey went back to the train.
House knocked on the door, but tbe
woman refused to open the door, and
tried to pass her ticket outside under
the door.
At that moment the train began to
move, and Mr. Bosqui declined to go any
further and got off the train and came
back to Los Angeles, arriving here at
night. A warrant having been procured,
a telegram was sent to the Needles to
have tbe woman arrested, but no answer
wae received yesterday, and she has
probably escaped from the state.
Thp cusp is a most extraordinary one,
Nothing to Be
Desired
Every Flavor made by Dr.
Price has the peculiar taste
characteristic of the fruit from
which it is obtained, and im
parts to cakes, puddings,
sauces or creams such a
delicious and grateful flavor
that their use really leaves
nothing to be desired. We
have yet to see the housewife
who has used Dr. Price's
Delicious Flavoring Extracts
of Lemon, Orange, Nectarine
or Vanilla, who was not de
lighted with them. THE PURITY
OF DR. PRICE'S FLAVORS is en
dorsed by the leading chem
ists and heads of the great
universities of this continent.
THE COLUMBIA COLONY,
In Southern California.
6520 Acres of Land Offered by the Southern California Land
Company, 230 North Main Street, Adjoining
the First National Bank.
1630 Shares at $100 Each, in Installments of $5 per Month
Without Interest.
NOT A LBND DISTRIBUTION. BUT fiN INVESTMENT OF MONEY!
Each Share Will Earn 5 Per Cent J'er Month on Each $100 for Five Years
From the Date of the First Subscription, and Has
the Best Heal Estate Security.
BOOKS OF" SUBSCRIPTION NOW OPEN.
Sixieen hundred and thirty shares at $100 each will buy the Fowler Ranch of G520 acres,,
with the present improvements and the prospective improvements to be made by the present
owneis at a cost to them ol $30,000. This splendid property is situated on the border line of
Tulare and Kern counties, four miles west of the Valley Road of the southern Paciflo Railroad,
and four miles north of the branch line to the oil wells, and twelve miles west of the present
line to San Franotsco. A survey of the Santa Fe line has been made through the western por
tion of this trace.
The belt fruit snd vine land in tho state. In tho heart oi the artesian belt. 'To be subdi
vided into tO-acre tracts, including a townsite, with artesian wcllb and an Irrigating canal of
twelve miles, broad avenues with treoß, and water for conveyance to each subdivision. These ,
improvements to be paid for by the present owners, and are included in the contract of sale to
this company. For lhe«e improvements $30.000 1» set aside. Title perfect and undoubted.
Thu stafr °' the Liebig World Dispensary are
only snr Reonß in Los An*e!es performing
"'' c t*'' ,l op ! rati * n, I , ' e l" ,r<,a ' ,or j* radical cure
£s§KUKßE£*wfflml lula fim ' Recta' diseases, Kyc, Ktir, Nose,
fe^^^^^S©//!'4Bi\s:(l \n\ Throat and Lungs, diseases of t he Digestive Or-
K ans ' aud diseases of women and children.
CHRONIC DISEASE'S AND DEFORMITIES.
VtWs!ll«S&l< Appliances for Rupture, Curvature of the
- ''si^^^^^¥st' ! iY''i Spine, Club Foot, and ail deformities, mauu
•<«ii^g^SA o*t» factured by our own instrument maker.
a f T"s» T Nervous Debility, Hexnal Weakness, Loss of Power, meet, Gonorrhoea, Syphilis,
nfl Lt M Spermatorrhoea and all u'inaiurai discharges of either hox ireaieu with unftil-
IVI I IM It* sucew. Confidential book and bottle of 3erman Invigorate given free to
Ifl L 1 1 prove it* merit; sure cure for special private and nervous troubles.
Hour.s-Oa in t04:30. aud 7 to) Address Tin I innin V f?n 123 8. MAIN ST.,
8:30 p.m. Sunday, 10to 12,0n1y.) (In confidence) UK. LILDIU (X OU., LOS ANGKLKS.
and it remains to be seen what will be
the outcome. The story of the crime
alleged to have been committed by the
woman is etrange in itself. She had
been an inmate in the house referred to
for some time, and has a friend of tbe
opposite sex who doeß not bear a savory
reputation in police circles. Monday
night she did up a bundle of clothes and
other articles, claimed by Daisy Foster,
and dropped them out of a win
dow. Later she Blipped out herself.
Complaint was made to tbe police and a
search instituted, but they failed to
locate tbe woman, until Detective
Bosqui ran across her at tho depot just
as the train was leaving. She had a box
which she had checked with great care,
and had secreted herself when the officer
first went through the train, much as
she did afterwards.
The first complaint against the woman
is filed in Justice Stanton's court, and
tbe value of the articles taken is placed
at |55, which makes the crime a felony.
It is very probable that Conductor
House will he obliged to undergo a
severe investigation of his conduct in
the matter.
Idaho's Prohibitionists.
Boise, Idaho, Aug. 31.—Tho Prohibi
tion state convention today nominated
Jos. A. Clark, of Bingham couuty, for
governor. A complete stat6 ticket, in
cluding presidential electors, was nom
inated.
Found,
At the drug store, a valuable package,
worth its weight in gold. My hair has
stopped falling and ail dandruff has dis
appeared since I found skookum root hair
grower. Ask your druggist about it.
Gents' Hat* Cleaned, Dyed and Pressed.
Hartley, hitter, 204 South Main stre't.
FOOS GAS ENBINE S
They cost less to operate than any other pow
er. First-class satisfaction. Call and see en
gine operate, or write for circular.
S. W. LUITWEILER,
200 N. Los Anareles St., Los Angeles.
8-4 3m d w
FLIES DIE
—TnEN—
"T. B."
INSECT POWDER
13 08BD.—
Fold in 2 oz. sprinkle-top tins, % lb, X lb, Ilb
and 6 lb cans.
Al a'l druggists and grocers.
MOTHS
Quickly destroyed and easily prevented
by using
TARINE.
SOLD IN CANS ONLY.
JMF~At all drug stores.
7. W, BRATJN tc, CO.,
6-22 lyr Wholesale Agent*.
ALL MEN
SUFFERING FROM
Nervous Debility
Lost or Failing Manhood I
Involuntary Emissions, Impotency, Mental
Worry, Personal Weakness, Loss of Memory,
Despondency, and all other Diseases oi Mind
and Body, produced by youthful follies and
: over-indulgence, quickly and permanently
cured
BY
DR. STEINHART'S
ESSENCE OF LIFE
THE GREAT VITALIZKBt
PRICK, $2.00 per bottle, or 6 bottles for 810;
or In Pill form at snme price. Call or write to
DR. STEINtIART, Room 12, 331« South
Spring struot, opposite Allen's Fnrniture Store,
Los Angeles, Cel.
SPECIAL and Infallible specifics Also pro
pared for Gonorrhoea, Gleet, Syphilitic and
Kidney and Bladder Troubles.
All communications strictly confidential and
private. Office hours: From S3 to 4 p.m.; Sun
days, from 10 to 12. 0-24 12m
STARR'S MI!
A Wonderful Success!
Ask Your Grocer for It; It Will
Please You !
A.F. MILLS, Sole Agent,
134 N. Los Angeles Si, Los Angeles.
- 7 17sututh3t
NO CAsiS OF DEFECTIVE VISION
Is too complicated for us. If yon have defec
tive eyes and value them, consult us first. We
guarantee cur fitting perfect, as our system is
the latest scientific one. Children's eyes should
be examined during school life. Thousands
sutler with headache which is often remedied
with properly fitted (lasses. Eyes examined
free of charge.
8. 0. MARSHTTTZ, Molentlflo Optician,
Established 1882,
181 N. Spring, opp. old Court House
■Taw** Don't forget the number *"Vl
MANICURING,
CRIMFING,
SHAMPOOING,
SINGEING
8P a c "thk bs wonder hair parlors
210 South Spring street.
Painless Dentistry
Fl he Gold Fillings,
jsf*PljP^^? t < ' IOWR and Bridge
AH operations pain-
J&t skt tkkth '* 8 -°°-
Stev.'ns k Sons,
j£fflTl*<to L' 4 Booms 18 and 10,
■saw** w _ * * Ma 107 N Bprlng 8t
C. F. HEINZEMAN,
Druggist & Chemist,
222 N. Main St., Los Angelea.
Prescriptions carefully compounded day or
night. B 3BU

xml | txt