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The Forest Republican. [volume] (Tionesta, Pa.) 1869-1952, September 23, 1914, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026497/1914-09-23/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE FOREST REPUBLICAN.
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Forest Republ
VOL, XL VII. NO. 31.
TIONESTA, PA., WEDNESDAY, SEPtEMHEU 23, 19U.
$1.00 TEIl ANNUM.
ou delivery.
ICAN.
PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO
THE CONSTITUTION SUBMIT
TED TO THE CITIZEN'S OK THE
COMMONWEALTH FOR THEIR AP
PROVAL OR REJECTION, HY THE
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THt
COMMONWEALTH OK PENNoYL
VAN1A. AND PUBLISHED BY ORDER
OK THE SECRETARY OF THE
COMMONWEALTH. IN PURSUANCE
OF ARTICLE XV1U OP THE CON
STITUTION. Number One.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to sction
one, article eight of the Constitu
Be it resolved by the Senate niifl
House ot Representatives of the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania in General
Assembly met, That the following
amendment to the Constitution of
Pennsylvania be, and the same is
hereby, proposed, in accordance with
the eighteenth article thereof:
That section one of artichr eight.
which reads as follows: 'i&'4
section l. kvery male citizen
twenty-one years of ace, possessing
the following qualifications, shall he
entitled to voto at all elections, sub
ject, however, to such laws requiring
and regulating the registration of
electors as the General Assembly may
enact:
"First. He shall have been a citizen
of the United States at least one
month.
"Second. He shall have resided In
the State one year (or, having pre
viously been a qualified elector or
native-born citizen of the State, he
shall have removed therefrom and re
turned, then six months) immediately
preceding the election.
"Third. He shall have resided in
the election district where he shall
offer to vote at least two months im
mediately preceding the election.
"Fourth. If twenty-two years of age
and upwards, he shall have paid
within two years a State or county
tax, which shall have been assessed at
least two months and paid at least
one month before the election," be
amended so that the same shall read
as follows:
Section 1. Every citizen, male or
female, of twenty-one years of age,
possessing the following qualifications,
shall be entitled to vote at all elec
tions, subject, however, to bucIi laws
requiring and regulating the registra
tion of electors as the General As
sembly may enact:
First. He or she shall have been a
citizen of the United States at least
one month.
Second. He or she shall have re
sided In the State one year (or, hav
ing previously been a qualified elector
or native-born citizen of the State,
he or she shall have removed there
from, and returned, then six months)
immediately preceding the election.
Third. He or Blie shall have re
sided in the election district where he
or she shall offer to vote at least two
months immediately preceding the
election.
Fourth. If twenty-two years of age
and upwards, he or she shall have
paid within two years a State or
county tax, which shall have been
. assessed at least two months and
paid at least one month before the
election.
Fifth. Wherever the words "he,"
"his," "him," and "himself" occur in
any section of article VIII of this Con
stitution the same shall be consirued
as if written, respectively, "he or she,"
"his or her," "him or her," and "him
self or herself."
A true copy of joint Resolution No. 1.
ROBERT McAFEE,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Two.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to section
eight of article nine of the Constitu
tion ot Pennsylvania.
Section 1. Be It resolved by the
Senate and House of Representatives
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
in General Assembly met, That the
following is proposed as an amend
ment to the Constitution of the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania in accord
ance with the provisions of the eigh
teenth article thereof:
Amend section eight, article nine of
the Constitution of the Commonwealth
of Pennsylvania, which reads as fol
lows; "Section 8. The debt of any county,
city, borough, township, school dis
trict, or other municipality or incor
porated district, except as herein pro
vided, shall never exceed seven per
centum upon the assessed value ot
the taxable property therein, nor shall
any such municipality or district incur
any new debt, or increase its indebt
edness to an amount exceeding two
per centum upon such assessed valua
tion of property, without the assent
of the electors thereof at a public
election in such manner as shall be
provided by law; but any city, the
debt of . which now exceeds seven per
centum of such assessed valuation,
may be authorized by law to increase
the same three per centum, in the ag
gregate, at any one time, upon such
valuation, except that any debt or
debts hereinafter incurred by the city
and county of Philadelphia for the
construction and development of sub
ways for transit purposes, or for the
construction of wharves and docks, or
the reclamation of land to be used In
the construction of a system of
wharves and docks, as public improve
ments, owned or to be owned by said
city and county of Philadelphia, and
which shall yield to the city and coun
ty of Philadelphia current net reve
nues in excess of the interest on said
debt or debts, and of the annual In
stallments necessary for the cancella
tion of said debt or debts, may be
excluded in ascertaining the power of
the city and county of Philadelphia
to become otherwise indebted: Pro
vided, That a sinking-fund for their
cancellation shall be established and
maintained," so that it shall read as
follows:
Section 8. The debt of any counly,
city, borough, township, school dis
trict or other municipality or incor
porated district, except as herein pro
vided, shall never exceed seven per
centum upon the assessed value of
the taxable property therein, nor shall
any such municipality or district in
cur any new debt, or increase its in
debtedness to an amount exceeding
two per centum upon such assessed
valuation of properly, without the con
sent of the electors thereof at a public
lection in such, maimer as shall be
provided bv law; tmt mt ritv the
debt of which on the first day of Jan-
uary, one thousand eight hundred and
seventy-four, exceeded seven per cen
tum ot such assessed valuation, and
has not since been reduced to less
than such per centum, may be author
ized by law to Increase the same three
perentum in the aggregate, at any
one time, upon such valuation. The
city ot Philadelphia, upon the condi
tions hereinafter set forth, may in-,
crease its Indebtedness to the extent
of three per centum in excess of seven
per centum upon such assessed valua-
tion for the specific purpose of pro-!
viding for all or anf the following
purposes. to-wttr-Tor the construe-,
tion anaV- improvement of subways
tunnels, railways, elevated railways,
and other transit facilities; for the
construction and Improvement of.
wharves and docjf "i.for the recla-1
mation of land to la tbe con-l
sirucuon ana , owned, provisions of the eighteenth (XV11I)
or to be owned by said city. Buch ! article thereof:
increase, however, shall only be made' AMENDMENT,
wish the assent of the electors thereof: Laws may be passed providing tor
at a public election, to be held in such , a system of registering, transferring,
manner as shall be provided by law.l Insuring of and guaranteeing land
in ascertaining the borrowing capacity titles by the State, or by the counties
of said city of Philadelphia, at any thereof, and for Bettling and determin
time, there shall be excluded from the j lug adverse or other claims to and in
calculation a cre&it, where the work! terests in lands the titles to which
resulting from any previous expendi-. ; are so registered, transferred, insured,
ture, for any one or more of the spe- j and guaranteed; and for the creation
ciflc purposes hereinabove enumerated j and collection of indemnity funds:
shall be yielding to said city an an
Dual current net revenue; the amount
of which credit shall be ascertained
by capitalizing the annual net revenue
during the year immediately preceding
the time of such ascertainment. Such
capitalization shall be accomplished
by ascertaining the principal amount
which would yield such annual, cur
rent net revenue, at the average rate
of interest, and sinking-fund charges
payable upon the indebtedness incur-
red by said city for such purposes,
up to the time of such ascertainment
The method of determining such
amount, so to be excluded or allowed
as a credit, may be prescribed by the
General Assembly.
In incurring indebtedness, for any
one, or more of suld purposes of;
construction, improvement, or recla
mation, the city of Philadelphia may
issue its obligations maturing not
later than fifty years from the date
thereof, with provision tor a sinking
fund sufficient to retire said obliga
tion at maturity, the payments to
such sinking-fund to be in equal or
graded annual Installments. Such ob
ligations may be in an amount suffi
cient to provide for and may include
the amount of the interest and sinking-fund
charges accruing and which
may accrue thereon throughout the
period ot construction and until the
expiration of one year after the com
pletion of the work for which Bald
indebtedness shall have been incurred;
and said city shall not be required
to levy a tax to pay said interest and
sinking-fund charges, as required by
section ten of article nine of the
Constitution of Pennsylvania, until the
expiration of said period of one year
after the completion of such work.
A true copy of Joint Resolution No. 2.
ROBERT McAFEE,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Nurnber Three.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to section
twenty-one of article three of the trlct incur any new debt, or increase
Constitution of Pennsylvania. j Its indebtedness to an amount exceed-
Section 1. Be it resolved by the I ing two per centum upon such as
Senate and House of Representatives Bessed valuation of property, without
ot the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 1 the assent of the electors thereof at
in General Assembly met. That the i a public election in such manner as
following amendment to the Constitu- shall be provided by law; but any
tion of the Commonwealth of Penn-, city, the debt of which now exceeds
sylvanla be, and the same is hereby, seven per centum of such assessed
proposed, in accordance with the I valuation, may be authorized by law
eighteenth article thereof: to increase the same three per centum,
Amend section twenty-one, article ,
three ot the Constitution of the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania, which
reads as follows:
"No act of the General Assembly
shall limit the amount to be recovered
for injuries resulting in death, or for
injuries to persons or property, and
in case of death from such Injuries,
the right of action shall survive, and
the General Assembly shall prescribe
for whose benefit such actions shall
be prosecuted. No act shall prescribe
any limitations of time within which
suits may be brought against corpora
tions for Injuries to persons or prop
erty, or for other causes different
from those fixed by general laws reg
ulating actions against natural per
sons, and such acts now existing are
avoided," so that It shall read as
follows: .
The General Assembly may enact
laws 'requiring the payment by em
ployers, or employers and employees
Jointly, of reasonable compensation
for injuries to employees arising in
the course of their employment, and
for occupational diseases of employees,
whether or not such injuries or dis
eases result in death, and regardless
of fault of employer or employee, and
fixing the basis of ascertainment ot
such compensation and the maximum
and minimum limits thereof, and pro
viding special or general remedies for
the collection thereof; but in no other
cases shall the General Assembly limit
the amount to be recovered for in
juries resulting In death, or for in
juries to persons or property, and in
case of death from such injuries, the
right of action shall survive, and the
General Assembly shall prescribe for j the same three per centum in the
whose benefit such actions shall be 1 aggregate, at any one time, upon such
prosecuted. No act shall prescribe any I valuation; except that any debt or
limitations of time within which suits! QeDts hereinafter Incurred by the city
may be brought against corporations and county of Philadelphia for tho
for injuries to persons or property, construction and development of
or for other causes, different from wharves and docks, or the reclama
those fixed by general laws regulating I tion of land to be used in the con-
actions against natural persons, and I
such acts now existing are avoided. !
A true copy of Joint Resolution No. 3.
ROI3ERT McAFEE.
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Four.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to the Con
stitution of Pennsylvania abolishing
the ofllce of Secretary of Internal j
Affairs.
Be It resolved by the Senate and
House of Representatives of the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in
General Assembly met, That article j nt at any time. In the aggregate, ex
four of the Constitution of Pennsvlva- ceed the sum of twenty-live million
nla shall be amended by adding there-
to section twenty-three, which Bhall j
read as follows:
The olllce of Secretary of Internul
Affairs be, and the same is hereby,
abolished; and the powers and duties
now vested in, or appertaining or be
longing to, that branch of the execu-
1 tlve deDartment. office, or officer, shall
j be transferred to such other depart-
mcnta, offices, or officers of the State,
now or hereafter created, as may be
directed by law.
A true copy of Joint Resolution No. 4.
ROBERT McAFEE,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
.
Number Five.
A tdivt nriv T'Tmv
TtoKiMtotha Con-
stitution ot this Commonwealth In
accordance with provisions of the
t.-ittiiii-cuiii .i in; uiutiu muieui.
Section 1. Be It enacted by the
Senate and House of Representatives
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
in General
hereby enacted
the same. That the following Is pro
posed as an amendment to the Con
stitution ot the Commonwealth of
i Pennsylvania, in accordance with the i
and for carrying the system and
powers hereby provided for into effect
by such existing courts as may be
designated by the Legislature, and by
the establishment of such new courts
as may be deemed necessary. In mat
ters arising in and under the opera
tion of such system, judicial powers,
with right of appeal, may be confer
red by the Legislature upon county
recorders and upon other olllcers by
it desicnated. Such laws mav nmvlila
! for continuing the registering, trans-
ferrlng, insuring, and guaranteeing
sucli titles after the first or original
registration has been perfected by the
court, and provision may be made for
raising the necessary funds for ex
penses and salaries of olllcers, which
shall be paid out of the treasury ot
the several counties.
A true copy ot Joint Resolution No. 5.
ROBERT McAFEE,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Six.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to section
eight, article nine of the Constitu
tion of Pennsylvania.
Section 1. Be it resolved by the
Senate and House of Representatives
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
In General Assembly met, That the
following is proposed as an amend
ment to the Constitution ot the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania, in accord
ance with the provisions ot the eigh
teenth article thereof.
Amendment to Article Nine, Section
Eight.
Section 2. Amend section eight, ar
ticle nine of the Constitution of Penn
sylvania, which reads as follows:
"Section 8. The debt of any coun
ty, city, borough, township, school
district, or other municipality or in
corporated district, except as herein
provided, shall never exceed seven
per centum upon the assessed value
of the taxable property therein, nor
shall any such municipality or dis-
In the aggregate, at any one time,
upon such valuation, except that any
debt or debts hereinafter Incurred by
the city and county of Philadelphia
for the construction and development
of subways for transit purposes, or
for the construction of wharves and
docks, or the reclamation of land to
be used in the construction of a sys
tem of wharves and docks, as public
Improvements, owned or to be owned
by said city and county of Philadel
phia, and which shall yield to the
city and county of Philadelphia cur
rent net revenue In excess of the in
terest on said debt or debts, and of
the annual installments necessary for
the cancellation of said debt or debts,
may be excluded in ascertaining the
power of the city and county of Phila
delphia to become otherwise Indebted:
Provided, That a sinking-fund for
their cancellation shall be established
and maintained," so as to read as
follows:
Section 8. The debt of any county,
city, borough, township, school dis
trict, or other municipality or Incor
porated district, except as herein pro
vided, shall never exceed seven per
centum upon the assessed value of the
taxable property therein, nor shall any
such municipality or district incur
any new debt, or increase its indebt
edness to an amount exceeding two
per centum upon such assessed valua
tion of property, without the assent
of the electors thereof at a public
election In such manner as shall be
provided by law; but any city, the
debt of which now exceeds seven per
centum of such assessed valuation,
may be authorized by law to Increase
struction of a system of wharves and
docks, as public improvements, owned
or to be owned by said city and
county of Philadelphia, nnd which
shall yield to the- city and county ot
Philadelphia current net revenue in
excess of tho interest on Bald debt or
debts and of the annual installments
necessary for tho cancellation of sahl
debt or debts, may be excluded in as-
certalnlng tho power of the city and
county of Philadelphia to become
otherwise indebted: Provided, That
such indebtedness Incurred by the
city and county of Philadelphia Bhall
dollars for the purpose of improving
and developing the port of the said
city and county, by the condemnation.
purchase, or reclamation or lease of
hind on the banks ot the Delaware
and Schuylkill riven, and land adja
cent thereto; the building of bulk-
beads, and the purchase or cunstruc-
Hon or lease of wharves, docks, sheds,
ntl warehouses, and other -buildings
n1 facilities, necessary for the estab-
"anmem ana maintenance ot railroad
and shipping terminals along the said
rivers; and the dredging of the said
rivers and docks: Provided, That the
all "ity and county Bliall, at or be-
fore the time of so doing, provide fur
the collection of an annual tux suitl-
dent to pay tho Interest thereon, and
T?W Tf ,U'y
fVY iTnn
A true copy ot '1 8'
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
iilA GENERAL SUnVEY OF
THE WAR
For ten days the forces of Germany
and the allies France and England
hav been engaged In a titanic strug
gle along the banks ot the river Alsne
In France, to which point tho kaiser's
forces retreated after getting to with
in about thirty miles of Paris. The
first eight days of the battle resulted
In no decMve gain for either side, i
On the ninth day the Uermau left wis j
driven back and the center also bo-
gan to crumble. General Von Kluck, j
on the German right, Is reported to be !
In a desperate situation, with the j
possibility of being enveloped. Both
sides are receiving reinforcements.
me casualties uuring me Alsne uatlie
will run into high figures.
The Germans are reported as being
prepared to fall back upon a line of
defenses In Belgium. Fortifications
have been hastily constructed there,
while entrenchments are being thrown
up. Siege guns have also been placed.
Expert opinion differs as to the
cause of the German retreat. It is
believed by some that the advance
was too rapid and that the main army
was too far from a base for supplies.
This opinion appears to have soic
basis in fact, for the German prison
ers captured on the retreat were half
furnished and complained of not hav
ing sulliclent food for several days.
The belief Is held by others, however,
that the German war staff blundered
by withdrawing from the French
army of invasion 200,000 men for tM
campulgn In east Prussia against the
Russians. Met by overwhelming num
bers ot the allies, the weakened Teu
tons were obliged to go back for their
own safety, It Is hold.
The beautiful city of Rhelms In
France has been reported as destroyed
by the German bombardment. Its fa
mous old cathedral Is Bald to bo In
ruins and other historic buildings
wrecked.
Russia has been aggressive on tho
eastern frontiers of both Germany and
Austria. At the present time the great
Austrlun fortress, Przemysl, Is under
bombardment and its Investment will
mean that the Russian hordes can
sweep through Galicla und carry the
war to the .'rontiern of Silesia. In eaut
Prussia tho Russian activities have
been confined to drawing the Germans
out and making It necessary for Wil
helm to kep a large force engaged,
thus weakening the German army In
France. Meanwhile, It is reported, a
third Russian army composed of !0P
000 men has started through Russian
Poland for the German frontier. Lit
tle Is known of this movement, and
no news is allowed to leak through.
The latest country to think of enter
Ing the war Is Roumanla, which will
uin the allies If hostilities are decided
upon.
On the sea the English cruiser Pe
gasus was put out of commission by
the German cruiser Koenigsherg. Tim
PegasuB was In the harbor of Zan,1
bar when attacked. A German mer
chant ship was sunk, while five Enr
llsh merchantmen were sent to tl 1
bottom.
TWENTY-FIVE ARE KILLED
Freight Train Runs Into Trailer Car
on Grade Crossing.
ISetween twenty aud twenty-five
persons were killed and many more in
jured win n un Illinois Central freight
train plowed Into the trailer ot a
Raleigh Springs car. The accident oc
curred at the Summer avenue cross
lug, one fourth of a mile east of Ding
hamton, Teiin.
The freight was going north on the
Belt line railroad. The trailer was
hurled 100 yards and over an embank
ment. 27 LIVES ARE LOST
Passenger Train Rum Into Cloudburst
In Missouri.
St. Louis and San Frunclsco train
No. 5, westbound, known us the Texas
limited, plunged into a cloudburst
near Lebanon, Mo., 182 mll.'.s south
west of St. Louis, and hi fore the en
gineer could stop the train the track
gave way und the engine and four cars!
rolled Into a llooiictl gulley.
Twenty-seven of tho passengers were
drowned and probably a score injured.
The four sleeping cars remained on
the track aud the passengers Iu those
coaches rushed forward to rescue
thoso Imprisoned in the cars sub
merged in twelve feet of water.
Trains Hit Two.
John Grillin, Jr., twenty-one years
old, was struck by a Pennsylvania
train at Sharon, Pa., and killed.
John Hover, twenty-six, was injured
fatally when a Pennsylvania train
wrecked his buggy.
Sixth Attempt to End Life Fails.
What Is said to be her sixth attem
to end her life failed when Mis.
Mophiu Sliepinshae, aged thirty-one, of
Pittsburgh was dragged from the Ohio
river. Her condition Is not serious.
ALLIES' LINES
HOLD AGAINST
TTIITmi ATT A fllL
IlUIUIi HI I HUN
normQIC Tru ft Drool Thrnimh
I WKllllUil I J IU UIGOn, III UUg.ll
Lelt and Center
GROUND LOST IN ATTEMPT
Present Struggle Along River Aline
Is Most Sanguinary of War After
Several Days of Fighting Neither
Side Has Gained Much Crucial
Test For the Armies on Alsne's
Bank9
The Germans attempted to break the
eft wing and center of the allies and
were again thrown back on the tilutli
day of tho battlo of the Alsne lr
Fiance.
All ..!.. I... 11.... .1... ...... 1
-
psreu. lliey sought to overwhelm
General French and supporting troops'
In the vicinity of Cliauny. Masses ol
Infantry and urtlllery were dashed
against the allies, but after fighting ol
I the most terrible description the effort
j failed and the Germans were pushed
j back to their trenches,
' liven more sanguinary and critical
was the struggle all along the cenlel
(or the possession of Rhelms. The
, . u.s.immie.1
-'.,-...,. 1.. 1 t .11 1.1'
ions wiucu siuiiu iroiu live 10 six
miles to the north and east of Rhelms,
bombarded tho city with siege guns
and after successive Infantry charges
took the heights ot llrlinont.
While the government's reports are
conservative, tho statement that the
Germans In the west and center arc
being forced back is emphatic. This
means that tho grand duke of Wiiei't-
einberg cannot aid the armies of You
Elncm, Iluelow and Von Kluck and Is
unable to support the crown prince.
The army of the latter, now compelleu
to give way even north of Moulfauco.i,
Is obviously not out of danger of en
velopment or segregation.
East of tho Argiinue the crown
prince ot Ilavarla Is being held In
check, at least, by French forces, and;
cannot break through the Infantry lUie
of Nuncy und Troyon.
Repulsing most violent blown
against their left wing, between the
Olse and the Alsne, the allies recov
ered lost ground and advunccd their
line. North und east of Rhelms, where
lies the center of the battlo, the Ger
mans fulled In a terrific assault upon
the French center. They took the
heights of llrlinont, but lust tho hill of
Pom pello.
On the east center the allies won a1
definite victory, canturliia Soiiain and
. .u,u mwiug un,ii'ui!,r t,,,g reinforced almost hourly
in motion an attack carefully lire I r i i i i.... 1...1 1
taking 1.000 prisoners. On the eur.t I r'""Hl H'""l''cs In all France, has be. 11
the crown prince continues, to glvi j rl1'1"'1'' '"is infuriated the French peo
way before determined assaults, while ')'0,
In the Lorraine and the Vostes thu' Without question the bombardment
French advance continues.
Not taking Into account losses It
killed, wounded and prisoners, at least
2,000,000 men havo contended with the
utmost ferocity. Thu Germans are op
posing 1,100,000 to an allied force ol
1,500,000.
This estimate of the forces engaged 1 "oncn (le.enses. 11 is sunt 40U
may be rctnlned because It Is ussuiued' civilians were killed,
thut the Germans and uillos have oh! Thomas Slldell of New York re
tained reinforcements to fill the Bans1 turned to Paris from Rhelms. He said
made by bullet, shell and bayonet.
These troops, after u series of en I
gagoments each vital to the general1
combut, nre stretched to the north of '
Novon to the north of Moiitiaucon. 01
a lino which forms an obtuse angle,
running southeast from Noyon to Cm
on no, lierry-Au Iluo and Rheiiiis and
thenceforth eaHt and northeast tc
Montfnucon and the forest of the Ar
gonno.
This Is the nial battle, where hu
man endurance Is l-liig put to uiilin
aglnabln strain to determine whethei
or not the Germans can again assunu 1
tho offensive acalnst Paris, or If thev !
aro to be broken and hurled back ovei
the frontiers of llelglum, Luxemhurp
and Lorraine.
Up to the present It Is a drawn b.it
tie. The Germans, evading alteinpli
to envelop their right and left wlngF
and themselves developing a slrom.'
offensive in the center of the bntth
line, which is east and north 01
Rliolms, have the advantage of en
trenched and fortified positions, tin
defenses calmly and skillfully prepared
by the German engineers at least Hirer
weeks ago.
England Is rushing new troops from
Great Iirltain aud Ireland and tin
colonies. France Is denuding tin
fortr,.KH,,s IIOW Bafn rrm KU..k ,, ,,
drawing heavily from young and ole
reservists.
PRESIDENT'S HANDS TIED
Peace Negotiations Are Bi ought tl
Standstill Next Move Uncertain.
Further consideration of Germany'!
reply to the overtures of the I'nllei
States made It more apparent 1'resl
dent Wilson bus no hope of hrlnglii;
about any peace negotiations helweei
the European belligerents in the iui
mediate future.
The reply of the Imperial clianeellnt
to the Inquiry of this government 10
to whether or not Germany was pre
pared to discuss peace has brougli'
the olTort initiated by this govcmiucii
to u standstill for the present, mil
1 there Is lik'dy to be no further movi
I until ruoro tangible suggestions come.
ATTACK BEGUN
ON STRONGHOLD
Russians Throw Shells Into
Przemysl Fortress
60,000 AUSTRIANS DEFEND
Reduction of Place Necessary Before
Oar's Army Can Continue Into Aus
tria Austrlans Ars Disorganized.
Dispatches from Pctrograd say that
It Is olllclally announced there that
tho bombardment ot tho great Aus
trian stronghold Priomysl has been
! lurt,1 I'X the Russian armies invud
'K rrancla Joseph's country.
I Shells are being burled Into thudty
j 'rolu 1,10 Krcat siege guns brought up
from Lemberg. It Is reported that CO,-
000 AuNtrlans are behind the Prt
cmysl defense.
The entire Juroslav 1'rieinysl dis
trict is swarming with Hubs!, ins, who
I .".( &,.-iiu-i is tmu ivuamuu 1 miiiiiu.
The principal purposes now are to
attack Przemysl, thus demolishing the
lust obstacle to the advance ou Cra
cow and to capture or anullillute the
remnants of the Austrian Held forcei
under Von ufTciibcrg und D.mkl. The
kilter purpose is regarded as certain
of accomplishment.
The czar's armies are now sweeping
In the west and south of Przemysl 'n
(till I'llleu vir tn iiiiv.iliti tin, I mi 11(11 i-.i
,, Austrian Held forces under Gear
I
I eral Von Auffenberg und Genera)
, Dankl. Von AulTeulierg la trying to
' escape to Cracow, but bin forces are
si-uttered mid dlHurn.inly.eil. Ocncn'l
Uiiukl's nit nation Is moru perilous and
his surrender cannot long bo delayed.
News of disaffection Is heard In the
high places of the Austrian armv.
Field Marshal Wodlnanskl, accused of
supplying secret Intelligence to the.
Russians In Galicla, was suiiuuHrlly
executed. Tho station master at Lem
berg, a brother of Captain Reddell,
who committed suicide a year ago,
was shot. Field Marshal Frorelch, who
commanded cavalry divisions aunlli.
I ated by tho Russians In Galicla, was
cushlered a'xl Immediately took his
1 own life. There are reports from all
j sides of detachments of Austrian
I troops mutinying und surrendering ul
I every opportunity.
GERMANS WRECK RHEIMS
Famous Place In France Loses
iti
Historic Buildings.
The French government announcee
that It will make formal protest to the
powers against tho destruction ol
Rheiiiis by the Germans.
11,0 m,WH "ml ,IU! 'aiiiHurui, which
,H H,'v " ''""'le8 old and one of the
of Rhelms, mii unfortified city, will he
j referred to the nations, along with
the destruction of Loiivaln, us uu ex
; ample of German barbarity.
j Rhelms, one of the most beaiitil'ul
cities III Fr-inee, with 105,(100 popiila
I thin, was 1111 Important link in tin
"'at Iho city and the cathedral wer
bombarded on Friday by the German
8,1(1 111111 he spent an hour In the
cathedral during the firing.
German prisoners, of whom ahoill
lfiO were suffering from wounds, he
said, had been quartered the prey-lout
day lie Greek chancel. German
shrapnel came through the window
and roof, killing four nuns, who wen
attending tho wounded, and three prls
oners.
Mr. Slide ' said that the great ros
window over the main portal had nol
been damaged much at (ho time lir
'"'ft the cr hedral, but that all I he
glass on b'lh sides, dallng from tlit
twelfth century,' was completely
ruined. The statue of tho Virgin on
tho western facade was broken badly
The old hotel of tlie Golden Linn
near tho cathedral was demolished, hi
said, und about 400 Inhabitants lni'l
been killed when he left. The city wat
in flames aud refugees were crowdliiii
thu roads toward I lie south.
GEORGE WILL STICK IT OUT
England In Preeent Fight to Finish
Says King.
War will be continued until tin
"worthy purpose" of lliitlsh endeavoi
Is achieved, said King George In pro
rngilliig parliament after he had slgncu
the home rule bill. The king In hit
speech from the throne said:
"My navy and army have with un
ceasing vigilance, courage 1 ml ikil
sustained in assuelal ion Willi our g,
hint ami tail liful allies a just anJ
righteous cause. There has been a
tqioutaiicoir and cutliiisiasiie rally ii
our common Hag. We are fighting loi
a worthy cause and we shall not la)
down our arms until that purpose ha.
been fully e-hleved."
Seventy-two Are Drowned.
Seventy two men, women and chil
dren, coastwise passengers and crew
were drow ned when the three mash (
steam schooner Francis II. I.eggetl
was pounded to ple -es In a gale slxt'
miles from the mouth of the Columbij
river.
NEED MORE MEN
AT THE FRONT
Kitchener Says Bigger EnglM
Army Is Necessary
TELLS OF BRITISH STRENGTH
King George's Men In Francs Num
ber 150,000, Field Marshal Tells the
Houie of Lords Struggle Long One.
Field Marshal Karl Kitchener, secre
tary of state for war, said In tho house
ol lords in England thut the tide has
turned everywhere iu favor of the
allies.
Tue strugglu is bound to be long, he
Bulit. but 1-higlaiid has good grounds
for looking forward with quiet confi
dence. To assure a successful Issue, how
ever, he said more men would bo re
quired fur t)" front.
Referring to the two new armies the
secretary said that now divisions were
now being collected at the training
quarters. The third army wus being
formed on the new camping ground
and the fourth army was being
created. Meantime Indian divisions
were on their way.
There already were iu France, the
secretary of war said, rather more
than six divisions of Ilrltlsh troops and
two divisions of cavalary, which were
being main) ilued at their full strength
(about 150,0(10 men In all). Further
regular divisions ami additional caval
ry were being organized from units
drawu from oversea garrisons which
were now being occupied by terri
torials aud volunteers.
A division of territorials already had
left for Egypt, a brigade had gone to
Malta and a garrison force to Gibral
tar. Iu his dispatches from the front Sir
John French, commander of tho Ilrlt
lsh expeditionary force, had omitted.
Iho secretary continued, one aspect ol
the situation "The consummate skill
and calm couragH of the commander
himself."
The government appreciated, how
ever, the full value of Kir John's serv
ices. Earl Kitchener also paid a
tribute to the other generals, and the
bravery and endurance of the olllcers
and men of the expeditionary force
The latest advices from General
French did not materially change the
situation, as It was already known
from published statements. Tho troops
were reported to bo Iu good heart and
ready to move forward when the
moment arrived.
On the subject of recruiting Earl
Kitchener said:
"A country which prides Itself on
outdoor sport as does England should
have no dilllcully In finding men
cupalile of making olllcers. The terri
torials are making great strides In cf
flcleiicy and before long will bo able
to take their part In the campaign.
Meanwhile reserve units are being
sent to augment the expeditionary
force und their places are being filled
by territorials.
"While England has good ground
for quiet confidence It should bo borne
In mind that the struggle is bound to
bo a long one ami It behooves us to
develop. armed forces to carry on and
bring tho mighty conflict to a success
ful conclusion. It will be necessary
in order to keep the army at Its full
strength to maintain a steady flow ol
reinforcements."
BROKtRS PROTEST TAX
Opposition to Means of Raising War
Revenue.
Slock brokers uro protesting to
Democrats of tho house ways and
means committee against tho proposal
to Include In the war revenue bill now
being drafted a special tax on them of
$50 a year. Such a tax was levied .11
tho war revenue net of the Spanish-
American war, which tho Democratic
((incus authorized the commit tea to
Miiilluto In Iho present emergency.
The stock brokers base their claim
for exemption on the fact that stock
( xch.inges are closed throughout tl.
country becuuse of the war and that
their business Is demoralized. They
also point to the uncertainty as to
when stock exchanges will resume op
erations. Tho matter will be taken up when
the committee expects to receive from
the treasury department estimates of
revenue to be derived from special
and slump taxes proposed to be levied.
Several members of the committee
maintain that the brokers' tax should
be included, because the brokers have
Hot closed their offices.
Trainship Goes Down With 21.
The English admiralty announces
nlliclally that the trainship Fisgard II.,
formerly the battleship Eieiius, has
foundered iu the channel during a gale
and ( went v one aboard her were
drowned. The Fisgard II. was one of
the four tliips bearing the name Fis
gard, all old Itritish battleships, which
were used as training ships for boy
artificers.
Produceis Increase Oil Purchases.
The Producers und Refiners Oil
company, Ltd., of Pittsburgh, will
purclutHu front producers connected
with its li.n s crude oil to the amount
of two-thirds of their normal prod-c-lion.
The company has ben purchas
ing only fine-third of the normal out
put of the operators.

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