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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, October 05, 1892, Image 9

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LABOR NOT DECEIVED
PECK'B FIGURES REJECTED BY
WORKINGMEN.
Republican Expectations Doomed to T)U
appolntmont—Worklngmeu Know That
McKinley Ha* Not Helped Them—What
They Say About Peck* Figure*.
Evidence is multiplying that Commis
sioner Peck's report is failing of effect
in precisely the quarter where the Re
publicans had hoped that it would
strengthen their cause most. Republic
an editors hailed the publication of
Peck's figures with headlines suitable
for announcing the arrival of the mil
lennium and framed to catch the eye of
the workingmeu, but the workingmen
are far too well informed aa to their own
condition to be imposed upon by figures
given under pledge of secrecy by pro-'
tected manufacturers. Workingmen do
not need to wade through pages of sta
tistics to find out whether their wages
have been increased.
We are beginning to hear from work
ingmen in many trades, and they utterly
reject Peck's figures and particularly
his conclusions iv favor of the McKin
ley tariff. Thus Matthew Barr, a tin
and sheet iron worker of Now York,
says: "What strikes mo as very peculiar
is the figures on the building trades.
They seem so incongruous that I must
pause before Igo any further. There is
scarcely a strike in this line but has
bettered its condition since 1889. And
yet with all this tho returns show a de
crease in wages of $1)0,829.
"This industry is ouside the reach of
the tariff, and whatever figures may be
H\t down there is only one thing that
hi ' gained it any advantages, and that
ia its organizations. Every concession
has been fought inch by inch. Where
tho tariff does affect any branch of the
trade, such as mine, we have certainly
Buffered. No tin and sheet iron worker
in the city, to my knowledge, and 1
know them nearly all, has yet used a
sheet of native tin. Before the McKin
ley bill was passed we had considera
ble work on tin roofs. In many cases
gravel roofs had an equal competition
with us, but since the higher duty on
tin was imposed in every case where
a gravel roof can be utilized it takes the
place of tin, and there is less work for
us. We have been injured by the tariff
and on* wages may have decreased, but
the other trades are not so affected, and
I believe they have been individual
gainsrs."
George Warner, of the Honsesmiths'
union and the Central Labor union,
says: "You can make figures prove
anything you like; I am looking for the
men of some trade who will show me
that their wages have been raised by
the tariff. If any trade has increased
its pay you can rely upon its being on
account of organization. Look at our
trade 1 We work on the buildings and
are not affected by the tariff, but the
men who manufacture the iron and
steel are highly protected. During the
past four years the men who have been
protected have been reduced in wages
and we have been obtaining an increase.
Mr. Peck's returns scarcely seem con
sistent. He gives decreases in wages
and production in building brick, tile
and sewer pipe, but in cement, lime and
plaster there is a vast increase. As the
business of one is totally dependent on
the other, and one could not be brisk
without the other, his figures certainly
need some explanation."
James P. Archibald, a prominent
leader in the Central Labor union, says:
"His statistics of the trade I am most
interested in—the paper hanging trade
—have been to me ludicrous. There ia
not a thinking man in the labor circles
in this city today, particularly in the
building construction line, who cannot
refute, so far as his own particular trade
is concerned, the statements of Mr.
Peck. I know of my own knowledge
that in the most skilled branch of the
trade of manufacture of wall paper,
which is block cutting, and which is
very highly protected, the men who
formerly earned twenty-one to twenty
four dollars per week are now, and
since 1888 have been, working at con
siderably less than twenty dollars. The
McKinley bill has had a deleterious
rather than a beneficial effect on the
wages in this branch of the trade."
The Young; Men's Movement.
The campaign of 1884, which resulted
in the election of Grover Cleveland to
the presidency, was remarkable among
other things for its movement of young
men in support of the Democratic can
didate.
The present campaign bids fair to sur-
Cthat of 1884 in the respect noted,
er before in the history of political
organizations in this country has there
been so earnest and widespread a senti
ment of party enthusiasm generated
among the young Democracy, many of
whom will exercise the suffrage for the
first time. Nor is it merely a party
ebullition. The party of Cleveland is
$he party of reform, and in it the san
guine spirits of the young men of the
country are strongly attracted. Tho
organization of young men's Democratic
clubs goes on at a marvelous rate.
Young men are coming to the front in a
greater degree than ever before as local
leaders, orators and campaigners.
It is surely a healthy and hopeful sign
of the times, and it induces the belief
that the political salvation of this coun
try will be wrought out by its young
men.
New Points for McKlnley's Speech.
The Iron Age contains two announce
ments which Major McKinley will not
be apt to include in the next delivery of
lib car&tiaign speech. One of these is a
«tato»wnt from Pittsburg that the
''rougbe**" (a class of workmen in the
iron mills) have decided to accept the re
duction of 10 per cent, in their wages
against which they have Jong contended.
The other is that the plant of the Owens
boro (Ky.) Wheel company has been of
fered for sale by the American Wheel
trust. Thus does Republican tariff pro
mote the interests of workingmen.
There Is no excuse for any man to appear in
socle'v with a grizily beard sin c the intro
duction of Buckingham's Dye, which colon a
natural brown or black.
FnirouU* California Industries
By ordering P. F. Double Extra Brown Stoat,
superior to any foreign made stout and porter,
Jacob Adloff, agent.
Bnmmer lap dusters at For 1 s old reliable sad-
bouse, Sls North Los Angelea street.
CDS ANGEtES ' HERALTT: WEDNESDAY MORNING, OCTOBfiI. 5, WS.
TEMPORARY HOBBIES.
The Instinct In Human future That
finds Expression in Fads.
A fad is described in the dictionaries
as a "trivial fancy, adopted and pursued
for a time with irrational zeal." There
is always a strong desire among certain
people to take up some fad or other that
shall distiuguiwh them from other peo
ple;. They are usually intelligent, but
have more or lees a spice of the crank
in their temperament and disposition.
They want to bo and to do something
that separates them from the great mass
of humanity. Sometimes this is accom
plished with the aid of accident, as of
birth or of training, as of a religious creed
or of nature, when a woman is hand
some or a man particularly good look
ing. But those latter are minor and in
dividual affectations. Where such per
sonal advantages fail there is still
another mode of keeping up a discrimi
nation from the multitude of people. It
is to cultivate a fad The mildest form
of it is exhibited among men and wom
en in cultivating a passion for cats aud
dogs.
There is a harmless class who collect
old books, rare engravings, first folio
Sliakespeares, coins and token pieces,
scarce sets or parts of sots of china or
old yellow lace. These are all quiet
folks with hubbies, and we can leave
them alone, quite confident that they
are wedded to their idols and will never
bo a disturbing force. Most of them are
secretive and hide their weakness from
tho profane crowd. Only the elect of
the name taste are invited to look upon
them. There is another intelligent,
more numerous and noisier set who are
bitten with a literary fad. These have
piped at social gatherings and in the
market places since - the time when
France originated the Precieuses and
English dames raved over the woes of
Clarissa Harlowe and German women
shed buckets of tears over the sorrows
of Werther. Tho two latest fads are of
Boston origin. There was originated
the first Browning society, and when "A
Doll's House" was translated they set
tho ball rolling toward "an Ibsen craze."
It is a pity that the last ever became a
fad, for apart from Ibsen's social theo
ries, his woman's right 3 notions and his
leveling principles generally he is a
strong writer and a master of romantic
expressions. As a fad, however, Ibsen
has run his course, and his followers are
looking out for some other literary
heroes to nurse. Maeterlinck, "the Dutch
Shakespeare,"' has been tried, but on ac
count of tho merely 'suggestive and
ghiibtly character of his plays he haa
failed to materialize. His best subjects
are disagreeable—tho vague terror of
death in the midst of a group of the
blind, or his unseen bnt felt presence in
un assembled household. The emotions
they cause are " creepy," and will not
bear to be talked about in a club, and
they entirely escape the clumsy hands
of a public lecturer.
There are two literary fads remaining,
but both tire English and one is a re
vival. Those who keep the stage at
present before select audiences are
George Meredith and George Borrow.
The reign of George Meredith is endan
gered because he still lives and writes,
and there is grave doubt whether he
will keep himself alive with other
"Chloes" and "Egoists" or kill himself
off with a succession of "Tragic Come
dians." But Borrow, fortunately for
his admirers and his fame, is dead.—-
Baltimore Sun.
"Aboutten; I con-BSaBBBB
traded a severe cum at, blood poj.*" - *"*** 4 "* 3
aon. Leading physicians prescribed medicine
after medicine, which 1 took without any relief.
I also tried mercuri.il and potash remedies,
with unsuccessful results, but which brought
on an attack of mercurial rheumatism that
Sizg RHEUMATISIi
four years I gave up all remedies and began
using 8. 8. 8. After taking several bottles I
was entirely cured and able to resume work.
WSPSRBI 19 r,l ° greatest medicine for blood
aWWp?)B poisoning to-day on the marki t."
Treatise on Blood and Skin Diseases mailed
free. Swift Specific Co., Atlanta, Ga
IT IS A PUTT tou owe yourself and fam
ily to get the best value for your money.
Economize In your footwear by purchasing
W. L. Douglas Shoes, which represent the
best value for prices asked, as thousands
will testify.
nrxiaE NO SUBSTITUTE, .ja
W. L. DOUGLAS
S3 SHOE «a n ,
THE BEST SHOE IN THE WORLD FOR THE MONET.
A genuine sewed shoe, that wiU not rip, fine
calf, seamless, smooth inside, flexible, more com
fortable, stylish and durable than any other shoe ever
sold at the price. Equals custom made shoes costing
from 84 to (5.
<r* m and 95 HandHiewed, fine calf shoes. The
apes* most stylish, easy and durable shoes ever sold
at the price. They equal nno Imported shoes costing
from alto $12.
(C Q SO Police Shoe, worn by farmers and all
90s others who want a good heavy calf, three
soled, extension edge shoe, easy to walk ln, and will
keep the teet dry and warm.
SBA 50 Fine Calf, 92.25 and 92.00 Work
«P sfi ■ lugmen'e Shoes will give more wear for the
money than any other make. TThey are made for ser
vice. The Increasing sales show that workingmen
have found this out.
n nuB | M 2.00 and Youths' 91.75 School
DUjfD Shoes are worn by the boys every
where. The most serviceable shocssold at the prices.
1.30 ICS Si.OO and #1.75 Shoos for
Misses are made of the best Dongola or fine Calf, as
desired. They are very stylish, comfortable and dura
ble. TheaS-OOshoeequalscustomniudoshoescosttng
from 64.00 to $6.00, Ladies who wish to economize la
their footwear are finding this out.
Caution.—W. L. Douglas' name and tho price Is
stamped on the bottom of each shoe; look for it
when you buy. Beware of dealers attempt ing to sub
stitute other makes for them. Such substitutions are
fraudulent and subject to prosecut ion by low for ob
taining money under false pretences.
W. L. DOl/GLAS, DrocUtou, Mans. Sold by
L_. W. GODIN,
104 North Spring Btreet
t])R. JORDAN ft, COvN
lEAT MUSEUM OF ANATOMK
151 Market St., San Frnnciscu.
(between 6th aud 7fh sts.)
Go and learn how wonderfully
you are made and how to avoid
sickness and diseases. Museum
enlarged with thousands of new
ft U objects. Admission 25 cts.,
Private Office, all Geary St, Disease* ol
men: rtrlcture, loss of manhood,diseases of the
akin and kidneys quickly cured without the
use of mdrcury. Treatment personally ' J t>~
■jtter. Send for book
NERVOUS
DEBILITY
cured toy the
use of
AVER'S
Sarsaparilla
Tones the system,
makes the weak
strong.
Cures Others
will cure you.
CURE
A new and Complete Treatment, consisting of
Suppositories, Ointment in Capsules, also in
Box and Pills; a Positive Cure for External,
Internal, Blind or Bleeding Itching, Chronic,
Hecent or Hereditary Piles. This remedy haa
never been known lo fail, f 1 per box, 6 for ;!>;
sent by mail. Why suffer from this terrible
disease when a written guarantee is positively
given with « boxes. To refund the money if
not cured. Send stamp for free sample. Guar
antee issued by C. F. HEINZIJMAN, druggist,
no !e agent. 222 N. Main street. Los Angeles, f 'n.l.
"nerve jtL& ]L BSAIM » I
DR. E. C. WEST'S NERVE AND BRAIN
TREATMENT, a specific for Hysteria, Dizzi
ness, Fits, Neuralgia, Headache, Nervous Pros
tration caused by alcohol or tobacco, Wakeful
ness, Mental Depression, Softening of Brain,
causing insanity, misery, decay, death. Prema
ture Old Age, Barrenness, Loss of Power ln
either sex, Impotency, Leucorrhoaa and all
Female Weaknesses, Involuntary Losses, Sper
matorrhoea caused by over-exertion of brain,
Self-abuse, Over-indulgence. A month's treat
ment $1,6 for J5, by mall We guarantee six
boxes to cure. Each order for 6 boxes, with $5,
will send written guarantee to refund If not
oured Guarantees issued only by H. M. SALE
& SON, druggists, sole agbnts, $20 B. Spring
street, Los Angeles. Cal.
ILLICH'S
RESTAURANT.
EVERYTHING NEW AND FIRST-CLASS
3 and 147 N. Main Street.
JERRY ILLICH, Proprietor.
DR. WO NO HIM.
Chinese Physician and Surgeon, has resided ln
Lot Angeles seventh n (17) years. His reputa
tlon as a thorough physician has been fully es
tablished and appreciated by many. His lane
practice is sufficient proof of his ability ancf
honesty.
The doctor graduated ln the foremost colj
leges, also practiced in the largest hosplt-tls o
Canton, China. The doctor speaks Spanish
fluently.
OFFICE: New number, 639; 01a number,
117 Upper Main street. P. O. box 664, Ste
tlon C. ; 12-17 tf
CHAS. BAUEK,
General Agent for Southern
California for
ANHEUSER-BUSCH
BREWING ASSOCIATION.
Keg and Bottled Beer delivered to any part
of Southern California. Bottling department,
409 411 North Alameda street.
This Celebrated Beer can always be found
fresh on draught at The Eintracht saloon. 163
North Spring street, and Tbe Anheiiser saloon
243 Booth Spring street.
Telephone at the Bottling Works 467; at
Eintracht saloon, 316. All orders promptly at
tended to. 7-14 lyr
T. J.. Griffith, President!
H. G. Stevenson, Vlce-Pres. and Treas.
M B. Nichols, Sec'v. E. L. Chandler, Supt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
LUMBER DEALERS
And Manufacturers of
DOOES, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS.
Mill Work of Every Description.
934 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles,
ml tf
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER COMPANY
WHOLESALE AND BBTAIL
Main Office; LOS ANG-ELES.
Wholesale Yard at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Azusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
"FRANK a. wein shank
Plumber and Gasfltter,
240 West Second Street.
sWTelephone 136. 9-6 lm
Los Angeles Terminal Railway Company.
Los Angeles depots, east end of First street
and Downey avenue bridges.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Pasadena for
Pasadena. Los Angeles.
t 6:35 a.m t 7:15 a.m.
* 7:10 a.m * 8:95 a.m.
* 8:00 a.m * 9:05 a.m.
* 9:00 a.m '10:35 a.m.
•10:30 a.m »12:00 m.
•12:15 p.m * 1:05 p.m.
* 1:25 p.m * 2:05 p.m.
* 2:25 p.m • 4 05 p m.
* 4:00 p.m • 5:25 p.m.
* 5:20 p.m • 7:05 p.m.
* 6:20 p.m * 8:05 p.m.
* 9:20 p.m *10:05 p.m.
•11:00 p.m '11:45 pm.
Downey avenue leaving time 7 minutes later.
Leave Los Angelea for Leave Altadena for
Altadena. Los Angeles.
•10:30 a m "11:35 a.m.
* 4:00 p.m • 5:00 p.m.
All trains start from First-street depot.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Glendale for Los
Glendale. Angeles.
* 6:45 a.m f 7:35 a.m.
* 8:15 a.m 4 9:05 a.m.
•12:20 pm .. * 1:15 p.m.
* 3:00 p.m * 8:50 p.m.
* 5:15 p.m ,! » 6:10 p.m.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave East San Pedro
Long Beach and Bast for
. San Pedro. Los Angeles.
* 9:55 a.m • 7:25 a.m
•12:45 p.m *11:15 a m
t 5:30 p.m 1 4:00 p.m
Between Bast San Pedro and Long Beach, 10
minutes.
San Gabriel Valley Rapid Transit Railway,
MONROVIA DIVISION.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Monrovia for Los
Monrovia. Angeles.
t 7:55 a.m t 6:55 a.m.
nl;10 a.m * 8:55 a.m.
* 2:55 p.m '12:45 p.m.
* 5:25 p.m • 4:00 p.m.
•Daily, tDaily, except Sundays. Stages meet
the 8:00 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. trains atPasedena
for Mt. Wilson on new trail.
Passengers leaving Los Angeles on the 8 a.m.
train for Wilson's peak can return the simeday.
Theater nights the 11 p.m. train will wait 20
minutes after the theater Is out when later than
10:40 p.m.
Special rates to excursion and plcnlo parties.
Depots east end First street ana Downey ave
nue bridges.
General offices. First-street Depot.
T. F "ttrnett, General Manager.
JyS-tt W. WZNOUP, Gen. Passenger Agt.
LINKS OF TRAVEL.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA RAILWAY
COMPANY. (Santa Fe Route.)
IN EFFECT MONDAY, SEPT. 26, 1802.
Leave. Arrive.
•12:20 p.m Overland .... * 2:45 p.m
• 8:15 a.m San Diego Coast Line. * 1:17 p.m
• 3:05 p.m .San Diego Coast Line. * 7:15 p.m
• 5:30 a.m t f * 9:50 a.m
• 8 30 a.m I .. Ban Bernardino .. I *10:50 a.m
•12:20pm f .. via Paaadena.... i * 2:45 p.m.
• 4:00 p.m J [i« C:2sp.m
• s:3ua.m> Riverside (i*lo:soa.m
• 8 30a.m > .... via \\* 2:45 p.m
•12:20 p.m) .. San Bernardino. . 'j* 6:25 p.m
*ll:<'oa.m ( Riverside aud San | '10:13 a m
• 5 05 p.m j Ber'dlno via Orange ( • 5:20 p.m
• 5:30 a.m 1 Redlaadu, Mentone f
• 8:30 a.m .and Highland. . * 0:25 p.m
•12:20pjn r„ *TT { * 9:50 a.m
• 4:00 pin [ - Panorama Train..] .j.0:50a.m
J via Pasadena [ * 2:45 p.m
•ii .nn. m ißedlauds, Mentone) * i.on„™
• k3k»« {and Hlnhland viaf *nn o .?'™
5.05 p.m ) onugo g Riverside*) *10:13a.m
• 5:30 a.m 1 ..." f * 8:50 a.m
• 8:30 a.m ♦ 9:50 a.m
•12:20 p.m I J "10:50 a,m
• 1:26 p.m (Azusa, Pasadena and | • 1:25 p.m
•4-00 p.m Intermediate * 2:45 p m
t 7:20 p.m stations * 6:25 p.m
• 5:25 p.m t 7:45 a.m
|10:30a.m J [ t 4:35 p.m
• 8:15 a.m Santa Ana * 1:17 p.m
• 3:05 p.m Santa Ana * 5.20 p.m
Santa Ana * 7:15 p.m
t 4:42 p.m Santa Ana t 8:48 a.m
-nnuMonl. a& Kedondo ■ B:2Ha.m
•10:00a.m KedondoA-antaMonica • 2:13 p.m
-tantaMonicfl&Kedondo • 3:52 p.m
• 1:30 p.m -,edondo&.-aula Monica * 4:57 p.m
• 5:2."> p.m SantaMouicait Rodortdo
t 5: 0 a.in San Jacinto vlaPafcatie'altlOiSO a m
112:20 p.m San Jacinto via fasade'a t 6:25 p.m
til :00 a.m 3an Jacinto via orange |10:13 a.m
San Jacinto via Orange f 5:20 p.m
til.oo a.m .Temecu'.a via Orange.. flo:l3a.m
r12:20 p.m lemecula via Pasadena 110:50 a.m
■ 3:05 p.m Sscondldo • 1:17 p.m
• Daily. ♦ Dally except Sunday. J Sunday only.
ED. CHAMBERS, Ticket Agent,
First-street Depot.
E. W. McGEE, City Pas. and T. Ag%
129 N. Spring St„ Los Angeles.
Depot at foot of First street. f 23
Sontbern Pacific Mpany.
IMPORTANT CHANGE OF TIME
OCTOBER 1, 1892.
Trains leave anu are due to arrive at
LOS ANGELEB IAKCADB DEPOT),
Fifth atreet. dally, as follows:
Leave For dretination. Arr. FroE
B;Soa.m Banning a 10:15 air
A4:35p.m Banning 10:00 pm
ss:3op.m. Colton 59:27 a m.
7:45 a.m. Colton AlO:?.sain
8:30 a. m Colton 4:52 p.m
A 4:3* p. m Colton 10:00 p. m,
8:30a.m ...Deming and Most.... 10:00p.m
830 a. m ... .Xl Paso and East.... 10:00 p. m.
A r >3op.m Chino AB:soa.m
925 B..DJ. fong Beach & Han Pedro 8:15 a. in
12-40 p. m San Pedro 4 u>ng Beaci. 11:56 a. n>.
5:00 p.m. ijonn Beach A San Pedro 4-15 p. m.
2.00 p.m. Ogden and East, 2d class 7:45 a. as.
10:40 p.m. Ogdenand Bast,lstclass 11:30 a.m.
10:40 p. m. Portland, Or 7:45 a. m,
s 5:30 p. m Riverside 9 9:27 am.
7:45 a. m Riverside A 10:16 a.m
8:30 a. m Riverside 4-52 p.m
A4:35p. m Riverside 10:00p.m
s 5:30 p. m San Bernardino s 9:27 a. m.
7:45 a. m. San Bernardino \10:16a./j
8 30 a. m Ran Bernardino 4:52 p.m
A4:3*p. m,,... .San Bernardino 10:00 p m.
8 5:30 p. m.' Red'auds 59:27 a.m.
7:45 a. m Redlands Al0:15 a re
8:30 a. m Redlands 4:52 p m
A 4:35 p. m Redlands 10:00 p. m.
2:00 p. m. San Fran, and Sacram'to 7:45 a. m.
10:40 p.m. San Fran, and Sacram'to 11:30 a. m.
a 9:12 a.m. Santa Ana and Anaheim 8:25 a. m.
5:10 p. m. Santa Ana and Anaheim a 4:04 p. m.
8 20 a. m Santa Barbara 1:20 p.m.
4:55 p.m Santa Barbara | 9.10p.m
Santa Monica. 7:44 a, re.
9:3oam Santa Monica. !«:•„{> a o .
.. .Minn Monica 12:15p.m
"1:17 p.m Santa Monica 4:10 p.m.
5:15 p.m. Santa Monica
6:15 p.m San ta Monl ca
Santa Monica Cafion.. 812:15p.m
M»:30 a. m . .Santa Monica Cafion.. 84:10 p. m.
■ 1:17 p.m. . .Santa Monica Cafion
4 :52 p. m Tustin S :43 a. m.
AO:4oa. m Whlttler 8:43 a. io.
4:52 p.m. Whittier.; A 1:45 p.m.
Take Santa Monica trains from San Fernando
street, Naud's Junction, Commercial street,
Aicade depot, Jefferson street (Winthrop sta
tion), Grand avenue, or University.
For nortn: Arcade, Commercial street, Naud's
Junction, San Fernando Hreet
For east: Arcade, Commercial street, Naud's
Junction.
For other branches: Arcade, Commercial
Btreet, Naud's Junction San Fernando street.
Local and through tickets sold, baggage
checked, Pullman sleeping car reaervanocs
made, and general information given npen ap
plication to J. M. CRAWLEY, Asst. G. Pas. Agt
No. 144 8. Spring St., oor. Bocond. CHARLES
FEYLBR, Agent at Depots,
s Sundays only.
a Holidays excepted.
BIOH'D GRAY, Gen. Traffic Mgr.
T. H. GOODMAN,
Gen'l Passenger Agt.
Pacific Coast S. S. Go.
GOO DELL, PERRINS A CO., GENERAL
Agents, San Francisco. Northern routes
embrace lines for Portland, Ore., Victoria, B.
0., and Puget Sound, Alaska, and aU coast
points.
SOUTHERN ROUTES.
TIME TABLE FOR OCTOBER, 1892.
LJS.'.VS BAN FBAN'.'ISCO.
For 1
Port Harford | 8 S. Corona, October 7,16
Santa Barbara... I 25; November 3.
Redondo . >
San Pedro. IS. 8. Santa Rosa, October 3,
Newport I 12, 21,30; November 8.
San Diego J
For 1 S. 8. Eureka, October 5,14,
Redondo 1 23: November 1.
Ban Pedro and (S. S. Los Angeles, October 1,
way ports J 10,19, 28; November 6.
LBAVH BAN I'KDBO ANil RBDJND ).
For 1 S. S. Santa Rosa, October 5,
I 14, 23; Hovember 1.
San Diego fS. 8. Corona, October9,,lB,
I 27; November 5.
For 1 S. 8. Bauta Rosa, October 7,
San Francisco... I 16, 25; November 3
Port Harford ...IS. 8. Corona, Oetober2,ll,
Santa Barbara .. J 20, 2K; November 7.
For 1 8. 8. Lob Angeles, October 4,
San Francisco I 13, 22, 31; November 9.
and [8. 8. Eureka October 8, 17,
way ports ) 26' November 4.
Cars to connect with staameis via San Pedro,
Leave 8. P. R. R. depot. Filth street, Los A3'
gel as. at 9:25 o'olook a. m.
Passengers per steamer Corona and Santa
Rosa, via Redondo, north bound, leave Santa
Fedepotat 13:00 a.m.; or from Redondo Rail
way depot, corner Joiferoou street and Grand
aye., 9:00 a. m.
Passengers per Los Angeles and Eureka via
Redondo, leave Saata Fe depot at 5:25 p. m.
Plans of steamers' cabins at agent's offloo,
where berths may bo secured.
The company reserve 'the right to change the
steamers or their days of sailing.
passage or ftalght as above or for
tickets to and from all important points in
Europe, apply to
W. PARRIS, Agent,
Office. No. 124 We; t Second st,, Los Angeles.
Compagnie Generate Transatlantique.
FRENCH TINE TO HAVRE.
COMPANY'S PIFR (NEW) NO. 42 'i.uSCL .
North river, foot of Mcrton street SSflßgt.
Traveler-, by this line avoid both transit by
English railway and the discomfort of crossing
the Ch-innel in a small boat.
LATOURAINE, October Ist, 10 a m.
LA GA«COGNK, October Bth, 4,30 a. m.
LA CHAMPAGNE, Octooer 15th, 10;30 a. m.
LA BOURGUtNE, October 22d, 4:30 a. m.
For freight or passage apply io
A. FORGET, Agent,
No. 3 Bowling Green, New York.
J. F. FUGA.ZI & CO., Agents, 5 Montgomery
aye., San Francisco Branch office, 19 Mont
gom r; street. Tickets for sale by all railroad
and steamship offices. d 29 tf
Redondo Railway.
Winter Time Card No. 9.
In Effect 5 a. in., October 3, 1892.
Los Angeles Depot, Corner Grand Aye. and
Jefferson St.
Take Grand aye. table or Main St. and Agri
urtural Park hocse cars.
Ti ains Leave Trains Leave
Los Angeles Redondo
for Redondo. for Los Angeles.
8:00 a. m .dally 7:20 a m. dally.
9:<>o a. m. dai y 9:10 a. m. dally.
1:35 p.m. dilly 11:00 a. m. dally.
5:00 p.m. datlv 4:45 p. m daily.
Running time between Los Angeles and Re/
dondo Beach, 50 minutes.
City Ticket office at A. B. Greenwald's cigar
Bl.Ar.i Co 1 * V(-n, oTirl UnHnn ...nut.
GBO.' J. AINSWORTH, " SUTTON.
President, Supt.
R. H. THOMPSON, Vice-President
,
6 PEK CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS.
Main Street Savings Bank and Trust Company,
CAPITAL, - - $200,000.
420 B. MAIN STREET, LOB ANGELEB, CAL.
The design of this Institution is to afford a safe depository for the earnings of all personi
who are desirous of placing their money where it will be free from accident, and at the same
time be earning for them a fair rate of interest. Deposits will he received in tame of from II us
$5000. Working men and women should deposit at least $1 per week from their wages. This
will form a nucleus that will ultimately enable you to purchase a home or begin business. Chil
dren can purchase 5-cent stamps ln all parts of the city and county. It is the best education you
can have in saving and caring for money.
J. B. LANKERBHIM, CHAS. FORMAN, FRANK W. DE VAN,
President. Vice-President. Cashier.
MONEY TO L-QAN ON M O RTQ AQ EB.
COLUMBIA SAVINGS BANK.
CAPITAL, - - $100,000.
Temporary Office with the Citizens' Bank, corner Sprlnjj and Third streets, until our room la
ready for occupation in the new Stimson block.
T. D. STIMSON, President. T. W. BROTHERTON, Vice-President. A. P. WKST.gashler
DIRECTORS:
T. D. Stimson. H. Jevne. f. 8. C. Lowe, A. M. Ozman,
Andrew Mullen, K. H. Wade, J.R.Clarke, Robert Hale,
Jabez Peruival, T. W. Brotherton, A. P. West. .
NAMES OF STOCKHOLDERS:
Baldwin, Mrs. H. A. Blinn, L. W. Jones, C. B. Kohlmeler, C. C.
Burns, J. F. Brown, T. s%. Lewis, W. M. Lowe, T. B.C.
Brotherton, T. W. Clark, J. R. Lewis, Thos. A. Menefee, J. M.
Clark, Wesley Chambers, Edw'd Mullen, Andrew Mullen I. F.
Curry, Mrs. 8. K. Curry, Miss K. I. Martin, I. T. McClung, Mrs. B. B.
Cullen, K. P. Demens. P. A. ozmun, A M. Perc.vW, I,
Dillon, Henry C. Driscoll, W. A. Pease, N'les Parker, Dr. F. M.
Eckstrom A Strosburg Fuy, E. G. Rvan, M.T. Stlmsou, T. D.
Fay, F. K. Faltis, G. P. Si'lmeon, W. H. Stlmton, Mrs. T. D.
Fiort F. P. Fay. Ell Stimson, C. W. Stimson, H. C.
Fay, Harriet K. Flxen, A. H. Spenc r. Misi Mary E, Seaberg, Hannah
Gillespie, M. M. Hale. Robert Van Dyke, W. M. Van Gulsllng,M. I.
Hale, C. F. Hoch, Wm. West, A. P. Williamson, R. B.
Jevne, H. Jones, J. H. Wade, K. H. Waters, R. J.
Johnson, M. D. Johnson, 0 T.
Interest paid on Deposits. Money to loan on Real Estate.
SeeUrirty Savings Bank, Capital, $200,000
HO. 1«8 SOUTH MAIN BTREET, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS,
9. N. MYERS PREBIDENV
IBAL4S W. HBLLMAH, President Nevada Bank, San Francisco; President Farmers and Mer
chants Bank, Los Angeleß.
ANDREW J. BOWNE President Fourth National Bank, Grand Rapids. MIC
H. W. HELLMAN Vice-president Farmers and Merchants Bank, Los Angel
T. L. DUQUK VICE-PBBBIDBM I
M. L. FLEMING Capitalist, Los Angelas
A. C. ROGERS Physician, Los Angeles
MAURICE 8. HELLMAN Of Hellman, Waldcck A Co., Wholesale Stationers, Los Angeles
J. A. GRAVES - Of Graves, O'Melveny A Shankland. Attorneys, Los Angeles
J. H. SHANKIAND ...of Graves, O'Melveny & Shankland, Attorneys, Ims Angeles, Osl
JAMES RAWHOrt Capitalist, Boston
J. V. BARTORI CASHIER; also Vice-president First National Bank, Monrovia, Cal.
FIVE: PER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS,
THK NOTICE OF THE PUBLIC IS CALLED
To tho fact that this bank has the largest paid up capital and surplus combined of any savings
bank ln Southern California, and only loans money on approved real estate security; that
among its stockholders are some of the oldest and most responslnle citizens ol the community;
that under the State law, the private estates of its stockholders are pro rata liable for the total
Indebtedness of the bank. These facts, with care exercised In making loans, insure a safe
derository for saving accounts. School teachers, clerks, mechanics, employees in factories and
shops, laborers, etc., will find it convenient to make deposits in small amounts. CHILDRBN'a
SAVINGS DEPOSITS receive din sums of 5 cents and upward. Remittances may be sent by
dratt or Wella, Fargo A Co.'s c xpress. 8-1 6m
Los Angeles Savings Bank,
No. 338 North Main Street.
CAPITAL" STOCK * 1 00,000
BUKPLUB. 24,000
H. W. HELLMAN, President. J. E. PLATER, Vice-President.
W. M. CASWELL, Cashier.
DIRECTORS:
I. W. HELLMAN. R- S. BAKER. H. W. HBLLMAN
J. E. PLATER. I. W. HELLMAN, Jr.
6-5 tf JJgF-Inten at paid on deposits. Money to loan on first-class real estate.
German-American Savings Bank,
114 SOUTH MAIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, OAL.
O APITAL PAID IN GOLD, - - $100,000.00.
Im rot compounded -quarterly to depositors at the rate of 5 per cent on term and 3.6 m per cent
on ordinary deposits.
b. n. Mcdonald, Pres't dr. Joseph kurtz and w. m. sheldon, vice-Pre? u>.
VI( lOR PONBT, Treasurer. M. N. AVERY, Secy P. F. SCHUMACHER, Asst. Secy.
DIRECTORS.
E N. McDonald, H. W. Btoix, Jobiph Kcrtz, M. N, Avkry, B. A. Puross,
Conkad Hafen. W. M. Sheldon, 8. W. Lcitweilbr, Victob Ponxt, C. N, Flint,
B. Etradd.
gtj*" Open every Saturday evening for deposits.
BANK OF AMERICA, i
FOBBtKB LV I
LOS ANGELES COUJNTY BANK,
Temple Block.
Capital Stock paid up $300,000
OFFICERS.
JOHN E. PLATER President
ROBT. S. BAKER Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART Cashier
DIRECTORS.
Jotham Bixby, Ckias. Forman.
L. T. Garnsey, Lewellyn Bixby
B. 8. Baker, Jobt-u B. Plater,
Geo. H. Stewart.
LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
U. S. DEPOSITORY.
Cor. First and Spring streets.
Capital * $500,000
Surplus » 85,000 1
Total „ $585,000 i
George H. Bonebrake President
John Bryson, Br Vice-President
F. C. Howes Cashier
E. W. Coe Asst. Cashier
DIRECTORS.
Dr. W. G. Cochran, Perry M. Green, George
McAllister, George H. Boneb:rake, H. fi. Mark
ham, John Bryson, Sr.. F. C. Howes, Warren
Gillelen.
No Interest Paid on Deposits.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States and Europe.
I FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK* OJ
1 Los Angeles, Cal.
Capital (paJd np) $500,.T00
Surplus and Profits 780,t*00
Total , $1,280,01 *0
OFFICERS.
IBAIAB W. HBLLMAN President
HERMAN W. HELLMAN Vice-President
JOHN MILNBB Caßhier
H. J. FLEISHMAN Assistant Cashier
■ 1
DIRECTORS. ■■
W. H. Perry. Ozro W. Chllds. J. B. Lanker
shim, C. E. Thorn, C. Ducommnn, H. W. Hell
man, T. L Duque, A. Glassell, I. W Hellman.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States, Europe, China and Japan
QALIPORNIA BANK.
Cor. Broadway and Second at,, Los Angeles.
Subscribed capital $500,000
Paid up capital 600.000
Surplus , 20,000
J. Fran ken Held President
Sam Lewis Vice-President
J. M. Wltmerr Assistant Cashier
. DIRECTORS.
J. Frankenfleld, G. W. Hughes, Sam Lewis
J. C. Kay a, B.W.Jones, I. B. Newton,
Hervey Lindley.
General ng and exchange business
transacted m 4 4m
rpHK NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA
Corner of Spring and Secomd streets,
LOS ANGELES, GAL.
Capital paid up 1250,000
J. M. 0. Marble President
0. H. Churchill Vice-President
Perry Wildman „ Cashier
A. Hadley ABst. Cashier,
BOARD OF DfRXCTOBS.
Dr. W. L. Graves, E. F. C. Klokke. O. T. John
son, W. Hadley, E. N. ?AcDonald, M. H. Sher
man, Fred Eaton, JrU:.. WolfskUl, Thos. B.
Bard. 10-31
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NATIONAL
BANK, 101 8. Spring St., Nadeau block.
L. N. Breed President
Wm. F. Boßbyahrdl Vice-President
C. N. Flint Cashier
Capital paid tv gold coin $200,000
Surplus and undivided profits 25,000
Authorized dapital r 500,000
DIBECTOBS.
L. N. Breed, H. T. Newell, Wm. H. Avery,
Silas Holman.W. H. HoHldav. E. C. Bosbyshell
M. Hagan, Frank Rader, D. Remick, Thos Goss
William F. BosbysheU. 7-1 r.f
THE UNIVERSITY BANK OF LOS ANGELES
Southeast corner First and Broadway.
Capital stock fully paid up $100,000
Surplus „ 60,000
R. M. WIDNEY Pre ldent
D. 0. MILTIMORB Vloe-Presldent
GBO. L. ABNOLD Oaahlor
DIRECTORS. t
B. M. Widney, D. O. Mlltimore, B.W. Little,
C.M.Wells. John MoArkhnr, C. A. Warner, L.
J. P. Morrill.
General banking business, and locus on first
class real estate solicitor!. Bay and sell first
class stocks, bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to invest ln flrst-class securities en either
long or short time can lie accommodate*A.
State Loan anil Trust Co.
OF LOS ANQBLEB.
Subscribed Capital $1,000,000
Capital Paid Up 700,000
BANKING ROOM, N W. CORNER BPBI
AND SECOND STREETS, BRYSON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
President
JOHN BRYSON, SB Ist Vice-Presidents
W. H. PERRY 2d Vice-President
A. E. FLETCHER Cashier
J. F. TO WELL.. Secretary and General Manager
George H. Bonebrake, W. G. Cochran,
H. J. Woollacott, Wm. H Crocker,
O. T. Johnson, San Francisco.
Judge W. P. Gardiner, A. A. Hubbard.
We act as trustees for corporations and estates.
Loan money on first-class real estate and col
laterals. Keep choice securities for sale. Sal*
deposit boxes for rent. Applications for loan
received from borrowers ln person or by mall.
SAVINGS BANK OF SOUTHERN CALIFOR
NIA,
Southeast corner Spring and Court streets
Los Angeles, CaL
CAPITAL, ... SIOO.OOO.

X, F. Bpence, President.
F. Cj Howes, Vice-President.
J. H. Brai.y, Cashier and Tress
DIRECTORS.
Geo. H. Bonebrake, J. H. Braly, H. L. Drew,
J. M. Elliott, C. N. Hasson. F. C. Howes, M. W.
Stimson, Hiram Mabury. E. F. Spence, warren
Glllelen. 4-16 m
THE CITY BANK,
37 South Spring street.
Capital stock $300,000
A. D. CHILDRESS President
JOHN S. PARK Cashier
DIRECTORS.
W. T. Childress, Poindexter Dunn,
J. J. Schallert, B. B. CrandaU,
John S. Park, B. G. Lunt,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof safe.
Deposit boxes rented at from $3 to $20 per an- -
num.
THIRST N ATIONaL BANK OF LOS ANGELES
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000
RE3ERVE $280,000
E. F. SPENCE President
J. D. BICKNELL Vice-President
J. M, ELLIOTT Cashier
Q B. SHAFFER Assistant Cashier
Directors—E. F. Spence, J. D. Blcknell, 8. H.
Mott, J. D. Hooker, H. Mabury, J. M. Bllott, D.
M. McGarry, Jul
TO THE UNFORTUNATE.
Dr. Gibbon's
DISPENSAfi Y
623 Kearney St.,
1 -Si Corner of Commercial,
San Francisco, Cal. Es-
tabllßhe d ia 1854, for
treacmentof Sexual and
*-^^™S^WlHi k W©' dem ina] Diseases, such
as Gonorrhea, Gleet,
B ** ic A ure - SyPbillis in
all its forms. Seminal
Weakuess, Impotency and Lost Manhood per
manently cured. The sick and afflicted shonld
not fall to cal! upon him. The Doctor haa trav
eled extensively ln Europe and Inspected thor
oughly the various hospitals there, obtaining a
great deal of valuable information, which he is
competent to impart to those in need of his
services. The Doctor cures where others fail.
Try him. DR. GIBBON will make no charge
unless he effects a cure. Persons at a distance
CURED AT HOME. All communications
strictly confidential. Al) letters answered ln
Slain envelopes,
all or write Address DR. J F GIBBON, Box
1,957, San Francisco, Cal.
Mention Los Angeles Hkral 12-17 12m
i ————— — I—.
INJECTION TRUE
Ouansstse Core fo> Gonorrhoea, Connie Oleet, Run
ning Ulcers or Strictures and Leuoorrhceaof long stand
ing positively cured from 5 toJ4 days. Bold by Drug-
i—- —
PERRY MOTT <Si CO.'B
l i i a m m tr- I—» vy A e> f \ aa
I— W IVI D C_ r~V I w
(AND PLANING) 3 KILLS.
Do. Sl6 Commercial street. nl
9

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