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The Scranton tribune. [volume] (Scranton, Pa.) 1891-1910, April 15, 1895, Image 3

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7
TOE SCR ANTON TRIBUNE MONDAY MORNING. APRIL 15, 1895.
3
r NORTON'S NEW STOCK
Wall Papers and Decorations
Are the Most Beautiful Designs and
Elegant Combinations of Colorings
Ever produced, have been
Selected from half dozen Factories
That make the Finest
Wall Decorations In this country.
Our Selections are Exclusive und
Cannot be see a in other stores la
This city. They comprise
All grades, from Kitchens to Finest
Parlors and at Right Prices Always.
Many Styles are about half
Former Prices. We invite an
Inspection of our stock which will be
Cheerfully shown to all callers
At our Spacious New Building,
312 Lacka. Ave.
M. NORTON.
A Foe to Dyspepsia
GOOD BREAD
USE THE
SnowWhite
FLOUR
And Always Have
Good Bread.
MANUFACTURED AND FOR SALE
TO THE TRADE BY
The Weston Mill Go.
i'IRI I a. I
LI
THE GENUINE POPULAR
Punch Cigars
hive the mmaLS
G. B. &CO.
: HWPRWITED ON EACH CIGAR.
Garney, Brown & Co. Mf rs
Court House Square.
I. FRANK SIEGEL'S
1INI CONCERT AID BULL
AT THE FROTHINGHAM.
BAUER'S ORCHESTRA AND BAND, 40 PIECES
Easter Monday Night, April 15.
Tirkets on Bale at box office, ona ticket ad
mlttieg lndy and fentleman: extra ladies'
tickets, uOu.
t&TA general invitation extend,
ed to all present and former pupils
and their friends.
Strangers buying tickets at box office must
be introduced. Xo tickets sold to parties not'
known.
PERSONAL.
H. Lan?feld, of Haslacher's millinery.
Is in New York.
Harry Madlgan, of Morristown, N. J.,
ipent yesterday with his parents in this
city.
Colonel George Sanderson and Rev. N.
F. Stahl returned Saturday from their trip
to Europe and Asia.
Edward Keefe, a student at Stroudsburg
State Normal school. Is spending a few
deys at his home on Phelps street.
Lewys Watcyn and Peter peuser left
last nlsht r Toronto. Canada, where they
will enter for the final examination work
for degree of Mus. liac. Both are well
. equipped for the task, and are pupils of
Professor T. J. Da.vlea, of this city.
GOMPERS IS COMING.
Object of the Noted Labor Leader's Visit
Is in Doubt.
Samuel Gompers, ex-president of the
American Federation of Labor, will ar
rive In this city at 1 o'clock thla after
noon. He will address a public meet
inn. lahn.t . . . . ,
... ,ui men lumorrriw nigni in
he hall over Samter'a clothing store,
corner of Lackawanna and Penn ave
nues. The Central Labor union will en
tertain Mr. Qompers while In the city.
It Is not known fyr what particular
purpose Mr. Qompers Is to visit Scran
ton. The garment cutters and workers
recently had controversy with the man
ufacturing: clothiers which was not set
tled. Since that time .the workmen
have placed boycott on the business
of the concerns Involved In the quarrel.
It Is reported that Mr. Qompers will
endeavor to bring about a settlement
and that that Is one of the objects of his
visit here.'
. DEATH OF MRS. A. Ifl.AIK.
She Has for Twenty-five Years Been
ll' . t, .... I . . U k J
. Mrs. Archbald Blair, an old ond re
spected resident of Archbald, died yes
. terday morning at the residence of her
daughter. Miss M. A. Early, 208 Spruce
street. She was 65 years old and Is
survived by two sons and five daugh-
ers. They are Miss M. A. Ear ley; Mrs.
M. J. Berry, Miss Anna. Blair and
'Thomas F. Earley, of Chicago; William
(Earley, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Mrs. Charles
.Jennings, or yueenstown, pa., and Mrs.
I T. Fv JVells, of Archbald.
The remains will be taken on Tuesday
morning to Archbald on the 10.10 Dela
ware end Hudson train.- Solemn re
quiem high mass for the deceased will
be celebrated In St. Thomas' church.
Archbald, and the interment will be
In the Catholic cemetery at that place.
Pill burr's Flour Mills have capacity
C UJU barrels a day.
CASE OF REV. MR. HOGAN
It May Be Consibercd by Wyoming
Conference Today. .
APPOINTMENTS WILL BE MADE
Business Transacted by the Conference
at Its Sessions on Saturday and Sun
day Addressed by Ulshop An
drew and ..Miss Dauforlb.
Concluded from Page 1.
the 'town, but when her work was
showing signs of success, 8hcwu sub
jected to the persecution of .the native
priests, who demanded that she should
be compelled to leave the town in thirty
days, and placards were placed around
warning her that her residence would
be burned and herself and pupils con
sumed In the flames. Large stones
were thrown .through the windows at
them and every effort made 'to compel
them to leave the town, but under the
surveillance of police officers they were
able to walk about und live In safety.
Before they were out of this perse
cution, a typhoon struck the town and
caused terrlbl havoc and disorgan
ized their work for a time. Following
this came the famine, with Its awful
ravages. She puld regular visits to the
lowest nuarter of the town where the
emaciated people crawled like brutes,
praying for a spoonful of rice to allevi
ate their overpowering pangs of hun
ger. The description of the effects of
the famine wasmost realistic, and while
her audience were Intensely Interested
In this phase of her adventures, Miss
Panfurth increased the Interest when
speaking of the deathly visit of the
cholera and mnallpox epidemics.
Havoc by mi Earthquake.
While every ear In the audience was
strained to catch every word of her
thrilling story she reached a climax
when describing the earthquake which,
in two minutes, hurled 10.000 souls to
eternity. Her description of the wreck
age of the house and school, and subse
quent escape to the grove, was more
than graphic and impossible of re-production,
us the Inflection of Miss Dan
forth's voice and her great charm of
description would, of necessity, be lack
ing. In relating how, during five days and
five nights, they wore out in the grove
while the earthquuke shook the earth,
fully one-fourth off her audience showed
signs of emotion and strong men were
seen weeping. Miss Danforth had the
care of a large number of natives, who
had gathered around her in the time
of danger, and who relied upon her
absolutely for protection from the pris
oners who had broken from the jails
and had looted the liquor shops. Al
most at the end of the fH'e days Miss
Danforth felt her reason giving way
under the terrlblle strain and went to
a secluded where she could die, if such
was to be her end. Here she thought
of the prayer of the disciples on the sea
and the Master's reply "Peace, be still."
Why had she not thought of that an
swer before. He could say to the earth
quake "Peace, be still," and then she
engaged In that earnest prayer for help
from on high. Thlt it was granted was
proved by her return to her old home
among the New England mountains
and her presence among them that day.
Miss Danforth's peroration was one
never to be forgotten. The loftiness of
thought and simplicity of deliv
ery was exquisite. She told of a
little girl friend In China Who
had died and left a last message that
when in Heaven she would ask the
Lord to allow her to stand at the door
to be the first to welcome In Miss Dan
forth through the golden gates. That
message, said Miss Danforth, was suf
ficient recompense for all her troubles,
Illness and weariness she had under
gone, but what a thought it suggest
ed F.he painted a brilliant picture be
fore the pastors of the glorious future
before them, when, In going to their
eternal rt t, they would be greeted
there by ell those whose souls they
had teen Instrumental In bringing to
Christ What a greatness of purpose
for which to work and a future so
glorious were described by the eloquent
lady while her audience listened spell
bound and regretfully learned the last
words r-f a trulj eloquent and ennobling
address.
Dr. Penrce's Apology.
Jlpv. TV. II. Pearce was announced to
deliver an address, but declined to fol
low Miss t'anforth, as he said he was
too wise in that line, and would n..
v .-nture to Break to them after the
manner that lady had so wrought upon
Ihelr feeilngs.
Last night a large audience assem
bled to celebrate the anniversary of the
Freeman's Aid and Southern Educa
tional moiety, when Rev. Manley S.
Hard presided.
Rev. Austin Grlflln and Rev. Q. T.
Price conducted the devotional exer
cises, after which Rev. 11. C. McDer
mott, conference treasurer, presented
the following report: Iilnghamton dis
trict, $352; Chzenango, $147; Honesdale,
$166;Oneanto,$180; Owego, $2.85; Wyom
ing, $6.87; total, $1,817, being a decrease
of $1S as compared with last year's re
ceipts. Rev. J. W. Hamilton, of Boston, one
of the corresponding secretaries of the
society, delivered an exceptionally inter
eating address upon the work and ob
jects of the society.
SUNDAY SESSIONS.
Work That Was Done Yesterday by the
Conference.
This morning at 9 o'clock the Metho
dist church was again crowded when
the lovefeast, an institution peculiar to
the Methodist church, was conducted
by Rev. William Hlller, of Tunkhan
nock, who. In relating his experience,
said It was thirty years that day since
he entered the conference, and they had
been years of pleasure, of memory, of
comfort, full of labor and anxiety. In
1880 he became pantos of Cafbondnle
Methodist Episcopal church and re
mained there three years. During his
time as a member of the conference he
had been detained from preaching but
three times, on account of sickness, In
the thirty years.
In conclusion he said that his pur
pose was to be loyal to the church, loyal
to Ood and loyal to himself. Many of
the pastors also related their experi
ences, and the meeting was described
as blessed by the Holy spirit, who was
evidently In their midst.
Bishop Andrews preached an eloquent
and practical sermon at the- motfhing
service, which was held at 10.30 o'clock.
The Bishop also conducted the prelim
inary devotional services and read se
lections from scripture. He based his
sermon on St. John x, 10: "I am come
that they might have life, and that they
might have It more abundantly."'
Bishop Andrews' Sermon.
During: his nermon he remarked that
the sending: of Christ to this world and
to His work, anticipated the creation of
man, and -that by Him, In Htm and for
Him were all things created. It was
not for such a life that Christ came on
earth, but to prepare the way to live a
life which would match our destiny.
Mun had- tho power of knowledgu to
serve Qod, a power of love and of af
fection. The reverend gentleman , Il
lustrated In detail the difference be
tween the love of human beings and
that of animals. The love of man far
surpassed that of the beast. Man had
a free will and knew right from wrong,
and should live In high achievements.
Some men lived as though thwe was
no Qud, and sought wholly the things
of the earth, so much that when they
would do good evil was present with
them. Their faith, love and power, to
do good are gone and if they remain so
it means eternal death; such men
have a continual war internally, the
lut, Jealousy and all ungodliness In
which they are living are at war, and
consequently .that man 18 rendered mis
erable. Christ on that Joyful Earner morning
made Ills own triumph over death, and
huppy was the time when He again ap
peared to Mary and HI disciples after
Ills resurrection. Christ's greatest
command was to preach tho Qospel to
it vsf
TT " w 7,7 St
REV. WILLIAM EDO A It,
Pastor of Carbondale Methodist Church,
all nations, baptizing them In the name
of the Father, Son and Holy Clhost.
How spiritual life was received no one
could explain and only He who created
the soul could re-make It, He can make
it to resist evil and accept good.
The bishop in his peroration made an
appeal to his audience to believe In
Christ and place their whole trust In
Him.
Ordinations of Deacons.
At the conclusion of his sermon
Bishop Andrews ordained the following
candidates in the oitlce of deacon, viz:
Clark Cnllender, of Trucksvllle, Lu
zerne; Arthur D. David, of West Nantl
coke; Charles Sweet, of Fergusonvllle,
Delaware, N. Y.; George N. Under
wood, of Larksvllle, Luzerne; Henry E.
Wheeler, of Damascus, Wayne; George
Remley, Judsun W. Pavls, David
Grouse, Walter Wugner and Mart Wil
liams. This afternoon at 2 30 o'clock the
members of the conference assembled
for the annual memorial service, one
attended by sad reminiscenes of the
labors of the faithful ones In the
Master's vineyard, who had gone to
their eternal rest since the last as
sembly of the ministers.
This afternoon the obituaries of the
following were read: Rev. Luther
Peck, Bradford county; Rev. George A.
Severson. of Blnghamton; Rev. Abizah
Brown, East Masonvllle, Delaware, N.
Y., and Rev. Aaron C. Sperry, of Whit
ney's Point, Broome, N. Y.
The obituaries of the' following
widows of deceased ministers were also
read: Mrs. Kate A. Lewis, widow nf
Rev. George C. Lewis; Mrs. A. C. Cole,
widow of Rev. A. C. Cole; Mrs. Cox,
widow of Rev. Hubbard Cox, and Mrs.
Blanchard, widow of Kev. H. A.
Blanchard.
Tho Recorded Obituaries.
The following excepts are from the re
corded obituaries:
Rev. Luther Perk, born at Pitcher,
Chenango county, on March 9, 1827, and
died Oct. 31, 1894; educated at Wyom
ing seminary and became a member of
Wyoming conference In 1853; was or
dained a deacon in 1855; ordained an
elder in 1877; married on May 15. 1807.
Rev. George A. Sever3on, born In Qull
erland, N. Y., on July 10, 1818; died in
Blnghamton Sept. 16, 1894; Joined
Wyoming conference in 185C, and was
united in marriage In 1838. Rev. Abl
Jah Brown, born on March 25, 1810, and
died Sept. 22, 1894; converted at the age
of 8 years, and united In marriage on.
Nov. 6, 1833; commenced to preach on
Oct. 29, 1842, and was a local preacher
for eight years. In 1890 he was or
dained an elder; on July 27, 1851, he
Joined the Oneida conference. Rev. A.
C. Sperry, born In Alfred, Mass., March
24, 1821, and died at Whitney's Point,
N. Y., on Aug. 18, 1894.. In 1849 became
a member of Oneida conference, and In
1888 retired from active service on ac
count of 111 health.
The following clergymen were or
dained as ciders: John S. Compton, of
Qreat Bend, Susquehanna, and John W.
Price, Of Contermoreland, Wyoming.
During the afternoon service selec
tions were rendered by the conference
trio.
Epworth l.coguo Anniversary.
This venlng at 7.30 o'clock a large
audience attended the anniversary of
the Epworth league, when. Rev. Ed
win A. Schell, secretary of the Epworth
league, addressed the meeting, explain
ing the remarkable development of the
league.
NOTES OF THE CONFEREJjjCE.
Colonel J. D. Laclar, of Wilkes-Barre,
was an interested visitor at the conference
on Saturday. .
Rev. Manley S. Hard, corresponding sec
retary of the Church Extension society,
who has worked so energetically during
the pust year, will continue In the oifice.
Rev. Austin Grililn, corresponding secre
tary to the Preachers' Aid society, has
been appointed to serve another term.
During the year the sum of $40,000 has
been promised toward the worn-out minis
ters' special fund.
At Saturday's business session Bishop
Andrews ruled that if a standard of num
bers hud been fixed by the conference as
a "passing point" In the examinations a
candidate not credited with the nec
essary numbers could not be advanced
unless a question of the sufficiency of the
examination be brought up. It would ajso
be necessary to attach the signature of
the quarterly conference to a recommen
dation of any candldute.
Rev. Edwin B. Olmstead, secretary to
the conference, has earned golden opin
ions for his unvarying courtesy to the In
cessant stream of callers at his desk, us
well as for his business-like manner in dis
charging the duties of his office. To the
representatives of the press Mr. Olmstead
has been very attentive and ready to as
sist them at all times. His record In tho
ministry Is: Oneonta Plains, 1882; Laur
ens and Oneonta Plains, 1883-84; Qreat
Bend, 1886-87; Hayre, 1888-89; Norwich, 1890
83; Tabernacle, Blnghamton, 1894-95.
At the phonographic entertainment on
Saturday afternoon three selections were
sung, vis., a solo by W. I. Foot, "Lord of
the Cloudless Day;" by the conference
trio, Rev. W. B .Westlake, Dallas; Rev.
John B. Sumner, 1'lttston, and Rev, John
C. Leucock, Dunmore, and a chorus, ami
w,ere recorded by the phonograph. In a
few minutes the solectlonB were repro
duced by tho Instrument to the delight of
the audience, who were able to distinguish
the lndlvlduul voices In the reproduction,
During the week Mr. and Mrs. Fox, of
the Anthrucote hotel, have been frequent
ly complimented upon their excellent man
agement In catering so skillfully to tho
lurge number of visitors who more than
tilled the amidol) dining rooinB. Although
the number of regular visitors at the hotel
was turgor than usual during the time
conference was In Hussion, and were aug
mented by tho visitors attending the meet
ings, it Is very creditable to the manugd
munt that every portion's wants were im
mediately attended to, Mr. Fox hua a
utulT of forty persons who wore kept buddy
enguged throughout the week.
Rev. William Edgar, pastor of the Our
bonclale Methodist church, will no doubt
bo glad when the conference sessions nre
over, so that he may enjoy a well earned
rest. For some months Mr. Edgar has
been enguged in preparing the locul ar
rangements for tho conference and much
of the success of the meetings Is to be at
tributed to his wIho forethought und su
pervision. All the hundreds of dvlcgutes
who have been entertained fur the puut
few duys are delighted with the excellent
arrangements prepared for their comfort.
It Is worthy of record that It Is to a great
extent due to the energy displayed by Mr.
Edgar that tho Methodists of Carbondule
have the iioIjIo eillllee in which the ses
sions have been held. His record In the
ministry is as follows: Decatur, 1878; Mor
ris, 1879-80; North Ablngton, 1881; Beth
any, 18S2-83; Worcester, 18x4-811; Dunmore,
18S7-9U, und Carbondule, 18891-95.
Tomorrow morning will, without doubt,
witness the lurgest assembly of pastors
during the present conference, In order to
hour the list of appointments as settled by
Bishop Andrews und his cabinet of pre
siding elders. Practically any minister is
liable to be removed whether he has re
ceived an Invitation from his church to re
main another year or not. The bishop is
supremo In'declillug appointments, and no
Indication whatever Is given of the pro
posed changes until the list Is read. It Is,
however, anticipated that Rev. W. H.
Pearce, Rev. A. F. Chaffee and Rev. L. C.
Floyd wll) remain another year In their
respective charges. Kev. M. D. Fuller
has completed hlB fifth year at the Provi
dence Methodist Kplscopul church und
will be removed to another churgo. Mr,
Fuller came from Wyoming, where ho
served four years. Kev. A. W. Cooper,
pastor of tho Humpton Street church,
may possibly have a change of pastorate.
Mr. Cooper came from Jermyn to Hamil
ton Btreet. Hev. 1. R. Uuwxhurst, of
Park Place church, will not be assigned a
charge, as he will leave tho ministry to
live at Asbury Purk, N. J. Presiding El
der Eckman will continue to discharge the
duties of that ofllce. It Is announced that
Rev. L. C. Floyd has blight prospects of
being elected a presiding elder, although
he has received a pressing Invitation to
remain at Simpson church. Outside of the
city It Is expected that Rev. F. P. Doty,
of Peckvllle, and Rev. J. R. Angel, of
Pulton, will be appointed to new charges.
Rev. F. H. Parsons, of Waverly, has re
ceived an invitation to remain another
year, and owing to the excellent work he
is engaged in, the wishes of his four
charges will be respected, T. O. C.
SUIT OVER COAL LAND.
A. B. Russell and Others Are the
Defendants.
On Saturday the ejectment case of H.
C. Comegys and others against A. B.
Russell and others was called for trlul
In common pleas court. Attorneys
Comegys, Wlllard and Shurtleff repre
sented the plaintiffs, and Attorneys H.
M. Hannuh and S. B. Price represented
the defendant. Dr. Comegys took the
stand and testified to having obtained
two leases from Mr. Davenport dated
July 1, 1891. He had also a lease dated
In 1890. In December, 1891, the work of
boring for the coal was commenced and
elevent feet of coal were found.
The defendant endeavored to show
on cross-examination that the plaintiffs
had only an option on the coal land and
would not make a lease till after the
test of the coal. When the coal was
found they were desirous of making a
lease, but their option had expired, and
the purpose of the plaintiffs was to
abandon their option if no coal was
found and thus take little risks of lia
bility. The plaintiff holds that the
work was done with the full knowl
edge of Mr. Russell and without his
protest, a.nd further that the option had
not expired, as it had been extended
from the time fixed at first for Its ex
piration. Early in the afternoon court ad
journed until this morning.
SHOT MEGARGEE'S DOG.
Sdraobody in tho Court House Forms the
Hubert Hifle Habit.
During the past week some person
employed In the court house has, it is
said, formed the Flobent rifle habit.
Several perstms complain that while
passing through the court house square
they have heard the whiz of bullets;
and two dogs have, within a week. Buf
fered untimely deaths In consequence
of this shooting propensity.
Bernard Megargee has a pet coolie of
which he Is very proud. The other day
this animal limped Into Megargee Hros.'
store on Washington 'avenue with a
bulletf hole In his neck. Mr. Megargee
was later Informed that the court house
rifle fiend did It. He will pay $25 re
ward for Information disclosing the
shooter's identity..
PURE RICH BLOOD Is essential to
good health, because the blood Is the
vital mild which supplies all the organs
with life. Hood's Sarsaparllla Is the great
blood purifier.
HOOD'S PILLS are purely vegetable,
harmless, effective, do not pain or gripe.
The leading magazines have completed,
or are Just about completing, their vol
umes for the year. If you have any vol
umes on hand Tho Tribune Bindery can
make them Into beautiful book for you
at short notice and low prices. A postal
sent us will bring our prices to you.
That wt carry more Pictures than all the
other Arms In tho oity put togetlinr, Wo
want you to know. You aro more than wel
come to com lu and look around.
Don't Ask You to Buy, Either.
Just put another hand at frame making.
Don't ninko much on eaob picture framed,
but bow they pour in.
REX FORD .'. CO.,
. 213 LACKAWANNA AVE.
Wall Paper
Styles and colorings are
very fine this season. '
Let , us fix you up a
sample room with nice.
Gilt Paper, $5.
PRIMS, . Lackawanna Avenue.
FREEIFREE!
TO KIDNEY SUFFERERS,
An Opportunity Worthy of Your
Notice.
If you suffer with kidney disease or any
ailment arising from an improper action of
the kidneys or urinary organB, this offer
we muke to tho people of Scranton should
Interest you. In the advancement of modl
cal science, the kidneys, being almost the
organs of greatest .lmprolance to human
health, luivu not been neglectod, and In
pluclng before you such a cure as Doan's
Kidney Pllln, the proprietors recognize
how fur t o many stutemunts of the mukets
of similar preparations have fallen short
of thclrclalms, being convinced that no
remedy for kidney complulnts 111 exist
ence equals Doan's Kidney Pills for HUch
ailments, strengthened in these convic
tions by letters that aro daily received cf
the work they are doing for matiklnd'B
benefit, old backs und young bucks ure
being constantly freed from never-ceasing
aches, and many a lame and shattered
one stooped und contracted, Is strength
ened, Invigorated, and Infused with new
life, with such a medicine an offer of this
kind can be muile without hesitancy, for
while we lose the box wo give you, we
make a friend that assists in the sale of
many others,
2M l ull lloxes
of Doan's Kidney Pills will be given away
free to persons suffering with kidney ali
ments at the undersigned address. First
come, lirst served, and only this one
chance offered. Remember this Is not a
sample box, but a. regular size box of
Doan's Kidney Pills, which retails at F0
cents.
This free distribution made in Scranton
at drug store of Matthews Bros, oil Mon
day, April IS, 1895. Cut this out. Not given
to children.
Solo Agents for the United States,
Foster, Milburn Co., Ituffalo, N. Y.
Notleo.
The members of Electric camp, No. D3,
P. O. T. of A., ure reuuested to meet lit
their hall -Monday, April 15, at 4 p. m to
make arrangements to attend the funeral
of Bister Sirs. Albert Kline, of 125 Robin
son street. By order of tho president,
Sirs. N. V. Kromer.
Attention.
All members of Waco council, No. 45, D.
of P., 1. O. of R. M., are requested to meet
ut their wigwam ut 3 o'clock Monday af
ternoon April 15, to make arrangements
for the funeral of Mrs. Albert Klme, of
Robinson street. By order of
.Mrs. G. Meyers, Secretary,
Dr. Thomas' Kclectrlc OH has cured
hundreds of cases of deafness that were
supposed to be incurable. It nover falls
to cure earache.
We show samples of high grade print
ing In catalogues and booklets The Trib
une Printing Department. v
"T
CHINA HALL,
MONDAY, APRIL 8
You are invited to be pres
ent. Our store will be the
finest in the state. Come and
bring your friends.
I)
134 WYOMING AVE
N. B. Remember the
number.
SCflflNK'S
- EASTER
SPRING STYLES
SHOES.
A Fall and Com
plete line of La-
Ji. ,1 I! I J
,aies , misses ana
Children's.
410 SPICE STREET
SCHANK'S
ROOF TWINING IRO SOLDERING
All done away with by the use of HART
MAN'S PATENT PAINT, which consist
of Ingredients well-known to all. It can be
applied to tin, galvanised tin, sheet Iron
roofs, also to brick dwellngs, which will
prevent absolutely any crumbling, crack
Ing or breaking of the brick. It will out
last tinning of any kind by many years,
and It's cost does not exceed one-fifth that
of the coat of tinning. Is sold by the job
or pound. Contracts taken by
ANTONIO UARTUAKN. W Blrck IU
OPENING
LATEST IN
WATER-PROOF
: OUR NEW
i
i
Combining all the requisites of a fine
Spring Overcoat and possess
ing water-proof qualities.
ALL NEW
SPRING STYLES
IN AT
MARTIN&DELANY'S
N. A, (HUBERT'S
WYOMING AVE, SCRANTON.
STEINWAY & SDN
DECKER BROTHERS
KRANiCH & BACK
STULTZ I BAUER
and
Otfaera
PIANOS
Also a large stock ol first-class
ORGANS
mUSICAL nERCHANDLSB.
MUSIC, ETC.
THIRD NATIONAL
BANK OF SCRANTON.
"- Statement March 5. 1805, called forty
tb Comptroller of the Curroney.
HESOIRCES.
Loans $1,436,774.91
Overdrafts 289.74
United. States Bonds 80,000.01)
Other Rends 29O.5S5.20
Banking tHouse 28.074.4S
Premlumi on t', 9. Oonds,. 043.75
Due frotnf'. S. Treasurer... 7,600.00
Due from Vanks 20S.79U18
Cash .).... 150.67.6
2,267.900.10
LIABILITIES.
Capital $200,000.00
Surplus . - 260,000.00
Undivided Profits 72.350.00
Circulation 71,800.00
Dividends Unpaid 520.50
Deposits 1,637.214.96
Due to Banks 26.013.74
2,267,9Oo7l0
WIliUM CONNELL, President.
GEO. 11. CATI.IN. Vico President.
WILLIAM 11. PECK, Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
William Council, George H. Catlin,
Alfred Hand. James Archbald, Henry
Belin, Jr., William T. Smith, Luther
Keller.
Special attention given to business ao
counts. Interest Paid on time deposits.
DUPONT'S
MINING, BLASTING AND SPORTING
POWDER
Haonfaetnred at the WapwaUomn Mills, Ls
serne connty, Pa., and at Wil
mington, Delaware,
HENRY BELIN, Jr.
General Agent for the Wyoming Distriat.
118 WYOMING AVE, Soranton. Pa
Third National Bank Building.
AOEifriits :
TH08. FORD, Httston. Pa.
JOHN B. UM1TH & fcON, Plymenth. Pa,
E. W. MULLIGAN, WilWBarre, Pa.
Agents for the Knpauno Chemical Com
pany'a High Explosives.
THE
E Bl
LIMITED
CORNER LACKA. AND JEFFERSON AVES.
Wish to call your attention to their
new and carefully selected Une of
DRY GOODS
Including B. PRIESTLEY & CO.'S
Black Dress Goods, and GILBERT'S
Faet Black Dreas Linings. We will
carry In Mock for spring and lummor
trade a full line of the
MATTEH'TI STEAM SHRUNK
SANITARY WOOL INDI-RWEAR
for men, women and children. It Is
Incomparable and the beet In the mar
ket today; It Is 33 per cent, below last
yrar'a prices and has no equal. In
Kid Gloves we carry the original
"GANTS JOUVIN" for ladlee.
In the Uont's Furnishing and Clothing
department you will find the style,
quality and make up to date. All the
Intent blocks and shapes In soft and
BtllY hnts.
"DENT'S" Kid Oloves and a well select
ed line of Neckwear.
TAR cum
Cures Colds, Lays Out LaGrlppc,
Cures Incipient Consumption.
Manufactured by G. ELMEN
DORF, Elmit-a, N. Y., and for sale
by the trade generally.
MEGARGEL & CONNELL,
Wholesale Agents, Scranton, Pa.
nil
YOU WILL REALIZE THAT " THEY LIVE WELL WHO
LIVE CLEANLY," IF YOU USE
APOLIO'
6ARUTS
III
ACADEMY OF MUSIC
IJnMmv A nan m
i, rniL 13,
Return EiiKasctnent of COSOHOVE &
URANT'b COMEDIANS, in the
New Dazzler.
EVERYTHING NEW BUT THE TITLE.
Florrie Weit, Chas. Wnytie. lliutou & Raltton,
laa uewiUBHwri, will west una otliara,
Elaborate Scenery,
Beautiful Electrical Effects,
New Costumes, New Music
Bale of seats opens Friday, April 12.
ACADEMY OF MUSIC
TUESDAY, APRIL 18,
THE POPULAR FAVORITES.
MARION JOHN-
Manola-Mason
Friend Fritz
One of the Most Beautiful Ploys on the Stage.
Lower floor J 1 and 75c. ; balcony 60o ; gallery 2&
Bale of ssats opens Saturday, April 13.
ACADEMY OF MUSIC.
THURSDAY. APRIL 13.
Engagement of the Clever Young Coineaian,
Mr. Charles Dickson,
In His Famous Come.iy,
INCOG
The cleverest licht comedian on the Ameri
can iWrr-Nsb York Dramatic Mirrsr.
One of the lichtost and finest comedians on
tuo VwircK Xew York Horald.
One of r clpvrt and best lilted you eg
actors of tue Tighter Vtm4a-tuu country.
Now York Mail and Express. ---- -
Kale of seats opens Tuesday, April 16.
YALE
GLEE ID BUMS
CONCERT
AT THE FKOTIIIXGHAU,
WEDNESDAY ' EVENING, APRIL 17, 1895,
AX 8.30.
TICKETS, $i.00,7Bc., 60c. and 25c,
Diasram opens Thursday, April 11, at V a.
m.,at i'owolrs Music Store.
DAVIS' THEATER
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday,
April 15. 16 and 17,
The Swedish Comedy Success.
Presented by an Admirable Com
pany, Including
RICHARD T. BROWN,
The Sweet Singer,
NEW SONGS, NEW DANCES,
NEW MUSIC, NEW SCENERY.
ADMISSION, 10, 20 OR 30 CENT3.
20c seata down stairs rastrrcd for
ladies and their escorts.
Nf xt Attraction Return of the Favorites of
all Scranton, "THE WHITE CROOK" Ce.
E
COME AND SEE OS,
i
THE CLOTHIERS,
416 LACKAWANNA AVENUE.
JOHN L HANGI, ENGRAVER,
OFFICE AND SHOP
311 Lack. A-y. and Stewart's Art Store.
Photo Engraving for Circulars, Bwka, CiU
lognts, Hwspapars.
Half-Tons and Line Work.
IB
111

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