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The Tarboro' southerner. [volume] (Tarboro', N.C.) 1867-1873, September 26, 1867, Image 1

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THE SOUTHERNER.
Published every Thariday by
CHARLES, IIEARNE & BIGGS.
IAS. O.CHARLES. WM.A.HE.WSS. WM. EIQGS.
Wife'
If
rV tifiBtt4ffltt:
TRANSIENT RATES :
(2ne Spuare, (inch paco) one time,.
Each Subsequent insertion,
CONTRACT RATES:
TEEMS OZ STTBSCBIPJOIT:
(invariably in advance.)
One copy one year,. $3 CO
One copy six months,, 2 00
One copy three months 1 00
Twenty-Five per cent. Is added to the
above rates ben paid at tbe end or the
year. v."
1
in
in u
JUL)
ti 00 J
One square one year, : $15 00
One-Fourth Column one year,. . . ..V.'' 50 00
Oatf-Hah" Column , 00 TK
Column QBc(year,,.":'..,.'......-I00 ftJ,
Duslncsfl Card occupying a squarf or
less inserted for Twenty Dollars a yemr. -'.-J
Monthly change;; flowed. '."
The Tacht John T. Ford Disaster.
1r-
"MY COUNTRY: RIGHT OR WRQNfl: MY COUNTRY."
VOL. XLIII.
TAIIBORO', EDGECOMBE COUNTY, NOItTI CAROLINA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 18C7.:
NO. 42.
PROFESSIONAL.
" I,. D. PENDER.
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
TARBORO, N. C.
OFFICE, one door below Tost Office,
and one above the store of D Pender & Co.
All business intrusted to my enre will
be promptly and strictly attend ta.
'' ".Sept. 25, 18CG. 12-tf
GILBERT ELLIOTT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
- Office No. 24 West Main Street,
Norfolk, Va.
references:
Messrs. Dancy, Ilyman At Co., New York.
'Dr P. 1. Clements, LJalliniore.
Messrs'. C. V Grandy & Sons, Norfolk,
lion. V. A. Graham': HilUboro', N. C.
Hon. W. N. II. Smith, MurlYeesboro'.X.C.
Auj. 2'J. 3!-tt
ASA BIGGS.
J. EDWIN MOORE
BIGGS & MOORE,
ATTORNEYS AT I, AW,
Tarboro', JT, C
jWILL attend the Courts in the Coun
Ww tics of Martin, Bertie, Pitt, Edge
combe, Ilaliiaz, Nash, Wilson and Wayne,
and also the Federal, Bankrupt and Su
preme Courts. Strict attention paid to
Jiio collection and adjustment of claims,
ud to cases in Bankruptcy.
August 1, 18G7. 35 tf
fisi?" Wilson Carolinian and Goldsboii)'
Star iusert for one month and send bill to
this offiee.
DR. R. F. ROBERTSON,
DBS
TIaJT,
TARBORO', N C,
Office at the Edgecombe House, where
be can ba found on Monday and Tuesday
of each week.
May 2, WG7. 22 -tf
NOTICE.
. A. E. RICKS, D. D. L , would respect
fully say to the Citizens of Tarboro' and
its vicinity, that be is again in the practice
k, his 1'iofession and will in the future
as in the pa&t endeavor to discharge his
duty faithfully for all those who require
Lis service
Address, Jloeky JJount, X. C.
Feb. 3, -.sua 10 tf
Jlich'd J. Conner. Chas. 11. Richardson
J AS. II. McCLLF.R, of X. C,
WITH
n. J. CONXKR tt- CO.,
Manufacturers and Dealers in
Hats, ('ops, Furs. Srttiv Goods.
254 & 2:.fi CANAL STREET,
Nearly opposite Earlc's Hotel,
NEW YORK.
July 28 3"-tf
JOHN K. H01T,
of Washington, N. C, with
CHICHESTER & CO.,
wholesale iealei: in
Foigign and Domestic Hard
ware, No 10, Barclay Street, near Aston House,
New" York.
fSf All orders promptly attended to."t32
Fob! 10 11 -tf
BROWN & (TYLER,
Commission JBerj'Iiaiits,
14Q Pearl Street,
NEW YORK.
ff 1BERAL ADVANCES ON CON
SLA fcignnietits of Cotton and other
Produce Bagging, Bale Eope and Iron
Ties, furnished to 1'Ianters on l'avoralde
terms.
New York. Ana-. 29, 1S07. 30-2ni
Tannahill, Mcllwaine & Co.,
Commissi.; Merchant.
130.. Pearl Street,
Xew YorK.
strict Personal Attention given to
tOTTO.V.
EST ROLL ANi GL'NY BAG-:
gmg, Iiope and Iron furnished at !
jnwfs market rates.
Tuxes mi Coiton will he paid liy our friends
.Messrs. J). lVider& Co.; -Matjjv W'eddell.
i-xj-, Jossrs. Smith & William, Tarboro',
. (.'. J. E. Liiulsey. Kot-ky Mount, N. O.
Air ssrs. G II. B.-OWU & Co.. Wa.-hinjuc'. X.
T. Au. 2U. aif-if
A T. BRUCE & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS,
AND
General Commission Merchants,
For the Sale of (Jetton and other
Southern Produce.
Ko. ICG PEA II L STREET,
NEW YORK.
F DUTIES Shipping Cotton to us can be
accommodated with funds to pay Tax
by culling on Messrs. Brown & Pippen or
Mr. II. D. Teel. Trboro'.
Property covered by Insurance as scon
nsftarted. " ' 1 oct 13-46-tf
.1 0 1 IX S. DANCY, JOHN II. HYM AN,
of Tarboro1, N. C. of Scotland Neck, N . C.
! JO.EPH H. I1YMAN,
late of Tarboro', N. C.
m
DANCF, HYM AN k CL,
GENERAL
Qonmission . Merchants,
for the Skle of all kinds, of
S O U T II E H N P II O D U C E,
and purchase of General Merchandise,
No. i4 Exchange Place.
HEjy yoqjc.
aug. 24,-50-tf
irashtegton, ft. C, July 1, 1867.
THE FIRM' OF JOHN MYERS &
SON is dissolved by the death of the
senior partner. The business v. ill be set
tled by the undersigned, surviving part
ner. B. L. MYERS.
mOE TJNDERSIGNEn HAVE THIS
J1 day formed a co-partnership under
the firm name of
: JOHN MYJpRS' SONS,
for the transaction of 'a GENERAL COM
MISSION BUSINESS, and respectfully so
licit the patronage of their friends, and
the friends of the late firm of John Myers
&Son.' R, L. MYERS,
, ,T, II. B. MYERS.
VashiPgtop, n, C.J July 1, 167. 3m
XpRFOLii,
RICKS, HILL & CO.,
COTTON AND
Gen. Commission Merchants
NORFOLK!, VA.
BAGGING and ROPE furnished pay
able in Cotton. Liberal advances
made. sep 1 40-tf
JAMES GORDON & CO.,
Commission Merchants.
SpjtFOLK, VIRGINIA.
PROMPT PERSONAL ATTENTION
given to the sale of Produce of every
kipd, and to the purchase of all supplies
for Farmers, Merchants, and others in the
country. hot 29, 1-tf
Geo. U. Fner, John B. Keal,
of A". C. o N. C.
FREER & NEIL,
Gen. Commission Merchants,
NORFOLK, J1.
LIBERAL ADVANCES ON CONSIGNMENTS
Refer to Exchange Natipnal Bank, Nor
folk. " ap 25 2l-ly
C.W. Grandy, C.R. Grandy, OW. Granny, jr
C. W. GRANDY & SONS,
House Established 1845,
FACTORS,
FORWARDING AND COMMISSION
M E R V II A NTS,
Mcintosh's Wharf,
KOltl-OLK, rjJ.
SOR THE SALE OF COTTON,
1 Grain, Naval Stores anu Country Pro
duce generally, and purchasers of Cteneral
Merchandise.
Sept 15 42-tf
COH AM) & HARRISS,
General Commission Merchants,
UiS CoinnKU'oe Street,
NORFOLK, VA,
UJILL attend promptly ti sales of Cot
t ? ton, Grain, Lumber, Tobacco, Na
val Stores, &c, nnd purchnsj of Supplies,
and forwarding Cotton aud Tobacco tq Eu
rope if desired.
D. G. Cowaxi), Waxhiiffton Co., X. C.
R. J. Hakkjss, Gra-.v;,Ue, late of Halifax
County, X. C. l-35-(m
fejT defers to T. E. Lewis, Tarboro'.
KAliE'.l BiqiiS. J. J. EiiJ.qs
KADER RIGGS & (0
GKNERAL
Com m ission Merchants,
AND
COTTON FACTORS,
McPhails "Wharf,
NORFOLK, VA.
Shipments made to Liverfool free of
forwarding Commissions, and the usual
advances pirule
trS" Special attcntipn paid to the sale
of Cotton, and all kinds of Country Pro
duce, june 2 27 ly
J. D, KKKD. ACT..
PRACTICAL riATTEIi,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer iu
Iltits?, Caps, Straw Goods,
Umbrellas, Canes, &c ,
No. '8 Main Street,
NORFORK, VA.
ap. in. 20-ly
L. Berkley W. 31. 3Iillar.
J. If Gr.tndy. Formerly of N. C-
BERKLEY, MILLAR & CO.
Wholesale Dealers in
I)r3" Goods Sc Notions,
1G West Main Stretx ,
Nextdoi to Exchange National Bank
NORFORK, VA.
mar. S. 1G ly
FSTABRlSJIFl7l831.
J. M. FREE if IN,
"Watchmaker and Jpweler,
NO. 29 MAIN STREET;
Corner of T albot Street.
N.QRFOLK, VA,
CONSTANTLY OXMTAND A FI LL
J assortment of Yatchcs, Jewelry, Sil
ver ware, &e.
Watches carefully and properly Repair
ed, apr. 4. 18-tf
CHERRY & 3IAPP,
(Late AY. D. ROBERTS Jr. & Co.,)
Manufacturers, Wholesale and Retail
Dealers in
Cooking and Heal ins; Stoves4
Tin. Copper and Sheet Iron
WARE,
House Furnishing Goods, and Brokers
in Metals,
Cor. Roanoke and Wide Wzttr Sis.,
Norfolk, Va.
mar. 28. . . f 16Gm
L. L. Brickhoune. S. J. Thomas.
L. L. BRICKnOCSE L 1 0.,
Wholesale and Retail dealers in
BOOTS, SHOES,
Trunks, Valises, Carpa Bugs &c,
Jj o, 2 3 M aim S t redft w
'Opposite Taylor, Martin &.Cb.,
Norfolk, Va.
Full stock constantly on hand at
Lowest Market Prices.
Jons II. Fekbee, of Morganton, N. C.
'mar 8. 16-ly
C F Greenwood. Fred Greenwood.
ESTABLISHED 1847.
C. F. GREENWOOD & CO.,
Watch makers 'and Jewelers,
DEALERS IN
I71INE GOLD AND SILVER WATCII
es. Diamond's, Pearl and other rich
Jewelry, Solid Silver and Plated Ware,
Spectacles, Clocks
- :" . AND ' '- "
Fancy Goods,
No. 27 Main fctreet,
Norfolk, Virginia
N. B. Watches and Jewelry repaire'd-by
the most skillful trcrkmen and warranted.
Arril 4, 1807. ' 18-ly
AORFOI.Ii.
U . HORNER,
Successor to P. DIL WORTH,)
1 Wide. ' Water Street,
NORFOLK, VA.,
No.
ILL PAY THE HIGHEST MAR
ket price for Cotton and Woolen
Rags, Rope, Paper, Metals, Boues, &c.
June 6, 1867. 27-ly
TAYLOR, MARTIN & CO.,
DEALERS IN
Hardware, Cutlery,
R vll IRON AND STEEL,
WAGON MATERIAL,
BELTING AN J PACKING,
House Furnishing Goods, &c,
Circular Front, corner of Main street and
Market Square,
Norfolk, Va.
Nails at Factory Prices, Trace Chains,
Weed, Hilling and Grub Hoes, Horse Col
lars and Haines, Axes, Saws, &c, &c.
The trade supplied at Northern prices.
mar. 28. 16-ly
.
Q9 IN rain Street,
NORFOLK, VA.
ESTABLISHED 854.
Wholesale and Retail
Ciothier nnd Merchant Taylor.
1-EEPS CONSTANTLY ON HAI)
jit one of the largest and best selected
stocks pf Ready Made ( tothing and
gent furnishing goods, also a fiue assort
incut of piece goods, which he is prepared
to make up to order in the lafpst and most
fashionable styles, a call is very respect
fully requested. S. W. SELDXER.
April 4, 18(57. 18-tf
REMOVAL.
J. H. D0DS0N,
(Late of the firji of Dodson & Itainer.)
Has Removed Lis Stock to the old
stand,
o. T East Side Water Street.
WHERE he will be pleased to see
his old friends and tiie public jre-eral-ly.
lie has on hand a large and well seleet
ed stock of
Ales, Brandies, Gins, Wines and
Wbislvics.
One lot of which is u liiuirnifieent article,
ten yi ars old. and anotliCF seven years old.
to which he euljs specia atJtMition A No,
choice
Old London Hock ISriiudics.
J2J-PRICES MEUERATi;.-3l
Give nit; a cIl.
J. H. DOBSON,
No. 7 Widei'iijer street.
Sept. r. ' 40-1 in
DAVIS & BROTHER,
Wholesale dealers in
GROCERIES, LIQUORS,
and Agents for Carolina Belle Scwtch
Snuff, and various grades of
VIRGINIA MANUFACTURED
Tobacco.
-grr EEP CONSTANTLY' ON HAND
JLsy. a full stock of Sugar and Codec,
Flour, Lard, Bacon, Caudles, Family and
Fancy Soaps, Cheese, Butter, Fish, Pork,
Salt, Candy, Buckets, Brooms, Shot, Pow
der, nud many other articles, to complete
the assortment usually found in a
(ftt'occrv Eioiic.
Any consignment wiil have especial at
tiou. No 4 Rowland's Wharf,
Norfolk, Va.
np. 25, 1807. 21-ly
Ed. P. Tahb. Ed. 31. 3Iore. Ed. J. Gifilh.
EDWARD P. TABB & CO.
WHOLESALE- DEALERS IN
HARDWARE, CUTLERY
AND
FANCY GOODS.
West tSidc Market Square,
Norfolk,
Sign ol the Ahyil.
GENTS FOR THE SALE OF f,LD
Dominion Nails, Emery's Cotton Gin,
Boyle & Gambles Circular Pit and cut
Saws WarrenUd. Gum Belting, all sizss.
A large stock always on hand of Axes,
pades, Shovels, Forks, Chain Traces
Ilollow Ware, Horse Collars, Rope.
Agents for Fairbanks & Co's Standard
SCALES,
that viii i?cjL a .Gold Dollar or a Canal
Boat Loaded.'
A large stock of Queens Ware, China
and Glass. Attention ef the trade re
spectfully solicited. mar. 28. 16-ly
THE JOURNAL OFFICE
BOOK BINDERY, :
In connection wjth our splendid
5ST JOB PRINTING OFFCE, a
is now in successful operation, and we are
making
SUPERIOR BLANK-BOOKS,
Binding and Rebinding Periodicals, Old
Books, Music, 1 "
AND EVERY KISD OF WORK
Done in a First-Class Book-Bindery.
TIIE BEST OF WORKMEN OXLY
a reemployed by us.
Thijpjonly' establishment of the
Vipu in xiae-w.uer Virginia, ana we can
do work as well and cheap as it can be
done id the North.
EVERY VARIETY OF BOOK and
JOB PRINTING
Promptly executed,
IN FLAIN OR FANCY COLORS.
Call at the JOURNAL office, 12 Roanoke
avenue, cr address your orders to
J. RICHARD LEWELLEN,
Supt Norfjlk Printing House Co.
May 2, 1867. " 22-tf
jno. w. white;
Cabinet Maker and Undertaker,
Tarboro', N. C.
HAS on hand a large lot -of Bedsteads,
Chairs and others articles of Furniture,
which he offers to the public cheap for
Cash, all kind-'of wood Coffins, of all sizes
on hand.
All kinds of furniture Made and He
paired at the shortest notice. ' '
3 in. 27 .... 9 tf
THE SOUTHERNER.
THURSDAY',. , - - SEPT. 20, 1267
JEANNE DARC.
BY JAMES I'ARTOX.
During the last few years, a dozen
Yoluuies or more have been published!
in France containing documents and
researches relating to the career of this!
illustrious heroine, the sa r of her
country. Our readers will be interest
ed, perhaps, in learninKthe sub
stance of those volumes, anulj
ascertaining what it u rational to be
lieve respecting the subject of them.
In the first place, we all spell her
name wrong, fche was not an ansto
cratic D'Arc, but a plebeian Dare ; andi
her first name was Jeanne, not Joan,
as we are accustomed to see it. The
name of Dare is still common in the.i
province of France from which she
spraug ; and we have the authority of
a learned decenaant ot her lamuy tor
the spelling which which we have giv-
en. Jeanne Uaucis, then, the name
of our heroine.
She was born at Doinrcmv, a village
upon the banks of the Mease, in 1412,
auu sue was tue uaujrnter ot .Jacques
and Isabel Dare, who were serfs. Her
father was a ploughman, who posses
sed a cabin, a little garden, and some
cattle; but, having a family of five
children to maintain at a time when
France was desolated by civil war,
Je.anne was reared in circumstances
not far removed from want. By turns
the child assisted the mother iu the la
bors of the household, and her father
in the care of his beasts. The village
in which she lived was partly in
Champagne and partly, in Lorraine
the latter province uot being at tht
time subjected to the king of France.
Upon thi$ border line, iu that time of
civil war, party spirit was iutense as
much so as it was in the border States
during our late war. The young girl,
at au early period of her life, imbibed
an euthusiasm for the royal cause and
a passionate attachment for the person
of the king, Charles VII., similar to
that which some people in England
felt for the princes of the House of
Stuart.
AnotL:r fact is to be noted her
father's cottage was situated very iuar
the village church. xl?r mother, it
appears, was a zealous Catholic ; and
her daughter, as she grew toward ma
turity, became as devoted to her reli
gion as to her king. The nearness of
the church, it is thought, nourished
the fjauip of her devotion. She was a
solitary girl, much given to reflection,
and was occasionally discovered by her
friends in lonely places with her eyes
fixed upon heaven, as though she were
communing with celestial beiugs.
In her thirteenth year, the war ap
proached her hitherto peaceful pro
vince, and Jeanne frequently saw the
dead and wounded brought in from the
field. A hostile force at length ap
proached the village itself, and all its
inhabitants fled in consternation to an
island in the river, from which they
returned to find it pluudered and half
burnt. These events stirred the com
passionate soul of the young girl to its
depths and caused her at length to in
dulge the dream of becoming herself
the instrument of her country's deliv
erancp. Her religions enthusiasm in
creased with her year?, and she imag
ined that she heard Heavenly voices
commanding her to go forth and deliv
er the kingdom.
Now there had long been a kind of
expectation in the superstitious minds
of thg French peasantry, that Frace.
in the fullness of time, was to he freed
lrotn ner r-nirlisii
r x, w
invaders by means
is highly prcbabl:
of a Virgin. It
that Jeanne Dare was familiar with
this expeptation, and that it led her at
length to the conviction that she was
the virgin destined by Heaven for this
glorious work. However this may be,
it is certain that, before she was four
teen years of age, she was fully posses
sed with the idea that the delivery of
France was her mission.
She first revealed her design to her
fither. She was her father's favorite
child, and he was content, at first, to
laugh at her delusion ; but, finding that
she persisted in it, he adopted the tone
of authority and commanded her uot
to leave her home She feigned to be
submissive to her father's commands,
and endjavored next to prevail upon
her uncle, who lived in the next vil
lage, to bring her father over to her
scheme. This uncle was so much in
fluenced by her entreaties, that he
made known her wish to a French cap
tain who was stationed near.
" My neice," said he, " wishes to
convey succors to King Charles VII."
" Box her ears," said the captain in
reply. " and send her home to her pa
rents."" Her famijy endeavored to wean her
from her supposed infatuation by get
ting her a husband ; but she firmely
refused either to marry or to promise
marriage. In the meantime, the 3roung
enthusiast, who wag tall, finely propor
tioned, and' highly prepossessing, and
whose enthusi'astifj piety had been re
marked and admired by her neighbors,
began to make co nverts in her native
village. ' In her sixteeuth year, the
news of fresh disasters to her native
country roused her to the highest pitch
of compassion' and 'determination. She
went herself to the captaiu just refer
red to, and said to him ;
" Though I wear out my legs up to
my' knees,-1 must and' will go aud raise
thesiegcrof Orleans
Gaining no encouragement from him,
she obtained an interview with a pow
erful dufcie, and made such an iuipres
sion thab he gave her a hdrsxj and some
gold, and "procured her ah11 escort for
her contemplated journey to the king,
who was tbje'n. at a distance 'cf three
hundred and eighty miles. Attired as
a man, and armpd with a sword, a dag
ger and a lance, jbe started upon her
journey, accompanied by two officers
and two soldiers.
On the sixth of March, 1422, after
perilous journey of eleven days, she
reached the royal residence, and sent
in to the king to ask an audience. Her
fame had preceeded her, and was con
sidered of such importance that tle
king's council deliberated for jay qp
on the question, whether or not she
should be dismissed without an inter
view. It was decided to admit her,
and put her inspiration to the test.
The king laid aside his royal garments,
and mingled with the crowd of cour-
ties, several of whom were more richly
clothe! than bumselr: but upon being
conducted to the apartment, the inaid
went straight to the king, fell on her
knees before him, and said :
" Gentle prince, I am Jeanne the
Virgin ; the King of Heaven sends me
to you ; through me you shall be crown
ed and anointed in the city of Reims ;
ana you snail De me vicegerent 01 vjtuu,
which is to be King of France."
The king, astonished at her words
and her bearing, took her aside and
conversed with her for some time.
UVhafc passed between them has been
variously related ; but it is certain that
jhc made an impression upon his mind
t a mind naturally weak and enfee
bled by vice and superstition. Not yet
(convinced of her heavenly mission, he
caused her to be examined by his coun
cil, and by learned doctors of divinity.
i'They subjected her to various tests,
Hyhich cannot be related here. A whole
month was consumed by this investi
gation ; at the end of which the king
gave her a military command, supplied
her with arms and accoutrements, and
assigned ner a retinue ot two pages,
twp servants, two herald? and a com
missary. Attired in white armor, and
bearing a standard covered with fleurs
fe?w aud religious emblems, she pre
sented herself to the Fron army,
then defending the great city of Or
leans against the English.
The novelty and splendor of her ap
pearance, the firmness aud composure
of her demeanor, the roj'al commission
which she held, aided by the universal
juperstition of the age, drew upon her
the eyes of the whole army,-and inspi
red them with confidence in the reality
of her mission. After a series of bloody
and desperate conflits, in which she dis
played the greatest valor and audacity,
the English were exhausted and aban
doned the seige. She continued her
car?er of conquest until she had ful
filled her promise, and the king was
crowntd at jA?Lms four months after his
first interview wiL?! the maid. Resolv
ed never to discontinue the struggle as
long as there was an enemy upon the
soil of France, she fought on until the
spring of the following year, when, in
a hotly contested action, she was sur
rounded by the foe, thrown from her
horse, and taken prisoner.
Upon a pharge brought against her
by the Inquisition and seconded by the
servile University of Paris, (then in
possession of the English,) she was
thrown into a dungeon, to await her
tijil for heresy. Twice, by her tact
and courage, she nearly succeeded in
escaping- Arraigned, at length, be
fore tho pregtly court, she was accused
of seventy distinct offences, the chief
of which were that she had professed
to receive communications from Heaven,
whereas, in reality, she had only iuvok-
cd the devil ; that she hd worn men's
clothes and entered the army as a sol
diea ; that her religious opinions were
heretical, and that she had refused to
submit to the authority of the church.
Her demeanor duriug the long u ocko
ry of a trial to which she was subject
ed was calm and heroic; bof, as her
condemnation was a thing resolved up
on, nothing availed she was condemn
ed and sentenced to be burut alive, un
less she abjured her errors.
In these terrible circumstances, the
woman, for a moment, prevailed over
the heroine. "With a disdainful smile
upon her lips, she took the pen in her
hands and placed at the bottom of the
paper of abjuration a zero, winch was
the usual mode ot assenting to abjura
tion by the persons who could not
write. She was then removed to her
cell, and condemned to remain there
for the rest of her life on bread and
water.
As one of the principal points made
against her by her priestly accusers
was, that she had worn iron's clothes,
she had, during her trial, resumed the
garments of her own sex. On the third
day after her return to the prison, on
getting up iu the morning, she discov
ered thajt her female dress had been ta
ken away and her men's clothes placed
in a sack at the foot of her bed. She
was therefore compelled, against her
will, to resume her former costume.
A priest who had been foremost in her
prosecution visited her cell that day,
and taunted her with haying relapsed
into the damnable errors for which she
had been tried. At this outrage, her
human indignation came to the rescue
of her religious faith. She rpfcracted'j
her abjuration, and dedared to the uia
iiguant priest that she had recanted in
a moment of womanly weakness, and
that she was indeed an instrument in
the hands of God for the deliverance
of France. The uea.t day the court re
assembled, and the original sentence
was again pronounced. She was then
nineteen years of age
When this fearful news was brought
to her, she again experienced a mo
ment of weakness aud burst into tears.
. " Oh," cried she, sobbing, " are they
so prucl that this -body of' fliins, entire
and uncorrupt, ihust be to-day ton
surned to ashes?" 1 '.,
She soon recovered her composure,
and joined with calmness and devotion
in the rites appointed by her church
for the dyiDg. Eight hundred English
troops escorted her to the place of ex
ecution. She was placed upon a lofty
platform of masonry, in the midst of
which there was a post covered with
cement, surrounded with a great mass
of faggots. Behind the stake a pla
pird was Set up. ufon which was writ
ten in large letters :
"Jeanne, who uas named her
self the Virgin, a liah, a perni
cious PERSON, AN ABUSER OF THE
PEOPLE, A SORCERESS, SUPERSTITIOUS,
A BLASPHEMER OF GOD, A DENIER OF
the Gospel or Jesus Christ, a
BOASTER, AN IDOLATER, CRUEL, DIS
SOLUTE, AN INV'JKER OF DEVILS, A
SCHISMATIC AND HERETIC."
On her head was a mitre, and upon
this was written : .
" Heretic, relapsed, apostate,
idolater."
When she had been chained to the
stake, the executioner set the wood on
fire at the lowest part of the pile, so
that she endured long and severe agony
before the flame3 reached her person ;
during which,'lioi-ever, 'she occasion
ally conversed ia a religious strain with
two friendly priests. Some of the
spectators, it is said, laughed at her
anguish, but the greater part of the
crowd were dissolved in tears. When
the flames at length reached her gar
ments, and wrapped her in a garment
of fire, she uttered only the name of
Jesus ; and with that name upon her
lips, her head fell forward and &hc ex
pired. It is impossible in the short compass
for an article like this to give anything
more than an outline ot the career of
this martyr to her country. There is
no doubt that, in common with all
mankind at that period, this heroine
was ignorant and superstitious. It is
plain, however, from the documents
recently brought to light, that she was
a pure and high-minded being, who
fully believed herself to be the chosen
instrument of Ileavcjo, and that she
performed what she conceived to be
her duty with a courage and devotion
whioh entitled her to the homage of
posterity.
Can Gentlemen be Salted I
I often wonder it it would be pos
sible for ladies to wear any gtyle of
dress that men wouldn't grumble at.
For years " the long trains" have been
anathematized and tripped over ; al
though with beautiful consistency the
New York men have persisted in prom
enading that idp pf Broadway on
which thoy mast abounded, though the
opposite one, was free and thiuly set
tled. Well, now short dresses have
come in, at least for street wear ; mod
est, non-interfering and eminently sen
sible. Are the meu happy ? Alas,
no. Now thoy have fallen foul of the
' chignon," which, according to them,
is full of little creepers. Now, if this
were true, let them understand that
tfie chignons 01 many ladies are not
" false." but arc their own natural
tresses dressed in that form. Perhaps
it might not be impertinent here to
sussrest that gentlemen's coats for street
wear, might with propriety be cut an
inch longer in the skirts. Perhaps one
might with propriety remind gentle
men, that late discoveries have reveal
ed the horrifying fact that tobacco is
made of oakum, with ody a thin cov
ering of the "leaf" over it. That
brandy has logwood in it, and the wines
they quaff are full of beastly adultera
tions. Do they not go on drinking
and smoking, all tha same, with a sub
lime trust in the venders of these
abominations, that heaven, earth aud
hell couldn't shake? And do they
not attribute all the head-aches and
stomach-aches consequent upon the
use of them, to " the dreadful strain
of daily labor they are put through to
support their families."
Besides, if gentlemen suppose wo
men dress to suit them, the sooner they
get rid of that idea the nearer the
truth hey wil come. They simply
dress to kill each other ; men don't en
ter into the arrangemeut at all, except
to pay the bills. j gentleman asked
me the other day, pointing to a costly
camel's-hair shawl on a lady in front of
us, " if it was uot Bfrapge that a lady
who was otherwise so handsomely
dressed should wear such a common
shawl 't" Now, as no man but a dry
goods merchant, would have any differ
ent notion about it, what's he use of
dressing for their eyes ? Not a bit.
But only imagine the delicious delight
of flaunting that shawl in the face of
a woman who would sell her soul to
get one like it? That's a motive
which I hope even you see.
Stupids ! know that women will
stagger under the weight of ten or
twenty pounds of beads, sewed all over
their sacs, while the doctor is rubbing
and dosing them for weak backs, ra
ther than r.ot dress like everybodj who
" is anybody."
" Is anybody !" lie is the fellow
who does it j not you. You have had
many a bill to foot on his account, and
many more coming in, tha you never
dream of. . That pretty, modest silk,
with a little rosebud on it, tho only
thing in your wife's wardrobe that you
really like, is going to be laid QtLjhe
shelf. Nobody that " is any
wears those now. Y'our wife has
purchased the last fashion. It has on.
it, the figure of an elephant in his na
tive jungle, with a huge trunk ram
pant. It's " a lovely thing." It must
be, for " it's costly and just from Par
is." And you've got to walk to church
beside that elephant, and when that
silk bows low, in that part of the Creed
where bows come in, t is hoped your
smile will be conveniently concealed
behind your mousftache. It don't
make any difference, ripwever, anyway;
except so far as your erWit as a church
goer is concerned. Remember that.
She'll wear it all the came,
And as to '(expense, my.
horses and bran
gars, cost as m
beads an
sympatjr
yovi 4
not- m
m
Babies are out of fashion. Nobody
that " is anybody " has them, if they
can help it.
Men have decided that women who
think are troublesome; and women who
don't thiuk are troublesome ; so unless
there is a general massacre of females
agreed ob,"I don't see what they are
going to do about it. Ah ! Eve was
the only happy woman. Adam had
his garden to "dress and keep," but
not her.' There were no milliners'
bills in those days. She had no buttons
to sew on. lie didn't ask her what
they should have for dinner every day.
The dessert required no cookery, al
though I will bet sixpence that Adam
grumbled even about pulling it off the
vines and trees. But the devil got in
to that Paradise; and though every
generation sTrfce' has been hunting him,
he seems to be as lively as when he of
fered Eve the first apple. Anyway,
I'm out of breath. 1 can't double on
him any more for the present. Fanny
Fern. ' '
Advertising and Its fonts.
Few business men, advertise syste
matically, liberally and persistently.
Those who pay most attention to it
either advertise fitfully, 'or with a de
gree of neglect which they w'ouhj re
gard culpable in any other department
of their business. What would a mer
chant be, thought of who only opens
his store now and then to invito aud
serve customers ? Y"ct an advertise
ment in a flourishing paper is more
conspicuous than on'es store, is more
observed, and more spoken of. and to
withdraw it is like putting up the shut
ters or taking down the sign. The
most enterprising merchants andtra-,
ders in the interior think themselves
liberal if they spend a few hundred
dollars a year advert'sing. They would
deem the farmer blind to his own in
terests who should be stingy in plant
ing and should fail to put in seed in
proper quantity because it costs some
thing. Advertising is the seed plant
ing of the business man, and stinginess
here must take the harvest meagre.
What shall be the sunt appropriated
tq advertising ? It will vary with the
character and extent of business. But
the smallest trade cau be made more
profitable, and the large?t can be ex
tended by liberal advertising. The
rule is sometimes given, that as much
should be paid for advertising as for
rent. This may be too much in some
cases, too little in others. But every
business should be kept constantly and
prominently before the readers of the
established papers of the district from
which trade is sought, lhe readers of
newspapers aro the most enterprising
and the most intelligent qf .be popu
lation, and usually have the most money
to spend- Reach them, and keep
their attention, and you create a cur
rent which others will follow.
The New York Trilmie states, that
it is true, as reported that a Boston
druggist, who had a speoialty befprc
the public, is paying that establish
ment $10,000 a year for advertising;
he paid 81,305 for the insertion of one
mammoth advertisement. The Tri
i?ieadds : " Bonner once paid us $3,
000 for one insertion of an advertise
ment of the Ledger. He knew that
by judicious advertising he could in
sure a fortune." This seems large, but
in England such sums arc hardly ex
ceptional. There advertising is regu--lar
part of business. It is reckoned
as necessary as rent, and often ten
times as much is spent for it. Adver
tising must bo done so as to reach the
people whose custom is sought. A
scperate sheet, a handbill, or circular;
a direct attack ; and the person who
receives it either throws it aside with
out reading it, or hp puts himself on the
defensive against it. A native iu the
favorite papers is a flank movement; if
catches their eye unawares; it attracts
their attention at an idle or listless
moments becomes part of current news.
Then it is like constant dropping.
It may not be read to-day. To mor
row it will be glanced at. Tho next
week it will be looked over. Finally,
it will be read. When a purchase is to
be made, wheu trade is to be transfer
red from the former dealer, when a
new article is needed, the notice will be
hunted up, aud the inducements offer
ed subjected to the test. Onesuch case
will often pay for a year's advertiaing.
Sometimes men get along without
advertising. Instances are given of
pilgrims reaching Mpcca cn their knees.
It is easier, pleasanter, swifter t-aycl
by the cars. Liberal and discreet ad
vertising puts business on wheels, ap'l
renderB it, active, beneficent to the pub1
lie, and renumerative to the dcaleir.
The Year of Dunces. This is
the euphonious appellation given by
W6ndell Phillips to the year 18G7,
because of the stupidity which he im
agines is universal except within the
limits of his own cranium. He ad
mits that treason flourishes in Wash
ington (of course) "but incompetency
is the dominant characteristic." This
is rather hard, for' 'people generally
have believed that of late -Mr. Phil
lip's friends at the capital had things
pretty much their own way. Refer
ring to tne present situation he says;
"Congress tonguctied "and hand.
cuffed till November: dbliged lo stand
silent by arid see Johnson trample on
its laws- Loyalty hunted and tremb
ling all oyer the South. A law so
clumsily devised that it cannot be ex
ecuted without bringing the great Vevr
erB of government ! a 1 collision. "A
General selected acd left io ' Washing
ton to represent'' arid protect the natio
ana louna wnen utb:iuii
Fate cf tho Crew Dreadful Sufferings at.
ck tuc suiiicmcm 01 Armstrong. - -
Full particulars of the loss of the
American yacht John T. Ford, which
sailed from Baltimore for Havre, are
given by the English papers. The
seaman Armstroqg, whoaloriesurvivt'a;
ives the following statenfent : '
In all kinds of weather two cut of
the crew of four had to be on deck, ai'
there was only room for two below, and J
then they were cramped up. On the
28th of July spoke a ship belongingef J
1 armouth, iN . fcsf" strong iWind at . S
W., the boat making heavyathbr.--
Ou the 29th, strong wind at S. 'SW.,
with a heavy sea running, the boat un
der the foresail, shinned a sea and cart1
J he water damaged all the b
books, and wet til eur clothes. Oul
2d of August moderate wckthcr.i
at N.; 1 P. M. spoke a bark belon
to Shields, from Montreal for Cork
Asked for a little bread but they couTdi
not supply any, but gave a bottle ot'l:'
rum and a little tobacco. Un the cth';
at 4 P. M., wind strong at K:; Wt, 5
sea struck the boat 'She turned over
again, and righted almost immediately,
and lost all their oil and the principal
part of their water, which placed them
in great distress. They were all suf
fering very much from cramp and
pains in their legs. Ou the 8th spoko
a ship belonging to Liverpool,-bound
to Quebec. (Jot a supply"" cf 'bread, a
little oil and tobacco. The master of
the boat did not report the miserable
state they were in. Shortly afterwards
got out of oil again, and had no light
for the compass, or to make anything
warm to eat or drink. They cut up
the boards that secured the ballast, anil
all the internal fittings of the boat, to
burn. On the 17th of August spoke
a bark bound to Portsmouth, from
Quebec, which furnished them with a
little bread and a few candles. Expe
rienced very heavy weather ; the wind
being from S. W., to E. N. E ; with a
cross sea. Monday, 19th, wind S. S.
W., with a cross sea, bore up for Cork,
N. E., about thirty miles. 10:30 P.
. a sea "struck the boat and turned
her over, and the ballast board hav
ing been burnt to furnish 'a ligh'tj'tho
ballast shifted, and all on board were
thrown into the vater.
Th'e boat kept' revolving round as
all four of the crew were trying to get
ou her, until tho lad got entangled be-
tweeu the rigging and the must, and
by that me'aus she was kept steady",
until they all got on her. She contin
ued on her side, and two of the hands
were on her masts nhd two on the sidi
cf the keel. They were in that posi.
tiou all that night, frequently being
washed off and on, until 11:30 A. M.
the next day, when they observed a
brjg bearing down towards them. They
were all quite cheered with the hopes
of speedy relief, but instead of render
ing them any aid, she cahjs close to
them, hoisted, the Dutch colors, and
stood away without giving us any as
sistauce. About an hour after, the
mate, John Shancy, asked Armstrong '
to pray for him. They all prayed -together,
and continued so for some time,
and while they were so engaged they
were now and then washed off aqd'Oa
the bottom of the tht-." Shortly' af
terwards the ears of tho mate were ob
served to swell very much, and his eyes
protruded, lie shook hauds with all
of them, then took his wife's likenes
cut and kissed it, after which he be
Ca'fne very excited, and bit the captain's
thigh. The captain pushed him from
hlin, and s:i id : ''John, for God's sake
don't bite me." The mate then fell
over the boat and sunk immediately.
iAbout 7 P. M. the lad (Edward M".r
piiy.) asked Armstrong to- uakc bin
fast. He did so to hia belt. ' Shortly
afurwards a sea swept, him away, and
then the captain and the survivor,
Armstrong, were washed off. T-he cap
tain cried, " God help my poor wi!V.
and family." and he then sunk. Ann
strong succeeded in regaining the boat,
aud remained on the bottom cf the
craft without the least foou oi'-;;u: Ali
ment cud btjr.g often washed -off by
the heavy easj until 4 A. M. of the
2",d, when the ship Aerolite, of Liver
pool, Captain Allen hove in sight una
rescued him from his dreadful position.
He was much exhausted :' and almcrl
insensible when taken on bear J ths
Aerolite. " -(' ' :
Literary Women. It isacurioun
fact that, while within the present
ccntufy woman have aehisv?! distin
guished success in nearly eVery de
partment of literature, no woman has
ever won a name as a dramatic author
--or, if you pldase, as aa ' author of
dramas. -In the higher Sel;i 'of' sci
ence, history -and philosoph, we have
such names as Mary Somervillc. ILm
riet Martipcaa, and Franois Cobb 3 j i
the upper regfoa's of'roainnce, e-iiaye
such feminine names as George Fund,
Miss Evans, and Charlotta .Bronte--,
not to speak of - Misa Muhlacji end
othera ; : ia .philosophical .pccdlatiou
there-'ia the name of Margaret Fuller:
iu art eritieiam we have tha urwac3- oi
Mrs. Jameson and Mre. S . C'll'aH ; ill
literature of traVsl, Ida-Pfiffer and
MissLott; ana Jri 'grand f'dry ur?
Browning, not to mention thuie
low.. But of. the.Bcores J
dramatists, who do verv,
in some cases ven
Jo,
a

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