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The Somerset herald. [volume] (Somerset, Pa.) 1870-1936, August 28, 1872, Image 4

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alty for F-4 rated rarwaar.
Being one of those farmer's sons
who would have an education if I
could, I want to bay a word on the
education of farmer's Sons generally.
It is quite common for them to be
tijwkcn of as verdant, frlovenifh, etc.
adjectives which conic doubly cut
ting whn those to whom they are
applied feel them to be true to a cer
tain degree, yet are ignorant of the
way in which they might improve.
The feeling that this is the inevitable
result of life on the farm, has done
much to mate the profession unpopu
lar, and has had no email influence
in nending those who were born there,
and were well fitted to conduct its
business successfully, away to the
village or city, to engage in some
thing that would at least free them
from this fault ,
Why nH'd a farmer's son, any more
than any other, be an ignoramus or a
clown, even though he cannot get
more than a common school educa
tion? Nearly all can get this; and
Then the same amount of application
that would )e necessary to make it
complete under the most favorable
circumstances, would do very much
towards it, even iu their homes, in
the spare hour they luifrht find, which
arc so generally wasted. Hooks and
pajK-rs can be obtained at a rate that
is, to some extent, within the reach
of all. Vet it is not enough to rvad,
siniplj ; it must be with eonie dcCnite
purpose. There are cords of books
and papers that leave one worse than
they found him, and farmers arc the
very ones who encourage their pro
duction by buying them, these pa-.
jxts, from the character of their sto
ries, do more harm among farmers'
children than anywhere lc, because
they do not have enough society
most of the time to counteract their
influence. The tendency toward
light reading is so strong as to produce
permanent injury. The country is
flooded with stories. They come in
books, magazines, and papers, end
are read by farmers' families general
ly, with far too little discrimination.
The effect is to destroy all taste for
more solid reading that requires a
Rtronger effort of the mind, and im
parts more valuable information. Vet
this solid reading that makes think
ing necessity, should 1m? the ground
work upon which to build an educa
tion, and the lighter kinds should on
ly be used as a recreation. There is
much of it that should not be read
at alL
Most of th farmers with whom I
am acquainted arc comparatively un
educated, and from not having its ad
vantages themselves, fail to appreci
ate its valu to their children, who are
growing up to Ell the places of their
parents with very few ideas beyond
the business of the farm. It is this
willful blindness to their own true in
terests that makes so large number of
fanners incapable of taking a higher
position in society. You mutt talk to
them of farmine or ther arc not in
terested. Their minds narrow down
to their own-petty interests, and they
wear themselves out to accomplish
what an educated mind would do with
case. Many of them are not consci
ous of their own defects, and are the
most difficult to get along with in the
town or church, because their minds
work perpetually in the same old rut.
Farmers do not think enough.
They use their muscles more freely
than they do their intellects, which
are weak for want of exercise. If
they cannot get this at the right time
ana in me usual pmcc unucr inMruc- ;
tors, inev ougui to uave a, cour- oi
reading that would produce a similar
effect unon the mind, and fit them not I
only to form, but alao to express opin-
4 ,
ions upon those questions
sns that concern
them in common with others.
This 1
would give a new rest to life, and
would tit them to do their own work
better and easier, while as citizens
they would far excel their present
reputation. A kos.
The Value of I'uMrKixs. Last
year I raised twenty ox-cart loads of
pumpkins with corn from an acre.
The cart would hold forty bushels of
potatoes. I consider them a valuable
food for stock, taking into considera
tion how cheaply they can b raised.
I undertook to dry in my apple dry
house some for market, and was of
fered five cents per pound. I found
that a green pumpkin weighing from
fifteen to twenty pounds would make
about one pound of wall-dressed dry
pumpkin, and that it would pay bet
ter to dry them for my hogs (as it
could bo dona very cheap) than it
would to sell.
I soaked the dry pumpkin in milk
and fad the same to the hogs they
gained fast I also dried quite an
amount and barreled it to feed them
with this summer. I fd my sherp
upon the green ones two months, and
it did very much toward fattening
forty, which I 6old for mutton, and
the "forty which I wintered never did
better. I commenced to feed my
cattle in September, end fed some
every day until February. It saved
a vast amount of feed. I aim plant
ing but a small piece of corn, and
wish to raise a large amount of pump
kins, so I plant them with my Early
Rose potatoes ; their tops die early,
which will let in the sun and give
pumpkins a chance to grow. Cor.
Maine Farmer.
Sakdspocts ix Nevada. For sev
eral hours there were visible from
Tirrinia Citv. Nevada, on Twentv-
one milt Pesart, five or six tall col
umns of eand, sucked up by as many
whirlwinds. At sea, these would
have been waterspouts, but upon the
desert they were onlv what we call
sandspouts. The columns ajteared
to be ten feet in diameter and one
thousand feet iu height Although
they waltzed about over the plain for
two or three Lours, they never came
together or never lost their cylindrical
from, and when they did go down
they went down at once, all falling to
eether. These sandspouts, says a local
paper, are well known to all old pros
pectors and seem to indicate a change
of weather. We have frequently seen
in the Forty mile Desert, east of the
lower Sink of tho Carson, not less
than ten or fifteen of these tall sand
columns moving about over the plains
at the same time. It is seldom that
they come together, but when they
do they dart forward like two flashes
of lightning, and an explosion like a
heavy blast ends all, and the two
columns of sand at once fall to the
ground. Those who have not been
upon our great deserts and who have
never witnessed these grand sand
spouts or the wonderful mirages,
have but little idea of the romantic
grandeur of these apparently unin
teresting wastes of sand.
A day or two ago the steam saw
null or Messrs. A. A. Barker & Son
known as the "California" mill, loca-
tep south of Ebcnsburg, Cambria
county, was discovered on fire. The
fames bad made such progress that
any effort to check them would have
been useless. How the fire origins
ted u a mystery and oai only be oon
jecturedL
WES DELL PHILUrt.
A ranstlr Review of the PoIlUral Sls
IIb Fhtlllps for !. Wfcy he
Aheald be Mappvrted racralni;
4iroeleT ernel Hmur.
..Wendell Fhillips has written a long
letter to certain colored citizens of
Boston, in which he gives his reasons
for supporting General Grant and op
posinn Mr. Greeley. We offer th fol
lowing extracts:
Of course, the first thought that oc
curs to you and me just now is, that
one of your best, ablest, and moet
watchful friends. Mr. Senator Sum
ner, advises you to. vote for Horace
Greeley, and believes that your rights
will be safe in his keeping. I touch
with reverent hand everything from
Mr. Sumner.. I can never forget his
measureless services to the anti-slavery
cause and to your race. When
ever I read his words, I read them
overshadowed by the memory of his
early and entire consecration to the
services of impartial liberty of that
real that has never flagged that
watchfulness which has seldom been
deceived of that devotion which has
so rarely shrunk from any sacrifice
which no opposition could tire and no
danger appal. From such a counsel
lor i venture to differ with great reluc
tance, and only after mature delibera
tion. I should hesitate to publish my
dissent if I were not sure that I was
right, and that he was wrong that
the occasion was very important
and his mistake one which leads to
fatal results.
You remember that in 186S I em
phatically denied General Grant's fit
ness for the Iresidcncv. Derided by
the Republican press, I went from city
to city protesting against his election.
Iu private with Mr. Sumner and oth
ers, I argued long and earnestly
against the risk of putting such a man
into such an office. At the same time
they saw only his great merit, and
supported him heartily. The defects
of his administration are no surprise
to me. I may say, without boasting,
that I prophesied those defects. I do
not wish to hide them to-day. I en
tirely agree with Mr. Sumner as to
the grave fault and intolerable inso
lence of the administration in the
Santo Domingo matter. I think the
frequent putting of relatives into office
highly objectionable, and the sad ca
reer of Webster is warning enough
against any man in public life ventur
ing to accept gifts from public men.
1 hose and other defects are no sur
prise to me.
The South has often announced
in the last instance by the lips of Jef
ferson Davis that the cause was not
lost, and must be won by getting
possession of the Government and
leaving us in the opposition. Such is
the present plot. That Mr. Greeley
sees it would never prevent his aid
ing it That Mr. Sumner does sec it
is no matter of profound astonishment
At such a moment the regular Repub
lican party becomes again the accept
ed and onlv iastance of resistance.
and Grant represents loyalty as Lin
cola did in 1861. I do not care for
his defects, wcra they ten times great
er. Chatham and Junius rightfully
forgot even the infamy of Wilkins
when he stood the representative and
symbol of the rights of a British sub
ject Kven if I accepted Air. Sum
ner s portrait or 1 resident Grant
which in some senses is true, but in
no sense is the whole truth I should
still vote for him against a rebellion at
the ballot-box, to which disloyalty
rives all the strength, and childish
j. a th charBCtor,
- . .
To !' lh subtest faith in
the
and
l'roiesiauons oi oppcrncaus
p-s ?n,!-ls' 7 w gn ',
" , "
exception of Mr. Sumner, no lead-
rag KepuWican docs really put any
faith in those pretensions. Theirs is
not a case of delusion. They arc,
hypocrites, not dupes. They know
wvll the plot, and lor the sake of of
fice are willing to help it and risk the
consequences. They know that Mr.
Greeley s election means the negro
surrender to the hate of the Southern
States, with no interference from the
nation in his behalf; that it means
the constitutional amendments neu
tralised by a Copperhead Congress,
our debt tampered with, and our
bond falling 30 per cent in every
market. The Democratic millionaire
who is willing to risk this has al
ready '"hedged." He holds millions
of Confederate bonds, and is plotting
to make o them more than enough
to pay four times over all that he
lotcs on the national securities, and
then safely laugh at the small bond
holders he has duped.
If General Grant is set aside, who
is offered us in his place? Horace
Greeley. I need not tell you, my
friends, what Horace Greeley is. We
abolitionists know him too well in
the weary years of our struggle. He
had enough of dear moral vision to
see the justice of our cause. But he
never had emirago enough to confess
his faith. If events had given him
the courage he never would have had
principle enough to risk anj-thing for
an idea. A trimmer by nature and
purpose, he has abused even an Amer
ican politician's privelege of trading
piiaciples for kuccchs. But for lack of
ability he would have been the chief
time server of his age. I never knew
till now any of his ulogists so heed
less and undiseriminating as evjen to
claim that he was a sincere man. As
for his honesty, for twenty years it
has been the by word with us that it
would be safe to leave your open
purse in the same room with him ;
but as for any other honesty, n.o one
was ever witless enough to connect
the idea with his name.
Mr. Sumner trusts him as a '"life
time abolitionist" This is certainly
news to you and me. You and I
know well, when abolitionist was a
term of reproach, how timidly he
held up his skirts about him, careful
to put a wide distance between him
self and us. You will find few work
ing abolitionists, who stood in the
trenches from 1840 to I860, willing to
trust the negro race to Horace Gree
ley. I can remember the day when
he and his fellow-Republicans quot
ed our criticisms upon them as cer
tificates that they were no abolition
ists. We can give him just such a
certificate now with a clear consci
ence. Judged by the files of the
Tribune itself, there never was an
hour when Horace Greeley could
have been trusted with the care of
the black man's rights.. No man has
known better than he how to manu
facture political and pecuniary suc
cess ont of the convictions of other
men. For himself he never had a
conviction. Men contrast his former
praise of General Grant with his
fault-finding now; and neither his
praise nor his blame ia of any ac
count ; neither comes from the heart ;
both are measured and weighed out
with shrewd calculation for effect
Examine the files of the Tribune
You will 6ee that whenever men's
convictions on any subject have got a
keen edge, Mr. Greeley was always
ready to blunt them with a compro
mise. He is only acting now the
text he has always played. Men
augh when some stirring and loyal
sentence is quoted from the Tribune
of 1863 and 1864, nnd Horace Gree
ley immediately proves that he did
not write it, but you and I know that
three-quarters of tho loyalty of the
Tribune was smuggled into it in his
absence, or in spito of him. If his
letter to Mr. Lincoln, during the
dark years of 1862 and 1863, arc ever
published, the world will see, what
vou and I have always known, that
he could hardly have aided the Con
federacy more unless he had enlisted
in its Cabinet
If as Mr. Sumner says, Mr. Greeley
is a "lifetime abolitionist" how comes
it till within three years Mr. Sumner
hardlyever got a kind word and never
had any hearty support from the
Tribune t How often have Mr. Sum
ner's friends heard him expatiate at
length on this point ? On the floor
of Congress he has stood for many a
year tho incarnation of the anti-
slavcry movement But he has again
and again complained that instead of
giving him any support tho Tribune
has constantly belittled his efforts and
Iiut obstacles in his way, cheering
lis opponents and carpi ug at his
measures, or at best damning them
with faint praise. My recollection
of these well-grounded complaints is so
fresh that I look at Mr. Sumner's
picture of Mr. Greeley with unfeigned
astonishment. Even the supiKised
conversion of the Southern Rebels is
not so wonderful as that of the Trib
une into a supporter of Charles Sum
ner. We put aside with scorn it deserves
the insult it implied in preaching to
us forgivness and conciliation. An
dersonvillo and Libby prison are
still living horrors. Besides the
thousands who were starved there,
hundreds still drag out dreary lives
in our streets, poisoned all through
bv that dread cruelty. The graves
of seven white native Georgia loyal
white men, ruthlessly shot down in
the streets, arc hardly yet covered.
The first-born of a hundred thousand
households are still freshly mourned.
Meanwhile thanks to the unparal
lellcd mercy ,thc unutterable generosi
ty of the nation ninetv-nine out of
every hundred . Confederate soldiers
enjoy to-day all the rights they had
before the war. I dare not fix the
epithet I think fitting to that mood of
mind which deems it necessary ana
becominir to preach to such a commu
nity the duty of forgiveness ! I wish
my voice could be heard by every
colored man down to the Gulf; not
because they need my advice. No;
they understand and see their danger
But I should like to rally them to
help us a second time to save the na
tion. I should say to them "Vote,
every one of you, for Grant, as you
value property, life, wife, or child. If
Greeley is elected, arm, concentrate,
conceal your property but organize
for defense. You will need it soon
and sadly."
JF.Kl SALEM.
Of all the cities of the globe, Jeru
salem has been the most memorable
for its divine honors, in prophetic
distinctions, and its misfortunes. Its
original name was Salem ; its first
king said to be Melchizedec; and the
proposed offering of Isaac .was said
to have been on Mount Moriah, one
of its three hills, afterward the site of
the Temple. Jerusalem was conquer
ed in the time of Joshua. Its history I
was thenceforth a succession of sieges.
It was recovered by the Canaanites,
and re-taken and burned by Joshua;
then captured by the Jebusites, and
finally captured by David, in his res
toration of the fallen glories of Isra
acl. Its lofty position and evident
strength determined the conqueror to
make it his capital ; and leaving He
bron, and rejecting the opulent fertil
ity and natural loveliness of Samaria,
he fixed bis throne in the citidel of
the Jebusites, and named it the "City
of David."
Jerusalem stands nearly central
between the Mediterranean and the
Jordan thirty-seven miles east of
the former, and twenty-three west of
the latter. David brought the ark
within its gates with great pomp, and
fixed the site of the temple on Mount
Moriah; but the erection of the
Temple was appointed to his still
greater son. The reign of Solomon
was the summit of Jewish grandeur,
and the building of the Temple was
the summit of the grandeur of Solo
mon. It was the most magnificent
edifice ever raised by man ; not mere
ly for its position on the pinnacle of
the sacred mountain, or for us noble
architecture, but for its splendor.
Wherever gold, cedar or marble could
be shown,- it was all gold, cedar, or
marble.
When Solomon, in advanced years,
fell into idolatry, evil was declared
against Israel. The kingdom of Da
vid was shorn of its strength by the
loss of the ten tribes, and the eivi ,
war terminated only in their captiv
ity. Judah still retained its royalty
for 130 years longer, until the Assyr
ian invasion, when the city was
stormed and the Temple was burned
by Nebuchadnezzer, and lost its inde
pendence as a kingdom forever. Re
stored, after a captivity of seventy
years in Babylon, it returned only to
an enfeebled vassalage and a ruined
Temple even saw its commonwealth
recovered only to fall again ; and af
ter suffering the repeated suprema
cies of Syrian Egyptian and Roman,
finally perished as a nation by the
Roman sword.
Yet the city was not wholly de
serted. But an attempt of the em
peror, in the year 141 of the Chris
tian era, to make it a Roman fortress
rased an insurrection which was ex
tinguished in national blood, and con
cluded the national ruin.
For nearly two centuries more Jer
usalem was forgotten by the world.
At length, on the accession of Con
stantine to the imperial throne, the
Empress Helena is presumed to have
made a pilgrimage to the wreck of
the city to discover the sites made
memorable by the history of our
Lord (a. d. 326). Constantine re
pealed the edict excluding the Jews
from entering Jerusalem, but he al
lowed their entrance only once in the
year to weep over the destruction of
the city. The ages of monachism
followed; and in the reign of Justin
ian a man of whom history has
scarcely yet decided whether he was
a philosopher or a dupe, a warrior or
a dastard, a restorer or destroyer of
empire the site of Jerusalem was
adorned once more, according to the
custom of the time, by building a su
perb church on Mount Moriah to the
Virgin (JL D. 527). He also built a
succession of convents in the neigh
borhood of Jerusalem and Jericho,
and hospitals for the pilgrims of both
these cities.
But evil days were at hand. A
Persian invasion of the Greek empire
rushed on Syria (a. d. 614), broke the
emperor's army, and stormed Jerusa
lem with desperate slaughter. AH
now was rapine ; but the Persians at
length retreated and. the Emperor
Heraclius entered the city, bearing
the Cross on his shoulder. A still
more formidable trial awaited this
"City of misfortune." Mohammed
ravaged Arabia, Egypt and Syria.
The torrent of fire and steel rolled on
Palestine. Jerusalem was besieged
(a. d. 637), and, after a desperate de
fense, was taken. Omar, the con
queror, then built the mosquo which
still stands on the spot once hallowed
by the Temple.
Jerusalem now rested, powerless
and enslaved, for two centuries and a
half: but the tenth century raised a
1 new spirit in Europe formidable to
Mohammedan supremacy. A roman-
' a.! v -1 r it.i ai. i i . ?
lie uenei turn me worm was coining
to its end in the year 1,000 urged a
multitude of pilgrims to the Holy
Land. Its masters laid a tribute on
the pilgrims. The insults and injur
ies inflicted by tho Arabs on those
European strangers became the uni
versal rumor, and roused the universal
wrath of Europe. In the tenth nnd
eleventh centuries Jerusalem had
passed from the Saracens to tho
Egyptian Khalifs, from these to the
Turcomans, and from them to the
Egyptians again. In this period of
doubt and distraction the army or the
Crusaders under Godfrey of Bouillon
appeared before Jerusalem, (a. p.
I09i); the city was stormed; after a
siege of forty days the Moslems were
exterminated, the Mosque of Omar
was consecrated as a Christian
church, and the successful command
er was proclaimed King of Jerusalem.
The Christians preserved their con
quest eighty-eight years.
Iu the twelfth century the Sultan
Saladin, an Arab hero, captured the
city, threw down the Cross, and puri
fied the holy places with rose-water.
The prince a man of great bravery,
sagacity and success restored the
fortifications of Jerusalem on the ap
proach of Richard Ceeur do Lion (a.
p. 1102.)After the death of Saladin
it fell successively into tho hanuls of
every invader of Syria Mamaluke,
Christian and Turk" In the sixteenth
century its walls were rebuilt by the
Turkish Sultan, Soliman the Magnifi
cent (a. d. 1642), whose inscription
remains over the Jaffa gate. Even
in the present century this "City of
lassitudes'' has changed masters,
falling into the possession of Mchcm
et Ali, the Pasha of Egypt, in his
Syrian invasion (a. d. 1832). From
him, however, it was wrested, with
all his Syrian conquests (a. p. 1841,
and restored to the Ottoman govern
ment, under which it now rests.
The Jewish nation, exiled from
their Temple, city and country, have
lccn dispersed all over-the world,
harassed by plunder and persecution
during the vast period, the seventeen
centuries, which have passed since
their national ruin. But a change
has already begun. The Jew in all
nations is sharing the protection of
the law and the jossession of proper
ty. It is to the honor of America
that this change was begun by her,
and that as she has long taken the
lead in liberty, morals, and religion,
she set the example of acknowledg
ing the claims of the Jews to the fellow-feeling
of mankind.
Then and Xw Crl Hrkurz ia ltttS
d IS73.
Some of the German papers are
amusing their readers with an illus
tration of Senator Schurz'a versatil
ity. In 1SC8 Senator Doolittle, of
Wisconsin, in a speech, denounced
the Republican Government of the
South as a " military despotism more
horrible than any ever endured bv
the Poles, Hungarians, or Irishmen."
Mr. Schurn, speaking in Chicago
shortlv afterwards, referred to Mr.
Doolittle as that " paltry statesman of
Wisconsin who delights the public
with his undertaker's wit and comic
al earnestness." As to the charge of
oppression in the South, Sehurz said
that " If made by a sensation news
paper, a pothouse politician at a ward
meeting, or by Andrew Johnson, it
might be allowed to pass, but when a
Senator of the United States comes
before the people and compares the
acts of the military government in
the South to the cruelties practiced in
Poland and Hungary, he deserves
chastisement Ho must either le
more ignorant than an average school
boy or have a love for deliberate mis
representation incompatible with the
character of an honorable man. I
understand that Senator Doolittle has
travelled in Europe. I think it would
have been a useful employment of his
time had he taken from a German
school boy some elementary instruc
tion in European history."
And then Mr. Sehurz went on to
give gome details to show what mili
tary despotism in Europe really
means. The comparison of the two
speeches is amusing, in which the
Sehurz of 1868 and 1872 express
themselves on the 6amc subject. True,
fairness properly suggests that what
was not a fact four years ago may be
a fact now. But the explanation
suggested is not satisfactory, as the
impression is irresistible that the
speaker in both cases is one of those
highly-gifted rhetoricians who can
descant with equal emotion and equal
effect on either side of the same shield,
fully persuaded that he is quite in
earnest all the time. The simple
truth is that whatever mistakes may
have been made in the reconstruction
and general treatment of tho South,
there has been no military despotism
there, and when Senator Sehurz, in
1 872repeats and applies Uie words with
which he so severely rebuked Sena
tor Doolittle in 18C8, he lays himself
open to the charge, not of ignorance,
but of misrepresentation.
- Deaaperaae Ikhnr
Don't look of dat lager wLen it bin
red, when it was given poorty much
golor in dat bier glass, nnd when he
vas rnorin all rite ; for of der last he
ftting liko 0110 pumblebec, nnd bites
like a Xewfountland bull-dog. No
drunken fellor don't could got by dat
kingtoni vou heafen in. Who got
droubles f who got fights ? who got
blue eyes nnd red noses; Guess
once ! Veil, I told you. lcm fellers
vat hangs around of dem lieker-gin-
muls, und trinken mixed trinks, like
hot Thomas und Jeremiah, for
instinct Don 'tit? .
Uf you don't dought more Ton
your 17 wives nnd one children dan
to vaa getting drunk, it vas better
you gone dead, by gracious.
- Don't you bin ashamed mit your
self ur. you vas comin' home on a
gonble o'clock in der morning time,
und don't could found der keyholes.
Den ven yon Tas drying pootv
much how much to pool dem poots off
nut ein a tood-brush, und glean dem
poods mit a jack-boot don't you bin
drunk den? Aid't it? I vas bin a
little hoarse, so I don't could rite no
more Ickshur. Who dreads to lager
next ? .
; A Balky . horse, it is said, can be
perfectly managed by placing your
hand over the horse's nose and shut
off his wind until he "wants to go,
and then let him go.' So says one
who states that he has long tried it
The remedy is simple, always at
hand, and a merciful one to tho beast,
and can be easily tested.
The posting of placards of quack
medicines has been prohibited in the
6treets of Chicago. 1
MiwUaneou.
EdTABUDHKll IX 1(431.
rpHE LARGEST AM) BEST STtiCX OF
FURNITURE
Wett of the Mountains,
Of on r own Manufacture, will be found at tle
MAMMOTH ESTABLISHMENT or
V. G. HA3IMi:it J S0X8,
The newest and inost approved style of Fine arid
Medium Furniture. In lurnervurio'ljr tlwnny oUier
buuae, at very reuwiiiatile prim. Fenuru runiUli
ing houxen would do wvll to write for our newrin-u-lr.
or when in FlttHhurifh, we retpect fullv miliiit a
vlKittoourwareruonif. Pon't loret the pluce,
46. 4M ASOKrvrnth At., Plttabarb, Pa.
Wechnllen-e the world In price fur the rame
quullty of Biau-riul and workuuioshlp of our good.
au7-3ru CL'T THIS OUT.
I'lTTSBllMUI FEMALE ( OLLEUE.
El-BO AKT Ilni.Dlxos, well fumi.-lied and car
peted throughout. TliorouKh count ol atuil)'.
TWENTY-THREE TEACHERS.
Srren Dcpailmenti. Special tew-hcni four In
Muslo foreai-h ot the ornamental liranrheii. Na
tive teaehen of French and (R'nuan. Charge Icm
than any achoul n tii.rci iiitr eijunl advantnireauudae
eonimodution. Fall term ruinmcneeK Si'ptelnlwr
10th. S-nd to the I'mddent, Iter. 1. 1 Ftn-hluK,
P. P.. Plttuburjli, l'a., for a ratuloguc.
anjf. 7-w.
M
ANSI ON 1IOUSK,
N.iJri., Fi:itlti:JU l'roprit lor.
Thin I one of the beet hotel Iu Somerset enuuty.
The taldca will always lie uppli4nl with the !.!'.
eiit t land the market afford, and the bar it h the
oest liquors. Koouiy tuhlratUi'hed. u; 2
jQASSKIALAN
PLANING MILL !
WOLFi:RftBKUFi:it, '
ZrFAI.L, !
I
PIIILLIPPI at Co.,'
Are now prciwrod to do nil WIii.Ik of planing and
Iu;iuuUeturUig
BUILDING
MATERIALS,! FLOORI1TG,
WEATHERBOAEMG,
SASH AND DOORS.
Wintlow ani Door Frames,
UltACKETS, etc.,
Or anything wed In building. We are alfo pre
pared to raw
FRAME-TI MHEK, VA ) Alt )S,
And any thing In that line of badness.
All kind of work done to order.
Order promptly filled.
WOLFEKSUKROFR.
ZL'FALL Ji. P11ILX.IFFI,
Casaelnian, Somerset eo., l'a., July 27, lsTi
T VI I E B ES T i UM P
1
IN THE WORLD!
THE AMERICAN SUBMERGED
PouMc-Aetlni Non-Freetloj
FORCE 1UM1!
The Simplest. Moot Fnweifnl, F.fTeetlve. Hum
ble. Reliubie and Cheajieat Fuuip In u.ie.
it 1.4 made all of Iron, and of a few fdtuplo part..
It will not Freeze, a no water remain. In the
' pljie when nut In action.
It ha nr. leather or gum packing, a the Fucker
: and valves are all of Iron.
I It eeldom, if ever. Rets out of order.
( It will force water from 40 U (JO feet In the air. I.y
attacnin a tew teei oi noee.
It I trnod for washing Bu;rgle, Window, water
ing (iardena, lie. s
It fumlfhc the Purest and eoldert water, because
I) I placed in the bottom ol the well.
TftKM.: -V inch I'ump, 15; pipe, We. Cad.
1 " - 18; " tic
L.irner slr.e In proportion.
WEYAXI A PLATT.
Sole A (rent lor Someraet County.
Somerset, Pa., May 1st, 187i
OUR VE YI X7 "COX V E Y A -Nr-
O CIXO, COLLECTINO AT.
J AS. 1$. CjiAITIIER,
DALE CITY, : : : MEYERS' 1) A EL P. O.
All hnelne entrusted to hi? care will he pmmit
ly attended to. The Agency for the purehae or
ale of all kind of real v.'lato taken on moderate
tenn. tulylu
T an psa x i VuuT Li 7x tTlaOTs!
Buililln lut- tn the
Borough of Somerset,
EHgl' ly rliuated, and
Farti Mineral ani Mr Ms
In varli.u aectiona of S.meret eunly, for Sale
OX ACCOMMODATING TKllMS.
A portion of the kndj arc
Improved Farms,
I Other are anlmprove.!.
LIMESTONE,
FIRE-CLAY,
IKOki-OKE anJ
STONlvCOAL,
Are ftml on nae if tlivm. of fair quality ami
quantity. 'ur term.', Ae., eall n or aillre
1. WEYANII.
Au(fnt 3?, Tl-tf. Somerset, Pa.
JUOUSK k SHIRKS,
Manufacturers of ull grailt s of
CIGARS,
UEDFORD, PA.
Attention part lenlarly akel nf Jolher.
art inlcr tmlii-ited by K. II. Marshall, lrugirit.
Soiuerxet, l'a. my. t.
BOVARD, ROSE & CO.,
Carpets,
OILCLOTHS,
MATTINGS,
Stair Rods, &c, &c.
A Full ami Carcfiillv Selected St)k.
BOVAKI), HOSE & CO.,
' a FIFTH AVENUE,
1'ITTftlSlTIlGir, 1A.
jnne 12- TA
JJANKIXO HOUSE OP
James T. Brady & Co.,
earner of ronrt. Arane ani Wood Stmt,
PITTSBURGH, PAl.
WE BUY AND SEtX.
GOLD.SILVER&COUPONS
On Liberal Terms.
WE ALLOW
Six per Cent. Interest on ' Deposits.
ACCOUNTS OF MERCHANTS AND
INDIVIDUALS SOLICITED.
James T. Brady & Co.
July 3-T2. V
"ARMCASTE Si MOORE'S
FATOSITE CMCMS,
SOLD BY ALL OROCERS.
ManufUotory, SO & 31 Seventh St,
PITT8BCBOU. PA.
ff
SHADES
MUreUanroiti":
Ra Ra Ra
RADWAY'S READY "RELIEF
Cl'BEa THE WORST PAINS
In from One to Twonty Minutes.
NOT ONE HOUR
after reautnc thU Mvrt imeni rned aar ooa
SOKFF.tt WITH FAIN.
RADWiT'3 UL&m RELIEF IS A CUES FOB
EVEIty FA IK.
It wa the flrrt and In
The Only livlii Ilemcdy
that uutantlf itopa the moat eicrnelaUitir pain, allays
ItiaanunatioBa, and eurea CuecUo. wuUmt vf Uie
.ungt. Stomach, llowsii, at utiiu (Inula or organ, by
one application,
IN FUOM ONK TO TWENTT MINUTES.
! mutter how violent or eTrrnciatln- th win the
KHEl'MATIO, Red-ridden. Infirm, Crippled, Kunrwia,
liauiaJfic, or proauatad wttii duvaaa nuy aulltir,
RADWAY'8 READY RELIEF
WILL AFFORD INSTANT EASE.
INFLAMMATION OK THB KIMNKYS.
lN'KLAMMATloX OK THB BLADDER.
INFLAMMATION OF TUB BOWKL9.
OONOKSTIOK OK THE IUNCS.
EORE THROAT. WKKICFLT BKEATHINil
PALPITATION OF THai HJkAET.
HYSTERICS, CROUP, PIl'HTIlElilA
CATAfiilil, INFLUENZA.
HEADACHE, TOOTHArHK, .
NEURALGIA. RHEUMATISM.
part when tha juia or uullcuUy exut will allufd eaw
Tin appUcstioa nf the Keadv Belief to the part or
inA mm fnrt.
Twenty drop In half a tumbler of water will In a few
rMmwnU core CUAMPa, M'ASUS, BOL'R (TOMA'li.
1IEARTIHIRN, BIOK HEAllACHE, aiAKKHKA,
liYSENTKKY. COLIO. WIND IN TRK RUWKLS,
and all INTERNAL FAINS.
TraKlrra aliould alway carry a bottle of Rndwav'
Heady Relief with them. A few drops Ui water will
prevail uckaem or pain from chaag of waur. It U
U:U liau Knauca Rialidy ex letter u X stuuuial.t.
FEVER AND AGUE.
FEVER AND AOOE eared for afty eente. There la
twit a retuedlid ajreul la tale world that will eura f-Vver
and Ayue, and all other Malarious, Ullioua, Bt-srlr-t. Tv
ilicl.t. Yellow, and other Knmol.lrl by RaIiWAYM
I'll.L-S) so quk aa RADWAY'S READY KUF.
Ir'itiy ci-au per haul, bold by Druggiata.
HEALTH llEAUTY ! !
ST1MNO AND ITI1K P.Ifll M-OOD-rNCREASl!
OK H.F.SII AND WEKillT -CLEAR Ha, IN AND
I.EALTIKUL COUfLLXlON hECURED TO ALL.
DR. RADWAY'S
SARSAPARILUAN RESOLVENT
n MADE THK MOST ASTONISHING CURES:
s. orii'K. k i:riD akk tuk change)
the iiony I'NM-.m.oFs. undkr tub in
I Ll'ENfK OK this truly wonderful
MEDICINE. THAT
Every Day an Increase In Flesh
and Weight is Seen and Felt.
THE CREAT DLOOD PURIFIER.
r.ei-nr ilron nt the MKSAPARII.L1AN RESOLV
ENT roriimutikalcH through the ltluod, 8wcat, Crtrtf,
fur It rviain the waat- if th Uxly with nw and tttuhd
n.!rriAl. Scrofula, hvj.l.ihft, 4'onuniplim, Ulanditiar
.teav, I'leem lit (lit Tlrat, Mouth, Tumor. Nodrs iu
tm (jlamla ami other (art f the yrtom, fckire Kyt,
SLruiiaoua Il:liftrjr m" the Kari, mud tli worst
forms f Skin iUm-iiv, hiupUont, Fever ttnrea. Scald
H-ad, Uine U'tTm, tt Kbiuni, Kryipl, Acii. black
S(i, Worms in the Hviaft, Tumor, Caitoera in ttt
W!nti,i.d all wmkft.lnii atil t.aluful dlacharff?; IVIcut
hwt-attt, lrMif Spfrth. atid nil antes of the life prind
le, itre within tiie curative mi re of this wonder of Mod
ern t'hemUtrf, and a few r?av uiv will prore to any
perton uVn it for fltlmr cf lUant funus of diMM iu
uotfTtt (Hiwv'r to cure thvm.
If the putlent, dully btrotnlnc reduced by the wastes
nnd decomposition that I t-titiim:diy pni)rrelrtf. sue
cjA in arrrsthijc tlicM whites, and repairs the same with
it - material made from healthy blood and tuis the,
.vA R-iAI'Ai:il,l.l AN will and doe secure.
. only docs the Haa r hilliam KnoLTTWT exrel
M !tfiiru rviTM-dhU at-iitu in the cure of Chronic Srufu
! it-, .'ititituttouU, uiid s-km Uitaj4,'3; tut U ia UieooJy
; ewiitvu cure for
tMncy fc Etlnddcr Complaints
".nr.rr, n) Womb illnessm, (IraveL Idabetes, Dromry,
t imref Witter. lnitliiene of C'rioe, briicht's !
!-. Aliiinnmun aud In a1 1 1- where there are brick -
. i.eiNxitn, or the water is thick, cloudy, mixed with
,t4 !uk the white of sti er, or threads like white
:!; .r t,trr ha morMd, d:irk. hiiloua appearance, and
- ho'.e-du-t dt-ftonlts. and when there la a rkkUijc
-i:r :i -i wtot-ttioii when pa-tlri? water. Mil pain la lL
. u-.M ..ti.e V.x-i and idou- thj Lius. i'rko, iixo.
WC8M3. The only fcauira ftid luro Hcacd7
ft l. ..... TupC, 41C
Ttmior of 12 Year' Growth
C :irt! by Rttdtvuy'ft Resolvent.
BkTEBXY. Mam., July IS, 18f.
T t. E tt : 1 Uri livt OvatM Tatruor in tb OTsriM and
1, !.. All tb Ifc-cfcffti Mtd liVr wai tx Wlp for it." I triad
-. t t'r-nj that Wat rwTfutiitiild ; but iMtlbing Swiped SM. I
v.ftr k.rlmt, mhI UioutfLt I wuul.l try It; lul tuie no faith
iii'!.' W.-.uifw I kiad avwtfa-rwd f-c twrlw ?mn. I took ais ferttlw
f tUaolvrat, mr.i m iVs of lUalwav'a Ptlla, axl ta totr
I ie THir Kmly K-Krf ; snd Ur hi t a lira of Imnor to ba
a--. r tV;t, 4 I frwl brt tW, aiirtevr, and bai-pior tbaa I !
I..T lrrt wvar. Tea iiri taaaTrrar aal tW Ul Wit aUa f Ua
(. !.. lb st"'"- I writ, this ie yea foe ike Uaatil el
etUvrt, Vve cm publish. It if Tea ctaa.
HANNAH P. KXAFP.
DR. RADWAY'S
PERFECT PURGATIVE PILLS,
j-rf -ctiv tx-t"Uai eljpntly coated with rweet rim.
i nr, rvui;U, purifr, rii-aiue, an I strengthen, liad
v :.v a I l.a, for tiie cure of all disorder of the hfomacb,
l iver. HweL Kidnera, Dindder, Nervous Dbeaaea,
It-ntt c'ie, 'otjr!tl;twn. i-oatiTenrat, ludiffefttion.
Iv.i t- ai, r.iliouitneae, l'dlous vtr. Inflftmmaiion of
tt.f t.v.'t-i. '.le,andall lcrantrrnieiUof Uie loiental VLa--Ta.
Warraiited to effect a jnwi'lve cure. Purely Veeeta
:, '.'it itd:i no mcreurr, miuerAi5,ordeIeterlrHjdnifj:s.
Ii OfiTve the followiiic sTmpUnus rtsuititf frua
;;i-nK-ra of the Ui?etU (raiia:
r.tn.i:t:i9a, Inwa4 PilM. Fallsew of the Dined ta the Head,
-Ufl f tHw Stattmavh, yaaiaa. iartrer.. lhgt of Font,
f .it" 'r VV.rt La ti SlnaKh, Hvaar aVmrlaVtaoaa, SiaA;Hff er
F Jt--nair at th- Tit nf lh Stomach, Kwisnmiae of lb Head,
liiritM An J PlArtilt Breath !mr, F)attarrincat U Haatrl. Ch4iet
" Vitr--attar Swnnti'iti ht In a I vine Pwlil. PlBiaaai of
.... lh.a. or H'U be,r ti Sirbt( Fr and Psll Pais ta
i. ht-w.l, IltflrUary nf Pff.tirt:oii, Vwlhwaa U iba SSia
.1 K.i. Nm itt Ui Stai, Cbaat, aUiul, ad auaUca Flathet of
' alarinr is Flh.
A f.-w tNe of BAD WAT'S riXLS will free the rra-
iceii''! ti-e U.vi-tiv;.ed M-onieri. l'rice, 15 ceut
Sil.l ItV I'kUMilSTS.
IKI K1K ANI THl-'K." Bend oae letter-
v .1 - RAW WAV 4t t'O.. No. 7 Ma.du Lane. Ntw
liafoiUMtioAi wwUi UtouaawbtaU wbi be aeot yuu.
' V Knives and Forks, 1V
SPOONS. SCISSORS, n
IXES, SHOVELS. LOCKS,
Hinges, Nails, Files, etc. 1 rial
(SlCarperrter's, Blacksmith's, and J3
rv. T.iv k p'Tts y. -w 1
Btreeti.
Lumber Company,
OABRETT, SOMERSET (X)., PA.
Earnest, Delp & Camp,
PROPRIETORS,
WHITE PINF,
VtUiWPINE,
OAK,
HEMLOCK,
AN I H F-STNUT mi BER.
SAWKH AMiSHAVKDSHINULES,
A.1 I'LlSlLllUdMin.
Building Lumber
"Cut to a bill"' at short notice.
Onlcr from lumber dealer promptly f)Uel at
wiKitemie prices. auic. v. 71-11.
QIRARD HOUSE,
Cohm:i: NtxTii axd Ciiestntt Strkcth,
V II I li A D E L P II I A .
H. W HANAOA,
Feb 14 Tl Proprietor.
QUE AT IXDUCEM ENTS.
Person wantlnsr flrtfl:iiB Fruit Tree. Vines
iin'l Plants ."ImulU cjII on
HAKXEDSVILLE,
. - Smarot C-onnty, Pa.
You ean pureha.'e of ltliu at lower rate than ol
any other party. '! 28-TA
i;r i:r.M:
J
tarporatei Ij Act of Legjslatiire.
CAPITAL, .... $100,000
PRIVILEGE, ... $500,000
Depositors secured by Real Estate
investments exclusively.
Six Per Cent. Interest
Paid to depositors on tho compounding
principle.
tlf-tttenttnn U directed ta tht liberal pro
ritiont for tritlulmiring money deposited.
Ilemnbedrmtin small amount, WlTnofl
KOTICK FROM TIIE ItEfOSITK.
AH tommunieution trill rrir prtmtpl
reply
JAMES T. BRADY,
DAVID CAMPBELL,
Tnaturer.
Miiccllantou.
Vlaecar Bitter ar not a vile Kaocy Dnnk.
made of Poor Rum. Whitkey, Proof Spirits and Refoi
Liquors, doctoreti, spiced, and sweetened to pleas the
taste, called Tonics," Appetizers Restorers,"
&c, that lead the tippler on to druukenoess and rain,
but are a true Mediane, made rrom the native roots
and herbs of California, free from all Alcoholic Stimulants
They are the Great Klood Purifier and a Life-giving
Principle, a Perfect Renovator and Invigorate of the
Srstetn, carrring off all poisonous matter and restoring
the blood to a healthy condition, enriching it, refreshing
and invigorating both mind and body. They are easy
of adniinistratKHi, prompt iu their action, certain m their
result. afc and reluble in all nuns of diteate.
No Person cats take thae IJUtera accord
ing to directions, and remain kmg enwell, provided
thetr bones are not destroyed by mineral poison or other
means, and the vitJ orgaus wasted beyond the poial
of irpair.
lyspepsla or Indlsreatlosi Headache, Pain
in the bhouldrrs. Coughs, Tightness of tiie t'het, lix
siness. Sour Eructations of the Stomach, ltad Taste
in the Mouth, Bilious Attacks. Palpitation of the
Heart, Inflanunationof the Kunip, Pain in the regions ot
the Kidneys, and a hundred other painful symptoms,
an the olbprings of Jjyspepsia. la these complaints
it has no egual, and one bottle will prove a better guazr
antee of iti merits tlnn a lengthy advertisement.
For Fcaislo Coraplalssts in yoong or old,
married or single, st the dasra of wnnunbood. or the
turn of hie, theje Tonic Citters display so decided an
influence that a marked improvement ia soon percep
tible. For Inflamffcatorjr and Oh routes Rhesi
mat Isua and Ohh, Dyspepsia or Indizestion, bilious.
Remittent and Intermittent Fevers, iviseasea of the
Biood, Liver, Kidneys and Bladder, these Bitters have
been mot successful Such Diseases are caused by
Vitiated Blond, which is generally produced by derange
mcnt of the Digestive Organ.
Ther are aC-eutlo Pnrn;alrc at well aa
a Tonic possessing also the peculiar merit of acting
as a powerful agent in relieving Congestion or Inflam
mation of the Liver and Vucer Oraus, and in Bilious
Diseases.
For Skin Diseases, Eruptions, Tetter, Salt
Rheum, Blotches, Spots, Pimples, Pustules, Roils, Car
buncles, Ring-worms, Scald-Head, Sore Kre. Ery
sipelas, Itch, Scurfs, Discolorarionsof tlte Skin, Humors
and Diseases of the Skin, of whatever name or nature,
are literally dug up and carried out of the system ia a
short time by the use of these Bitters. One bottle m
such cases will convince the roost incredulous oi their
curative effects.
Cleanse the Ilia teI Blood whenever yon
find its impurities bursting through the skin in Pimples,
Eruptions, or Sores: cleanse it when you find it ob
structed and sluggish in the veins ; cleanse it whea it m
ioul ; your feelings will tell you when. Keep the blood
pure, and the health of the system will follow.
ttrateful thoosauUs proclaim Vinegar Bit
tcks the most wonderful Invigorant that ever sustained
the sinking: system.
Plnt Tape, and other Worms, lurking ia
the system of so many thousands, are effectually de
stroyed and removed. Says a distinguished physiol
ogist: There is scarcely an individual upon the bee of the
earth whose body is exempt from the presence of worms.
It ia not upon the heaby elements of the body that
worms exist, but upon the diseased humors and slimy
deposits that breed these living monsters of disease.
No system of Medicine, no vermifuges, no anthelmin
tics, will free the system from worms like these Bit
ters. Mechanical Diseases. Tenons engaged 10
Paints and Minerals, such as Plumbers, Type-setters,
Gold-beaters, and Miners, as tliey advance 10 life, will
be subject to paralysis of :he Bowels. To guard against
tlus take a dose ot walk as s vinsga ii.rraas once
or twice a week, as a Preventive.
Bilious, Remittent, and Intermittent
Fevcre, which are so prevalent in the valleys of our
great rivers throughout the United States, especially
those of the Mississippi, Ohio, Missouri, Illinois, Ten
nessee, Cumberland, Arkansas. Red, Colorado, Brazos,
Rio Grande, Pearl, Alabama, Mobile, Savannah, Roan
oke, James, and many others, with their vast tn buta
ne, throughout our entire country during the Summer
and Autumn, and remarkably so dunng seasons of
unusual heat and dryness, are invariably accompanied
by extensive derangements of the stomach and liver, and
other abdominal viscera. There are always more or less
obstructions of the liver, a weakness and irritable state
of the stomach, and great torpor of the bowels, being
closed up with vitiated accumulations. In their treat
ment, a purgative, exerting a powerful influence opoa
these various organs, is essentially necessary. There is
no catltartic for the purpose equal to Da. J. Walkzr's
Vixkgak Brrnr as they Will speedily remove the
dark-colored viscid matter with which the bowels are
loaded, at the same time stimulating the secretions of
the liver, and generally restoring the healthy functions
of the directive organs.
Scrofula, or Kin-' KtII, White Swellings,
Ulcers, Erysipelas, Swelied Neck, Goiter, Scrofulous
Inflammations, Indolent Inflammation, Mercurial Af
fections, Old Sores. Eruptions of the Skin, Sore Eves,
etc, etc In these, as in all other constitutional Dis
eases, Walkek's Vinbcak Ei Trass have shown thetr
great curative powers ia the most obstinate and intract
able car-
Dr. Walker's California Tine gar Bitters
act on all these cases in a similar manner. By purifying
the Blood they remove the cause, and by resolving away
the effects of the inflammation (the tubercular deposits)
the alXected parts receive health, and a permanent cure
is effected
The proertIee of Da. Waikii'i Vutcgab
Bittsbs are Aperient. Diaphoretic and Carminative,
Nutritious, Laxative, Diuretic, Sedative, Counter-1 m
tant. Sudor inc. Alterative, and A nti-Bilious.
The Aperient and mild Laxative properties of
Da. Walks a 's Vinegak Eittbrs are the best safe
guard in ail cases of eruptions and malignant fevers,
their balsamic healing, and soothing properties protect
the humors of the fauces. Their Sedative properties
allay pain ia the nervous system, stomach, and bowels,
either from mfUmmation, wind, cotic, cramps, etc
Their Counter-Irritant influence extends throughout
the system. Their Diuretic properties act on the Kid
neys, correcting and regulating the flow of urine. Their
Anli-Btlious properties stimulate the liver, in the secre
tion of bile, and its discharges through the biliary ducts,
and are superior to all remedial agents, for the cure of
Bilious Fever, Fever and Ague, etc
Fortify tha bod 7 aajainst d lee ate br ptm-
5 ring all its fluids with VmrGAK BrrTaas. No epi
eraic can take bold of a system thus forearmed. The
bver, the stomach, the bowels, the kidneys, and the
nerves are rendered disease proof by this great invig
orant. Direction. Take of the Bitters on goiog to bed
at night from a mJf to one and one-haif wine-giassfull.
Eat good nourishing food, such as beef steak, mutton
chop, venison, nwt beet; and vegetables, and take
out-door ernrose. They are composed of purely veget
able ingredients, and contain bo spirit.
J WALKER. Prop'r. R.H. HcD05AUetCn
Druggists and Gen. Agtx, San Francisco, Cat,
and cor. of Washington and Charlton Sts., New York.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS AND DEALERS.
K
EMl"S NURSERY,
HAUXEDSV1IXE, SOJIEUSET CO., PA.,
The aut'vriher Inform hi fricn.1 and the pub
lic that he 1 now devotlog his entire time to hi
The firt one ever tartel In theennntjr, ami Is pre
pared to furn!h promptly nil kind ot
FRUIT AND
ORNAMENTAL TREKS,
Vines and Plants.
HIS CONNECTION WITH
KNOX'S riTTSRURG NURSERY
The larjtt ami most complete In the T'nited
State, enable him to irunnuitee to hi eutorier
the choicest Tartetics ami thrMiert growth. Hi
priee are lower than ever before. Ill resolve i
not to be autdone by any In the State tn price or
qualitr. Thee word will he tuadejiood! He will
personally solicit order thl la 11. but order ad-ilresia-d
a ala.ve will be promptly attended to.
Send thorn In early.
HARRISON II. KEMrH.
WITH
A. H. Franciscus & Co.,
rMror.TEns sn healers is
COTTON Y A RN S, RATTS, WICK,
Twine and Ropes,
LOOKING GLASSES, CLOCKS. FANCY BASKETS
Wooden and Willow Ware, &c,
MAJClTACTCKEnS SI JOBBERS OK
OIL CLOTHS, MATTING, RUGS, &c,
M3 Market Street and 610 Commerce Street,
llxiladclplria.
Jane 10-tf.
N STOYSTOWN.
he nndersltrned. proprietor of the Diamond
Hotel, on the southeast corner of the Diamond, be
ing Induced by his many mend, would say to the
traveling public that he ts now prepared to receive
and hospitably entertain all who may arlve him a
call. Hi house will be conducted with the beat
order aud furnish tine accommodation.
SAMl'ELj CUSTER,
Stoystown, Pa April 17th, 18T2.
RAIN CRADLES. The under-
JC slimed I now ensraited In making upward
ol auOUrain Cradle, of an Improved tntttern, us
ing the sharp ground Clipper Scythe, which is the
best manufactured. The cradles will he distribu
ted through the county between the lt and aotn
of June next. Person wishing to purchase will
And them for sale at all the principal business
places In the county. A large number are made
ready at the manufactory at Herlln. Price fa.
apr. 17. UEU P. HAY, Berlin, Pa.
a. C. XKJM. J. D. UVK.XOUOO.
JEIM & LITENGOOP,
BANKERS,
SALISBURY ELKLICK, P. O.
Sour, tin rr Cocstv, Pairs' a.
Drafts bought and sold, and colrectlona made on
all parts of the country.
Interest allowed on time deposit.
Specinl arrangmentii with Guardian and others
who hold moneys in trust. Jan 17 Ti
J O. HARVEY k. CO.,
BUTTEB COMMSSIOK MERCHANTS
67 EXCIUNGE PLACE, BALTIMORE.
liberal cash advances on 'gnmenti and
returns promptly made,
Boots and Shoe.
JJOOTS AND SHOES.
Harry C Beeril.s
Respeet tally Informs l!ieritlxena ef Somrr-t and
the public generally, tiui ho baa Juat rr knishd
bli
NEW SIIOE.STOKE,
In the New Building on Main Cross
Street,
WITH A
SPLENDID STOCK OF OOODS
Rought in the Eastern cities a! the lowra'h price,
ami I pretared to tarnish the public with every
thing pertaining to Li line of burine.
AT VERY LOU' TRICES.
He will kwp iantlyihandaodl.M'rt-iir-ed
to make to onltr on short nota-e,
BOOTS
SHOES
FOR ,
Men, Women and Children,
bnlc.. . T,m lh ,in "H lrtothe
ed with br"'f"- i e ladie. will li lurul-h-
SLiri'ERS,
(JA ITERS,
ROOTS,
i;almoi:al,
i5uskin ()' calf
MOKROCCO, ' KID
AND LASTING MATERIA Ls!
Ami of the iu.t fahhaalIe tyles.
He will Insure a g.-.l fit and give sati.lactl.fl to
all who may give him a call.
He i aim prepared to lunii h sliut iuaLers aiih
a complete asaortmcnt of
SOLE LEATHER,
KII', CALF,
AND MORROCCO.
ALSO,
Lasts and Shoe Findings
pri"tr kln',' W,,'Cb be"lj3th lowest cab
ar-All kind of repairing done on bort notice.
n'ir.'' kreplng a Urge and good stock, by
selling at the lowest p,a.il,l prW. and bv fair
dealing and strict att-ntloa to busluesa, to receive
a lilierul fhare of public palrotmgt!
ai. a, -u-tf. H.C. HEERITS.
W. DAVIS k BRO S
CHEAP
Grocery and Confectionery,
SOMERSET, I'A.
We desir. tt i,ir..m i.. i- . ... t
nlty tliat we have pun-liased the tirocery and V-a-
Zl"TJ "f " -.Kn'"r- E"H- PI"'1,"e the '
Karnet ll,i,c. .n l have made valuable additions I
.nc.in-,YuuetaKol U...1. We sell all the i
best brand of
FLOIR,
AXD MEAL,
COFFEE.
TEAS,
SI CJARS.
RICE, SYRVPS,
MOLASSES,
FISH, SALT,
SPICIS.
APPLES,
FLAVOR I. NO EXTRACTS,
DRIED AXDCAXXED FRVITS.
ALSO,
CHiALftlL, TOBACCfl. CK1ARS.
SXIFF, IJKiaiMS,
IJl'CKETS, TV11S.A-.
All kind French oral ci tuui..n
CANDIES. NITS, CRACKERS.
FAXCY CAKES. PEEFl .MERT.
AXD TOILET ARTICLES,
COMES, BRUSHES, SOAP, ate.
Also an assortment of Toy, he., for the little
fol k.
If you want anything In the Oructry ami Con
fectionery line call at
Davis' Cheap Grocery,
OPPOSITE THE IIARXET Hol SF.
Hot. ly.
Boots
Mild
Slioes,
HATS AND CAPS,
Leather and Shoe Findings.
J. IT. J Zimmerman
Takes pleasnre in calling the attention of the dt
iiens of Somerset and vicinity to the fact that he
has opened a store in bis residence on Union street,
where there will alway be kept on hand a com
plete assortment of
Boots and Shoes,
Of Eastern aral home manufacture, a large and
well assorted stoek of .
HATS CAPS,
Ami a great variety uf
Loalhor and KhoeFindin;4
Of aU kinds. '
There 1 also attached to th store a
CUSTOM-MADE ROOT i SHOE
DEPARTMENT,
With X. R SNYDER as cutter and Utter, which
alone Is a sufficient guarantee that all work made
up In the shop will not only at the feet of custom
er hut that only the best material will be used
and the
lUst Workmen j
Will I employed. The public are respectfully i
invited to call and examine hia stork. '
.'p.o.-:i.
JOR SALE AT
S7,000 OO,
FAYABMi
."W 1st f Vt. Jier, 18TJ."ti0O 1st January. 18TS, jM
l-t April, la73, and $oou a year thereafter,
WITHOUT INTEREST,
A Farm of 229 Acres,
Having two New Houses, New Bank Bam, good
Orchard and Sugar Camp, well timbered and well
Improved, within balf wile of North Fork Kail
road. Possession 1st April, 1873.
thaal pajier will be taken for the first two pay
ment. Poaseat,m aw rn! 4 in- tlmh vn . . . -
1,U00 U paid.
W. J. BAER.
Somerset, May S, TT
iOIIII DIBEKT. taw T BOBkBTS.
JOHN DIBERT i CO.,
NO. 240 MAIN STREET,
JOHNSTOWN, PEXXA.
W Hell Draft nvitt IoKIm In art rr4m nftk. thi
toil States and (Huiadas, and la Foreign eountrle.
Buy (raid. Coupon ani Oovernaent Boodi at
bigbest market price. Loan money on approved
security. Draft and Check on other bank cash
ed. Money received on deposit payableoa demand
Intereit at Hie rale of Six per cent, per
Annum paid an Time Deposits.
Everything In tha Banking Lin receives our
prompt attention.
Thankful to our friend and container for their
past patronage, ws aoltclt a continuanea of tha
same, and Invite ether who have baalnew la our
Una to give a a trial, assuring alL that we .hall at
all time do all we eaa to give entire satisfaction.
Feb ia Ta JOHN DIBERT U CO.
Miacrllanrou.
e. r. EHoaoa.
LIVE GROCERY.
C. F. R IIOA D S k c 0
Respei tfully anaoce lu the public that th. kt
opjneii their grocery in t!i basement of tij,
ling house lately occupied by W. J. ft,er, n,m .
Waahlngtoo Hotel, and are Bow dally rwi,
Ircsh uppllea erything In the
GROCERY AND CONFEf TIor;,
Line. J!ve u a call. Ourg'lare',f.t
best quality. We will ondcaror to plac ,n , '
keep all the best brand of
FLOUR AXD MEAL,
' COFFEE, TEA, 8COAI SVB, h
t
! iuii.aksck ntrtwiu.wi.ii,..
WAS HIM 1 POWDERS,
SODA, IXDIOO,
S A POLIO,
ALL KINDS SOAP,
EX. LOOWOOD,
EX. CUFFEK.
VA.MIJU.
i SPH L
'ALLKIMts
TOBACCO,
CI'JARS.
SXUFF,
CANNED FRUITS
AND VEGETABLES,
ALL K1XDS
DRIED FRUITS
AXD JELLIES,
STf VE POLISH.
SHOE BLAC'J;;
CANM.L
CAJClj
LAMP Wi,L
BROOMS.
BRUSHES.
BUCKETS,
TUBS,
BASKETS,
ROPE,
B
FISH, OIL, SALT,
FREXC1I fc COMMON
C A X D I E . p
XUTS, ALL K IX Its,
CJiA CKEItS,
FRUIT BISCUITS.
SUGAR JUMLLL.
SPICED JUMBLLi.
GIXGERSXAPS,
PERFUMERY,
TV
d to.
Met aM Fancy Articles 6sri
KtMty Dtg THK PLACE.
IX BASEMENT OF THE LATE RE"IiI
W. J. BAER. ESQ.
N..Y. li. Tl ly.
THE Hlail EST MikKET Pfi( 1 fll!
ALL A'LVDS OF COUNT F PSObl 'I
5. U. Ktlll.
W. W. KXABLK.
JT O. KEIM A CO.,
SUCCESSORS TO STUTZMAX klU
In the
SOMERSET FOUM;
Beg leave to ay to it Patpt an-i the Pi!-
tnrv a
will continne te (apply whatever iff XT J TV C
line by Farmer. Builders, Hi' MAAjJI
their line by
Carpenter. Blaekmith. Miner. MiiitP
Dermen aral .uanutacturer generally.
STOVES
FOR COOKING
and heat: KGET
Of the mfist desirable kind, wklch kavenrv . th
yet. tailcl to give entire sutistacliuu. ar. v
kept on bund. '
A B work don
PLOWS, LOWES
Sonrm. m
I f the various pattern bet adapted to :
of our Fanners, warranted to give xi
The large number already In use thrvoi
and the alHdning counties, and a trsi 'f
Ing demand, are a sufficient guaraout 4'
merit.
CAB "WHEELS
MMtrarki,
3tarS
For Mining, Lumbering. Railnnd BiuiJi
of the most approvedjttteru and r v
made to onler on short notice.
GRIST AND SAW MILL IEi
j SHAFTING,
i
! PULLEYS.
Rpo-
(t)pr
V '
'fwrtfr. .
tai
HANGERS,
deyel-whe:
Tin wai
M1LL-SP1XDLES, SAW Ml--'
ANTI-FRUTION ROLLER
BKillTlN AND
IRON RAILIXO. BALCONIES.
Window and Voot&uZZ
The "Rose' Direct, and the -Part laOVMO
Water-Whee!s.;5?
HOLLOW WARE,
PLOW-CASTINU
?ftt4
For all tha different Plow used m th rfrj, j
WeBretheBUthori.edacnufo,tl, Ov-fc,,,,,
SPEAR'S ANTI-DUST PABU S Ut- S-rUlBlt
TO THE !
Io thi county.
W sell, t manufacturer' prU'
THE SPBAOVE MOWER, i aauaew
THE RCSSEL REAPER AX U l '
THE BEST STEEL TW ' E
THE BEST HORSE RA s-j
And Agricultural Implements ft thn-J'
W hop. to merit a
o Utairally wteadeU to thl .tuW"" a
llf Ja !? Pi
Our pricat will be fair nad r terr. " ,
jan. 10, TL
I
Ull
rear
wIf
Sal
ihci
wU
s
J
OHN
truatew i
tleawltli
Pa oe
ASS
Iletbatt
Boroagh
Ulna at
all wood
Apr 17
TTBTS
1 Soaa1
ail bnaine
adjoinasg
Its ta i'
tx:
. Pa.
ntraaud
-Braliatr
Dr.P.C.:
T)
now pens
tice of aae
rlceo to t
Ottce ra
KUufliel.
amies pro
"rflgi
dec IS, '
ir H.
at :
aessrtfpn
V XKf
piCK
MANl
L001
FlneM:
. . : i
141 W(H
XarB
gOME
CO(
Are now
faaauuMtun
FLOOR
WE
.t
la short, am
lag. AU kli
f Tien pro
J!y-ai71
isaam pr
WAG
He
fa;
cr
EHYSK
3-
- , r
Xac 14, i a
COLE,

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