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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, September 06, 1892, Image 2

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HARRISON'S LENGTHY EPISTLE.
His Letter of Acceptance Is a
Long One.
A Wordy Review of the Issues of
the Campaign.
A Labored Defense of the McKlnley Act
and Reciprocity, and Incidentally
a Large dob of Tally for
Mr. lllaiue.
By the Associated Press.
Washington, Sept. s.—President Har
rison today made public hia letter of ac
ceptance of the Republican nomination
for re-election. It contains eight thou
sand words, and ia an exhaustive review
of the political situation aa viewed from
the president's standpoint. Following
is the letter in part:
THE NOMINATION ACCEPTED.
Hon: W. McKlnley, jr., aud Others of the Com
mittee, etc::
Gentlemen —I now avail myself of the
first period of relief from public duties
to respond to the notification which you
brought me June 20th of my nomination
for the office cf president of the United
States by the Republican national con
vention. I accept the nomination, aud
am grateful for the approval expressed
by the convention of tne acta of the ad
ministration. I have endeavored, with
out wavering or weariness, as far
as the direction of public af
fairs was committed to me, to
carry cut the pledges made to
the people in 1888. If the policies of the
administration have not been distinct
ively and progressively American and
Republican policies, the fault has not
been in the purpose, but in the execu
tion. I shall speak frankly of the legis
lation of congress end of the work of the
executive departments. ... A vote
of a want of confidence is asked by our
adversaries ; and thiß challenge to a re
view of what has been done we promptly
and gladly accept. The great work of
the Fifty-first congress has been sub
jected to the revision of the Democratic
house of representatives, and ihe acts of
the executive department to its scrutiny
ami investigation. A Democratic na
tional administration was succeeded by
a Republican administration, and the
freshness of the events gives unusual
facilities for a fair comparison and judg
ment.
There Eeldom has been a time, I
think, when a change from the declared
policies of the Republican, to the de
clared policies of the Democratic party,
involved such seriouß results to the bus
iness interests of the country. A brief
review of what has been done, and of
what the Democratic party proposes to
do, will justify this opinion.
THE CURRENCY QUESTION.
The Republican party, during the
civil war, devised a national currency,
consisting of United Stateß notes, issued
and redeemable by the government, and
of national oank notes based upon the
security of United States bonds. A tax
was levied upon the issues of state
banks, and the intended result, that all
Buch issues Bhould be withdrawn,
was realized. There are men
among us now who never aaw
a state bank note. Notes furnished
directly or indirectly by the United
States have been the only and safe and
acceptable paper currency of the peo
ple. Bank failures have brought no
fright, delay or loss to bill-holders.
The note of an insolvent bank is aa good
aud current aa a treasury note, for the
credit of the United States is behind it.
Our money is all national money. I
might Bimoßt Bay international, for
these bills are not only equally and in
discriminately accepted at par in all the
Btatee, but in some foreign countries.
The Democratic party, if entrusted
with the control of the government, is
now pledged to repeal the tax on state
bank isßues, with a view to putting it
into circulation again, under Buch di
verse legislation as the states may
adopt. The result would be a flood of
local bank issues. Only those who, in
the yeurs before the war, experienced
the inconveniences and losses attendant
upon the use of such money, can appre
ciate what a return to that system in
volves. . . . Changes may become
necessary, hut our national system of
currency, safe aud acceptable through
out the whole country, ia the fruit of
bitter experience, and I am Eure our
people will uot consent to the reaction
ary proposal made by the Democratic
party.
OUR MERCHANT MAHI.VE.
Few Bubjecta have elicited more dis
cussion or exhibited more general inter
est than that of the recovery by the
United States of its appropriate share of
the ocean carrying trade. Thia subject
touches not only our pockets, but our
national pride. . . Thousands of im
migrants, annually, seeking homeß un
der our flag, have been denied a sight ol
it until they entered Sandy Hook, while
increasing thousands of American citi
zens, bent on European travel, have
each year stepped into foreign jurisdic
tion at, the New York docks. The mer
chandise balance of trade, which the
treasury books 6how, ia largely reduced
by the annual tribute which we pay for
freight and passage money. Great ships,
the fastest upon the sea, which are now
in peace profiting by our trade, are in a
secondary seuse war ships of their
respective governments, and in
time of war would, under existing
contracts with those governments,
speedily take on guns for which their
decks are already prepared, and enter
with terrible efficiency upon the work of
destroying our commerce. An undis
puted fact ia that the great steamship
lines of Europe were built up and are
now in part sustained by direct or indi
rect government aid, the latter taking
the form of liberal pay for carrying
mails, or of an annual bonuß given in
consideration of agreements to construct
the ships so as to adapt them for carry
ing an armament, and turn them over
to the government on demand, upon
specified terms. It is plain to every in
telligent American that if the United
States would have such lines, a similar
policy must be entered upon. The
fifty-first congress enacted such a law,
and under its beneficent influence six
teen American steamships, of an aggre
gate tonnage of 57,400 tons, and costing
1400,000,000 have been built or contracted
in American shipyards. In addition to
this, it is now practically certain that
we shall soon have, under the American
flag, one of the finest Bteamship lines
out of New York, for any European
port. This contract will result in the
construction, by American yards,of four
new passenger Bteamshipß of 10,000 tons,
coßting about $8,000,000, and will add to
our naval reserve six steamships, the
fastest upon the rrh, ...
The Democratic party found no place in
its platform for any reference to this
Biibject, and has shown its hostility to
the general policy, by refusing toextend
the appropriation made during the last
administration for ocean mail contracts
with American lines. ...
TIIE RECIPROCITY POLICY.
Another related measure, as furnish
ing increased ocean traffic for our ships
and of great permanent benefit to tbe
farmers and manufacturers, as well, is
the reciprocity policy declared by sec
tion 3 of the tariff act of 185)0, and now
in prac'ical operation with five natione
of Central and South America, San Do
mingo, the Spanish and British West
India islands and with Germany and
Austria, under special trade arrange
ments with each. The removal of the
duty on sugar, and the continuance of
coffee and tea upon the free list, while
giving great relief to our own people by
cheapening articles used increasingly in
every household, was also of such
enormous advantage to the countries
exporting these articles, as to suggest
that in consideration thereof, reciprocal
favors should be shown in their tariffs
to articles exported by us to their
markets.
GREAT CREDIT TO BLAINE.
Great credit is due to Mr. Blame for
the vigor with which he preesed this
view upon the country.
We have only begun to realize the
benefit of these trade arrangements.
The work of creating new agencies and
of adapting our goods to new markets,
has necessarily taken time, but the re
sults already attained are such, I am
sure, as to establish in popular favor
the policy of reciprocal trade upon the
free importation of such articles as do
not injuriously compete with the prod
ucts of our own faims, mines and facto
ries, in exchange for the free or favored
introduction of our products into other
countries.
The obvious efficacy of this policy is
that the increasing foreign trade of the
United States at once attracted the
alarmed attention of European trade
journals and boards of trade. The Brit
ish board of trade presented that gov
ernment a memorial asking for the ap
pointment of a commission to consider
the best means of counteracting what is
called the "commercial crusade of tbe
United Stateß." At a meeting, in
March, last, of the associated chambers
of commerce of Great Britain, the pres
ident reported that the exports from
Great Britain to the Latin-American
countries, during the last year, de
creased $25,750,000, and this was not
due to temporary causes, but directly to
the reciprocity policy of the United
States.
Germany and France have also shown
etartled appreciation of the fact that
the new and vigorous contestant has
appeared in the battle of markets, and
has already eecured important advan
tages. The most convincing evidence of
the tremendous commercial strength of
our position is found in the fact that
Great Britain and Spain found it neces
sary to make reciprocal ttade agree
ments with us for their West Jndia
colonies, and that Germany and Aus
tria have given us important conces
sions in exchange for the continued
free importation of their beet sugar pro
duction.
[The president then gives a few details
as to the increase in tbe trade of tbe
United States under reciprocity.]
DEMOCRATIC TARIFF REFORM.
The Democratic platform promises a
repeal of the tariff law containing re
ciprocity provision, and especially de
nounces as a sham that eection ot the
j law under which these trade arrange
ments have bten made If no issue
were involved in the campaign, this
alone would give it momentous import
ance.
Are the farmers of the great grain
growing states willing to surrender these
new, large and increasing markets for
their surplus? Are we to have nothing
in exchange for the free importation of
sugar and coffee, and at tbe same time
to dtstroy tbe sugar planters of the
south aud the beet sugar industry of the
northwest aud of the Pacific coast; or
are we to have the taxed sugar and
coffee, which a "tariff for revenue only"
necessarily involves, with the added loss
of the new markets which have been
opened ?
As I have shown, our commercial
rivals in Europe do not regard this reci
procity policy as a "sham," but as a
serious threat to a trade supremacy
they have long enjoyed. They would
rejoice, and, it prudence did not re
strain, would illuminate their depressed
manufactoring cities, over the new s that
the United States had abandoned ite
system of protection and reciprocity.
They see very clearly what the restric
tion of American products and trade,
and a corresponding increase of Euro
pean production and trade, would al
low, and I will not belive that what is
bo plain to them can be hidden from our
own people.
THE DOCTRINE OF PROTECTION.
The declaration of the platform in fa
vor of "the American doctrine of protec
tion" meets my most hearty approval.
The convention did not adopt a sched
ule, but a principle that ia to control all
the tariff schedules. There may be dif
ferences of opinion among protectionists
aa to the rate upon particular articles
necessary to effect an equalization be
tween wages abroad and at home. In
some not remote national campaigns tbe
issue has been, or, more correctly, has
been made to appear to be, between a
high and low protective tariff. Both
parties expressing solicitous regard
for the wages of our working
people and for the prosperity of every
domestic industry. But, under a,more
courageous leadership, the Democratic
party has now practically declared that,
if given power, it will enact a tariff law
without any regard to its effect upon the
wages or upon the capital invested in
our great iuduetriea.
The majority report of the committee
on platform to the Democratic national
convention at Chicago contaiiied this
clause : "That if custom house taxation
is levied upon articles of any kind pro
duced in this country, the difference be
tween the cost of labor here and abroad,
when Buch a difference exists, fully
measures any possible benefits to labor,
and an additional imposition of the ex
isting tariff will fall with crushing force
upon our farmers and wcrkingmen."
Here we have a distinct admission of
the Republican contention that Ameri
can workmen are advantaged by a tariff
,'rate equal to the difference between
home and foreign wages, and a declara
tion only against the alleged "addition
al impositions" of the existing tariff
law.
Again, this majority report further
declared: "But in making a reduction
in taxes, it is r-iot proposed to injure any
domestic induatrieß, but rather promote
their healthy growth. Moreover, many
industries have come to rely upon legis
lation for their succesßful continuance,
co that any change of the law must be
at every step regardful of the labor and
capital thus involved."
Here we have the admission that
many of our industries depend upon
protective duties "for successful con
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 6, 1892.
tinuance," and tbe declaration that tbe
tariff should be regardful of the work
men in such industries and of the in
vested capital. The overwhelming re
jection of these propositions, which had
before received the sanction of the
. Democratic national conventions, is not
more indicative of the new and more
courageous leadership to which the
party has now committed itself, than
tbe substitute which was adopted. This
substitute declares that protective duties
are unconstitutional, high protection,
low protection—all are constitutional.
A Democratic congress, holding this
view, cannot enact, nor a Democratic
president approve, any tariff schedule,
the purpose or effect of which is to
limit importations or give any advan
tage to American workmen or producers.
. . . There ia not a thoughtful buei
ness man in the country who does not
know that the enactment into law of the
declaration of the Chicago convention,
on the subject of tariff, would at once
plunge the country into business con
vulßion, such as it has never Been, and
there is not a thoughtful workingman
who does not know that it would at once
enormously reduce the amount of work to
be done in this country by the increased
importation that would iollow, and ne
cessitate the reduction of his wages to
the European standard. If any one
suggests that this radical policy will not
be executed if the Democratic party at
tains power, what shall be thought of
the party that ia capable of thus trifling
with the areat interests of the country V
The threat of euch legislation would be
only less hurtful than the fact. A dis
tinguished Democrat rightly described
thia movement as a challenge to the pro
tected industries to a fight of extermina
tion, and another such rightly expressed
the logic of the situation when he inter
preted the Chicago platform to be an in
vitation to all Democrats holding even
the most moderate protection views to
go into the Republican party.
And now a few words in regard to
THE EXISTING TARIFF LAW.
We are fortunately able to judge oi
its influence upon production and prices
by the market reports. The day of the
prophet of calamity has been succeeded
by that of the trade reporter. An ex
amination into the effect of the law
upon the prices of protected products,
and of the cost of Buch articles as enter
into the living of people of small means,
haß been made by the senate committee
composed of leading Benatorß of both
parties, with the aid of the best statis
ticians, and a report signed by all the
members of the committee, given to the
public. No Buch wide and "careful in
quiry has ever been before made.
[The president then quotes from the
report of the senate committee such
paragraphs as would seem to fortify the
Republican tariff policy.]
The ninth annual report of the chief
of the bureau of labor atatistica-of the
state of New York, a Democratic officer,
very recently issued, strongly corrobo
rates, as tc that state, the facta found
by the senate committee, in view of
this showing of an increase in wages, of
reduction in the cost of articles of com
mon necessity, and of the marked ad
vance in the prices of agricultural pro
ducts, it is plain that thia tariff law has
not imposed burdenß, but conferred
benefits upon the farmer and the work
ingman.
[the president then goes on, at length
to show how, under the McKinlev act
American tin-plate production, the
manufacture of pearl buttons and other
industries have been built up, and con
tinues :]
The act gives to miners protection
against foreign silver bearing lead ores,
the tree introduction of which threat
ened the great mining industries of the
Rocky mountain states, and to wool
growers protection for their fleeces and
fl. cks, which saved them from further
and disastrous decline. The house of
representatives at its last session paßsed
a bill placing these ores and wool upon
the free list. The people of the west
will know how destructive to their
property these measures would be.
Thia tariff law gives employment to
many thousands of American men and
women and will each year give employ
ment to increasing thousands. Its re
peal would throw thousands out of em
ployment and give work to others only
at reduced wageß. The appeals of the
free traders to the workingman are
largely addressed to hia prejudices or to
passion, and are not infrequently pro
nouncedly communistic. The new De
mocratic leadership rages at the
employer and seeks to com
municate hia rage to the em
ploye. I greatly regret that all
employers of labor are not just and con
siderate, and that capital sometimes
takeß too large a share of the profits.
But I do not see that these evils
would be ameliorated by a tariff
policy, the first necessary ef
fect of which is a severe
Continued ou Fifth page.
Dandruff Is due to an enfeebled state of
the skin. Hall's Hate Renewer quickens the
nutri ivc functions o? the skin, healing and
preventing the lorranllon ot dandrull
NOTICE.
A NOTED HEaLtII
ry Valley, located in the tine forests of San
Jacinto mountains. The Mitchell House sets the
best table, has the best rooms, and hauls baggage
free, hos Angeles references, 0. H. Hunter,
208, and C. Cooper, 220 West First street
8-5 cod MKS. MITJHELL, Propr.
-CHRISTIAN SCIENcITTeijTurK- REV.
\J Frank E. Mason, C. 8. I)., pasior of the
Fir-tt Churoh oi Christ (Scientist) of Brooklyn,
N. V., will deliver a free lecture on Christian
Science in Illinois hall, Monday, September
12 h, at S p.m. All are cordially invited.
Questions from the audience will h • received
and answered at the close of the lecture. 9-4 9t
NYONE HAVING PLEDGES AT THE PEO
ple's Loan Office must redeem the same
within thirty days from date or they will be
sold- 9 4 5t
NOTICE OF REMOVAL - D08INS0N~&
Vetter have removed their real estate fire
and life insurance office to 105 South Broad
way, near First street, S UO lm
OTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY WATER
Comr.any will strictly enforce the following
rule: The hours for sprinkling arc between 0
and 8 o'clock a.m. and 6 and 8 o dock pm
For a violation of the above regulation the water
will he shut off and a fine of $2 will be charged
before water will be turned on again. S-17?l
T H E GREAT INDIAN RHEUMAIT, CURE
X is the greatest discoverj-mada wnhiu the
last 100 years in patent medicines. |. or ga i e
by a'l leading druggists, * 10 17 01 ly
I OK KXCIIA.MiK.
\\T ANTED TO FoTTS
TV acres in Eycarrore cafion, m<i,r iMendale,
12 acreu under cultivation, small honse 150
2-year-old fig trees, 75 apricot and r each trees
in bearing, lor 10l snd house of 5 to 7 rooms in
city: willing to give or take a few hundred dol
larstomake trade equitable. Address W S
L„ this office. a-30 tf
TiiOß SALE OR TRADE—A GOOiTTayInG
X I livery business lv a good town, doing a
good busine-s. Will sell cheap f or raih or
trade for real estate. Address, B. J F this of
flße - 8-21,1 m
AND BUILDEBB.
CONRAD
ou* and asphalt paving. 227 W. First st.
9-1 12m
T\H. BROWN, GRADUATE OF BISLLEvIjE
XJ Hospital Medical college. Special atten
tion paid to diseases of women and children,
and all chronic diseases. Room 3, Riiss House,
corner Los Angeles and First streets, telephone
721, Los Angeles, Cal. 7-22 ly
Intelligent Headers will notice that
Titt's Pills
aro not "irarrnnterf in cure" all clause*
of disease*;, but only such na result
t roiis ts disordered liver, via t
Vertigo, Headache, Dyspepsia,
Fevers, Costiveness, Bilious
Colic, Flatulence, etc.
For these they are not warranted (n
-faUil.lr, but are as nearly sous it In po*.
slble to make a remedy. Price, Suets.
SOLO EVEKYWULEIiE.
WANTED—HELP.
Agency, successor to Martin <& Co. and
Petty & Hummel. 20. Weft Second stree', tele
phone 40, and 131 to 135 West First street, tel
ephone 509.
For the following orders apply at 207 West
Second street:
General work—Two fruit ranch hands, $26
etc ; orchardist, $2a etc.; milker, $30 etc.;
much hand $25 uc.; man and wife, $30 etc.;
elderly man, ?15 etc.: boy on ranch, $12 etc.;
office boy, $15; man for pri vato place, $20 etc ;
lmruessinaser, $2 50; blacks., ith 'carriage),
#3; six-horse tearr.sler, $30 etc.; shop black
smith, $2.r>o; men to cut greasewood: grape
pickers, $1 etc. per day; city teamsters, $1 etc.
per ray.
Mrs Scott's household department is at 207
West Second S'reet Bhe wants a largo number
of bousegirls and cooks for cltv and couutry.
Mr. Petty is ln charge of the hotel depart
ment at 131 West First street. There are sev
eral good orders there, and the household de
partment at that office has a large number of
first-cla** plat es on the list.
PETTY, HUMMEL & CO.. 207 W. Second Bt ,
tel. 40; 131 W. First Bt., tel. 509,
ANTED—HELP—MALE AND FEMALE—
We waut men for all kinds of wor*; wo
men to cook and do housework, snd chamber
work. Give us a trial. You will find we do
what is right evervtimo. If yon want help of
any kind we can supply you with people having
No. 1 references, bend in your orders and
oblige, F. G. CHABE, W. Filßtst. 9-6 lt
AITANTED-TO CARE FOR A 20 OR 40
tf acre f uit ranch for two years; pay, part of
crep; ouly first-class ranch accepted; refer
ences. Address RANCH, box 30, this office.
9 2 5t
\I7ANTKD— ALL NEKDINO HELP FREE—
T t Employment or any information, address
K. NITTINGER'o BUREAU, established 1880.
Office, Sl9!-. South Spring street: residence,
451 South Hope Btreet, corner Fifth, Los Ange
les, Cal. Telephone 113. 816 ti
THOROUGH AND EXPERIENCED
1 bookkeepers and Btenographirs apply at
WOODBURY COLLEGE, 245 South i-priug
street. 8 14 3m
WANTED—SITUATIONS.
Vir ANTED—si TUA HON BY A NEWLY
ti married cnuplein pleasaut family: woman
is obliging and an exceptionally nice cook;
men is a thorough horseman and gardener:
moderate wages ln right placo. Address for
ono week, F. X., box 60, this office. 9 0 lt
AIT ANTED—AN ITALIAN OF LONG KX
TT perience In citrus culture, olives, etc.,
would like to lake charge of work in sn or
ch m. or of a lnnre plantation he will guaran
tee a lapid improvement iv an oichard; no
need ol spraying or fumigating the trees for
killingscale. Address ORCHARDIST, box 60,
thjsoftoe, 8 13 tit 8 20 w lm
AY ANTED—MISCELLANEOUS.
where he can work for bis board and go to
business college; can milk cow, also good with
horses. Addicts, M. 60, Hkhai.d effice, Lob
Angeles. s5 lot
AIT ANTED—PKTUREB TO FRAME, i HEAP-
T> est place at BURNS'. 256 South Main st.
1-27 tf
FOB BENT—BOUSES.
I*OB BENT —HOUSES ALL OVER THE 01 i'Y
' C. A, Sumuer A Co., 107 S. Broadway.
4 12
FOB BENT—BOOMS.
FOR RENT—NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS
for housekeeping, very clo'e iv; ground
floor; bath; no children. 211 W. Fifth st. 9 6 2t
FOR RENT—COMFORTABLE FURNISHED
mom« for two gentlemen, $8 per mouth;
healthy situation 712 Sand street. 9-3 7t
FOB rRENT~TiLREE _ FURNISHhD OR UN~"
furnished ro ms for housekeeping. 207
North Olive street. 8-26 tf
ITIOR RENT—THE BARKER, 449>4 SOUTH
JD Spring street, elegantly inrnished rooms.
-?-12 tf
b'OK RKNT—FINE SUNNY ROOMS. FUB
nished. Hotel de Grenoble, 205 Aliso and
Lpy Angeles streets 6-3 tf
FOB BENT-MISCELLANEOUS.
I7IOR REST—AT WOMAN'S EXCHANGE,
1 Potomac book, half of liont of store, with
large window, $35 monthly. 9 3 tf
LOST
lOST— A BASKET VALISE FIFTH StT.
_ Broadway or Sixth street, September 4!h.
Finder please leave at this office. 9-B lt
10ST— FRIDAY NIGHT A GARTF.R AND
-j garter button, engraved "'Maud Irt m Hal."
Reward of $5 if returned to 203 Alameda
street. 9-4 tf
OST—A PARROT RETURN TO 151 N.
j Spring .t ■. .■• nnd I. ■ i.-.y. r.-'ed. 9 I 3t
STB AYE D OB STOLEN.
TH\)im)—l FROM
ica mountains, near Wol'sklll ranch, dark
red buil, no horns; very wild; Spanish brand
ou left hip; points whiti. Send any informa
tion to uuder-igned, E. A. DE CAMP. 116 West
First street. Lp»b Angelas 9-4 cod 2w
FEBSONAL.
P~1^8~0Nl^I^c7)Fli ;
onr giant coffee, roaster, Java and Mocha,
35c lb; Mountain coffee, 25c; Peerleßs coffee,
20c: sugars, 15 lbs gr.nutated, $1; IB lbs
brown, $1; 6 lbs rolled oats or wheat, 25c; 4
lbs best rice, 25c; 0 lbs sago or tapioca. 25c;
10 Its Lima beans, 25c; 3 pkgs Btarch or corn
starch, 25c; can milk, 10c; can deviled ham,
sc; 5 cans saidlnes, 25c; 2 lbs corned beef,
15c; 5 lb» Japan tea, $1; can coal oil, 80c: best
bacon, 15c; pork, 12c; brooms, 15c; wooden
palls, 15c; frnit jars SOc dozen. ECONOMIC
STORES, 305 South Spring street. __
I)KKSONAL— RALPHS BROS —GOLD BAR
Flour, $1.20; city flour, 85c; brown sugar,
19 lbs $1: granulated sugar, 15 lbs $1; white
sugar, 16 lbs $1; 5 boxes sardines, 25c; 3 cans
fruit, 50c; 50 bars soap, |1; eastern gasoline,
80c, snd coal oil, 80c; 2 lbs corned beef, 15c;
lard, 10 lbs, 90c; 5 ibs, 50c. 601 South Spring
street, corner Sixth. 12-2 tf
I PERSONAL - W. W. TAYLOR, LAWYER,
room 13 Bryson-Boncbrake block. Pro
bate aud insolvency law a specialty. Advice
free. 7 23 ly
PERSONAL— 81L VER COIN.THE VERY BEST
L Southern California extra flour, 11.36; white
sugar, 18 lbs $1; rice, sc; sardines, sc; 3 cans
corn, 25c; 1 gallon golden syrup, 30c; 2-lb"can
choice corn beef, 15c; 2 lbs choice cheese, 25c;
10 cakes gilt-edged soap, 25c; 1 lb salaratus,
sc; choice sweetened condensed nilk, 15c.
All other good groceries at low prices. Free de
livery in city. Postal card orders promptly at
tended to al WHEELER'S "RIGHT PLACE
BT0BX8," 901 East First street, on cable line.
3-13 tf
ARRIAGES ANNULLED.
probate, Insolvency law, specialty: advice
tree; strictly confidential; without publicity;
15 years' experience. W. W. HOLCOMB, att'y,
211 West First st, 7-20 T2m
NCLE SAM'S WINK CELLARS AT E.
FLEUR'S, wines and liquors, 404 406
North T.oh Angeleg street. 6-3 tf
medical personals.
oiTladieTolTi??^
Compound Is the greatest medical discov
ery of tho age. Absolutely sure and safe. Every
bottle guaranteed. Write to the Prophylactic
Compound Company. Fresno, Cal., for a de
scriptive circular, which contains information
that may save you years of Buffering, and per
haps your life. Circulars and the preparation
can be obtained Irom all druggists. F. W.
BRAUN & CO., distributing agents for South
ern Call foruia. 7-16
InBENCH TANSY WAFERS—LADIES WILL
1 find these wafers just what they need, and
can be depended upon every time to" give relief.
Safe and sure. Send by matl, sealed securely.
Price. S2 per box. Emerson Drug Co.. manu
facturers San Jose, Cal., aud for sale only by
GODFREY & MOORE, 108 8. Spring st,, ana
H. G. VOECKKLL, corner Fifth and Main.
3-20 cod 12m
ARRIF.D LADIEB—SEND 10 CENTS FOR
'■Infallible Safeguard" (uo medicine, no
deception); just what you want. LADIES'
BAZAR, Kansas City Mo. 7-8 6m
PATENTS, COPYRIGHTS, ETC.
block. Tel. 347. Los Angeles. 11-22 tf
BARGAINS IN RKAL ESTATE.
I~foß CO KNKK LOT,
1 209x214; fine site for a home: must sell;
come and see it. Apply at No. 045 Union ave
nue. 9-6 lm
li>Oß BAI K-KIOHI-ROOM HOUSE, ONE
! half block from elecirlc road; $20 per
:__orith for 85 months; no cash, no Interest:
others as Rood. WEBB & GRILLEY, 110
South Broadway. 9-1 tf
OR SALE-FIVE HOUSES) AND LOTS IM
good localities; will sell cheap to a party
meaning business, as the owners wish to go
away. Por more particulars Inquire of M.
MARQCEZ, 645 North Main street. B-12 lm
REATEST~BARGAIN YBT-UORNEK LOT
on Broadway; owner must sell. Apply
340 8. Brosdway. 7-1 tt
FOR SALE—COUNTBY PBOPEBTY.
F?0il
B Santa Anita Rancho, acres, good
soil; water piped; perpetual water right; con
venient to raihoad crossing and station; 45
minutes from Los Angeles. Call or address
H. A. UNRUH, Arcadia, Cal. 8-31 tf
FOR SALE — 20 ACRsS OF
fOOVU he.ilthy peach trees, in bearing;
new house, st-bla, waterworks; 2 American
horsos: 1 covr; new fruit wagon, surry, har
ness and fir".!!'. 1 ; tools, all go with the place;
10 milts Ion LosAas-les ln San Fernando
valley. Will take ptrtiss out, by addressing
UEO M. BALSSS".y. Lsa Angeles. 8-25-lm
ATTERSON'S KAj:o!i-THIB FINS RANCH
in Ventura connty iv for sale at $275,000;
$100,000 cash, balance la dye annual Install
ments, at 8 per cent interest. H contains 5400
acres, the mo-t of which is Sltt citss bean and
corn laud; is fsBCH KtCiS nnOsXtj has
houses and barus and nua BOwinS woll;20C
acres in alfalfa, whieii growa wltaost lir'SM
tion. Adjoining lands are wlliaa ia tracts ut
$125 and $'200 per acre. Will pay IC r*t Cf'J*
interest ou investment to rcr-i. jxvx.au on?
mile from Huenemc. This irr"—=3« to J,
D. Patterson, ot New York, Vio la Vv .errs old
and In poor health, and is i>~.«. :..c it -t M'.uoh
less than its worth. Adofess __S"<sl: &
BARNS, sole agents, Ventura, Cal. ~-Sl Ir;
IpOR SALE CHFaP—t>!X TO KIoTkT AC RSS
' near city limits; 9-yesr-old full
apricots, prunes and peaches; paying $130 psr
acre per annum; good house and bam. rent' Bfi
for $3 per month; railroad station on tha las'):
terms easy. Apply to or address OWNER, 53
Bryson-Bonebrake building. 6-i 3 tf
FOB SALE—MISCELLANEOUS.
tiff pups. 5 months old; sire Amado. Can
be Been at 1047 South Main street, or inquire at
121 wtst Second street. 9-4 Lit
Tj*oß SALE-LIGHT TOP BUGGY, ALMOST
JL" new. Inquire 8. E, comer N. Spring aud
Court sts. _____ 8 31
I SALK—AT A B.*RGAIN—ALL IHE
1 type and other material necessary for tho
printing of a newspaper in the French lan
guage. Inquire of GEO. P. I'HIBBS. fourth
floor, new Court House. 8-31 lm
I*OR HALE-OLD PAI-KRS IN O.UANTI.
! ties to suit, at this offlco.
EDUCATIONAL.
SUMMER SCHOOL AT THE
WOODBURY BUSINESS COLLEGE,
245 t>. ?piir_g st, Los Augeleß.
School in session till summer. Thorough
training in the ccmmercial aud English
branches, penmanship, O.orlhand and tetegra
f>hy. Call or write forour new illustrated cata
ogui. P. A. HOUSH, PrerMeut.
W. G. FELKER, Vice President.
7- 6 3m K. C. WILSON. Secretary.
SPECIAL SUMMER SESSION
£3 —WILL OPUS AT—
THE LOS ANGELES BUSINESS COLLEGE,
144 South Main Street, June 27th.
Ono of the most successful teachers of the
public schools has been employed for the sum
mer. Glasses will be formed to accommodate
these who wish to make up back work, who
wish to advance a grade, or to take up any
spccisl work, such as penmanship, bookkeep
ing, chcrthand, typewriting, etc. For lull par
ticulars call at college office, 144 South Main.
3. R. cSH.VDKR, President. F. W. KELSEY,
Ylco-Prejiaeai. I. N. IN? KEEP, Secretary.
810 01 lyr
AY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, ''
410 West Tenth street.
(Between Grand avenuo and Olive street, on
electric and Cible routes.)
OPENS TUESDAY, BEITEMBKR 22D.
Alice Knight Parsons, A. B.; Jeannle Whit
ney li. in.en, principals
Formerly principals of New York Avenue In- \
stltute, Brooklyn, N. Y. |
Preparatory and academic departments. .
Courses of study iv English br.iuehes, lan
Bulge*, physical culture, music and art. Col
lege preparation a specialty.
Frinc pals may be consulted at school build
ing dally, between the hours of 10 and 12. 9-4 I
HE MARLBOROUGH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS,
West Twenty third street. Will reopeu
September 20, 1t?92. 0-0 lm
ST. PAUL'S MILITARY RCHOOL,
Opens September 15th,
GRAND AYE. BET. SIXTH and SEVENTH STS.
Pre pares tor universities and scientific schools;
also primary department; catalogue on appli
cation. P. 0. box 519. 8-26 lm
H RISTIAN SCIENCE-REV. FRANK E.
Mason, C. 8. D., full course graduate of tho
Massachusetts Metaphysical College and pas
tor of the First Church of Christ (Scientist) of
Brooklyn. N. V., wil) teach classes in Chri-tiau
Science in Southern California during Septem
ber and October The first class will begin at
Pssadcna September 14th. The second class
will bo taught in Los Anvelcs. Terms for tui
tion satisfactory in all cases. Applications ro
eeived by JAMES R. TOWNSEND, 9 Dowuey
block, Los Angeles. 8-28 lm
NIVERBITY OF SOUTHERN CVLIFOR
nia—The fall term of the college of liberal
arts whi begin on Wcdnefday, September 21st,
'lhree full college courses, covering lour years
each. Seminary course of three years, prepar
ing the student for college. Departments of
instrumen.al and vocal music, art and elocn
tion, stenography, typewriting and bookkeep
ing. Terms reasonable Advantages the very
best. For full particulars call on or address
vice president, W. X MATTHEW, D. D., Uni
versity Floce, Loa Angeles. 8-28 25t
UDLAM SCHOOL OF ORATORY AND
Arts will open October 10th. 7-8 tf
SCHOOL OF THE SISTERS OF CHARITY.
(Boarding and day school.) This institu
tion will reopen on the first Monday of Sep
tember. The course of Instruction embraces
tho English branches, the French, Spanish, and
German languages; vocal and Instrumental
music, plain and ornamental needlework. For
particulars apply to Sisters oi Charity, corner
of Boyle and Stephenson avenues, Los Auge
les, Cal. 8-20 lm
MF. MASON, TEACHER OF PIANO AND
• organ. Address Station F. 8-25 lmo
rpHK OCCIDENTAL COLLEGE OFFERS
X thorough instruction at reasonable rates;
four courses. For particulars and catalogue
address J. M. McPHERRON, president, Station
B, Loa Angeles. 8 19 lm
ST. VINCENT'S COLLEGE, GRAND AYE.,
Los AngeDs, Cal.—A boarding and day
school for young men and boys; course col'ege
and commercial, with a preparatory depart
ment: board, lodging, etc.. and tuition in all
branches for session of ten months, $280; day
pupils, tuition, $5 per month. For circular or
lnlormation, apply to the PRESIDENT. Fall
term begins Monday, September 5th 1 8-17 lm
lOS ANGELES CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC
j and Art: open during summer. MRS.
EMILY J. VALENTINE, president, 648 South
Olive Btreot. 8-14 ly
BE' MONT HALL, FIRST AND BELMONT
avenue, boarding and day school for girls
and young ladies; superior location; thorough
instruction; best facilities for the study of
musls, art, elocution, etc. Fall term opens
September 13th.
8- 7 lm HORACE A. BROWN, Principal.
AWILLHARTITZ, MUSICAL STUDIO,
• room 37, California Bank B'ld'g. 813 ly
MISS MARSH'S SCHOOL —A BOARDING
and day school for girls, incorporated.
The fifth school year begius September 21st.
For circulars address 1340 and 1342 S Hope
St.. Principals, Miss A S, Marßh and Miss F.
C. Shoecraft. 7-31 2moa
INDERGARTEN TRAINING SCHOOL WILL
reopen October 6th. Address MRS. N. D.
MAYHEW, 670 W. Twenty-third street. 7-9 tf
rpHK LONGLXY SHORTHAND INSTITUTE,
JL the oldest and best. Pupils assisted to
situations. Bprlng and First streets. 0-26 tl
TEACHERS' CLASS PREPARING FOR
county examination. Positions for govorn
esses and teachers. 120* 8. Spring. 12-25 tf
REAL ESTATE AGENCIES.
">L». NOLAN." Q. A. SMITH.
NOLAN & SMITH, REAL ESTATE AND
General Business Agents, sell orange
orchards, walnut orchards, deciduous fruiv
orchards, olive orchards, dairy or farm ranches,
fine city residences, hotels, lodging houses,
grocery stores, hardware business, fruit stands,
cigar stsiids, meat markets, saloons, bakeries,
restaurants, and all kinds of mercantile.busi
ness; pilces from $100 to $250,000. Loans
negotiated. Office, 228 W. Second St., Hollen
beck block, Los Angeleß. Cal. Telephone 440.
Free carriage to see property. 7-3 3m
AKSTKACTS.
psny of Los Angeles, northwest corner of
Franklin and New High streets. ml 7 tf
AIWI7SKMENTB.
Under tbe direction of Ar. Hayman.
McLain & Lehman, Managers,
Tw Sn1 y ghts ( SEPT. Ud 8. i.n w d«iY
Engagement of the popular comedian,
SOL. SMITH RUSSELL 1
Appearing ln two of hii latest plays.
Wednesday Evening,
A POOK RELATION I
Thursday Evening,
PIACirilL VALLBIM "":
Seats ready Monday morning, at 10 o'clock.
SULLIVAN
vs.
CORBETT.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1892.
CAFE ROYAL, UNDER LOS ANGELES
THEATER.
RETURNS READ AND POOLS 80LD.
A direct wire with the New Orleans Club
ring, giving the full details of the fight by
rounds, by arrangement with Ihe Postal Tele
graph Company. Doors, open at 6p m. 9-4 4t
ATHLETIC PAKK~ •
Seventh and Alameda.
SCHEDULE CALIFORNIA LEAGUE.
BASEBALL"'!j
IOS ANGELES VS. OAKLAND.
Watch the new battery, M'NAB and BALDWIN.
WEDNESDAY | THURSDAY I FRIDAY,
BATURDAY I SUNDAY,
GREAT GAME ON ADMISSION DAY.
LADIES' DAY FRIDAY.
THE
Corner First and Spring streets.
( Family aud Ladles' entrance on First St.)
PROFES9ORROMANDY
W ITH HIS ORCHESTRA
Will tender every day. from 12 to 1:30 p.m.
(during lunch hour),
A CONCERT,
Also every evening from 7:30 p.m to 12 m.
The best commercial lunch in the city from
11 a.m. till 2 p.m., and from 5 to 7 p.m
A la carte from tip.m. to 12 m. 9-0 lm
NEW VIENNA BUFFET.
114 and 110 court street.
F. KKRKOW, Proprietor.
Family Entrance. Family Departments.
FREE REFINED ENTERTAINMENT AND
CONCERT EVERY EVENING.
First, appears nee of MI9S HATTIE MERTONB,
Seriocomic; MISS SYDNEY BARRY
MORE, soprano; MISS IiESSIE
SEARLE, the highly ac
complished Contralto.
MR. VAL VINO, the American Japanese Jug
gling Marvel.
And reappearance of the Berth Family, MISS
MARGUERITE BERTH, Directress.
FINE COMMERCIAL LUNCH from 11 am. to
2 p m.. and from 0 to 7 p.m.
A - LA - CARTE - AT - ALL - HOURS.
The only place for Import, d Bavarian beers
on draught, and Berlin Weiss beer; also Letup's
Extra Pale aod Buffalo. 4-3 ti
W. BARRETT,
CANDIDATE FOR
SHERIFF,
Subject to the decision of the Democratic
County Convention.
FINANCIAL.
MONEY
in any amounts on all kinds of personal
'' property and collateral security, on plauos with
out removal, diamonds, jev elry, sealskins, bi
cycles, carriages, libraries, or any property of
value; also on furniture, merchandise, etc., ln
warehouses; partial payments received, money
without delay; private offices for consultation;
will call If desired. VV. E. DeGROOT, Manager,
rooms 2, 3 and 4, No. 114 8. Spring St., opposite
Nadeau hotel. 7-29 tf
lOANS77ANDB PER CENT. BRADSHAW
J BROS., 101 South Broadway. 8-16 6m
G~B. ROBINSON 7 LOANS; 7 PEjTcENT;
city and county property. 213 West First
street. 8-13 3m
ONEY TO LOAN AT 8 PER CENT; ANY
amount. M. P. SNYDEU, J39 South
Bioadway. 8-13 6m
M' ONEY TO LOAN ON COUNTRY AND
city property: lowestrates. W. R. BURKE,
notary public, 169 North Spring sireei.B-13 6m
6 ""PER CENTFIDKLITY SAVINGS AND LOAN.
Rooms, California Bank building. 216 tf
ONEY TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS, JKWEL
ry, watches, pianos, sealskins, live stock,
carriages, bicycles and all kinds of personal and
collateral security. LEE BROS, 402 S. Spring.
TF YOU WANT MONEY WITHOUT DELAY,
X no commission, at prevailing rates of inter
est, see fcecurity Savings Bauk, 148 S. Main St.
8 1 If
TO A N.
T)OINDfXTJCB & LIST,
JL Second st.. loan money on good security at
reasonable rates. Farm loans a specialty. If
you wish to lend or borrow, call on us. 8-17 6m
BETTB & SILENT HAVE MONEY TO LOAN
on improved city or country property; low
Interest. Second and Broadway. 8-18 6m
E HAVE MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL
estate security, or will purchase secured
notes. GRIFFIN & BILLINGS, 136 South
Broadway. 8 18 tf
ONEY TO LOAN—A. R. FRA9ER AF: D.
Lantcrman. 139 8. Bmadway. 817 6m
EXCUBSIONS.
j to all points; tickets bought and sold. 213
South Spring street, Hollenbeck Hotel block.
Member American Ticket Brokers' Association.
UNION PACIFIC TOURIST EXCURSIONS
every Wednesday by the old reliable Union
Pacific, also European steamship agency. For
tickets and reservation, apply to G. F. HERB,
229 South Spring street, Los Angeles Theater
building. 0-6 lm
H~AMM'S RAILWAY AND 81EAMBHIP
Ticket Office, 122 W. Second street, next
to Pacific Coast Steamship Company's office.
Railroad tickets bought, sold and exchanged.
9-22-91 lyr
U. JUDBON A CO.'S EXCURSIONS EAST
• every Wednesday vis, Salt Lake City and
Denver. Tourist car., to Chicago and Boston.
Manager ln charge. Office, 212 8. Spring st.
6-1 tt
IMPROVED EXCURSION CAR SKRVIOBS
the Santa Fe route, shortest through car line
to the east; daily through trains to Chicago;
special family tourist sleeping car excursions
for Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago and New
York personally attended through to Boston by
Santa Fe excursion conductors, For cheapest
tickets and full information apply to any agent
Southern Calllornla Ry, and City Ticket Office
Santa Fe Rome, 129 N. Spring st„ Loe Angeles.
PHILLIPS' EXCUBSIONS VIA DENVERAND
Bio Grande raUway and the Great Book
Island route leave Los Angeles every Tuesday.
Personally conducted through to Chicago and
Boston. Office. No. 138 South Spring St. 1 U
HONOLULU TOURS—HUGH B. RICK, SPB
clal agent Oceanic S S. Co. Office: 134
W, Second st: P.O. Box 679. 13-4 tl
' architect.
» Broadway. 8-7 ly
BURGESS jTrEEVE, ARCHITECT, BBTAB.
lished for the past 10 years ln Los Angeles.
Rooms 8 and 9 (second floor), Ferret block, cor.
verßpring and Talid streets. 3-2 ly

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