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The Forest Republican. [volume] (Tionesta, Pa.) 1869-1952, September 30, 1914, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026497/1914-09-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XL VII. NO. 32.
TIONESTA, PA., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 19H.
$1.00 PER ANNUM.
THE FOREST REPUBLICAN.
If: AM
PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO
THE CONSTITUTION SUBMIT
TED TO THE CITIZENS OF THE
COMMONWEALTH FOR THEIR AP
PROVAL OR REJECTION, BY THE
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE
COMMONWEALTH OK PENNSYL
VANIA, AND PUBLISHED BY ORDER
OP THE SECRETARY OF THE
COMMONWEALTH, IN PURSUANCE
OF ARTICLE XV1II OF THE CON
STITUTION. Number One.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing: an amendment to fiction,
one, article eight of the Constitu
tlon of Pennsylvania.
Be It resolved by the Senate and
House of Representatives of the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania in General
, Assembly met, That the following
amendment to the Constitution of
Pennsylvania be, and the same is
hereby, proposed, in accordance with
the eighteenth article thereof:
That section one of article eight,
which reads as follows:
"Section 1. Every male citizen
twenty-one years of age, possessing
the following qualifications, shall be
entitled to vote at all elections, sub
ject, however, to such laws requiring
and regulating the registration of
electors as the General Assembly may
enact:
"First. He shall have been a citizen
of the United States at least one
month. . .
"Second. He shall have resided In
the State one year (orr having pre
viously been a qualified elector or
native-born citizen of the State, he
shall have removed therefrom and re
turned, then six months) Immediately
preceding the election.
"Third. He shall have resided in
the election district where he shall
offer to vote at leaBt two months im
mediately preceding the election.
"Fourth. If twenty-two years of ago
and upwards, he shall have paid
within two years a State or county
tax, which shall have been assessed at
least two months and paid at least
one month before the election," be
amended so that the same shall read
as ffillows:
Section 1. Every citizen, male or
female, of twenty-one years of age,
possessing the following qualifications,
shall be entitled to vote at all elec
tions, subject, however, to such laws
' requiring and regulating the registra
tion of electors as the General As
sembly may enact:
First. He or she shall have been a
citizen of the United States at least
one month.
Second. He or she shall have re
sided in the State one year (or, hav
ing previously been a qualified elector
or native-born citizen of the State,
he or she shall have removed there
from, and returned, then six mdhths)
immediately preceding the election.
Third. He or she shall have re
sided In the election district where he
or she shall offer to vote at least two
months immediately preceding the
election.
Fourth. If twenty-two years of age
and upwards, he or she shall have
paid within two years a State or
county tax, which shall have been
assessed at least two months and
paid at least one month before the
election.
Fifth. Wherever the words "he,"
"his," "him," and "himself" occur in
any section of article VIII of this Con
stitution the same shall be construed
as if written, respectively, "he or she,"
"his or her," "him or her," and "him
self or herself."
A true copy of Joint Resolution No. 1.
ROBERT McAFEE,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Two.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to section
eight of article nine of the Constitu
tion of Pennsylvania.
Section 1. Be it resolved by the
Senate and House of Representatives
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
in General Assembly met, That the
following is proposed as an amend
ment to the Constitution of the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania In accord
ance with the provisions of the eigh
teenth article thereof:
Amend section eight, article nine of
the Constitution of the Commonwealth
of Pennsylvania, which reads as fol
lows: "Section 8. The debt of any county,
city, borough, township, school dis
trict, or other municipality or incor
porated district, except ns herein pro
vided, shall never exceed seven per
centum upon the assessed value of
the taxable property therein, nor shall
any such municipality or district incur
any new debt, or increase its Indebt
edness to an amount exceeding two
per centum, upon such assessed valua
tion of property, without the assent
of the electors thereof at a public
election In such manner as shall be
provided by law; but any city, the
debt of which now exceeds seven per
centum of such assessed valuation,
may be authorized by law to increaso
the same three per centum, in the ag
gregate, at any one time, upon such
valuation, except that any debt or
debts hereinafter incurred by the city
and county of Philadelphia for the
construction and development of sub
ways for transit purposes, or for the
construction of wharves and docks, or
the reclamation of land to be used In
the construction of a system of
wharves and docks, as public Improve
ments, owned or to be owned by said
city and county of Philadelphia, and
which shall yield to the city and coun
ty of Philadelphia current net reve
nues in excess of the Interest on said
debt or debts, and of the annual in
stallments necessary for the cancella
tion of said debt or debts, may be
excluded In ascertaining the power of
the city and county of Philadelphia
to become otherwise indebted: Pro
vided, That a sinking-fund for their
cancellation shall he established and
maintained," so that it shall read as
follows:
Section 8. The debt of any county,
city, borough, township, school dis
trict or other municipality or incor
porated district, except as herein pro
vided, shall never exceed seven per
centum upon the assessed value of
the taxable property therein, nor shall
any such municipality or district .in
cur any new debt, or increase its in
debtedness to an amount exceeding
two per centum upon such assessed
valuation of property, without the con
sent of the electors thereof at a public
lection lu tuch manner as shall be
provided by law; but any city, the
debt of which on the first day of Jan
uary, one thousand eight hundred and
seventy-four, exceeded seven per cen
tum of such assessed valuation, and
has not since been reduced to less
than such per centum, may be author
ized by law to Increase the same three
per centum in the aggregate, at any
one time, upon such valuation. The
city of Philadelphia, upon the condi
tions hereinafter set forth, may in-,
crease Its indebtedness to the extent,
of three per centum In excess of seven
per centum upon such assessed valua
tion for the specific purpose of pro-,
viding for all or any of the following,
purposes,-i-to-wit: For the construe-,
tlon and improvement of subways
tunnels, railways, elevated railways,,
and other transit facilities; for the
construction and improvement of.
wharves and docks and for the recla-l
mation of land to be used in the con-l
structlon of wharves and docks, owned:
or to be owned by said city. Suchj
increase, however, shall only be made:
with the assent of the electors thereof!
at a public election, to be held in such
manner as shall be provided by law.l
In ascertaining the borrowing capacity!
of said city of Philadelphia, at any
time, there shall be excluded from the
calculation a credit, where the worty
resulting from any previous expendU
ture, for any one or more of the spe-l
clflc purposes hereinabove enumerated!
shall be yielding to said city an an
nual current net revenue; the amount
of which credit shall be ascertained
by capitalizing the annual net revenue
during the year immediately preceding
the time of such ascertainment. Such
capitalization shall be accomplished
by ascertaining the principal amount
which would yield such annual, cur
rent net revenue, at the average rate
of interest, and sinking-fund charges
payable upon the indebtedness incur
red by said city for such purposes,
up to the time of such ascertainment
The method of determining such
amount, so to be excluded or allowed
as a credit, may be prescribed by the
General Assembly.
In incurring indebtedness, for any
one, or more of said purposes of,
construction, Improvement, or recla
mation, the city of Philadelphia may
issue its obligations maturing not
later than fifty years from the date
thereof, with provision for a sinking
fund sufficient to retire said obliga
tion at maturity, the payments to
such sinking-fund to be In equal or
graded annual installments. Such ob
ligations may be in an amount suffi
cient to provide for and may Include
the amount of the interest and sinking-fund
charges accruing and which
may accrue thereon throughout the
period of construction and until the
expiration of one year after the com
pletion of the work for which said
indebtedness shall have been incurred;
and said city shall not be required
to levy a tax to pay said interest and
sinking-fund charges, as required by
section ten of article nine of the
Constitution of Pennsylvania, until the
expiration of said period of one year
after the completion of such work.
A true copy of Joint Resolution No. 2.
ROBERT McAFEE,
Secretary of the Commonwealth,
Number Three.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to section
twenty-one of article three of the
Constitution of Pennsylvania.
Section 1. Be it resolved by tthe
Senate and House of Representatives
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
in General Assembly met. That the
following amendment to the Constitu
tion of the Commonwealth of Penn
sylvania be. and the same is hereby,
proposed, in accordance with the
eighteenth article thereof:
Amend section twenty-one, article
three of the Constitution of the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania, which
reads as follows: -
"No act of the General Assembly
shall limit the amount to be recovered
for injuries resulting in death, or for
Injuries to .persons or property, and
in case of death from such injuries,
the right of action shall survive, and
the General Assembly shall prescribe
for whose benefit such actions shall
be prosecuted. No act shall prescribe
any limitations of time within which
suits may be brought against corpora
tions for injuries to -persons or prop
erty, or for other causes different
from those fixed by general laws reg
ulating actions against natural per
sons, and such -acts now existing are
avoided," so that it shall read as
follows:
The General Assembly may enact
laws requiring the payment by em
ployers, or employers and employees
Jointly, of reasonable compensation
for injuries to employees arising in
the course of their employment, and
for occupational diseases of employees,
whether or not such injuries or dis
eases result in death, and regardless
of fault of employer or employee, and
fixing the basis of ascertainment of
such compensation and the maximum
and minimum limits thereof, and pro
viding special or general remedies for
the collection thereof; but in no other
cases shall the General Assembly limit
the amount to be recovered for In
juries resulting in death, or for in
juries to persons or property, and in
case of death from such injuries, the
right of action shall survive, and the
General Assembly shall prescribe for
whose benefit such actions shall be
prosecuted. No act shall prescribe any
limitations of time within which suits
may be brought against corporations
for injuries to persons or property,
or for other causes, different from
those fixed by general laws regulating
actions against natural persons, and
such acts now existing are avoided.
A true copy of Joint Resolution No. 3.
ROBERT McAFEE,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Four.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to the Con
stitution of Pennsylvania abolishing
the office of Secretary of Internal
Affairs.
Be it resolved by the Senate and
House of Representatives of the
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in
General Assembly met, That article
four of the Constitution of Pennsylva
nia shall be amended by adding there
to section twenty-three, which shall
read as follows:
The office of Secretary of Internal
Affairs he, and the same Is hereby,
abolished; and the powers and duties
now vested in, or appertaining or be
longing to, that branch of the execu-
tlve department? office, or officer, shall
be transferred to such other depart
ments, offices, or officers of the State,
now or hereafter created, as may be
directed by law.
A true copy of Joint Resolution No. 4.
ROBERT McAFEE,
. Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Five.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to the Con
stitution of this Commonwealth In
accordance with provisions of the
eighteenth (XVIII) article thereof.
Section 1. Be it enacted by the
Senate and House of Representatives
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
in General Assembly met, and It is
hereby enacted by the authority of
the same, That the following is pro
posed as an amendment to the Con
stitution of the Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania, in accordance with the
provisions of the eighteenth (XVIII)
article thereof:
AMENDMENT.
Laws may be passed providing for
a system of registering, transferring,
Insuring of and guaranteeing land
titles by the State, or by the counties
thereof, and for settling and determin
ing adverse or other claims to and in
terests in lands the titles to which
are so registered, transferred, Insured,
and guaranteed; and for the creation
and . collection of indemnity funds;
and for carrying the system and
powers hereby provided for into effect
by such existing courts as may be
designated by the Legislature, and by
the establishment of such new courts
as may be deemed necessary. In mat
ters arising in and under the opera
tion of such system, Judicial powers,
with right of appeal, may be confer
red by the Legislature upon county
recorders and upon other officers by
it designated. Such laws may provide
for continuing the registering, trans
ferring, insuring, and guaranteeing
such titles after the first or original
registration has been perfected by the
court, and provision may be made for
raising the necessary funds for ex
penses and salaries of officers, which
shasj. be paid out of the treasury of
the several counties.
A true copy of Joint Resolution No. 6.
ROBERT McAFEE,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Number Six.
A JOINT RESOLUTION
Proposing an amendment to section
eight, article nine of the Constitu
tion of Pennsylvania. 4
Section 1. Be it resolved by tne
Senate and House of Representatives
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
in General Assembly met, That the
following is proposed as an amend
ment to the Constitution of the Com
monwealth of Pennsylvania, in accord
ance with the provisions of the eigh
teenth article thereof.
Amendment to Article Nine, Section
Eight.
Section 2. Amend section eight, ar
ticle nine of the Constitution of Penn
sylvania, which reads as follows:
"Section 8. The debt of any coun
ty, city, borough, township, school
district, or other municipality or in
corporated district, except as herein
provided, shall never exceed seven
per centum upon the assessed value
of the taxable property therein, nor
shall any such municipality or dis
trict incur any new debt, or increase
Its indebtedness to an amount exceed
ing two per centum upon such as
sessed valuation of property, without
the assent of the electors thereof at
a public election in such manner as
shall be provided by law; but any
city, the debt of which now exceeds
seven per centum of such assessed ,
valuation, may be authorized by law ,
to increase the same three per centum, i
in the aggregate, at any one time, I
upon such valuation, except that any J
debt or debts hereinafter Incurred by j
tne city ana county 01 rmiaueipnia
for the construction and development
of subways for transit purposes, or
for the construction of wharves and
docks, or the reclamation of land to
be used in the construction of a sys
tem of wharves and docks, as public
Improvements, owned or to be owned
by said city and county or Philadel
phia, and which shall ylold to the
city and county of Philadelphia cur-
rent net revenue in excess of the in
terest on said debt or debts, and of
the annual installments necessary for '
the cancellation of said debt or debts, j
may be excluded in ascertaining the j
power of the city and county of Phlla- j
ueipiua to Decome otnerwise indebted:
Provided, That a sinking-fund for
their cancellation shall be established
and maintained," so as to read as
follows:
Section 8. The debt of any county,
city, borough, township, school dis
trict, or other municipality or Incor
porated district, except as herein pro
vided, shall never exceed seven per
centum upon the assessed value of the
taxable property therein, nor shall any
such municipality or district incur
any new debt, or increase its indebt
edness to an amount exceeding two
per centum upon such assessed valua
tion of property, without the assent
of the electors thereof at a public
election In such manner as shall be
provided by law; but any city, 1 the
debt of 'which now exceeds seven per
centum of such assessed valuation,
may bo authorized by law to Increaso
the same three per centum in the
aggregate, at any one time, upon such
valuation; except that any debt or
debts hereinafter incurred by the city
and county of Philadelphia for the
construction and development of
wharves and docks, or the reclama
tion of land to be used In the con
struction of a system of wharves and
docks, as public improvements, owned
or to be owned by said city and
county of Philadelphia, and which
shall .yield to the city and county of
Philadelphia current net revenue In
excess of the Interest on said debt or
debts and of the annual installments
necessary for the cancellation of said
debt or debts, may be excluded in as
certaining the power of the city and
county of Philadelphia to become
otherwise indebted: Provided, Tiiat
such indebtedness Incurred by the
city and county of Philadelphia shall
not at any time, In the aggregato, ex
ceed the sum of twenty-five million
dollars for the purpose of Improving
and developing the port of the said
city and county, by the condemnation,
purchase, or reclamation or lease of
land on the hanks of the Delaware
and Schuylkill rivf.vt, and land adja-
I cent thereto; the building of bulk
heads, and the purchase- or coiieruc-
tlon or lease of wharves, docks, sheds,
and warehouses, and other buildings
and facilities, necessary for the estab
lishment and maintenance of railroad
and shipping terminals along the said
rivers; and the dredging of the said
rivers and docks: Provided, That the
said city and county shall, at or be
fore the time of so doing, provide for
the collection of an annual tax suffi
cient to pay the interest thereon, and
also the principal thereof within fifty
fears from the incurring thereof.
A true copy of Joint Resolution No. 6.
ROBERT McAFEE,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
A GENERAL SURVEY OF
THE WAR
The third week of the battle of the
Aisne finds the forces of France alio
England and the allies in deadlock
Reinforcements are being rushed u(
by both sides and it may he that speed
will determine the winner of this, the
world's greatest battle. The allief
claim they can bring up more ue
men than the Germans.
The battlu line extends for a dls
tance of about 120 miles. General Vot
Kluck's army composes the right
wing, General Von Buelow the centel
and the crown prince the left Hank ol
the kaiser's force. The allies, it ap
pears, htve been making strenuous ef
forts to turn Von Kluck's wing an i
force his army back on Von Buelow
who would ihus be at a disadvantage
Such a turning movement would be
fatal to the Germans, experts hold.
Paris and London reports claim that
the German right wing has weakened
and that the allies are gaining ground
daily. Thesa same reports nay that
the Germans are vigorously pounding
at the center of the allies without sue
cess, while the crown prince on the
left is not giving much trouble.
Berliu advices report that the Teu
ton line is withholding against ever)
attack and that while Von Kluck It
standing off the tremendous attack
at his end the center and left of the
German army are buttering down the
enemy's resistance and are making
appreciable gains.
It is admitted by all. the war otllcei
that the losses during the great battle
are tremendous, lu some places th
trenches being piled high with dead
The losses to the allies are said to b
grgater than the enemy for the reason
that the French and English have been
on tlie offensive.
The Russians are continuing theii
successful invasion of Calicia, every
duy reports of captures of new town
coming in. The great stronghold o
the Austrhins, rrzemysl, is reported
as fallen. Przemysl was the last forti
fled town of any consequence In Ga
Hcla and now the czar's great armit'f
can advance on Cracow, the old capi
tal of Poland. In east Prussia the Ger
mans have oeon able to keep back the
czar's soldiers. A new Russian army I.
reported on Its way, however, which
may combire with the army now re
leased from Gullcla for a march into
Germany.
Zeppelin airships and German aero
planes have been busy, (lying over
Paris, Warsaw and cities in Belgium
In Paris a man was killed and hit
daughter was crippled. In Warsaw
three of the czar's soldiers were slain
and in Belgium an aged man was mor
tally wounded by a bomb.
Several important naval battles have
taken place during the week. The j
greatest disaster that has befallen the j
English fleet since the war began oc j
curred when a German submarine
boat, U-9, sank three English cruisers,
With an estimated loss of life of 1,133
The ships were the Ahoukir, Creasy
and Hogue. Each was torpedoed by ;
the submarine and sank within a few 1
minutes. English survivors say that
there "were several submarines and j
that at least two were sunk by the 1
Hogue before that vessel was sent to ;
the bottom. The German admiralty i
announces, however, that only one Bub
marine was engaged. The English alsc
lost a cruiser when the Pegasus, which
was in the harbor of Zanzibar, wat
put out of commission by the German
ship Koenlgsberg. It Is reported Ger
many suffered the loss of a cruise'
and two torpedo boats when a Russian
cruiser discovered the vessels laying
mines in the Baltic sea. These encoun
ters, it is believed, are only the begin
nlng of a series of great engagcmcnti
between the contending countries.
H. K. Thaw Will Get $142,124.
Payment of $142,124.28 to Harry K.
Thaw was ordered In the orphans'
court in Pittsburgh by Judges J. W.
Over and Thomas P. Trlmple.
This is the accumulated Income with
Interest from the coke trust created
by the will of Thaw's father, William
Thaw, In which all his coal landt
wero placed lu the hands of three trus
tees.
Hinitt to Head W. & J. College.
Dr. Frederick William Hinitt was
elected president of Washington and
Jefferson college in Washington, Pa.,
at the meeting of the hoard of trus
tees. He will till the vacancy caused
by the resignation of Dr. James 1).
Moffat. He lias previously been at the
head of Parsons college in Fairfield,
la., and had served eight years ill the
Presbyterian ministry.
Oil Industry on Again.
The Joseph Seep agency, a Standard
Oil concern, notified producers that
until further notice It will buy not only
ull current production hut all accumu
lated balances. This means thut the
oil Industry In Pennsylvania, West
Virginia and southeastern Ohio is put
hack on practically the same basis It
was before thojiuroueua war.
HAND-TO-HAND
FIGHTING ALONG
BATTLE FRONT
Allies and Garmans Engage Li
Deadly Bayonet Charges
COMBAT RAGES WITH FURY
Night and Day For Three Days Teu
tons Maka Assault on Enemy'i
Lines, Hoping to Break Through.
Doth Sides Claim Gains Loss of
Life Extremely Heavy Battle I of
Unprecedented Fury.
Despernte attempts made by the
Germans on the western end of the
long line of battle to break through
the allies' forces, which are engaged
in a turning movement, have resulted
iu the most furious lighting thai hue
taken place since the beginning of the
campaign along the Aisne river In
France.
Alter fighting without respite night
and day corps after corps of Germane
were hurled against the (lower of the
French and English armies, only to
be thrown back.
The attack was made witli such
numbers thut it is evident that order
hud been received to euueavor to end
the battle with a clearly decisive
victory.
The Germans are once more in tlielr
trenches after giving ground slightly
between the Oise and Sommo. They
lost prisoners, (lags and guns und
the spirit of the troops is broken.
At their center near Rheims the Ger
mans launched a determined blow at
the allies, but were thrown buck ncai
tho fort of Nogent L'Abbesse.
Farther eastward, toward the Ar
gonno, they gained ground but were
obliged to surrender it.
Along the Mouse tlielr position im
proved, but they have not broken
through the barrier of Verdun-Toul
Nancy. There have been no decisive
engagements in Alsace-Lorraine.
Tho government report contains
the assurance that tho allies' Hanking
movement is vigorous In spite of in
creased German resistance and that
the severest lighting Is now with the
bayonet.
Germans and allies have been strug
gling back und forth over the same
ground ami the loss of life is frightful.
Tho allies' center holds while tho right
strives to clinch victory.
Adequate understanding of the but
tie of the Aisne, now in its fifteenth !
duy, is impossible. One is bankrupt j
of superlatives. Such endurance, valor .
and determination wus never before 1
seen on any Held of buttle. I
Combats of greater violence than
Austerlitz or Leipzig urn mere inci
dents of this unprecedented struggle.
There is undoubtedly u large Inde
pendent force of English and French
striking at German communications
witli Belgium. A column from the
allies' left wing attempted a stroke
were unuble to drive the enemy out.
The French communique, Issued at
Paris, was us follows:
' "It is confirmed that from the night
of Sept. 2G to 2ti up to today the
enemy bus not ceased night or day to j
renew his attack, his manifest object j
being to try to break our lines. The
attack was madu with such an Im j
meuse number of men that it is evl-i
dent that orders had been received I
from tlie highest source to seek to end
the battle with a decisive victory. I
"Not only has tho attack failed, but 1
in the course of the action we cap
tured a standard and several guns anil ;
many prisoners. Ail our army com- i
manders report the morale of our j
troops is excellent. Tho officers are '
even forced to restrain their men from ,
dashing on the enemy sheltered ill his
organized d fensive positions." j
Tlie German war authorities Issued
this statement ut Berlin: 1
"Tlie enemy, by utilizing his rail
roads, made an attack on the German ;
right dunk, but was repulsed by an In-1
ferlor force of Germans. The Frcncii
forts south of Verdun have been
silenced by the artillery. The German
forces before llapauine engaged a
French division. Otherwise in the
western theater of war conditions ure
unchanged. Tim lighting around Ha
paunio Is between the Frencii forces
which have been trying to swing
around the army of General Von Kluck
in an enveloping movement in order
to attack the German line."
ALLIES CAPTURE LISSA
City In Dalmatia Changes Hands After !
Bombardment. j
A dispatch from Rome says t!i ,
Austrian seaport of Mssa in Dalmatia
was bombarded by a French ilect Sept
19. Later troops landed from the
French warships and went into gar
rlson. British and French Hags were
hoisted over the semaphore station at
Lissu.
Boctsb Dropped Into Shipyard.
A dispatch from Boulogne says: "A
German aeroplane Hew over Boulogne
tt a great height. The aviator threv
a bomb Into 11 shipbuilding yard. Nc
one was injured."
Mother Sees Child Decapitated.
In sight of her mother May Sum
mers, live years old, was deca Dilated
by a trolley car iu Philadelphia.
AUSTRIANS ARE
BOTTLEDIN FORTS
Russians Occupy Most of the
Fortified City of Przemysl
GARRISON'S POSITION CRITICAL
Cossacks Are Only Fifty, Miles From
Cracow and Are Overrunning the
Country In That Part of Galicla.
A dispatch from Petrograd says the
Russian general BtoXt announced that
the Russian advance toward Silesia
is proceeding irresistibly and that tho
Calicia campaign lias been successful.
That the Russians are uow lu pos
session of tlie greater part of the city
of Przemysl is stated in a dispatch
from Vlenne, which says:
"The Russians approaclied tlie city
from the southwest, forcing tlie Aus
trlans to take shelter iu the eastern
torts, where tlie entire, garrison is con
centrated, and Is preparing to make a
final resistance. The situation of the
garrison is critical, as it Is eutlrely
surrounded.
"Russian troops are advancing from
Grodek 011 the Austrian positions,
wlille the right wing continues to at
tack from the north. Troops ure bulug
poured into the city of l'rzoniysl to
press tlie uitack from the southwest."
"Germany is reinforcing her army
in east Prussia ut the rate of one army
corps per day," says a dispatch from
Petrogrud.
"These reinforcemeuls nre being
curried by 150 trains 011 all fcur avail
able railroads. Other troops are being
hurried from Berlin and Schneldemull
to Baltic p.irls and thence by sea to
east Piusuhi.
"All this is iu preparutlou for the
great ur.d ieclsive battle soon to be
fought along the whole western lino.
"At least SOO.OOU German troops are
now gathered lu an effort to balance
the'Austrluu failures. The armies are
already lu touch and the grand battle
is bound tr come soon. The Russian
will have the advantage, however, I
cause the lighting will be on ground
chosen by the Russian leaders."
Tlie Petrogrud correspondent of the
Dally Telegraph has forwarded the fol
lowing Beiui olllrlul statement regard
ing the operations In Russian Poland:
"The niownicnt of German troops
from east Prussia in the direction ol
Wursuw has come to nothing. In tlie
government of Suwulkl (Russian Po
land) the Germans have suffered a
serious repulse. The left Hank of tho
Russian army has defeated the Ger
man troops under the command of
General Von Hindeiiburg neur Stl
walkl." URGES MORE SUBMARINES
Secretary Daniels Sees Lesson In Eu
ropean Naval Battles.
The need of intrueonstal canals ami
the wisdom of building more sub
marines und fewer dreadnoughts are
the lessons the United States should
druw from the naval activities of the
Europeun war, according to Secretary
Daniels, who was addressing tlie At
lantic deeper waterways convention.
Tho secretary said:
"If wo had war wo could rely upon
a great Infracostal waterway in which
we would have the advantage of send
lug the effective submarines up und
down und letting them slip from the
numerous exits to catch the enemies'
ships unawares wherever they might
be attempting to bombard our coasls
or shell our great ships and bring
them to terms. It would enable us to
bring our r sources to bear In the con
test, and if we can do that wo would
be almost sure to win. If not we
would probably lose the war."
FLEET OF ZEPPELINS READY
Raid on English Navy to Be Made
On of These Days. j
Tho Chicago Daily News prints the
following as a dispatch from Berlin:
"It was ated by a high authority!
that practically ull Zeppelins are
centered around the North sea, where I
they ure to assist in an attack on ihe
British lleet. The outcome of such a
buttle will bo Important, for It will do-1
termini whether a dirigible can mem-!
ure up against a warship. If it can
tho German lleet will not bo greatiy
outnumbered in the conflict about to
tuke place, for the British lleet Is In-,
sufficiently supplied with aeroplane ;
guns. j
"We hear remarkable stories ubout
the number of Zeppelins. At the out-!
breuk of the war there were twenty-!
two on record. Today the report of;
tlielr number vailes from llfty-six to,
sixty." j
CANADIANS GO TO FRONT
32,000 Volunteers Started Away to Re
lief of English Forces.
Minister of Labor Crothers of the
dominion of Canada announced Hint
Hli.OOO Canadian volunteers "have gone
to the froiu u day or two ago." .M".
Crothers inadi tlie announcement iu
a speech before the Canadian Trad"S
and Labor congress In convention
here. Mr. Crothers extolled the patri
otic spirit of the Canadian voluntcc-i.
Tho foregoing brief dispatch Is the
only announcement which tlie Car i
illan Connor lias permitted to go over
the wires j,arding tin disposition ol
tiio ;oluuteers for more than a week.
VILLA CALLS HIS
ARMYJTOGETHER
Every Man In Torreon Pressed
Into Nsw Revolt
QUICK MOVE ON CARRANZA
Constitutionalist Chief Promise! Presi
dent Wilson to Defend Only and Not
Attack Wirei to Mexico City Cut.
Now that he has declared revolt
against the Currunza government Gen
eral Francisco Villa Is mobilizing his
army. Every man In Torreon has been
called Into service and the concentra
tion movement Is going along rapidly.
All the garrison commanders of the
smaller towns have been commanded
to send their men to Chihuahua.
The old tederal contingent in Mex
ico w ill swing to Villa lu the present
revolution, according to Carranza
agents.
Rumors at tlie border said Carranza
was rushing men north from Zacut"
Ctts and westward from Monterey
ogalnst Villa's men at Torreon, con
trary to Carrauzu's assurances to tlm
United States that he would not at
tack Villa but would prepare to resist
If Villa should attack him.
First blood lu the revolt against
the Carranza government in Mexico
was shed lu a battle between troops
commanded by Jose Maria Muytoront,
governor of Sonora, and tlie commanl
of Cnrranzu troops under General Ben
jamin Gill at Santa Barbara, Sonora.
Maytorena's strength was estimated
at about 3.000. Gill's troops are de
clared to be somewhat superior numer
ically. Maytoremi has issued a formal
proclamation renouncing Carranza and
declaring allegiance to Villa.
Carranza Won't Attack.
General Carranza has informed the
United Stales government he will not
attack General Villa, but will order
his forces to bo on tlie defensive and
resist attack.
The first chief's communication de
clared tho national convention would
bo held as scheduled on Oct. 1, when
a provisional government would be
established which, he hoped, would ho
satisfactory to the United States.
Tho Isolation of Mexico City from
coniniunlc; tlon and the cutting of all
wires between the United States ami
points In northern Mexico were re
ported to the government. As a result
the administration Is without news ..s
to events in Mexico City cither iu Cur
runza or Villa territory.
Tho cutting of railroad and tele
graph lines from Mexico City to Vera
Cruz Is attributed to General Villa.
Tliis formal statement wus Issued by
tho war department:
"Numerous Inquiries were mndo
hern and of General Funston with re
spect to the date of the departuro of
tho American troops from Vera Cruz,
hi view of Lho matter which must be
first settled no date can at present
ho fixed, but In no event can the de
parture take place within tlie next ten
days, and General Funston wus so ad
vised." OIL PROBE ASKED
Senator Gore Wants Standard's Af
fairs Looked Into Again.
An investigation of the Standard Oil
company was proposed us tho first
duty to he imposed upon the newly
created federal trado commission In a
resolution Introduced by Senator Gore
of Oklahoma. Action was delayed.
Tlie resolution calls for a probe ot
relations between the various brain li
es of tho company, as dissolved by
the supreme court, and of the meth
ods employed by their respective ru
nning und transportation agencies to
ward Independent producers. Atten
tion also Is called to alleged efforts to
control the price of crude oil on the
part of these companies and the com
mission would be instructed to inuko
a comparison of tho capital and divl
(lends of the company for three years
prior to dissolution with those of In
dependent concerns.
GERMANS BLAME FRENCH
Reasons Given For Firing on Cathe
dral at Rheims.
Tho German headquarter staff in
further explanation of the bombard
ment of the cathedral of llhelms suy:,:
"Since Sept. 20, when a white Mag
wus hoisted In the steeple, tlie cathe
dral bus been respected by our artil
lery. We soon discovered that ti.e
French had used tho steeple as u poi'-.t
of observation which Bulliciently ex
plained tho good shooting of the
French artillery.
"It became necessary to remove the
observation post which removal was
cfl'ected by shrapnel."
Spain and U. S. May Ena War.
Negotiations between the United
States and Spain aiming nt tlie co
operation of these countries, and pos
sibly of Italy, in efforts that will be
tnado to end the Kuropcan war are re
ported to be under way.
Pennsylvania Has 6,000 Students.
With an enrollment approximating
C.000 students tin University of Penn
sylvania entered upon Its 174th year.
R-ne Gilbert Dies.
Reno ii'ttlieit, the painter auJ
paateiilst, died iu Paris.
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