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Los Angeles herald. [volume] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, October 18, 1892, Image 9

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AFTER FEMALE SMUGGLERS.
4. Woman Customs Inspectress Who
Kama Her Money.
Miss Lillian Ellis, of New York city, has
been inspectress of customs "exclusively
for ladies" since 1880, and was practically
brought up to the business, for her mother
was appointed to the place by President
Lincoln when the husband and father. Dr.
Ellis, lost his life by attending to sick sol-
LILLIAN ELLIS.
diem. It is an interesting coincidence thnt
Ellis island, where Miss Ellis now does her
work, was named for her great-rrrand
father, who was an aid-dc camp to' George
Washington, nnd on her mother's side she
is closely related to the Cnrrolls of Mary
land and the Randolphs of Virginia.
Miss Ellis has to do the work of woman
inspectress for the Bremen, Hamburg and
Thingvnllu lines, and her experience wit,h
female smugglers would make a rich vol
ume.
"Women," says Miss EIHb, "smuggle
more than men, but they seldom carry out
their plans as well. Not long since I point
ed out to an officer v, gentleman who was
emptying his pockets of dutiable goods
into his trunk that had been passed and
checked. I was reading a newspaper, sit
ting on the end of a trunk next to Ins and
he was using me as a shield from the in
spector not far away. He looked as if he
could have killed mo when he learned I
was an officer too. Women sometimes use
their children for means of carrying off
things. About three weeks ago I made
love to a little baby until I had secured
over $600 worth of tho finest laces and jew
els that the mother had sewed into its
hood and cloak, and even eucn little shoe
had a ring in the toe."
An Italian woman who was suspected
set up a fearful screaming in the private
room and rushed out barefooted aud hare
headed calling for tkje interpreter. When
he came she explained that before she left
Italy she had been cautioned against the
American people, who would steal the
very clothes off her back.
"Mio Dlol" she exclaimed, "and they
have already taken my shoes, and la signora
wanted my dress and shawl too!"
It was evident that the woman did not
have the nerve for a smuggler. Au Irish
woman was found to have five yards of
coarse, black cotton lace wrapped arouud
her person, a bag of cigarettes, two clay
pipes and four yards of cheap silk suspend
ed by pieces of rope from her belt and
snugly hidden in the folds of her petticoat.
It was her personal property and not dutia
able. When told that she might have car
ried it as freely in an open basket her dis
gust may be imagined.
Miss Ellis is of average height and very
attractive in appearance, with a disposi
tion that makes it hard for her to say any
thing severe, but she catches many a
tricky woman just the same. The great
building on Ellis island is so perfectly sys
tematized that from 1,200 to 1,500 immi
grants can easily be landed at one time.
Here are rooms for the detention of pau
pers, lunatics, criminals and persons sits
pected of being contract laborers. Women
and children are provided with separate
rooms, and a telegraph station, money ex
change, postal station, information bureau
and railroad aud steamship office are in
convenient order. When the approach of
a vessel in her class is telegraphed from
Eire island Miss Ellis is notified and must
be ready for duty at 0 a. m., very often re
main ing till 10 p. m. Still there are few
days when she is overworked. A stout
heart, a steady nerve and a quick eye are
what are needed, and she has them.
VVas Immersed in the Jordan.
The man who was baptized in tbe River
Jordan by Rev. Dr. Talmage, of Brooklyn,
two yearn ago was married in Topeka the
other day. Dr. Talmage in his book on
Palestine states that while traveling in
that country on foot he met an American
who asked to be baptized in the same
stream in which John the Baptist bap
tized Jesus Christ. He baptized him and
each went his way. The name of the man
la not given in Dr. Talmage's book, but, as
has been before suspected, he was from
Kansas. His name is TJlysses Grant Hous
ton, and he lives at Concordia. He is a
graduate of the Kansas Agricultural col
lege at Manhattan and a member of the
Methodist church.
His bride is Belle Varral, a teacher in
the Concordia schools. They went to To
peka and were married at the North To
peka parsonage by Rev. G. W. Browning,
pastor of the Kansas Avenue M. E. church.
They left for Chicago, and this fall Mr.
Houston will enter a theological school in
the east. Ho has made two trips to the
Holy Land and has traveled over the coun
try on foot, accompanied only by a guide.
He speaks with a good deal of pride of bis.
baptism by Dr. Talmage.
Novel Evidence of Devotion.
While summering at a hotel on the Blue
mountains, near Reading, a gallant youth
who resides in Philadelphia bethought him
of a clever plan to prove to his fiancee his
undying devotion. In the six weeks on the
mountain he killed with his own hand
nineteen huge rattlesnakes. Tho rattles,
numbering 213, were carefully plucked
from the tails of the venomous reptiles and
all the snakes were bravely skinned. The
skins were taken to a furrier in Reading
and a section of each was cut out and
pieced into a brilliant girdle. The edges
of the girdle, top and bottom, were trimmed
with the rattles after tho fashion of jet
beads. This astonishing trophy was then
presented by the gallant youth to his sweet
heart.
Hanged by His Playmates.
Some little boys at Shelton, Conn., while
"playing circus," hanged one of their
party as a horse thief. The performance
was so natural that a physician exercised
his skill half an hour before the lad re
covered consciousness.
Didn't Know His Luck.
AKaOtf v 'l. le (Term.) liveryman fell off a
"bridge and landed on a pile of rocks, a dis
tance of fifty f° et > while intoxicated. Ho
"escaped without injury, but got mad be
cause his watch case was broken."
A Criticism.
It must have been a relative of Mrs.
Partington's who visited a waxwork exhi
bition aonie weeks ago, and who remarked,
when she saw the waxen effigy of the deasi
.Napoleon lying in state, "Ain't it wonder
ful? You'd almost think he was alive. I
.declare I don't see how they manage to get
:that lifelike waxiness of death."—Harper's
.Magazine, —
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 18, 1892.
Consonptfon.
When the gain of what is termed a
whole nation under arms is estimated,
the exaggeration of the pompons phrase
hides the nakodness of the fact that
large numbers of young men are lost to
their country by the means to which
they resort to escape military service.
In Italy and Germany these may be
counted by legions; in France men are
less numerous, because in France men
are more wedded to the native soil, and
take to service moro gayly and more
naturally, but in Italy and Germany
thousands flock to emigrant ships, thus
choosing lifelong, self expatriation, and
every year, as the military and fiscal
burdens grow heavier, will lads go
away by preference to lands where,
however hard be the work, the dreaded
voice of tbe drill sergeant cannot reach
them, and they can "call their soul their
own."
Patriotism is a fine quality no doubt,
but it does not accord with the chill and
supercilious apathy which characterizes
tho general teaching and temper of this
age, and a young man may be pardoned
if he deem that his country is less a
mother worthy of love than a cruel and
unworthy stepmother when she demands
three of the fairest years of his life to bo
spent in a barrack yard, and wrings his
ears till the blood drops from them or
beats him about the head with the butt
of a musket because lie does not hold his
chin high enough or Bhift his feet quick
enough.—Ouida in Fortnightly Review.
Where Strong Men Lived.
A£ter the Spanish occupation of the-
Grand Canary a certain enormous stone
was for a long time -pointed out as ono
of the instruments of the Gaunehe
athletic courses. The natives had been
ablo to lift it, set it on their shoulders
and oven throw it over their heads.
Their degenerate posterity and the
Spaniards could not raise it from the
ground.
It was reckoned nothing out of the
common for a man to take an unteth
ered ox by the horn with one hand and
slay it with tho other. A certain native
born priest of Grand Canary in the Sev
enteenth century showed that he in
herited some of his ancestors' vigor, for
one day, hearing that an enraged bull
had broken loose and was in the street,
he ran ont and grasping it by the leg
threw it down, and so held it until its
owner was able to secure it.
This doughty son of the church before
his death chanced to have one of his
legs amputated for a cancer. It was
then found that his thigh bone was
solid, with no trace of marrow. It must
be confessed, however, that the relics of
the Canarians now found in their bury
ing places do not bear out the inference*
that this was a national characteristic,
though their dimensions are certainly a
testimony of the strength and size of
their late proprietors.—National Review.
He Thought He Knew That Face.
"I pride myself on never forgetting a
face, but as a nomenclator I am a far
reaching and iridescent failure," said A.
O. Smoot as he bruised the crumbs of
the table d'hote out of his whiskers.
"Some years ago I was in a Boston street
car when a lady entered whoae face was
very familiar. I felt that I knew her
well, but to savo nic I could not recall
her name. I shook hands with her,
asked after her health and tried to make
myself very agreeable. She treated me
to ice water, but that is a peculiarity of
some women, so I didn't mind. Finally
she told me frankly that she had not the
pleasure of my acquaintance.
"That bluffed me, but I handed her,
my card. She read the name and shook
her head. She was quite sure that she
had never even heard of me. I sub
sided and put on my thinking cap. Was
she making game of me or was it pos
sible that I was mistaken? I couldn't
make it out. That night I went to the
theater and the mystery was solved.
The woman I knew so well, but who
had never heard of me, was that queen
of tragedy, Mrs. D. P. Bowers."—St.
Louis Globe-Democrat.
She Dreaded "Loveless Old Age."
The late Anne Reeve Aldrich wus the
author of the novel, "The Feet of Love,"
and of a volume of collected verses
which have attracted the attention of
the public through their intensity, great
felicity of expression and unaffected
simplicity and directness. Mias Aldrich
was one of the youngest of the writers
of the day. She had made an unusual
name for herself, and lived in the prom
ise of a brilliant future. A friend re
cently described her appearance to be
like that of the heroine of a success
ful novel. She was tail and had a
beautiful figure. Her manners were
charming, her carriage graceful. The
head was statuesque and adorned with
a wealth of red brown hair. This she
wore in classical style.
Coupled with her clean cut features
it gave her face a look of distinction
and refinement which made her an ob
ject of remark. In her early death
she attained perhaps more than she
coveted. Yet her writings more than
once dwelt upon the hardships of a
"loveless old age"—a condition from
which she shrank.—Current Literature.
Why Diamonds Are Worn.
Ignorant, flippant men are fond of say
ing that ladies' fashions have nothing to
do with common sense. But there is one
fashion —at first sight a very ugly and
rather vulgar one—which is based on
reason. Not many years ago it was con
sidered vulgar to wear diamonds in the
daytime. Now you may see them
sparkling in dainty ears and under well
bred chins. And it is rumored that if
the prying eye could look under cloaks
and bodices it would discern stars and
necklets and bracelets. The fact is that
women put on their jewels when they
go out because they dare not leave them.
—Ran Francisco Arewwit. .
C. F. HEINZEMAN,
Druggist & Chemist,
222 N. Main St., Los Angeles.
Prescriptions carefully compounded day or
night. - m22tf
MD IT TDD OPTICIAN, Kyesflttcu
. U. ALILU. accurately with SPBCTA
. v. auiuu, CLKB or 'j, Tl GLASSES by
the latest methods. Fine lenses a specialty
Microscopes, telescopes, hydrometers, barome
ters, thermometers, cos puses, microscopic ob
jects, lantern slides, etc. Glasses ground to
order. Repairs promptly done.
No. 126 South Spring st,, Los Angeles,
6-29 8m
REDUCTION OF
COUNTY TAXES!
Honest Administration!
DEMOCRATIC CAMPAIGN
MEETINGS.
Headquartebs Democratic 1
County Committee, >
October 5,1892. >
The following meetings ate arranged to take
place at the precincts named in Los Angeles
county, on the dates named, and to be addressed
by the following speakers:
Tuesday, October 18th, Norwalk.—
County candidates and M. L. Graff and W. J.
Hunsacker.
Wednesday, October 19th, Whlttler.—
County candidates and Judge Guthrie and
Clarence A. Miller,
Thursday, October 20th, Long Beach.—
County candidates and C. F. Harris and W. A.
Ryan.
Friday, October 21st, Ban Pedro.—
County candidates and T. E. Gibbon and M. X
C. Munday.
Saturday, October 2ad, Wilmington.—
County candidates and Geo. W. Merrill and
Richard Dnnnlgan.
Monday, Ootober 24th, Santa Monica.—
County candidates and J. J. Ayers and Clar
ence A. Miller,
Tuesday, October 25th, Redondo —
Connty candidates and Abbot Kinney and
Wm. 8. Creighton.
Wednesday, Ootober 26th, Soldiers'
Home.—County candidates and Enoch Knight
and W. A. Ryan.
Thursday, October 27th, Glendale,—
Connty caudicates 'and J. Marion Brooks and
C. F. Harris.
Friday, October 28th, San Fernando.—
County candidates and Judge Guthrie, A. L.
Selig and Richard Dunnlgan.
Saturday, October 29th, New-ball.—
County candidates and W. J. Hunsacker and
M. L. Graff.
Monday, October 31st, Lancaster.—
County candidates and J Marlon Brooks and
W. A. Ryan.
Tuesday, November Ist, Los Angeles.—
County candidates and Geo. S. Patton, T. E.
Gibbon, J, De Barth Shorb and other speaker?.
Additional speakers will be assigned from
time to time by the State Auxiliary Committee.
By order Democratic County Central Com
mittee. C. F. A. LAST,
HENRY P. WILSON, Chairman.
Secretary.
I LLICH'S
RESTAURANT.
EVERYTHING NEW AND FIRST-CLASS
5 and 147 N. Main Street.
JERRY ILLICH, Proprietor.
• LOVELY!
SOFT AND GLOSSY
Are only acquired by using
FORD'S CUBLINH FLUID.
Guaranteed to give the best
satisfaction of any article
in the market. Perfectly
harmless.
£SP- Manufactured only
"SOts; by the
I FOBD CDBLINB FLUID OOIF'I,
TRADE MARK. Los Angeles. Cal
Painless Dentistry
Fine Gold Filling ,
Crown and Bridge
JtS BET TEETH, $8.00.
£&rftw * , ti S"t Kooms 18 and 19,
\%.8&% 107 N. Spring st,
CHEAP
Dinner, Tea sToilet Services
Plates and bowls for the million,
Haviland China, Amateurs' Supplies
staffordshirelrockery CO.,
8-27 417 South Spring street 6mo
Los Angeles Terminal Railway Company,
Los Angeles depots, east end of First street
and Downey avenue bridges.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Pasadena for
Pasadena. Los Angeles.
t 6:35 a.m t 7:16 a.m.
* 7:10 a.m • 8:05 a.m.
* 8:00 a.m • 9:05 a.m.
" 9:00 a.m »10:36 a.m.
•10:30 a.m »12:00 a.
•12:15 p.m • 1:06 p.m.
* 1:25 p.m • 2:05 p.m.
* 2:25 p.m * 4 05 p.m.
* 4:00 p.m • 6:26 p.m.
* 5:20 p.m • 7:05 p.m.
* 6:20 p.m • 8:05 p.m.
* 9:20 p.m '10:06 p.m.
•11:00 p.m.... •11:45 p m.
Downey avenue leaving time 7 minutes later.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Altadena for
Altadena. Log Angeles.
•10:30 a.m *11:35 a.m.
* 4:00 p.m • 6;00 p.m.
All trains start from First-Btreet depot.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave Glendale for Los
Glendale. Angeles.
f 6:45 a.m » 7:25 a.m.
* 8:15 a.m • 9 : 03 a.m.
•12:20 p m • i;i6 p.m.
* 3:00 p.m • 3:50 p.m.
* 5:15 p.m...» 6:10 p.m.
Leave Los Angeles for Leave East San Pedro
Long Beach and East for
San Pedro. Los Angeles.
* 9:55 a.m • 7:25 a.m
*12:45 p.m •U:Usm
5:30 p.m 4:00 p.m
Between East San Pedro and Long Beach, 10
minutes.
Stai Gabriel Valley Rapid Transit Railway^
MONROVIA DIVISION.
Leave Los Angeles for Leavo Monrovia for Loa
Monrovia. Angeles.
t 7:55 a.m .77777.* 6:55 a.m.
•11:10 a.m * 8:55 a.m.
* 2:55 p.m »12:45 p.m.
* 5:25 p.m.... » 4:00 p.m.
*Daily. fDaily, except Sundays. Stages meet
the 8:00 am. and 12:15 p.m. trains at Pasadena
for Mt. Wilson on new :rail.
Passengers leaving Los Angeles on the 8 a.m.
train for Wilson's peak can return the same day.
Theater nights the 11 p.m. train will wait 20
minutes after the theater 1b out when later than
10:40-p.m.
Special rates to excursion and picnic parties.
Depots aast end First street and Downey ave
nue bridges.
I General offices. First-street Depot
T. B. BURNETT, General Manager.
]y3-tf W. WINOUP, Gen. Passenger Agt.
I I NKS OF TKAVKL.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA RAILWAY
COMPANY. (Santa Fe Boute.)
IN EFFECT MONDAY, SEPT. 26, 1892.
Leave. Arrive.
•12:20p.m Overland ... * 2:45p.m
• 8:15 a.m San Diego Coast Line. * 1:17 p.m
• 3:05 p.m . .San Diego Coast Line. * 7:15 p.m
• 6:30 a.m I f * 9:50 a.m
• 8 30 a.m 1 .. San Bernardino .. J *10:60a.m
•12:20p m f... via Pasadena....! * 2:45 p.m
■ 4:00 p.m J [ • 6:25 p.m
• 5:30a.i0 , Klvorside < *10:50a.m
• 8 30am [.... via .... \ * 2:45 p.m
•12:20 p.m ).. San Bernardino... (» 6:25 p.m
•11:00 a.ni / Riverside and San t "10:13 a.m
• 6 05 p.m ( Ber'dino via Orange I * 5:20 p.m
• 6:30 am | Redlands, Mentone f
'4ss% D and Highland.
• 4:00p.m - Panorama Train.. | «io:soa.m
J via Pasadena ... I, * 2:45 p.m
•11-00 am (Redlands, Mentone) »s. 2 ot>m
• vmnm S a nd Highland vla£ , In -.fo Pm
•5.05 p.m forange & Riverside* *«•:»«.»
• 6:30a.m 1 f ' 8:50 a.m
• 8:30 a.m * »:50a.m
•12:20 p.m I ....) "10:50 a,m
• 1:25 p.m f Azusa,Pasadenaandi • 1:25 p.m
• 4 00 p.m intermediate ... * 2:45 pm
• 7:20 p.m stations • 6:25 p.m
• 5:25 p.m , 7:45 a.m
♦10:30 a.m J [ t 4:35 p.m
• 8:15 a.m Santa Ana • 1:17 p.m
• 3:05 p.m Santa Ana * 5:20 p.m
Santa Ana. * 7:15 p.m
t 4:42 p.m Santa Ana t 8:48 a.m
SantaMonlra&Redondo • 8:28 a.m
•10:00 cm Kedondo&aantaMonlca * 2:18 p.m
•ianta MonicsA Redondo • 3:52 p.m
• 1:30p,m tedondo&SantaMonica * 4:57 p.m
• 5:25 p.m -iantaMonicaiSi Redondo
t 6:30 a.m San Jacinto via Pasaoe'a 110:50 am
t12:20p.m -tan Jacinto via Pasade'a t 6:25 p.m
fll:00a.m San Jaeinto via Orange 110:1:> a.m
San Jacinto via Orange r 5:20 p.m
fll .00 a.m .Temecula via Orange.. fl0:13 a.m
(12:20 p.m lemeculavia Pasadena 110:50 a.m
• 3:05 p.m Kscondido • 1:17 p.m
• Daily. ♦ Daily except Sunday. J Sunday only.
ED. CHAMBERS, Ticket Agent,
First Btreet Depot.
E. W. McGEE, City Pas. and T. Ag%
129 N. Spring St„ Los Angeles.
Depot at foot of First street. f 23
Soiitta Pacific Coops.
IMPORTANT CHANGE OF TIME
OCTOBER 1, 1892.
Trains leave and are due to arrive at
LOB ANQKLKS (ARCADE DEPOT),
Fifth street, dally, as follows:
Leave For destination. Act. Ftoio
8:80 a.m. Banning Alo:lsam
a 4:36 p.m Banning 10-00 pm
ss:3op.m Colton s 9:27 a.m.
7:45 a. m Colton Al0:15an:
8:30 a.m Colton 4:52 p.m,
A4:3sp.ra Colton 10:00 p.m.
8:30a.m Demingand Bast.... 10-00p.m,
B:3oa.ui El Paso and Bast.... 10:00 p.m.
a 5 :30 p. m (i hi no a 8 :50 a, m,
9:25 a.m. Long Beach <4 san Pedro 8:15 a.m
12-40 p.m. San Pedro & Long Beach 11:56 a. m.
6:00 p. m. Long Beacb & San Pedro 4-15 p. m.
2:00 p.m. Ogden and East, 2d class 7:45 a.m.
10:40 p. m. Ogdenand East, Ist class 11:30 a. m.
10:40 p. m Portland, Or 7:45 a, m,
s 5:30 p.m Riverside 8 9:27 am.
7:45 a.m Riverside Alo;lsa.m
8:30 a. m Riverside 4:52 p.m.
a 4:35 p. m Riverside 10:00p.m
55:30 p. m San Bernardino s 9:27 a.m.
7:45 a. m San Bernardino Alo:lsa.m
8:30 a. m San Bernardino 4:62 p.m.
A4:35p,m San Bernardino 10:00 p m,
ss:3op.m Red'ands 59:27 a.m.
7:46 a. m Redlands Al0:15 a m
8:30a.m Redlands 4:62pm
a4:35p.m. Redlands 10:00p.m,
2:00 p. m. San Fran, and Sacram'to 7:46 a. m,
10:40 p. m. San Fran, and Sacram'to 11:30 a. m.
a 9:12 a.m. Banta Ana and Anaheim 8:26 a. m.
6:10 p. m. Santa Ana and Anaheim A 4:04 p. m.
8:20 a.m Santa Barbara 1:20 p.m.
4:65 p.m Santa Barbara 9.10 p.m
Santa Monica, 7:44 a. ix,
9:30 am Santa Monica 8:29 a. as.
Santa Monica 12:15 p.m
1:17 p.m. Santa Monica 4:10 p.m.
6:15 p.m Santa Monica
6:16 p.m. Santa Monica
Santa Monica Cafion.. 512:15p.m
s9:3oa. m. . .Santa Monica Cafion.. s4:lop. m.
si :17 p.m. . .Santa Monica Cafion
4:52 p.m Tustin 3:43 a.m
a 9 :40 a. m Whittier 8 :4 ?, a. m.
4:52 p. m Whittier ; Al :45 p.m.
Take Santa Monica trains from San Fernando
Btreet, Naud's Junction, Commercial street,
Arcade depot, Jefferson street (Winthrop sta
tion), Grand avenue, or University.
For north: Arcade, Commercial street, Naud's
Junction, San Fernando ttreet
For east: Arcade, Commercial street, Naud's
Junction.
For other branches: Arcade, Commercial
street, Naud's Junction San Fernando street.
Local and through tickets sold, baggage
ohooked, Pnllm&n car reservations
made, and general information given upon ap
plication to J. M. CRAWLEY, Asst. G. Pas. Ast.
No. 144 H. Spring St., cor. Second. CHARLES
BBYLER, Agent at Depots,
s Sundays only.
A Sundays excepted.
BIOH'D GRAY, Gen. Traffic Mgr.
T. H. GOODMAN,
Gen'l Passenger Agt.
Pacific Coast S. 5. Go.
GOO DELL, PERKINS & CO., GENERAL
Agents, San Francisco. Northern routes
embrace lines for Portland, Ore., Victoria, B.
C, and Puget Sound. Alaska, and ah coast
points.
SOUTHERN ROUTES.
TIMS TABLE FOB OCTOBER, 1892.
LEAVE SAN FKANOISCO.
For 1
Port Harford— 8. 8. Corona, October 7,16
Santa Barbara,.. 25; November 3.
Redondo >
San Pedro. S. fa. Queen, October 3, 12,
Newport. 21,30; November 8.
San Dieg0........
For 1 8. S. Eureka, October 5,14
Redondo I 23; November 1.
San Pedro and fS. 8. Los Angeles, October 1,
way ports J 10.19, 28; November 6.
LEAVE SAN PSDRO AND BBDONDO.
For I S. 8. Queen, October 5, 14,
I 23; November 1.
San Diego fS. 8. Corona, October 9,; 18,
J 27; November 5.
For 1 a 8. Queen, October 7, 16,
San Francisco... I 2o; November 3
Port Harford fB. 8. Corona, October 2,11,
Santa Barbara ■. J 20, 29; N ovem ber 7.
For 1 8. 8. Los Angeles, October 4,
San Francisco 1 13,22, 31; November 9.
and fS. S. Eureka, October 8, 17,
way ports J 26; November 4.
Oars to connect with steamers via San Pedro,
leave S. P. R. B. depot. Fifth street, l,o>-- An
geles, at 9:26 o'olock a. m.
Passengers por steamer Corona and Queen,
via Redondo, north bound, leave Santa
Fe depot at 10:00 a.m.: or from Redondo Rail
way depot, corner Jefferson street and Grand
aye., 9:00 a. m.
Passengers per Los Angeles and Eureka vis
Bedondo, leave Santa Fe depot at 5:25 p. m.
Plans of steamers' cabins at agent's office,
where berths may be secured,
The company reserve the right to change the
steamers or their days of sailing.
Mpty-Vot passage or freight as above or for
tickets to and bora all Important points in
Europe, apply to
W. PAR RIB, Agent,
Office, No. 124 West Second st., Los Angeles.
Redondo Railway.
Winter Time Card No. 9.
In Effect 5 a. in., October 3, 1892.
Los Angeles Depot, Corner Grand Aye. and
Jefferson st.
Take Grand aye. <able or Main st. and Agrl
ultural Park ho.se cars.
Tiains Leave Tralnß Leave
Los Angeles Redondo
for Redondo. for Los Angeles.
8:00 a. in daily 7:20 a. m. daily.
9-.00 a. m. daily 9:10 a. m. daily.
1:35 p.m. daily 11:00 a. m. daily.
5:00 p.m. daily 4:45 p. m. daily.
Running time between Los Angeles and Re
dondo Beach, 50 minutes.
City Ticket office at A. B. Grcenwald's cigar
store, cor. First and Soring streets.
GEO. J. AINSWORTH, J. H. SUTTON.
President. Supt.
R. H. THOMPSON, Vice-President
IE. LITTLEBOY'S
DRUG STORE
311 S. Spring St., Near Third,
Removed irom 160 N. Main st.
A complete stock of Drugs, Chemicals, Toilet
Articles, Druggists' Sundries and Electrioal In
struments always ou hand.
Prescriptions carefully prepared at modern
prices. 6-30 6m
BANKIN«^JHMJHIK^
DEPOSITS.
Main Street Savings Bank and Trust Company,
CAPITA L, - - $200,000.
,86 B. MAIN BTBMT, LOS ANOBLKH, C4.L
The design ol this institution Is to aflord a sale depository for the earnings of all person,
who are dmirnniofDiae i nVtheir money where It will be free from accident, aud at the same
time be earniPK for fhen a fair rate of Interest. Dei oslU *>ll be received in ram« of from *1 to
SSSo aid lW«nWuld deposit at least Bl pet week Irom their wages. This
will form a nur Ins that will U-ltlmately enable you to purchase a home or begin business. Chil
dren can purchase"ft- cent sts mr, s in all parts of the city and county. It is the W education yon
can have in saving and caring tc r money.
J. B. LANKICRSHIM, CHAS. FORMAN J. V. WACHTEL
President, Vice-President. Cashier.
MONEY TO LOAN ON MORTGAGES
COLUMBIA SAVINGS BANK.
CAPITAL _ $100,000.
Temporary Office with the Citizen*' Bank, corner Spring and Third streets, until our room is
ready for oooapation in the uew Stimson block.
T. D. STIMSON, President. T. W BROTHERTON, Vice-President. A. P. WEST, Cashier
HIBECTORS:
T. D. Stimson. H. Jevne, T. S. C. Lowe, A.. M. Ozmun,
Andrew Mullen, K. H. Wade, J.K.Clarke, Robert Hale,
Jabez Perclval, T. W. Brotherton, A. P. West.
NAMES OF STOCKHOLDERS:
Baldwin, Mrs. tt A. Bllnn, L. W. Jones, C. B. Kohlmeier, C. 0.
Burns, J. F. Brown, T. E. Lewis, W. M. Lowe, T. 8. C.
Brotherton, T. W. Clark, J. R. Lewis, Thos. A. Menefee, J. M.
Clark, Wesley Chambers, Edw'd Mullen, Andrew Mullen J.F.
Curry, Mrs. ti. K. Curry, Miss K. I. Mar tin, I. T. McClung, Mrs. E. B.
Cullen, K. P. Demons. P. A. -Ormt'n, A M. PerciVil,J.
Dillon, Henry C. Drisooll, W. A. Pease, Nlles Parker, Dr. F. M.
Eckstiom & Btrosburg Fay, E. G. Rvan, U. T. Stimson, T. D.
Fay, F. E. Falils, G. P. Stimson, »V. H. Stimson, Mrs. f. D.
Frost F. P. Fay, Eli Stimson, «, W. _ Stlmsou, H. C.
Fay, Harriet K. Fixen, A. H. ttpeue r. Miew Mary E, Seaberg, Hannah
Gillespie, M. M. Bale. Robert Van Dyke, W. M. Van Guysliug, M. I.
Hale, C. F. Hoch, Wm. West, A. P. Williamson, R, B.
Jevne, H. Jones, J. H. Wade, K. H. Waters, R. J.
Johnson, M. D. Johnson, 0. T.
Intorest paid on Deposits. Money to loan on Real Estate.
Security Savings Bank, Capital, $200,000
NO. 14)t SOUTH MAIN STBBKT, LOS ANOBLKS, CALIFORNIA.
OFFICERS AND DIREOTOES.
F. N. MYERS PRESIDENV
ISAIAB W. HELLMAN, President Nevada Bank. San Francisco; President Farmers and Mer
chants Bank, Los Angelos.
ANDREW J. BOWNE „ President Fourth/National Bank, Grand Rapids. Mic
H. W. HELLMAN - Vice-president Farmers aad Merchants Bank, Los Angel
T. L. DUQUE VICE-PRBSIDBMa
M. L. FLEMING Capitalist, Los Angeles
A. C. ROGERS . . Physician, Los Angeles
MAURICE S. HELIiMAN Of Hellman, Waldeiik A Co., Wholesale Stationers, Los Angeles
J. A. GRAVES Of Graves, O'Melveny & Shankland, Attorneys, Los Angelea
J. H. SHANK i.AND of Graves, O'MUlveny & Shankland, Attorneys, Los Angeles, Cal
JAMES RAWSON •• - ••;• ■ • Capitalist, Boston
I, F. SARTOBI C &SHIER; also Vice-presf.dent First National Bank, Monrovia, Cal
FIVE P ER CENT INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS,
TH! '. NOTICE OF THE PUHLIC IS CALLED
To the fact that thiß bank has the largest paid up capital and surptus combined of any saving!
bank in Southern California, and only loans money on approved real estate security; thai
among its stockholders are son ie of the oldest and most responslnle citizens of the community;
that under the State law, the private estates of its stockholders are pro rata liable for the total
indebtedness of the bank. T. iese facts, with care exercised ln making loans, insure a safe
derosltory for saving accounts. School teachere, clerks, mechanics, employees in factories and
shops, laborers, etc., will find it convenient to make deposits ln small amounts. CHILDRENS
SAVINGS DEPOSITS received 1; » sums of 6 cents and upward. Remittances may be sent by
drart or Wells, Fargo A Co.'s expi eas. 8-1 Bm
Los Angeles Savings Bank,
No, 5 336 North Main Street.
capital: STOCK 9 100,000
STJKPL.US 34.000
H. W. HELLMAN, Preside nt, J. E. PLATER, Vlee-President
W. M. CASWELL, Cashier.
DIRECTORS:
I. W. HELLMAN. B. S. BARER. H. W. HBLLMAN
J, E. PL ATBR. I. W. HELLMAN, JB.
6-5 tf jTUT" I merest paid or i deposits. Money to loan on first-class real estate.
German-American Savingfs Bank,
114 SOUTH : I4AIN STREET, LOS ANGELES, OAL.
O APITAL PAID> IN GOLD, - - $100,000.00.
Jm rest compounded quarterly to depositors at the rate of 5 per cent on term and 3.6 m per cent
on ordinary deposits.
E. N. MCDONALD, Prea't Jill. JOSEPH KURTZ and S. W. LUITWEILER, Vlce-Pref Is.
fit TOR PONET, Treasurer. M. N. AVERY, Bec'y P. F. SCHUMACHER, Asst. Seo'y.
DIRECTORS.
E N, McDonald, H. W. 3ti ill, Joseph Ktjbtz, M. N. Avbby, X. A. Pasoss,
Conrad Hafbn. W. M. i Jh: ildon. 8. W. luitwkilkb, Victob Ponbt, C. N, Flint,
Isaac H, Johnson.
MaT** On en every Sattfday evening for deposits.
BANK OF AMI .RICA,
FORMERLY
LOB ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Temple Block.
Capital Stock paid up $300,000
OFFICES B.
JOHN B. PLATER President
ROBT. S. BAKER 1 Vice- President
GEO. H. STEWART Cashier
DIBECTOBS.
Jotham Bixby, Cba s. Forman,
L. T. Garnsey, Lew allyn Bixby
R. S. Baker, Johr E. Plater,
Geo. H. Stewart.
OS ANGELES NATIONAL BJ iNK.
TJ. 8. I IKFOSITORY.
Cor. First and Spring sti ecu.
Capital * 1500,000
Surplus _ 85,000
Total 1585,000
George H. Bonebrake President
John Bryson, 8r ..Vice-President
F. C. Howes Cashier
E. W. Coe Asst. Cashier
DIBECTOBB.
Dr. W. G. Cochran, Perry "H, Green, George-
McAllister, George H. Boneb rake, H. H. Mark
ham, John Bryson, Sr., F. C. Howes, Warren
Quieten.
No Interest Paid on Deposits.
Exchange ior sale on all tb«> principal cities)
of the United states and Europe.
ARMERS AND MBRCHANTS BANK Q§
Lob Angeles, Cal.
Capital (pad up) $500,000'
Surplus and Profits 780,000
Total $1,280,000
OFFICERS,
IBAIAS W. HBLLMAN Presid«s»t
HERMAN W. HELLMAN Vice-President
JOHN MILNER Cashier
H. J. FLEISHMAN Assistant CashJer
DIBECTOBS.
W. H. Perry. Oiro W. Chllds. J. B. Lanker
shim, C. E. Thorn, C. Ducommnn, H. W. Hell
man, T. L. Duque, A. Glassell, I. W Hellman.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States, Europe, CI llna and Japan ;
QALIFOBNIA BANK..
Cor. Broadway and Second st,, Los Angeles.
Subscribed capital $500,000
Paid up capital 500,000-
Surplus _ 20,000
J. Frankenfleld President ,
Sam Lewis Vice-President
J. M. Witmerr Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS.
J. Frankenfleld, G. W. Hug hes. Sam Lewis
J. 0. Kayß, E. W. Jones, I. B. Newton,
Hervey Lindley.
General ng and exchange business
transacted m 4 4m
rpHE NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA
Corner of Spring and Secon d streets,
LOS ANGELKS, OA L.
Capital paid up (250,000
J. M. C. Marble . .. .President
0. H. Churchill .Vice-President
Perry Wildinan Cashior
A. Hadley '. Asst. Cashier
BOARD OF DIBECTO BS.
Dr. W. L. Graves, K. F. C. Klol :ke. O. T. John
son, W. Hadley, E. N. McDonal' 1, M. H. Sher
man, Fred Baton, John WoU :skill, Thos. B.
Bard. 10-31
SAVINGS BANK OF SOUTH EBN CALIFOR
NIA,
Southeast corner Spring a- ac l Court streets
Los Angeles, Ci .1.
CAPITAL, - - 8100,000.
X. F. BrKNCE, President
F. 0. HOWB3. VI ae-Presldent.
J. H. Bb> .ly, CanMer and Treaa
DIBEC rOBB.
Geo. H. Bonebrake, J. h. Bralv, H. L. Drew,
J. M. Elliott, C. N. Ha» bob, y. c Howes, M. W.
Stimson, Hiram Mabr <xy. E. F. S'pence, Warren
Glllelen. 4-1 6m
THE UNIVERSITY / BANK OF LOS ANGELES
Southeast corr- i<?r pint and Broadway.
Capital stock ml paid up $100,000
Surplus 60,000
R. M. WIDNEY Prertdeut
D. 0. MILTIMO'iB V'ce-President
GBO. L. ARNOJJD Cashier
_ „.,. WJ:BCTOBS.
BvM. Wldnf jy , D. O. Miltimiore, 8, W. Little.
C. ./ohn McArthur. C. A. Warner, L.
General banking business, a nd loans on first
olass real estate soli cited. Buy and sell first
class stocks, bonds and warrants. Parties wish
ing to invest in first-class se curitlea on either
long or short time can be aoco mmodated.
State Loan and Trust Go.
OF LOS ANOHLHS.
Subscribed Capital $1,000,000
Capital Paid Up 700,000
BANKING BOOH, N W. CORNER SPBI
AND SECOND STREETS, BRYSON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS.
President
JOBTJ BRYSON, SB Ist Vine-Presidents
W. if. PERRY 2d Vice-President
A. E. FLETCHER Cashier
J. F. TO WELL . Secretary and General Manager
George H. Bonebrake, W. G. Cochran,
H. J. Woollacott, Wm. H Crocker,
O. T. Johnson, Ban Francisco.
Judge W. P. Gardiner, A. A. Hubbard.
We act as trustees for corporations and estates
Loan money on first-class real estate and 00l
laterals. Keep choice securities for sale. Safe
deposit boxes for rent. Applications for loan
received from borrowers ln person or by mail.
THE CITY BANK,
37 South Spring street.
Capital Stock $300,000
A.D. CHILDRESS President
JOHN S. PARK Cashier
DIRECTORS.
W. T. Childress, Poindexter Dunn,
J. J. Scballert, X. E. Crandall,
John S. Park, R. 9. Lunt,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof safe.
Deposit boxes rented at from $3 to $20 per an
num.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA NATIONAL
BANK, 101 B. Spring St., Nadeau block.
L. N. Breed President
Wm. F. BosbysheU Vice-President
0. N. Flint Cashier
Capital paid in gold coin 1200,000
Surplus and undivided profits 25,000
Authorized capital 600,000
DIBECTOBS.
L. N. Breed, H. T. Newell, Wm. H. Avery,
Silas Holman.W. H. Holliday, E. C. Bosbyshell
M. Hagan, Frank Rader, D. Remlck.Thos Goss
William F. BosbysheU. 7-1 tf
THIRST NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANGELES
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000
SURPLUS 295,000
J. M. KLLIOTT President
J. D. BICKNELL Vice-President
J. H. BRALY i asluer
G. B. SHAFFER Assistant Cashier
Directors-J. M. Elliott, J. D. Bicknell, 8. H.
Mott, 11. Mabury. J. D. Hooker. D. M. McGarry,
Wm. G. Kerckhoff, ju 1
DR. WON Gt HIM,
Chinese Physician and Surgeon, has resided in
Los Angeles seventeen (17) years. His reputa
tion as a thorough physician has been fully es
tablished and appreciated by many. His large
Eraetice is sufficient proof of his ability and
onesty.
The doctor graduated ln the foremost col)
leges, also practiced in the largest hospitals o-
Canton, China. The doctor speaks Spanish
fluently.
OFFICE: New number, 639; old number,
117 Upper Main street. P. O. box 564, ota
tlon C. 12-17 tf
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER COMPANY
WHOLESALE AND BET AIL
Main Office: LOS ANGELES.
Wholesale Yard at BAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Azusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
T. J.. Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pres. and Treas.
MX. Nicholß, Sec'v. X. L. Chandler, Supt.
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
LUMBER DEALERS
And Manufacturers of
DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS.
Mill Work of Every Description.
984 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles-
lul tf

Baker Iron Works
950 to 966 BUXNA VISTA ST.,
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
I Adjoining the Southern Pacific Grounds. Tela
I phone,l24. 7-21
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