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Carolina watchman. [volume] (Salisbury, N.C.) 1871-1937, May 26, 1933, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026488/1933-05-26/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Oldest Newspaper Published InNorth Carolina __ -
JL JL I Ht'MiM
JJ "The Watchman Carries a Summary of ^All The TSlgws”
BOUNDED 1832—100TH YEAR SALISBURY, FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 26, 1933 'i " VOL. 100 NO. 43 PRiCE 2 CENTS
New Grants
In Public
Works Bill
500 Million
Goes To Cities
Loan Feature Is Supplanted By
Direct Grants
May or Hedrick Will Present Matter
To Council
Application May Be Made By City
Council To State Board
Additional funds for local high
way, relief and construction work
for the city of Salisbury may be
obtained in the near future if the
plans of Mayor B. V. Hearick and
the city council, now underway,
will be submitted
city council at its Friday
meeting in all probability. It is
believed application will be made
for funds for Salisbury by the
council.
Under the plan of the bill, ac
cording to the information receiv
ed by Mayor Hedrick, any city
may obtain funds under this bill
for construction work if applica
tion is made in due time.
"Municipalities,’’ Mayor Hedrick
explained, "are assured of continu
ed financial assistance to meet the
serious relief needs under the new
federal act just signed by the presi
dent. The act sets up a fund of
& 5 00,000,000 to be allotted to the
states on a direct grant and not on
a loan basis. No bonds have to
be issued by municipalities or
states for collateral in order to se
cure these funds.
"There is now no reason why
any municipality in the United
States requiring assistance not get
ting funds Applications must be
made to the duly constituted1 state
relief authorities,” the Mayor stat
ed.
The funds shall be available on
July 1, 193 3 and shall remain
available until expended. No part
of the funds apportioned to any
state need be matched by the state,
under the terms of the law.
Briefly, the bill provides and
authorizes grants and loans to
municipalities for:
(1) All types of construction
projects.
(2) Municipal utilities.
(3) Housing and slum clear
ance.
For this work the president is
authorized to make direct grants
for the cost of materials and labor.
Also, a large amount of the fund
is made available for highway
“work. These funds can be used
for:
(1) Emergency construction on
federal aid routes and extensions
thereof in and through municipali
ties.
(2) Grade-crossing elimination.
(3) Certain bridge construction.
(4) Construction designed to
make traffic clear.
These funds will be under the
control of the state highway de
partment.
All kinds of printing done prompt
ly at The Carolina Watchman,
119 East Fisher St.
!_
| UEWJQ
BRIEFS
BANKER TRIES SUICIDE
Finally located by federal offic
ers serving a warrant on charges of
wrecking the Fifth Avenue bank
bearing his name, Joseph W. Flar
liman tried to commit suicide ir
the remote Long Island inn at
which he had sought refuge. Fit
is expected to recover from a stafc
over the heart.
FRENCH STICK TO ARMY
Distrusting the ready agreement
of Hitler’s German government tc
act in accord with the other pow
ers in sharp reduction of armed
forces, the Daladier government
has decided1 to retain France’s army
at its full strength.
ADOPT MUSSOLINI PEACE
PLAN
France, England, Germany and
Italy have agreed to the peace pact
advanced by Mussolini, Italian dic
tator. The pact guarantees a min
imum of 10 years peace in Europe.
DYNAMITE BLAST KILLS 7
A stick of dynamite exploded on
a lumberman’s skiff on Lake
iCreux, 60 miles from (Quebec,
jCaaada, kilkag SCTe»-umb
juring one^
TO DIE FOR HOLDUP
MURDER
John L. Edwards, 17, negro, was
sentenced in Charlotte to die in
the electric chair on July 7 for
the February 11 murder of J. W.
Brown, street car conductor.
$607,000 DIVIDEND PAID
A 15 per cent dividend of S607,
000 is being distributed to 6,3 00
depositors in the closed tcmmer
cial National bank, High Point, by
the receiver.
McNAIR DIES IN CHAIR
David McNair, young Durham
negro, died in the electric chair to
pay for the murder of Mrs. J. W.
McCown, Greensboro, in an at
tempted filling station holdup.
Just before taking his seat he con
fessed his guilt.
ACCIDENTALLY SHOOTS HIS
BROTHER
Thomas Renn, nine, playing
with a shotgun at the home near
Henderson, S. C., did not know
the gun was loaded. He inserted a
marble in the barrel, aimed at his
brother, Clyde, three, and fired,
shot through the abdomen, the
small boy died instantly.
———
I VICTIM OF ROCK CRUSHER
! Dragged into a pulley after His
hand had caught in a belt, Robert
j Enloe, 25, Macon county, was
j beaten to death by the revolving
j wheel of a highway rock crusher
eight miles west of Franklin.
YOUNG KILLER SENTENCED
Ffarry Murch, 15, was sentenced
in a New York court to serve 20
years to life in Sing Sing prison for
tying William Bender, 12, to a
chair and stabbing him to death.
STATE GARDEN CLUB
MEETS
The Garden Club of North
Carolina met in annual sessions at
Greensboro last week and named
Mrs. Wesley Taylor, that city, as
president. The club favors a state
garden center at Raleigh.
FIRST TAR HEEL BREWERY
Incorporation has been made in
Charlotte of the state’s’ first brew
ery to manufacture 3.2 beer under
provisions of the national and state
acts legalizing the beverage. Or
ganization of other brewing con
Icerns is forecast.
r-—•-- i——+—r~r: • ■■
! r —-rr--;--—i
Champion High School Orators of U. S. I
Here are the' four champion high school orators of the United States for
1933, crowned at the national meet at Wooster, 0. No. 1, Caryl Arnold,
Grand Rapids, Mich, (humorous) ; No. 2, Harold Stark, Granite City, 111.
(oratorical) ; No. 3, Gene Davis, Cicero, 111. (original oratory) ; No. 4,
Robert Dunham, Sioux Falls, S. D. (extempore).
I .-■-.-1
| Displeased Rockefellers
Diego Rivera, celebrated Mexican
mural painter, whose work was halted
and payment made in full for the
fresco he was working on in Rocke
feller Center, R.C.A. building. The
Rockefeller family objected to the
portraying of Lenin and red hags in
the mural.
To Dine at White House
Mrs. Pattie Willis South, 80
years old, Nieholasville, Ky., wrote
Mrs. Roosevelt that she had always
wanted to eat a meal in the White
House, “if only bread and milk.
Mrs. Roosevelt wrote Mrs South that
she would be welcomed to dine with
her when she came to Washington.
Schmeling and Dempsey
Jack Dempsey, promoter of the
heavyweight battle between Max
Schmeling, Germany, and Max Baer,
California, at New York, June 8,
has been a frequent visitor to
Schmeling’s training camp as pic
tured here with the German battler.
Prison for Boy
Despite a highly emotional trial a
jury of twelve married men returned
a verdict of murder in the second
degree against Harry Murch, 16-yeax
old N. Y. school boy for stabbing a
12-year-old playmate to death. The
penalty is 20 years to life imprison
ment.
Says Repeal To Cut Taxes
Farley Warns
Of Higher Rate
Incomes To Be Levied On More
Heavily If Dry Law Stays,
He Declares
The Roosevelt administration
this week gave a shoulder push to
the movement for repeal, with
Postmaster General Farley declar
ing that, unless the eighteenth a
mandment is written off the books,
every income taxpayer will have to
hand the government $6 to $10
out of every $100 he earns this
year.
In the matter of increased taxes,
word came directly from the
White House that President Roose
velt intends automatically to end
the far-reaching new levies now
under consideration in the house as
soon as the eighteenth amendment
is repealed.
Farley’s words came during a
disclosure made that the full
weight of the administration would
be thrown behind the movement to
ratify the prohibition repeal a
mendment through the writing of
letter to Democratic workers
throughout the nation, urging such
a step.
The postmaster general, wiho is
chairman of the Democratic na
tional committee and chief dis
penser of patronage, pointed out
that, under the pending public
works-industrial control bill, in
come taxes would be boosted from
4 to 6 per cent on incomes up to
$4,000 and from 8 to 10 per cent
on all above $4,000.
- |
ACREAGE REDUCTION
CHIEF
Chester Davis, Montanan, has
been appointed production admin
istrator to direct the federal agri
culture department’s colossal task
of securing sharp acreage reduction
in the basic crops. He will work
through farmer organizations by
state and counties.
APRIL FIRE LOSS DROPS
A fire loss of only $254,490 was
incurred in the state in April as
compared with $491,722 in April,
1932. There were 177 fires report
ed to the state insurance commis
sioner.
DODD IS BAPTIST PRESIDENT
Dr. M. E. Dodu, Shreveport, La.,
was elected president of the South
ern Baptist convention. The con
vention went on record as opposed
to the sale of beer or the repeal of
the 18 th amendment.
PHONE RATE CUT
DRAWS PROTEST
Any material reductions in tele
phone rates would result in reduc
ing earnings to the point where it
will be impossible to meet operat
ing costs and fixed charges, official
of the Southern Bell Telephone anc
Telegraph company told the cor
poration commission in a confer
ence in Raleigh this week.
The conference was one of a se
ries which the commission has helc
with telephone companies operating
in this state, the object being to se
cure voluntary rate reductions fot
North Carolina subscribers.
All companies, with the excep
tion of the Hickory Telephons
Company, have conferred with th<
commission. Some of them, Cor
poration Commisioner Stanley
Wine borne said, have agreed to
j slight reductions, while others have
| not made any agreements.
| The Hickory conference origin
jally was scheduled for this week,
but the date has been changed to
June 6, Commission Clerk R. O.
Self said. Self said the commission
now had such a large amount of
data before it that it wished some
time in which to review briefs pre
| sen ted by other companies.
| The commission also has before
lit briefs filed by telephone com
I panies protesting a proposed order
j which would limit the amounts set
I aside for depreciation.
GOOD
MORNING
Little bankroll, ere we part,
Let me hug you to my heart;
All the year I’ve clung to you,
You’ve been faithful; you’ve been
true,
Little bankroll, before long
You are going for dance and song,
A cabaret, some pleasant spot—
And I’ll come back you will not!
THE GENT who said figures
never lie must have forgotten a
bout the shop-window dummies.
Salty—Unmarried?
Sweety—Yes, twice.
"What is the idea of the crowd
at the church?”
"An ice man confessing his
sins.”
WE DON’T hang people by
thumbs, nowadays, but just the
same a lot of motorists are held up
by them.
A STORE advertises "Special al
teration department for ladies.”
And no doubt some of them need it
badly.
r THE GENT who said truth i;
stranger than fiction hadn’t read
any of the modern stuff.
Dumb—"Hey, you’re sitting on
some jokes I cut out.’’
Bell—"I thought I felt some
thing funny.”
MUSSOLINI has urged Italian
women to cultivate full figures.
Over here we are only inflating the
currency.
Heir—"Do you like romantic
old ruins?”
Heiress—"If they’d stop asking
to marry me.”
A MISSOURI MAN WHO is
suing for divorce complains that
his wife kissed him only when she
wanted money, but who could put
up with so much kissing as that?
"Father,” said the small boy,
"what is a pork barrel?’’
"My son, you are entirely too
inquisitive.”
"Don’t you know?”
"Only in a general way. It’s an
institution, more or less mythical,
to enable a Congressman to show
his folks that he can bring home
the bacon.”
A Northern tourist got off a
train in Arkansas to get a better
view of an animal that was rub
bing itself against a sqrub ofak.
"What kind of an animal is that?”
he asked of a native.
"It’s a razor-back haw'g, suh,”
answered the native.
"What’s he rubbing himself a
gainst the tree for?” pursued the
tourist.
The native replied: "He’s strop
pin’ hisself—jes’ stroppin’ hisself,
suh.”
The mother had been telling lit
tle Bobbie the story of creation—
how the Lord made Eve out of one
of Adam’s ribs. The child was
greatly impressed with what he
heard.
A few days later Bobbie felt a
pain in his side, and began to cry
dismally. His mother asked him
what the matter was. Little Bobbie
between sobs, whimpered: "I be
lieve I’m going to have a wife.”
"This tonic is no good.”
"What’s the matter?”
"All the directions it gives are
for adults and I never had them.’’
SOME PEOPLE aim high but
never pull the trigger.
KMGreeson
Loses Life In
Local Lake
Victim Member
Junior Class
Succumbs While Swimming In
Goodman Lake
Father Arrives From Home In
W hit sett
Catawba Shocked And Grieved
Over Tragedy
Kecil Monroe Greeson, jun
ior at Catawba college, was
drowned Thursday afternoon
around 4 o’clock in Good
man’s Lake about five miles
out on the Bringles Ferry road.
Fie lost his life as he attempt
ed to swim across a stretch of
back water of the Yadkin
river.
Rescue crews recovered the body
several hours later. All efforts to
resuscitate the unfortunate youth
were futile.
His father arrived in the city
last night and the body will be
taken to Whitsett, Guilford coun
ty, N. C., for burial. No funeral
arrangements had been made last
night.
Kell Hollar and several friends
from Faith had gone to Goodman’s
Lake with the young man and were
swimming near the bridge, when
Greeson went down in about H or
20 feet of water and his body fail
ed to return to the surface.
Dr. Howard Omwake, president
of Catawba, as well as the entire
student body were shocked and
saddened by the tragedy.
Dr. Omwake described Greeson
as being a most wonderful young
man, excelling in his studies and
one of the most popular students
in college.
Young Greeson took his fresh
man work here three years ago.
Last year he completed the sopho
more requirements at Elon College,
returning to Catawba for his third
and junior year which he had just
completed this week.
oreeson, it is stated, togetner
with several of his friends went to
Goodman’s Lake to swim and find
relief from the terrific heat which
visited this, community Thursday.
They had1 been swimming close
to the bridge for some time and
Greeson started to swim across the
back water and went down.
His body had been in the lake
for about two hours before the res
cue parties could be properly or
ganized with instruments for locat
ing the bodv. How«ever,. after once
underway, the body was recovered
in 1J or 20 minutes close to the
place where it had gone under.
His death cast a pall of sorrow
over the entire faculty and student
body at Catawba College.
The bodv was taken to Summer
sett Funeral home awaiting rhe ar
rival of the young man’s father.
Memorial Services
Sunday P. M.
Annual memorial services will
be held in the Capitol theatre Sun
day afternoon at 3 o’clock by the
Samuel C. Hart post of the A
merican Legion.
The Rev. Marshall Woodson,
pastor of the First Presbyterian
church, will deliver the main ad
dress.

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