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The Scranton tribune. (Scranton, Pa.) 1891-1910, December 03, 1896, Image 2

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THE SCR ANTON TKIBUNE-TnUBSDAT MORNING. DECEMBER 3, 1896.
REMARKABLE FATE
OF PEDRO ROXAS
Spain Deports tbe Leadioc Maa of
Manila to Centa.
M1LLI0N1ARE BETRAYED BY HIS WIFE
lie Wat to Have Been the First
Preaident of the Philippine llepub
lie, llnd Spain llecn Whipped.
Told Ilis Wife, W ho Confessed to a
Faithless Clergyman.
New York, Dec. 2. The Sun prints
the following remarkable story of the
late of Pedro lloxas, the leading man
of .Manila and the man who had been
lil. kid out as the lirst president of the
new Philippine republic in case the re
bellion against the Spanish rule on the
Islands was successful. The story has
to do with Koxas' wife and her con
fessor, who Is alleged to have violated
the sacred vows of secrecy.
Koxas was a sugar planter. He was
a mestizo, or half caste, his father be
ing a Spaniard and his mother a na
tive of the islands. As a sugar planter
and exporter of sugar and hemp. Pedro
Koxas accumulated a fortune. He was
llnelv educated, speaking Knglish,
Spanish, Tagaloy (the native language)
and Chinese. He was broad-minded
nnd libel tl, and gradually came to be
looked on as the most progressive of
nil the native citizens of the islands.
He was at the fore in all improve
ments. He was the organizer of the
electric light company, the street rail
road company, the bank, and most of
the other Institutions or modern civi
lization that have been introduced in
the city of Manila or elsewhere on the
Islands. He was at the head of the
educational system ond of most of the
churitii'S, and it was the custom' on
Mondays nnd Fridays of each week for
nil the beggars in the city, number
ing :tfi to 4011, to gather in the front
yard, where he would give each a pack
age of rice and would then distribute
copper coins.
He came to be beloved by everybody
except the Spanish government. The
Ppanlsh dislike of him was natural,
bemuse his desire for progress was
not In keeping with the bigotry and In
tolerance of their government. It was
natural when the revolution ngalnst
Spanish misrule broke out months ago
that the meszos who uprose should
turn to Pedro Hoxas as a leader, or for
I'licouragi'ment at least. Hut the in
terests of Koxas were so great that he
would not risk them. He was counted
ns worth at least JI5.000.0U0, and his pos
sessions were In all parts of the Island.
At the first overt act on his part all
would be confiscated, so he could not
openly espouse the cause of the in
surrectionists. Hut an Implied prom
ise to accept the presidency of the new
repulillca Flllpplna when that republic
came was different. He could do that.
THE ItELIGIOUS WIFE.
Pedro Koxa's wife, the story goes,
was a woman bound up In her religion.
She was a woman educated almost as
well as her husband. She was hand
some. She had most of the generous
traits of her husband, but she lacked
the important one of discretion. Pedro
kept from her at first the news that
he would be the first president of the
republic; not that he didn't trust her,
but he feared the lack of discretion. He
vus careful to have nothing to do with
the Insurrectionists and not on nny one
net of his could the Spaniards base a
charge that he was even a sympathizer
with the men who were struggling for
their Independence. 'Hut one day In an
unguarded moment he confided to his
wife the plan that was on foot to make
him president. This she told to her
confessor. If her confessor had been n
faithful Catholic It would have made
no difference. But this confessor, the
sti.ry says, thought more of currying
favor with the government than he did
of his vows, and she had no sooner
confessed to him than he told of the
confession to the Spanish officers.
It came back to Pedro's ears quick
ly, even before the otllcials hod time
to net: and In a rage he accused his
wife of having conspired to ruin him.
She denied It, and he rushed at her and
attempted to choke her. Hut he was
overpowered by the help that came in
response to her screams.
Here was the excuse of the govern
ment to get rid of Pedro without any
scandal. The olllcials pretended to be
lieve in his loyalty to the goverlment.
They had "pity" for him. They said
he must surely be suffering from tem
porary aberration of mind or he never
would have assailed his wife so sav
ngely. They said nothing at all about
the charge of disloyalty. They said
that the doctors on the island were in
competent to treijjt a case so serious as
his, and that he needed the best of
European treatment and a change of
scene. He must have it instantly, and
in less time than it takes to tell It he
was placed aboard a ship under the
care of a physician. The ship sailed
away to the penal colony of Ceuta, In
Africa. There Pedro Koxas was land
ed. There he is today, it is said, and
there he will stay until death or a
republic release him.
With him once safely out of the coun
try, the next step was to confiscate his
property. This was done. Every foot
of ground he owned, every share of
stock he owned, every house and every
thing in every house, even down to the
last spoon, was seized. The woman
who had caused his downfall through
her want of discretion was turned out
on the Btreet a beggar. Not satisfied
with that, the Spaniards trumped up
a charge against P. L. Koxas, the
cousin of Pedro. If Pedro was a trait
or, they said, It must be in the blood
of the family. So they confiscated the
millions owned by V. L. Koxas and
turned him and his family out to
starve. So the story ends.
SENSATION Al LA PLATA.
Murderer Matthews it Removed to
Baltimore Tor Safe Keeping.
Baltimore, Dee. 2. Mrs. Emma Ir
win, indicted as an accessory to the
murder of her husband, James J. Ir
win, of which crime George Matthews
was found guilty at La Plata. Md.,
last week, will be tried In Haltimore.
Eleven Jurors had been accepted In the
trial of the woman at La Plata today,
when her attorney created a sensation
by filing a petition for removal. The
court granted the request.
State Attorney Posey, of La Plata,
petitioned the court for the removal of
George Matthews to the Baltimore Jail,
dclarlng that public sentiment was
such that the convicted murderer was
not safe in the La Plata Jail. Mat
thews was accordingly brought here
tonight.
RECORD OF W1NQ SHOTS.
The First Money is Again Divided at
the Trenton Matches.
Trenton, N. J., Dec. 2. The crack
wing shots of the country, who are
gathered here had some fine suort at
the Inter-State Fair grounds today,
but the contest for the championship
cud held by Elliott did not take plaea
owing to the willingness of only three
men to compete. Six miss and out
events took up the greater part of
the day. The money was divided as
follows:
First event, Lott, Woodruff and El
liott; second, Fulford, Cubberly and
Elliott; third, Woodruff, Fulford and
Elliott: fourth, Fulford, Cubberly, Hill
and Woodruff; fifth, Fulford, Elliott
and Cubberly: sixth, Lott, urewer.
Fents and Fulford. A ten bird shoot
was the next event. Elliott, van Dyke,
Woodruff and Tlmmlns killed all their
birds and divided first money. Ful
ford and Brewer got second money,
killing nine each and Hill and Daly
captured third money, killing eight
each. The day was wound up with
a contest between Murphy and Brew
er, 25 birds, 21 yards, purse $50. Brew
er killed 23 birds und Murphy 17.
TRAGEDY AT A FIRE.
Two Firemen Cremated in tbe Burn
ingofst. Monica's Church.
Atlantic City, N. J.. Dec. 2. St. Mon
ica's Catholic church, situated in the
lower section of the city, known as
Chelsea, was burned to the ground this
morning between 8 and 10 o'clock.
When the building collapsed there
were several firemen on the inside, who
were caught in the debris, two of whom
were killed.
They are: William Dougherty, aged
4K. former assistant engineer of the
lire department; Thomas Lennlg, agvd
32, engineer of the chemicul engine.
The tlames were first discovered while
Father Peters was celebrating mass at
8 o'clock, and is believed to have been
caused by a defective Hue. The loss
is JM.OOO; insurance. 12.C00.
COAL TRADE CONDITIONS
Tbe Market Has Improved on Account
of Seasonable Weatber No
Chance in Prices is Expected.
New Tork, Dec. 2. Anthracite coal
trade conditions. It is announced, have
improved of late on account of the
more seasonable weather. No change
in prices is expected this year, and It
is understood that the September
schedule will be adhered to until 1807.
During that year an era of prosper
ity is confidently looked for by those
Interested in the trade. The mining
and carrying companies report new
orders at tide water very light, but It
is claimed that prices are not far from
the September circular. There Is au
thority for the statement that most of
the coal that has been moved In the
last three months and is being shipped
at present was sold fully 25 cents per
ton below the September basis. Cut
ting of prices has been done by indi
vidual operators nnd through Jobbers.
There is plenty of coal at the west
and better prices have been secured
than In any tide water market. Coal
has been accumulating at the east, but
continued cold weather is expected to
relieve the market. It can be safely
assumed that, although the agreement
between the nnthraclte coal presidents
nominally expires on Jan. 1 next, no
change will be made In the conduct of
the trade. The agreement runs on
subject to thirty days notice.
GET THE BEST.
One year ago The Tribune compiled its
political handbook, and although It was a
first attempt, the compilation was easily
superior to any similar publication in
Northeastern Pennsylvania, and met with
a very encouraging sale. It made a vol
ume of about 100 pages. This year every
Important feature of the former Issue is
retained, the whole being corrected und
brought up to date, and In addition a val
uable mass of the new statistical and gen.
cral information is added, together with
an exhaustive review of the local and na
tional political activities of this presi
dential year. The Annual for 1S97 will
probably contain over 200 pages possibly
250 and every line of it will have been
edited and composed in this office. Among
the contents will be:
The complete official vote of Lacka
wanna, Luzerne, Wayne, Wyoming,
Susquehanna and Bradford counties.
Rosters of the county olllcials and
court calendars of those counties.
Postal Information, with list of post
masters in Lackawanna county.
Eastern and National league base ball
averages, bicycle and racing records
and many other sporting statistics
and records.
Internal revenue statistics.
Coal trade statistics.
Proceedings and platforms of the po
litical conventions of 1S9G, with list of
the Presidents, Vive-Presidents, Cab
inet officers and Speakers of the
House since the government was
founded.
History of American tariff legislation.
Digest of State laws relating to mar
riage, divorce, voting qualifications
and interest rates.
Roll of the Fifty-fifth Congress and of
the next Pennsylvania Assembly; also
list of state officials.
Very complete digest of official census
statistics.
A digest of copyright and patent laws.
Table showing nutritive value of foods.
Many valuable household hints, health
helps and redoes.
A digest of the civil service rules and
list of places still open.
Facts about our coinage.
List of great World's Fairs.
Directions to govern one In emer
gencies. Brief review of past Presidential cam.
palgns.
Several hundred business pointers, es
pecially relating to legal topics.
And a vast mass of miscellaneous infor
mation, all valuable and timely, but too
voluminous to refer to In detail. We can
assure the reading public of Northeastern
Pennsylvania that The Tribune Political
Handbook for 1897 will be by far the best
publication of Its kind ever prepared In
this state. It will answer thousands of
questions of all kinds, such as continually
arise In every household, and will be an
indispensable reference book In the six
counties wherein It will be offered for sale.
Notwithstanding this large Increase In its
scope, the price will remain 25 cents.
Note to Advertisers A few desirable
pages yet remajn open.
it n:vit:i Railroad t o Issue Cler
ical Orders.
The Pennsylvania Railroad company
announces that for 1897 It will Issue
clerical orders to regularly ordained
clergymen In charge of churches lo
cated on or near Its lines east of Pitts
burg and Erie. To secure these or
ders clergymen should make applica
tion to the nearest ticket agent as
soon as possible, and It Is desired that
all applications reach tbe general of
fice by December 15.
LIVE NEWS FROM
THE OLD WORLD
Egypt Must Now Refund Expenses ol
tbe Doojola Expedition.
THE ACTION OF CAISSE RESCINDED
France's and Russia's Objections
Finally 8ustainedRnmors Per
sist That the Situation is Critical
Despite OlDcial Denialstierman
Political Sccret"llamburg's Uig
Strike.
Alexandria, Egypt. Dec. 2. The
court of appeals today issued Its deci
sion in the famous case of the Calsse
of the Egyptian debt and the govern
ment, and condemned the latter to re
pay the funds advanced by the Cnlsse
for the purposes of the Anglo-Egyptian
expedition to Dongola.
The commission of the Egyptian
debt, otherwise the Calsse, on March
25 lust decided to advance from the re
serve funds $2,500,000 needed to meet
the expenses of the British-Egyptian
expedition to Dongola, and eventually
did so. The English, German, Italian
and Austrian members of the commis
sion voted in favor of the proposition.
The Kussiun and French members vot
ed against it. Almost immediately af
terward the representatives of the
Paris syndicate of Egyptian bondhold
ers took steps to institute proceedings
against the Calsse for advancing this,
and the mixed trlhunul, on June 8, de
cided against the government, stating
that the advance wus made in viola
tion of all existing decrees, and con
demned the government to repay the
money advanced and enjoined the com
missioners from advancing any fur
ther money for the war expenses. The
Egyptian government and the four
commissioners referred to then lodged
an appeal against this decision, and
the matter eventually came before the
court of appeals, with the result an
nounced in the above dispatch.
GERMAN POLITICAL SECRETS.
They Are Expected to Come Out in a
Berlin Libel Suit.
Berlin, Dec. 2. The trial of Heir
Lockert, Baron von Luetzow, Herr f io
etz. Herr Uerger nnd Herr Foellmer,
the Journalists, who are charged with
libelling Count von Eulenuerg, Baron
Marshal von Biebersteln and Prince
Alexander von Hohenlohe commenced
today. The case arises from the two
fold versions of the czar's and Emperor
William's toast at Breslau, and the
alleged libels are contained In com
ments on the modtlled official version
of the toast in asserting that the pub
lication of the lirst version, which the
libel construed us unfriendly to Ger
many, was due to the irresponsibility
of the government and to English in
fluences. Herr Leckcrt refuses to divulge the
mime of the person who gave him the
information upon which he based his
criticism, but he is believed to be a Ber
lin official. The trial Is causing a
sensation among political circles, as It
is expected to reveal the workings of
the court clique, which, domlnuted by
the former minister of the interior.
Count Bolho von Eulenberg, the hit
ter's cousin, the present court marshal,
and Hlc hthofen, the ex-chlef nf police,
is credited with bringing about the
downfall of C.enerul von Caprlvl, tne
predecessor of Prince Hohenlohe as
Imperial chancellor. They are also
charged with being the instigators of
the press war waged for a year past
against Prince Hohenlohe, the chan
cellor, and Baron Marshal von Bieber
steln, the minister for foreign affairs.
This clique has heretofore been sup
posed to enjoy the confidence of Em
peror William, and Prince Hohenlohe
and Baron von Biebersteln, both of
whom are to be called to the witness
stand, intend to expose the whole plot
of tile clique's attempts to force them
to resign.
Herr Leckert and Baron von Luet
zow were examined at length, and the
latter admitted that he was the chief
author of the articles complained of,
adding that Herr Leckert hinted that
he had obtained the story of the
changed versions from an official of
the foreign ollice.
HAMBURG'S BIG STRIKE,
Men Willing to Arbitrate, but the
Employers Decline.
Hamburg, Dec. 2. At meetings
which were attended by about eight
thousand strikers this morning, reso
lutions were udopted providing for the
acceptance. In behalf of the strikers,
of the proposition made by the Chief
of Police, the president of the munici
pal council and the chairman of the
Trades' court, that the dispute of the
dockers and their employers be submit
ted to a court of arbitration composed
of the officials mentioned and. in addi
tion, one leading employer and four
labor representatives, the decisions of
this court to require a majority of six
out of the eight votes. The represen
tatives of the strikers also selected the
four men to represent them in the
court of arbitration.
At a meeting of the employers' union
today it was unanimously resolved to
reject the proposal to submit the dock
ers' dispute to a court of arbitration.
RACING MEN IN SESSION
The Board of Review of the National
Trotting Association Considers
Seme Important Track Cases.
New York, Dec. 2. The Board of
Review of the National Trotting asso
ciation resumed lis sessions at the
Murray Hill hotel today.
The sensational case of the pacing
gelding, Charley P.. which, although
the board has an abundant mass of
business of a routine nature to act
upon, is the important feature of the
annual meeting, was the lirst question
to be taken up today.
Mr. Keed, a lawyer, from Boston, ap
peared for Gormley and Fitzgerald.
Fitzgerald himself was the first wit
ness. He said that he knew Clark. He
talked abut the horse at iMystic park.
Medford, and Clark said he was the
owner of the animal. He (Clark)
bought the horse without knowing of
his previovus doings and had trotted
him honestly.
The well-known driver, John M.
Ramsey, was the next witness, and
said he trained and drove Charley P.
in 1S96 for Fitzgerald. Lawyer Reed
followed with a strong appeal for Fitz
gerald, in which he demanded that
Fitzgerald be restored to the privi
leges of the trotting turf. He also de
manded that punishment be meted out
to the guilty parties in the case, and
asked for the reinstatement of Driver
Ramsey. The reinstatement of the
horse was also asked for on the ground
that It had been used as an Instrument
of fraud. Intentionally. The matter
was laid over until the execution ses
sion after the adjournment of the
meeting today.
The board next took up the case that
Is of ten years' standing. In 1884 a
race was trotted at Dover. N. H.,
which was given to a mare named
Belle Sargent. There was some foul
ing In the race. Belle Sargent had won
two heats and a horse called Roger D.
one heat, after which Mercedes won
the next two, a foul occurred in the
sixth. and though Mercet'es won the
heat and consequently the "aces. The
Judges decided It "no heaf'and after
ward awarded the race to Belle Sar
gent on a walk over. The board In
188S decided that the Judges erred.
The appeal in the case of Derby Prin
cess and Fred 8.. In the Transylvania
takes at Lexington last summer also
went over. The John R. Gentry-Joe
Patchen hipped rome race at Belmont
park. Philadelphia, was held over in
like manner, after some evidence had
been taken.
Johnson and Colt appealed from the
decision of the Judges at Providence,
It. I., last September when they re
versed the placing of the Cleveland
horseman McDuff. in the third heat,
placing him sixth after having pre
viously awarded him third.
Another case of -ringing" was
brought to light in the appeal of C. H.
Cook", of Hampden, Conn. Cooke
bought a mnre called "Hampden Girl"
from one Foote, horse dealer In New
Haven. Cooke made the purchase for
Charles Roberts, of New Haven. Foote
did not disclose any of the mare's an
tecedents and she went on racing; in
New England until at Haverhill, Mass..
she was identified as Wahnetah. 2.1SVi,
a western campaigner. This case shar
ed the fate of all the others in being
referred to the executive session. With
the vast amount of business before the
board It is not likely that the meeting
will adjourn lefore Saturday.
BOWER'S AWFUL CRIME.
Kills His Wife, Wounds Two Other
Persons and Commits Suicide.
lie Kalb. III.. Dec. 2. Henry L.
Bower, with a butcher's knife killed his
wife and so badly wounded his moth-er-ln?law
and his little daughter this
morning that they may die.
Bower had been out of work recently
and visited his brother-in-law at Nixon
and borrowed money. He acted
strangely and brooded over his misfor
tune. Early this morning he became
insane and rushed upon his family,
first mortally stabbing his wife, then
turned upon her mother nnd his little
daughter, ufterwards sending the knife
to his own heart, and dying almost
instantly, .
HOM'SDALE.
This Is Institute week.
Work is booming in all of our Indus
tries. No empty houses to be found In our
place.
The building boom still continues.
The educators of the county are our
visitors this week.
We have at present two postoffices.
The Delaware and Hudson Canal
company have a lurse force of men
engaged cleaning out the canal basin.
Henry Dunklelmrg, of Seeleyvllle,
will soon open a meat market on Main
street, near Park luke bridge'.
The play season opened In the Opera
house Monduy night with "My Wife's
Friend."
The school teachers were pleasantly
entertained Monday evening by the
Young People's society of Grace church.
The funeral of Thomas Nichols, who
died in Carbondale, and was burled In
Dyberry cemetery, was In charge of
Honesdale Masons, he being a member
of the fraternity.
Doctor Peterson Is occupying his new
residence corner of Main and Race
streets.
NICHOLSON,
Mrs. O. H. Williams went to Shef
field, Pa., on Tuesday to attend the
funeral of her brother-in-law, Mr. C.
H. Lamkin, who died quite suddenly
on Monday last.
The funeral of Willie Ryan, of Glen
wood Switch, who died a few days ago
of typhoid fever, took place yesterday
at the Catholic church of this place.
Interment was made in the Catholic
cemetery. Larry, an older brother,
died of the same disease and was
burled Inst week.
The Ladles' Aid of the Methodist
church met yesterday at the home of
Mrs. W. H. Knapp. Supper was served
to a large attendance.
Miss Northrop, of Dalton, was a call
er In town yesterday.
Frank Baker, who has been ill for a
few days past, has resumed his work
again at Dalton.
There will be lively times up around
Walker's mill for a time. Why?
There is good skating.
To Cure a Cold in One Day.
Take laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets.
All druggists refund the money If It
tails to cure. 25 cents.
MARKETS AND STOCKS.
Wall Street Review.
New Yoik, Dec. 2. Higher cables from
London and an advance in American rail
way securities there stimulated purchas
es of stock at the opening of the Stock
Exchange here today and the upward
movement, which set In yesterday, made
further progress during the early trading.
Commission houses noted an improvement
in the outside demand for securities mid
this, combined with covering of short con
tracts, led to an advunca of "ia2 er cent,
in prices all along the line. The Improve
ment was most pronounced In the cases
of the high-priced anthracite coalers,
Jersey Central selling up li und Lack
awanna !!'. In a general way these stork
were benclltej bv reports of activity in
the co:il trade. In the Industrials Hutrar
was erratic- ami sold ut HUM 117V clcej g
Ht ll'ii. Speculation closed firm, .x't
changes show gains of HalH per cent.
Total sales were 170.000 shures.
Furnished by WILLIAM LINN, AL
LEN & CO.. stock brokers, Meurs build
ing, rooms 7iX-7oti.
Open- High- Low- Clos
ing, eft. est. inn.
Am. Tobacco Co. ... 7'i'i 7:i 7.Vi 7':V,
Am. Bug. Kef. Co. ..1I7'4 117'j llii'a U'S"i
Ati-h., T. 8. IV ... 14", H- H' H::,
Atch.. T. & H. Ke Pr 23s 23 2.1'i !
Canada Southern ... W'i 4-l W't W
Ciies. & Ohio Hi'i b'1 I''1 1
Chicago Has 74'-, 7;.'n 74 T
Chic. & N. W 1i 10i K,k W't
Chic., K. ftr V ', 7H 7K-- K
c. c. c. & st. i a , -'
Chic, Mil. St. P... 7.VS, 7.VS, 74 71
Chic. It. I. ft Pac. ... 6!t-t, .H' fi!i' mi
I list ft C. K U H U 13'i
flen. Electric 314 ?. 3Ui 31',
Lake Shore 1W If.:!' IM i:c"i,
Louis, ft Nash Bo' 4 CH So'i
M. K. ft Tex. Pr. .. 2!H IM1 BP W,
Man. Elevated M 9.V; Its 9V-4
Mo. Pac 22" 22:I 24
Nat. Cordage H
Nat. Lead 2:.' ST.Si 2."i 2r.
N. J. Central li'i 1' I'fl'i la'i
N. y s. & w. Pr. . y- 2t;4
Nor. Pac 2f', 24 24', 24'i
Oht. ft Western V'it 1" "5i
Pac. Mall 2'i'i 2i 2m
Phil, ft Reading 2 2W, SH
Southern It. R 10 M'i 10'. 10'
Southern K. R. Pr. . SUV 29 29 29
Tenn. C. ft Iron 29'i , 2 2"-
Texns Pacific !' I" ' 'i
Cnion Pacific !"i 9'i 9"! 9'i
Wabash 7H 7 7 7
Vnlon Pacific 9i ! 9S 9
Wabash 7"-, " Vf, 7
Wabash Pr 1r-, K, 1S
We'tern Vnlon Si7K 87 Wi i
W. I S'i s'4 84 l"4
V. S. Leather M, 8S !''.
1. 8. Leather Pr. ... 14 i Sl4 ni
V. S. Rubber 2I 23S4 24 2J',
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE PRICES.
Open- High- Low- Clos-
WHEAT. Ing. est. est. in.
May 84 84 82 82
July 784 78 78J4 7G)i
OATS.
Mnv 2174 21T4 21Vi 21i
CORN.
Msy 20 2C 26',i 2C
LARD.
January 3.87 3.9S 3.87 3.92
Mnv 4.12 4.17 4.12 4.17
PORK.
January 7.D0 7.CT 7.K7 7.CT
May 7.90 8 v7 7,99 8.02
Brraaton Board or Trade Exchange
luotationsAII Quotation Based
cnParoMOO.
Nam. Bid. Asked
Dlmn Dep. ft Dis. Bank 14S
Bcranton Lace Curtain Co. M
National Boring Drilling Co ... U
First National Bank IN ...
Bcranton Jar 4k Stopper Co. .. ... M
Elmhurst Boulevard Co ... 1M
Bcranton Savings Bank ...... 300 ...
Bonta Plate Glass Co It
Connolly & Wallace
KID GLOVE
DEPARTMENT.
Have You Seen the
New Patented "Ideal
Fastener?"
We Are Sole Agents
for Scranton.
CONNOLLY & WALLACE,
Scranton Packing Co
Lackawanna Iron ft Steel Co.
Third National Bank
Throop Novelty M'f'g. Co. ...
Scranton Traction Co
Scranton Axle Works
ISO
,2'J
w
30
'is
iii
40
110
110
110
Lack's Trust & Safe Dep.
Economy Steam Heat
Co.
4k
t'ower 10
Weston .Mill Co
BONDS.
6crnnton Pass. Railway, first
mortnaRe due 1918
People's Street Railway, first
mortgage due 1918
Bcranton ft Plttston Trac. Co.
People's Street Railway, Sec
ond mortgage due 1920
Dickson Manufacturing Co. ..
Lacka. Township School
City of S-rnton St. Imp. 6.
Mt. Vernon Coal Co
Scranton Axle Works
Scrarton Traction Co
Economy Steam, H. & P. Co..
250
100
liB
103
83
100
i
100
'ew York Produce Market.
New York, Dec. 2. Flour Firm, quiet.
unchanKHii. Wheat Dull. wcRk: f. o. h.,
9s'3C.; ungraded red, 8.'n9ic.; No. 1 north
ern, 91,a9lc; options were dull and
closed weak at an'io. decline: January,
SS"ic; March, 9!)'ic; May, 87'i.c; July,
83'4c; Decern ler, 89'". Corn Dull,
easier: No. 2, 29c. elevator: 30c, alloat;
ungraded mlved, 2.V.: No. 3, 2r'vc; options
dull, closing weak: December, 29c. j Janu
ary. 29' jc: May. 32'4c Oats Dull, weak:
options dull, weaker; December, 2:Sc;
February. 24c: May, 2.1.: cpot prices.
No. 2, 23c.; No. 2 white, 2.'i'i.c; No. 2
Chicago. 24c; No. 3, 20a2o'ic; No. 3 white,
22.; mixed western, 22a24l4c: white do.
nnd white state, 22H.tt.HVic Provisions
Quiet, steady, unchanged. Lard yulet,
easy, unchanged. Butter Firm: state
dairy, lla20c; state dairy, lla20c: do.
creamery, 15u22c; western dairy, 8ni:ic;
do. creamery, ir,a2.Ti.c. ; do. factory. 7n12c;
Ftglns, 23'jc: Imitation creamery, lla1t'3c.
Cheese Steady, unchanged. Kkbs Firm;
state and Pennsylvania, 222fic; Ice. Iiomkc,
liiaL'lc; western fresh, 2'Jh24c: do. case,
I3a5; southern, 21u23c; limed, liable.
Philadelphia Provision Market.
Philadelphia. Dec 2. Provisions wore
firm and In fair jobbing demand. We
quote: City smoked beef, llal2c; beef
hams, I17..19ulkc, as to age and brand:
nork, family. S10n1o..V: hams. 8. P, cured.
Intlerces, 8a9c; do. smoked. 9iallc., as to
average and brand; sides, rlbli-'d. In salt,
4'.ja4e.: do. do. smoked, il'iauc: shoul
ders, pickle cured, fi'ia.Viic; do. do.
smoked, li'jati'ic; picnic hams. S. P. cured,
r.'ia'c; do. do. smoked, G'ini;(:.; bellies,
In pickle, according to average, loose, 6Ha
Be; breakfast bacon. 7a8c, as to brant
nnd average; lard, pure, city rotlned, In
tierces, Sui'4c; do. do. do. In tubs, GVia
u'ic; do. butchers', loose, 4a44c. ; city
tallow, in hogsheads, 3'ic; country do.,
2";1Iu3V, as to quality, and cakes, 3c.
f hiraco iirniu nnd Provision Mnrkrt.
Chicago. III.. Dec 2. The leading fu
tures ranged as follows: When t Decem
ber, MV, 79'4c; Muv. 83-c., 82c; July,
78'ic., 7iic Corn December. 23c, 23c;
Jamiarv, 23'.c, 23c; May, 28c, 2c
Oats December. IS'ic, 17ic: May. 21V..
21c. Mess pork December, tfi.85, $fi.8.1;
Mav, 17.90. $8."2'4. Iird December, 83.70,
3.77'i; May. $4.12's 4.17i4. 8hort ribs
Deccinher, $3.85, $3.8.".; May. $4. $4.07V. Cash
quotations were as follow: Flour Easier,
unchanged: No. 2 spring wheat, 79'',n8H',c;
No. 3 do. 7saN0c; No. 2 red. 8S"4n!i1V-; No.
2 corn, 227ta23'ic; No. 2 oats. 17'(,c: No. 2
rye, 41c; No. 2 barley. :Hic; No. 1 flaxseed.
75'a78c: prime timothy seed, $2.5o; mess
pork, fti.S0aH.83; lard. f3.80a3.8Ti; short ribs,
sides, f3.73a4: shoulders, J4.2Tia4.fiO; short
clear sides, $4a4.12',4; whiskey and sugars
unchanged.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago, Dec. 2 Cattle Receipts. 17,000
head; market limine, lower; common to
extra steers. $3.Tii'aT.33; stockers ami feed
ers, fi.CTiSt.lO; cows and bulls, Jl.u0a3.T5;
calves. $3.TiOa3.60: Texans, $2.i:."ia4.2.'i. ltos
itecelpts. M.uoo head; market 10c. lower;
heavy packing and shipping lots, $3.10'j
3 40: common to choice mixed. $3.15'i" 4T,;
choice assorted. $3.37'in3.4J; light, i3.20a
3.45; pigs, t2.8na3.4Ti. Sheep Receipts. It!.
ooo head; market weak and from lfiaSTic,
lower: inferior to choice, 12a3.00; lumbs.
$3.23a5.15.
Ilnflhlo Live Stock.
Rtiffalo, N. V., Dec. 2. Cattle Slow.
Veals In good Supply nnd lower; tops,
M.2Ta6.To: fair to good, flaii. Hogs Dull,
lower fur all kinds; Yorkers, good to
choice. f3.55a3.HO; light, $3.(15; mixed pack
ers. f3.4T.a3.50: mediums. $:i.40a3.45; roughs.
S2.75a2.90: stags. 82.23n2.75. ifheep and
lambs Sheep steady: prime lambs, fi90a.i;
fair to good, $4.1584.75; culls and common,
il 75i3; bandy wethers, S3.6oa3.73; extra,
tl; Canada, lambs, fl.70a4.75.
Oil Market.
OH City. Pa.. Dec. 2. Option oil mar
ket closed $1.03; credit balunces, $1.05; na
tional transit runs, 20.03H barrels; ship
ment. 4.009 barrels. Unckeye runs, 45,510
barrels; shipments, 43.310 barrels.
Opposite Wyoming House.
T
A WORD.
WANTS OF ALL KINDS COST THAT
MUCH, WHEN PAID FOR IN AD
VANCE. WHEN A BOOK ACCOUNT
IS HADE NO CHARGE WILL BE LESS
THAN CENTS. THIB RULE AP
PLIES TO SMALL WANT ADS., EX
CEPT LOCAL SITUATIONS, WHICH
ARB INSERTED FREE.
HfcLl VVANTiTD AlALliS.
UfANTED-TWO EXPERIENCED MEN
to erect elevators: also two machinists.
Apply to JOHN F. DEAN, Manager, Morse
Williams & Co., 425 Spruce street.
tlTANTED-AN IDEA. WHO CAN TfllNK
V of some simple thing to patent ! Pro
tect vour ideas: they may bring you wealth.
Write JONH WF.DDKRBUfl s A CO,, DepN
C, S3, Patent Attorneys, Washington. D, C,
for their SINtio prize offer and list of itouiuren
tiona wanted.
WANTED-AS AGENT IN EVERY HEC
tlon to canvass: f 4.11 to $5 00 day
made ; sells at sight; also a man to sell Stn pie
Uoods to dealers: best aide line $75 a month;
salary or large commission made; experience
unnecessary. Clifton Soap and Manufactur
ing Co., Cincinnati, O.
WANTED -WELL-KNOWN MAN IN
every town to solicit stock sulworlp.
tions; a monopoly; big money for agents: no
capital required. EDWARD C. FISU & CO.,
Porden Block, Chicago, 111.
HELP WANTED FEMALES.
1 ADIES-l MAKE B'.O WAGES DOINU
1J plensant lioiue wot k, and will gladly send
full particulars to all 6endlng 2 cent stamp.
J11K.S M. A. SI EI-BIN'H, Lawrence, Mich.
r ANTED LADY AQKNTS IN SCRAN
V V ton to sell and intruduc Snyder's cake
Icing: experienced canvasser preferred : work
permanent and very profitable. Write for
particulars at once and tret benefit of holiday
tiado. T. B. SNYDEK & CO., Cincinnati. O.
TntedImmediatelytwo ener-
tetio saleswomen to represent us
Guaranteed $0 a day without Interferring
with other duties. Henlthtul occupation.
Write for particulars, enclosing stamp, Alange
( hemical Ccmpany, No. 72 John Street, Now
York.
WANTED.
SECOND-HAND FURNACE TO HEAT A
hotel. Call or address ANTHRACITE
HOTEL, 111 Wyoming avenue.
FOR SALE.
lOR HA1.E-TWO $1,000 BON III AND
V forty shares of Mount Vernon Coal Co.
Make me an offer. Address "William," Trio
une ofllce.
I.-OR RALE A SILVER-PLATED CONN
F double bell euphonium, nicely engraved
with trombone bell, gold lined; nearfv new
and cist $00: will sell at a bargain. Address
this week to E. W. OAYLOR, LaRaysvllle,
Pa.
I;OR HALE-HORSE, AGED SIX YEAHS.
' weight 1,000 tounds; cau be seen at 1621
Price afreet.
L'OR SALE MY COTTAGE AT ELM
V hurst and the four lots on which it
stands; also the four lots adjoining; mostdea
simile locution in Elmhurst; prices reasons
ble: terms ensv: possession given at once. E,
P. KINGMBCKY, t lu mcawealtn Building,
Hetnntnn. I'a.
FOR RENT.
tOR RENT-HALF OF DOUBLE HOUSE;
F modern improvementa; rent reasonable;
corner of Pine ai.d Blakely streets, Dunmore.
FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT.
L'OR RKNT-Ft'RNlHHED FRONT ROOM,
I suitable for two, witti or without board.
IIS Adams avenue.
CHIROPODIST AND MANICURE,
CORNS, BUNIONS AND INGROWING
nulls enrod without the least pain or
drawing hlood Consultation and advice given
free. E. M. HETSKL, Chiropodist. !UU Lack
awanna avenue. Ladies attended at tuoir
residence if dcair. d. Charges moderate,
Cloaks "d Millinery
EXCLUSIVELY.
NO TRASH
Medium and Fine Goods Only
We give you BETTER VALUE for your
money than any other house In this city.
Store open evenings till Holi
days. ONE Pino ALL.
400-402 Lacka. Am, Scranton, Pa.
01
CEl!
- mi
ivaiflV "'I
1 si i ' s Inla I
209 Washington Avenue,
Opp. Court House.
AGENTS WANTED.
AGENTS WANTED TO SELL BY 8AM
plo pure wuieky from distillery to pri
vate consumers. LICKING VALLEY CO.,
Covington, Ky.
WANTED-UVE PEOPLE IN EVERY
V V locality at $12 weekly salary and ex
penses to take orders for Christmas Goods.
Permnnent employment if right. MANUFAC
TURER, P. O. Box 5i08. Boston, Mass.
WANTED-GENERAL AGENTS IN EV.
err county; also lady canvassers; some
thing new; - sure seller; apply quick. J, U,
HILBERT, 141 Adaais avenue, Scranton, Pa.
GENTS WHAT ARE YOU GOIVQ TO
do about Safe Citizenship price $1. Go
ing by thousands. Address, NICHOLS,
Napervllle. 111.
AGENTS-TO BELL OUR PRACTICAL
tilod, silver, nickel and copper electro
plasters: prices from $3 upward: salary and
expenses paid: outfit free. Address, with
stamp. MICHIGAN MFO Co., Chicago.
AGENTS TO SELLGIH ARM TO DEALERS;
$25 weekly und expenses: experience un
necessary. CONSOLIDATED MFU CO.. 44
Van Buren St., Chicago,
SALESMAN TO CARRY SIDE LINE; 2
. pur cent, commission: sample book wailed
free. Address L. N. CO., station L, New
York.
BUSIN ESS OPPORTt'N I TIES.
ULL8 AND I1EARS-A PAMPHLET
telling how to handle stocks, grain, etc .
mi margins will b m died on application to
ROUILI.OT & CO., Brokers. No. 125 South
Third street, Piiiladelpuia; $10 margins, 10
shares of stock, or 1.000 bushels of gruiu;
(twenty) eta.: mail orders a specialty; corru-spondenc-solicited.
AUDITOR'S NOTICE.
IN RE: ESTATE OF FREDERICK SIMON,
deceased. In tbo Orphans' Court of Luok
awanuu 'unity. No. 511. Series A.
The nmlel lirned. appointed by the Or
phans' Court of l.nckanvinnii comity, to make
distribution of the funds in tho hands of Hon.
F. W. GiuiHtur ii lid Matgaret Simon, execu
tors, hereby gives notice that he will attend
to thn duties of his appointment at tho ortice
of ('has. II. Welles, in tbo Conl Exchange
Building, city nf 8crnutou, at lo o'clock, on
the 2Un day of November, I8IK1, at which time
and place all parties interested must appear
and preeent tlioir claims or be forever de
barred front coming in upon said fund,
AARON V. BowER. Auditor.
CLAIRVOYANT.
MADAME DeLKON KENTON READS
your life. lO-tt West Lackawanna ave
nue, Hyde I ark, for a fow days only.
R8. DR. STANLEY ACKNOWLEDGED
by the press and public to be one of the
greatest writing mediums and clairvoyants in
the world, is makiu r a tour through tbo Uni
ted States, aud will be here for III days only at
215 Lackawanna avenue. Scranton. Parlor
upstairs. Ladles only. Price, 50o and $1.
CITY SCAVENGER.
AB. BRIOGS CLEANS PRIVY VAULTS
. and cess pools; no odor: Improved
pumps used. A. BRIGGS, Proprietor.
Leave orders 1100 North Main avenue, or
Erckes' drug store, corner Adams and Mul
berry. Telephone 4535.
SITUATIONS WANTED.
DRUGGIST REGULAR PUAHMACIST,
Pennsylvania. Temperate. References.
Address. DRUUG1ST, Scranton, Pa.
WANTED - WASHING, IRONING OR
scrubbing by tbe day. Call at 218 Lin
den street.
SITUATION WANTED -- GOOD LAUN
dress would like ono or two family wash
ings and Ironings at home and go out cue or
two days a week. Mrs. Keywood, Fairfield
Park, Scranton,
SITUATION WANTED BY A MIDDLE
sged man as engineer or fireman: has had
years of experienco and cau give beat of ref
erences. W. L., 821 Phelps street.
SITUATION WANTED - TO GO OUT
washing and ironing; ladles' and gent's
washing and ironing taken home, also, Call
or address L. K.. 618 Lee court.
POSITION WANTED -AS GENERAL
houso girl by strong girl, 10 years of age.
Address J., Tribune office.
SITUATION WANTED YOUNG MAN
O man having had four years' experience
in office work, wishes position as timekeeper,
general clerk or work of similar nature; beat
of references. Address G. A, H., Tribune
otltce.

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