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The Tarboro' southerner. [volume] (Tarboro', N.C.) 1867-1873, January 23, 1868, Image 1

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.7
W Southerner.
to n4 Political newspaper
T TnrRSDAY UOItXIM BY
$ & BIGGS f
I
WILLIAM B1GC.S
s is one f ibe oldest ti- l
rth Carolina, anil a
s oi the Uonntrv. arv.l
bp County, its conjun
ct it in Hie interest ol
at Hrge, and they will
, ii a tit renresuutatii'i
.itch it emanates.
prive is Three 'Dollars a
ars tor Six Mouths and must
lABLf IN ABV'ANCK. 'MfllU'V i'lBV
ie sent by mail, at the risk ol the
PRO FESS I OX .4X.
L. J).
ATTORNEY,
I AS npvnvvn Tits OFFICE. HE
now occupies an uince m
ldins ot" Messrs. Shaw Sc. MoCabe, (up
kOn- V .. ill find him
1 14 1 hits .....
V-a- .. . . m. .t . i.... until!
all tit) l
lUl ro-pectfuSly
. bp wtiul
- OOllr
olieitor, that the
would retuf" a
iwii as I'"'.'
:i ve-
yreme courts. Strict
"uana afI-
jbhu 10 cases
m Jini .
1SU7
Attorney an ounsejior at Law,
rocky Mour?J-r. c.
Collect ions made ' jwsnlllc.
ff AVL ; l'KOVIDKl) MYSELF
;iav(iiir ttScUcii : m riiiisri'inetlt with a Ro
ister to viit 1 i t-Lv .Miuiiit wlient'ver the
papers are .ei let: . iLe.toy mviu; ar
tie liie trouble 'i U viiijj h'line I am pre
pnrJ to trai niiie hi iinlrttjtiy
v:'Ji the tuu.o.-t '.tU-h. j; lfc-tl
GILBERT ELLIOTT,
ATTOIIXEY AT LAW,
Office No. 24 West Maia Street,
Norfolk, Ya.
Messrs. lianey. liyiuau Sr Co., Xew York'.
lr. I'. !' t.'ieiae:its. lialtitnort
Me.'V. C V.' t5rSndy- toiis, Xorf.Wk.
Hon. V . A. I ; raham. llillsboro', X. ('.
Hon. V. . X. II. .iiiitli, Murireesboro". X. C.
An-. '-H.
j'.i-ti
mi,
R. F. ROBERTSON,
N C ,
nffie at the KiTseconiiie liouse, wncre
' .
5ja caiibe found on Moa,ti and Tuesday
of each week-.
MaT. ""tf
NOTICE.
Ai E. HICKS, I. U. L, would respect-
fully s;iy
to t.ie l ltizeas or larnoro aim
its vicinir
tlj:i t lie is siguiii in the practice
i'ti-ic
;i
sion ana Kilt in me luiure
as iu tho p-ist euilciivor to dischntge his
duty fiithl'ulty for all those who require
Lis service
Address, Rocky Mount, N. C.
Feb. 3, ISO') 10 tf
:v voai.
dajJcy, uvn & CO.,
eneral Couiinissioa Merchants,
"Vo. 21 ExsVianjo Place,
xj:w YORK.
Jeeptem! cr JJ;h lviT. 32-1 v
T WM. BRA CE & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS,
J9 Chambers amd 5 Reade Streets,
siiiv 5 on tt.
CiPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO
??tiiesa!o of Cotton in this Market, on
.vhtli liberal advances will be made and
T X PA1 L on application to K. Cliapmau.
t-....t
19, n-iy
iich'dJ. Conner. Chas. II. Richardson
JAS. II. McCLUER, of N. C,
xitn
?, J. COXXER cD CO.,
Manufacturers and Dealers iu
Hats, Caps, Furs. Strata ioatln
254 & 2.-G CANAL STREET,
Nearly opposite Esirle's Hotel,
NEW YOItK.
July 8 35-tf
JOHN K. II01T,
of Washington, N. C, with
CHIC HESTER & CO.,
WIIOl.KSALK HE A LB M S IS
Foreign and Domestic Hard
ware, No 10 Barc?y Strrc. near Aston House,
Neyr Voik.
ipgg- All orders promptly utteuded to.-a
eb. 10 11 -tf
p. f. HATCH,
cw York.
I.. i. KSTKS,
Wilmington, N. C.
M. F. NATtJI,
New York.
HATCH, I5STES & CO.,
jGeneral C'onvn!s,oll Merchants,
132 Front street, corner ot l'me
New York.
c
CONSIGNMENTS OF COTTON AND
j Jaai otores soiicuvu.
advances tnau.c niiu iui orders
,romlt'y eiceuted.
Oct. 10-
1 Ttil
44-tf
Tannahiil, WcIlMMie & Co.,
Commission Merchants,
ISO Pearl Street,
Icv York.
strict Personal Attention given to
i'OTTOH'.
EST
KOLL AND GUNNY BAG-
Kopc and lrn I rm shea at
juwi s market i'a.es.
Taxes on Cotton will he paid by our friends
Messrs. D, PeiiflerX' Co!; Alathew Wedili ll.
Esq., Mens. nijh & Williams, Tarhor ,
N. C. J. E. LiiifJsey, KoeUy Mount, N.C.
Messrs. G. II. Jirb'n & Co.. Washington. X
c. -'.y. yy-if
E
1,
1
If V Bj
0
21 li-tf
kCoun-fiyae,
ins,
usft X
J 35 tf
IV DEN
A. T. J3RUCE & CO.,
COTTON FACTORS,
AIS'p
General Commission Mtrchujils,
For the Sale of Cotton and other
Southern Produce.
Ho. 16 PEARL street,
" NEW YORK.
PARTIES Shipping Cotton to ns can be
accommodated with funds to j,av jax
by palling on Mesurs. Browr, i piflDen 0r
ilr. II. p. Teel. Tarboro'. F
.Property corered by Insurance n9 8con
tiW'- CCUS.46.UM
? 1 Jiff fOP Bllir
. V Ax a Bouthern ManV'of Southern Priuoiplef's.r-J"."s Davis.
' '- " ' ' 5. - " . f - - - i - i ; . 4 - n : "
VOLUME XLIV.
NORFOLK.
! NOTICE.
irons' wihte, esq., formerly
j of Warrcnton, N. C, is this day admit
'ted a partner iu our business, the style of the
.firm to be
SEAL JL CO.
FREER NEAL
4l-tf
October 9.
GEO. H. FREER, K. C. JOHN" B. KEAL, S. C.
JNO. WUITE, N. C.
FREER, N i: AL A CO.,
COTTON FACTORS,
AND
General Cemmissiou Merchants,
Norfolk, Va.
Refer to R II Smith. Esq. Seotland Net ;
Hon Z B Vance, Charlotte ; O G Parsley Sc
Co, E Murray & Co, Wilniingtoa ; General
R W llayward, llaleigh; General Wade
Hampton, South Carolina; Colonel John W.
Cunningham, Person cunty; Turner Battle,
Esq, Edirecoinbtt; Exchange National Bank
of Norfolk.- Georife 11. Brown Sc Co, Vaa
tnvwr, OCt. 9. 41-tf
RICKS, HILL & CO.,
COTTON AND
Gen. Commissio7i MercJiants
NORFOLK, VA.
BAGGING ami HOPE furnished pay
able iu Cotton. Liberal advances
made. sep 1 40-tf
JAMES GORDON & CO.,
Com m lasion Merchants,
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA.
ROMTT rEKSONAL ATTENTION
civen to the sale of Produce of every
kind, nud to the purchase of all supplies
for Farmers, Merchauts. and others in the
country. nov 29, 1-tf
tf. W.
Grand;, C. 11. G randy, CW.Grandy.jr
C. M. GRANDY & SONS,
House Established 1845,
FACTORS,
FOR WAR DIN U AND COMMISSION
M E 11 CIIA X T S ,
Mcintosh's Wharf,
NO 11 FOLK, t9.
gOU THE SALE OF COTTON,
EL Grain. Naval Mores and Country Pro
ihu-e generally, and purtUasers itf general
Meri'liandisc.
Sept 15
42-tf
COH AND & HAURISS,
Gfnrral Commission .Merchants,
20 Commerce Street,
NORFOLK, VA.
7 ILL attend promptly to sales of Cot
ton, Grain, Lumber, Tobacco, ra-
val Stores, &c, and p.urchass of Supplies,
and forwarding Cotton and Tobacco to Eu
rope if defcired.
D. G. Cowaxd, Washington Co., N. C.
R. J. Hakriss, Granville, late of Halifax
County, X. C. !inJ? l-3o-fiui
Refers to T. E. Lewis, Tarboio.
J. V, II KKD. AGT..
PRACTICAL 1-IATTEll,
WLoksalo aud Retail Dealer in
Hats, Caps, Straw Goods,
Umbrellas, Canes, &e.,
No. 18 Main Street,
NOHFOHK, V
A.
20-ly
ap. 18.
L. Berkley. W. M. Millar.
J. W. Grandy. Formerly of N. C-
BERKLEY, MILLAR & CO.
AYbolesale Dealers in
1 )i'y Goods & Xotions,
'16 West Main Mtrcet,
Next door to Exchange National Bank
NORFOLK, VA.
mar. 28. 16 ly
ESTABLISHED 1831.
J. 31. FREEMAN,
Watchmaker and Jeweler,
NO. '2J MAIN STREET,
('ornrr of 1 albot Street.
NORFOLK, VA.
ONSTANTLY ON HAND A FULL
J assortment of Watches, Jewelry, Sil
ver ware, sc.
Watches carefully and properly Repair
ed, apr. 4. 18-tf
L. L. BrickhotiM. S. J. Thomas
L, L. BRICKHOCSE & CO.,
'Wholesale aiid Retail dnalers in
ROOTS, SHOES,
Trunks, Valises, Carpet lings &c.,
No. 23 Main Street,
Opposite Taylor, Martin & Co.,
Norfolk, Va.
fiSf Full stock constantly on band at
Lowest Market Prices.
John II. Ferkek, of Moiganton, N. C.
tnnr2S. 16-ly
C F Greenwood. Fred Greenwood.
ESTABLISHED 1847.
C. 7. GREENWOOD & CO.,
"Watchmakers and Jewelers,
DEALERS IN
SINE GOLD AND SILVER ?VATCIIr
es, Hiainoivis, Pearl and other rich
Jewelry, Solid Siier and Plated Ware,
Spectacles, CJocks
AND
Fancy Goods,
No. 27 Main fctroet,
Norfolk, Virginia..
N. B. AVatcbefl and Jewelry repaired by
the most skillful urcrkwcn and warranted.
April 4. 18.07. . 18-ly
S. Wf" SELI)$ER.
3Q Main Street,
NOKIOL.K, VA.
ESTABLISHEP 1354.
Wholesale and Retail
Cldlhier and Merchant Tyor.
fT7"EEPS CONSTANTLY ON HAND
i$L one of the largest and best selected
cks i,t Rp1v liarift 1 lothmar and
. e T1J -f7
gent furnishing goods, ajso a fine assort
nicnf of piece goods, which, he is prepared
to mijke t;p to prder in the Jtj?st and most
fashionable styles, pU M yery rpspept-
fully request. 0, f. WJ
re-
T4lBOftO
NORFOLK.;
JXO. BURGESS & CO.,
Wholesale Grocer, Comml8,loa Mer
chauts, au4 Dealers U
Foreign anj Domestic Liquors,
Cor. Wide Water nd c.niBierol Street
INorfolk, Va.
SPECIAL ATTISItTlON GIVEN TO
consijnruenta and- proonft returns
made. Oct. 44-6ia
SMITH, ELLIOTT A CO.,
Grocers and Commission Merchants,
No. 12 Roanoke Square,
Norfolk, Va.
CONSIGNMENTS OF PRODUCE
and orders for Goods will receive
prompt attention. Bagging and Rope fum
ed. Sept. 12. 40-tJau'6S
W. H. CHEEK. W. E. CAPEHAKT. C. CAPEHAHT.
CHEEK, f APEII ART & CO.,
Grocers and Commission Merchants,
. . So. &S Comm.rce Street,
Norfolk, Va.
A SUPPLY OF PURE Permian
Guano and other Fertilizers, Rope,
Bagging, Groceries and liouors, kept con
stantly on hand.
Sept. $. 40-Otn.
stabliskcd 1851.
KADER BIOGS. , JOS. BIGGS
Kader Biggs & Co.,
Cotton Factors and General Commis
sion Merchants,
Norfolk, Va.
SPECIAL AND ENTIRE ATTEN
t!on to sales of Cotton and all other
kinds of produee; and prompt returns made.
Our long: experience in business gives us
superior advantages in making sales at the
hiVhest market prices.
Cotton Forwarded to Liverpool
Free f Commissions.
Liberal advances made on produce in
Travelling Agents, Maj. Jas. M. Mayo ol
Edgecombe-and Mr. Jas. H. Hancock ot
Wilson, who will be pleased to furnish any
information or facilities to those Shipping to
us.
Revenue taxes on Cotton can bo paid
in all eases when preferred by Shipper ac
cording to recent regulations.
Norfolk. Va. Oct. 31, lStj7.
TAYLOR, MARTIN & CO.,
DEALERS IN
Hardware, Cutlerj'-,
li R IRON AUD STEEL,
WAGON MATERIAL,
IJKLT1NG ANU PACKiNS,
House Furnishing Goods, &c,
Circular Front, corner cf Main street and
Market Square,
Norfolk, Va.
Nails nt Factory Prices, Trace Chains,
Weed. Hilling and Grub Hoes, Horse Col
lars and Haraes, Ases, Saw?, &c., &c.
The trad supplied at Northern prices.
mar. 28. 16-ly
DAVIS & BROTHER
Wholesale dealers in
GROCERIES, LIQUORS,
and Agents for .Carolina Belle 1 Scotch
Snuff, and various grades of
VIRGINIA MANUFACTURED
Tobacco.
KEEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND
a full stock, of Sugar and Coffee,
Flour, Lard, Bacon, Candles, Family aud
Fancy Soaps, Cheese, Butter, Fish, pork,
Salt, Candy, Buckets, Broom, Shot, Pow
der, and many other articles. t complete
the assortment usually found in a ,?tE
t)tts CnIHMVI'V EEoUM".
Any consignment will hate especial at
tion. No. 4 Rowland's Wharf,
Norfolk, Va.
ap. 25, 18G7. 21-ly
Ed. P. Tabb. Ed. M. Moore. Ed. J. Giffith.
J&WARD P. TABB & CO.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
HARDWARE, CUTLERY
AND
FANCY GOODS.
West Side Market Square,
Norfolk, Va.
Sign ol the Anvil.
AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF OLD
Doniinh n Nails, Emery's Cotton Gin,
Boyle & Gambles Circular. Pit and y, cut
Saws Warrentcd. Gum Belting, all sizes.
A large stock always on hand cf Ases,
Spades, Shovels, Forks, Chain Traces.
Hollow Ware, Horse Collars, Rope.
Agents for Fairbanks & Co's Standard
SCALES,
that will weigh a Gold Dollar or a Canal
Boat Loaded,
A large stock of Queens Ware, China
and Glass. Attention of the trade re
spectfully solicited. mar. 28. 16-ly
J0HS MYERS' SONS,
p,ommission Merchants,
' Receiving and Forwarding
A3rENT3;
WASHINGTON, N. C
April 4th, 1867. 18-tf
B. F. HAVENS,
General Commissio?i Merchant
Washington, .1. C-
Strict personal atUnticn will be given to
the receiving and shipping of all kinds of
producjs. iec G 2"
II. WISH ALL & SON,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Groceries & General Merchandise,
Commission 6Y Forwarding Merch
ants,
MAIN STREET,
Washington, N.
Nov 25.
C.
1-ly
U. II. BROWN with
T. M. ROBINSON & CO.,
Genefsl Commission and. Shipping Mer?
cnanis,
WASHINGTON, 297 C.
fiKi'ER TO
Col. D it Carter, Washington.
Judge K J Warren,
Col. Will B Rodman
It Norfleet. Esq-. Tarborough.
Willie Weston, Esq.,
tiont George Howard,
Oct. 31.
i7-tu
EBaECOJlBB COUJSTY, NOKTlI
Tlio r!arloro' Southerner.
THURSDAY,
JAN. 23, im.
treat Doe; Fight.
There is an excellent moral to tfie
following story, which is told wih
great skill. It shows ua bow a whole
country is sometimes torn to pieces bv
fipht between two puppicsj
The most remarkable fight on record
came off at Frogtown, on the frontier
of Maine, 8om6 years ago. It engross
ed the entire community in one indis
criminate melee interminable lawsuit
or suits at law, distraction of the town
aod its downfall or ruin.
A fanciful genius, named Joe Tuck
er, a man about towD, a lounger with
out visible means of supnort. a do-
nothing, loafing, cigarsmoking, good
natured fellow, owned a pretty beast,
always at Joe's heels, and known as
. well as his master, and liked far better
by the Frogtowners. One day, Joe
and his dog were passing Bunion's gro
cery store, when a piebald, ugly-looking
dog, standing alongside a wood wagou,
bounded onto Joe Tucker's dog, knock
ed him heels overhead, and so fright
ened Bob Carter's wife who was pass
ing towards her husband s blacksmith
shop with hia dinner, that she stum
bled, and her old sun bonnet flopped
off, and scared the horse attached to
tho wagon. lie started, hit Lather
um's barber pole, upset the load of
wood, all of which falling down Gum
bo's refreshment cellar, struck one of
Gumbo's children on the head, killing
it for a short time, stone dead, and so
alarmod Mrs. Gumbo, that she let fall
a stew pan of boiliog hot oysters into
her customer's hp who sat waiting
for the savory concoction by a table in
a corner instead of the dish. Mrs.
Gumbo ru&hed for the child, and the
customer for the door. Mrs. Gumbo
screamed, the customer yelled out.
'Oh! oh! oh-oh-oh, my poor child,"
cried Mrs. Gumbo.
"Eh, c-h-e.e e," screamed the poor
child.
' Oh, murder-r-r! Oh, my everlast
ing sir, I'm scalded to all eternity!"
'Murder! murder!" roared tho poor
cu- timer.
Tba horse, a part of the wagon, and
some wood, went on their mad career.
T he owner of the strange dog camo
out of tLo iore just in time to see Joe
Tucker seize a rock to demolish the
savage dog, and not waiting to see
Joe let drive, gave Vim 6ueh a pop cn
the back, that poor Joe fell forty leet
up the street, aud striking a long lad
der upon which Jim Ederby was perch
ed, paint pot iu baud, forty feet above
terra firma, brought ladder, Jim and
paint pot sprawltug ts the earth, crip
pling poor Jim for life, and sprinklins
blue paint over the broad-clotlip, satin
ets aud calicoes of Abraham Miller, a
formal and even-tempered Quaker, who
ran out or the door, just ts the two
dogs had got fairly at it, hip and thigh
uip and catch. A glanee at thioiis
seem' d to convince Abra"! m cf the true
state of the case, and, in an unusually
elevated tone of voice, Abraham called
o'it to Joe Tucker, who had righted up:
Joseph lueker, thy
doir's a firht'
in-!"
"L.et eia fight it out," yelled the
pugnacious owner ot tne strange dog.
Let 'em fisht it out. I'll bet a lor of
wood my dog can beat any dog in town,
and I can beat the owner.
We have said Abraham Miller was
a quiet man: Quakers are proverbially
so. But the guantlet thrown down by
the stranger from tho country, stirred
the gall of Abraham; he rushed into
the store, and from the back yard, hav
ing slipped his collar, Abraham brought
orth a brindle cur, strong, low and
powerful.
"Friend," 6aid the excited Quaker,
'thy dog?halJ be woil beaten, 1 prom-
. rt a i m
lse tuee. llv&e, seize turn;
"Turk, here boy!" and the dogs went
at it.
Bob Carter, the smith, coming up in
time to hear ths stranger's defiance to
the town, and bent on a fight with
somebody for the damages to his wife.
clamped the collar of the stranger, ana
by a series of ten-pounders upon the
lace, back and sides ot his bully antag
onist, with his natural sledge hammers.
Bob stirred up the strength and ire of
the bully stranger to tne top ot his
compass, and they made sparks fly
dreadfully.
Joe lueker s dog, reintorced by
Abraham! Miller's, took a fresh start,
and between the two, the strange dog
was being cruelly put to his stumps.
Deacon Fugh, one of the most piou3
aud substantial men in Frogtown, came
up, aud indeed tbo whole town was as
sembling.land Deacon Fugh, armed with
a heavy walking stick, and snocKea at
the spectacle before him, marched up
to the docs, exclaiming, ns he uiu so:
"Fie, fie, for shame! disgracelul: you
mean citizens of Frogtown, will you
stand by and
"Don t thee, don t thee Btnke my
dog, Deacon Fugh," cried Abraham
Miller, advancing toward the Deacon,
who was about to cut right and left
with his cane.
"Your dogs!" shouted the Deacon
with evident fervor
"Net my dogs, Deacon Pugh," said
the Quaker.
"What did you say so for then?"
said ihe Deacon.
never said they were my dog3,
Deacon Fugh."
""You did!" yelled the Deacon.
f'Deaoon Pugh, thee speaks ground
lessly," said the Quaker.
"You tal a falsehood, Abraham
Miller."
"Thae utters a mendacious asser
tion," reiterated Abraham.
"You you tell a lie!" 6houted the
Deacon .
?'Tlou hast provoked my eyil pas
sion, deacon Pugh," shouted the fetal-
Tjrart Quaker, "and I will chastise thee.
And into the Deacon's hair wen th
CAROLINA, TIIUKSDAY, JANUArff
Quiker.
. The Daeon, nothing loth, entered
into the fight, and we leave thm to
nip and tuck," to look to the stranger
ad Bob Carter, who fought and St, and
fit and fought. otil Squire Catchcni
and the constable came up, and in the
attempt to preserve the peace and ar
rest the offenders, tbo bquiro was thrust
through the window of a neighboring
wtchmaker, doing a heap of damago,
while lawyer Hooker, in attempting to
aid the constable, waa hit in mistake
by the furious blacksmith, in the ribs
and went reeling down Gumbo's cellar
with frightful velocity.
The friends and fellow-churchmen
of Deacon Pugh took sides against the
Quaker antagonist, and then the shop-
bojB or Abraham, seeing their employ
er "thus beset, came to the rescue; while
two ItjSLshmen, full of fun and frolic,
believing it to be a 'free fight' tried
taeir nands and sticks upon the com
batant so indiscriminately, so in less
man nait an nour, the happy village ot
Frogtown was shaken from its proprie
ty by one grand, sublimely ridiculous
nd most terrihc battle.
Heads and windows were smashed:
children and women screamed; dogs
barked; and so furious, mad aud excit
ed became the whole commuuity, that
a quiet looker-on, if there nad been
any, would have declared that the evil
ones were all in Frojrtown.
A heavy thunder-storm finally put
an eud to the row, the dogs were more
or less killed, a child severely wounded,
a man scalded, wagon breke, the horse
ran himself to death, his owner badly
beaten by Bob Carter, whose wife and
the wives of many others were danger
ously scared, the painter was crippled,
dry goods ruined, a Quaker and a Dea
con, two Irishmen, lawyer Hooker,
Sqnire Catchem, and souse fifty others,
shamefully whipped. Lawsuits ensued,
feuds followed, aud the entire peace
and good repute of Frogtown annihila
ted all by a rcmardable dog fight.
Eeruty.
There is a potent aud subtile in
fluence in mere physical beauty v. hidi
philosophers have puzzled themselves
in vain to account for Why is it that
greater homage h always paid in socie
ty to the posesor cf a haudsonie face
than to ladies of far greater culture,
wealth or refinement, who are posses
sed of features of'but ordinary mould?
Why will cien listen with more pica-
sure and attention to common-place
aud empty gossip from beautiful lips
than to the nuest fcuse and wit from
plain en s ?
Feminine beauty has played a great
part in the history ef the world.
From the handsome dames of antiqui
ty who intoxicated the souls of great
men like Darid, Pericles, Crosar and
Mark Anthony, to the wonderful in
fluences of many medtra beauties in- j
politics and state-cral't, there has been,
for the possessor of beauty, a constant
succession cf triumphs. The history
of ceuturies (or what passes for such)
hangs by the Trojan war, and the
Trojan war hangs by a Quarrel about
a woman. What a sad baggage Gre
cian Helen must have been to have
suffered s much noble blood to be
spilt abut her pretty face! Yet there
is nothisg that men will so quickly
fight fur as the possession or reputa
tion of a woman. Even they who aff
ect to despise and ridicule the vauties
of the world are as sensitive to the
potent charm of beauty as other men.
The devotees of the saintly calling
which the church imposes upon its
ministers are often fouud among the
most vulnerable to tender passion.
One need not read Lewis' story "The
Monk," or Hawthorn's "Searlot Let ter,"
or the coarser delineations of the
weakness of priests in Baceaceio, to
learn that the church yields no anti
dote against the irresistible tempta
tions of beauty. The ltev. Bellamy
Stoker has been seen in almost every
pariah, aud the beautiful Myrtle Haz
ards needs some other guardian angei
than clerical functionaries against the
wiles of the adversary.
Some people think that the passion
for beauty is a boy's ',vhim, ani would
have us believe that old philosophical
fellows, with a proper kuowledge of
the world, know how to estimate the
pretty races at their real value; which,
in their arithmetic, is .represented by
a cipher, Even Thackeray, the genial
but sometimes misanthropic old hu
mtrist, h s written a ballard on "The
pge of Wisdom," that begins thus:
'i'h'c pretty pnge, with the dimpled chain
That hus never known tho barber's shear,
All you wiah is woman to win,
This is the way that boys begin
Wfvl till you come to forty year.
'Thc reddest lips that ever have kissel;
The brightest eyes thj.t ever have shone,
May p'y and whiiper and we not libt
Or look away and never be missed,
Ere yet over a month is gone.''
Yet daily experience shows us that
men in middle age, and even frosty
cid fellows turned of sixty, are often
times the maddest of all the insane
worshippers at the shrine of beauty.
A hundred times a day a man may be
ealled a fool, and may even c. 11 him
self so; yet he is as incapable of resis
ting the iuyiucible attraction that leads
him to play the fool with his time, or
his intellect or his fortune, or his pro
spects in lite, as if he were a helpk-sa
atom in the sweeping grasp of fate.
A poor compliment, uny pay to
beauty who undertake to timuiuta its
charms by the counterfeit help of art.
Yet the world is fell of sham beauties,
who shine only by the borrowed aid of
rouge, enamel, gas light and fine clo
thes. Instead of the genuine cheek pf
woman, so finely depicted in "TwJieh
Night"
.sri beauty t-aiy blent, wnose rd and
white
Kature's own sweat and cunning banil
laid on." j
Yon shall find a host of reputed fair
women in balls and assemblies, whose
beauty ia not even skin-ep, and to
23, 1868
t from .beincr a iov forever, is a thing
f puffs, powers, horse hair and cosme
tics, lhink of the mianrv cf the ncfor
sWoney mad enough to marry such a
ifcouster, aud never discover his mis
take till too late! We do not wonder
at the occasional suicides of mistaken
soula that dreamed of heaven and
found themselves condemned for life
to such a purgatory. "This also is
vanity."
The poets are full of eulogies unou
beauty, and it is but just to say that
there is quite as much truth as poetry
of them. Tho man must be both
churlish and foolish, who cannot Bee,
in the glowing tributes inspired by
the beauty of a pure and lovely woman,
something more than froth and "en
tusimusv." What can be nd
more 'spiritual than this eulogy
good Vt. jjonne:
' "Her pure and eloquent blcod spok in
her cheeks, and so distinctly wrought,
that one might almost say her body
thought,"
And the splendid epitaph of Ben Johnson:
Underneath thi stone doth lie ;
As much beauty as could die."
Is not mere hyperbole.
The philosophic Emerson tells us, in
his essay on "Manners," that "a beau
tiful form is better than a beautiful
face a beautiful behavior is better than
a beautiful form; it gives a higher
pleasure than statues or pictures; it is
the fiucst of all the fine arts." Proba
bly there are few reflecting persons but
will agree to this discrimination; yet
the multitude will reject it unhesitat
inly, and even those the most convin
ced of its truth will sometimes forsake
the charm of fine manners, inspiring
conversation, and perfect grace, to
gaae upon a face that is strikingly
pretty, and as strikingly empty.
For the finest and most beautiful
tribute to beauty anywhere to be
found we must still go tj Shakespeare:
"For where isany author in the world
Ter.ches such beauty as a woman's eye?
Front women's vyes this doctrine I derive:
They !-pn:kl sin! the li.ht Foniothean fire;
Tucy aret'r.e tool-;, the acts, the a'-a
r.ies Xha. r-how,t';oiitali:s an 1 noi'rifh f.L
"EarL l'wala' Blsfsursvlh ca tVomas.
At a banquet of the Newspaper Cur
respondents' Club, given at Washing
ton, Saturday night; " Mark Twain,"
the humorous lecturer, responded as
follows to a sentiment to woman :
Mr. President : " I do not know
why I should have been singled out to
receive the greatest distinction of the
evening for so the ofSco of replying
to the toast to woman has been regard
ed in evory age. Applause I do
not know, why I have received this
distinction, unless it be that I am a
trifle less homely than the other mem
bers cf the Club. But be this as it
may, Mr. President, I am proud of the
position, and you could not have chosen
any one who would hsve accepted it
more gladly or labored with a heartier
good will to do the subject justice,
than I. Because, sir, I love the sex.
Laughter. I love all the women, sir
irrespective of ago or color. Laugh
ter.' Human intelligence cannot estimate
what we owe to woman, sir. She sews
on our buttons, laughter, she meuds
our clothes, laughter, she ropes us
iu at the church fairs she confides in
us ; she tolls usjwhatever she cap find
out about the little private affairs of
the neighbors she gives us good ad
vice and plenty of it she gives us a
peice of her mind, sometimes and
sometimes all of it she soothes our
aching brows she bears our ehildren
ours as a general thing. In all the re
lations of life, sir, it is but just and a
graceful tribute to woman to say of
her that she is a brick. Great laugh
ter. Wheresoever you place woman, sir
in whatsoever position or estate she
is an ornament to that place she occu
pies, and a treasure to the world.
Here Mr. Twain paused, looked in
quiringly at his hearers and remarked
that the applause should come in at
this point. It came m. Mr. Twain
resumed his eulogy. Look at the no
ble names of history ! Look aV,Cle
opatra ! look .at Dcsdemona! look
at Florence Nightingale! look at Joan
of Arc ! look at Lucretia Borgia !
Disapprobation expressed. "Well,
said Mr. Twain scratching his head
doubtfully, " supposa we let Lucretia
slide Look at Joyce Ileth 1 look at
Mother Eve ! Cries of "Oh!" "Oh !"
You need not look at her unless you
want to; but, said Mr. Twain reflec
tively after a pause, Eve was orna
mental. Sir particularly before the
fashions changed ! I repeat sir, look
at the illustrious names of history!
Look at the Widow Machree ! look at
Lucy Stone look at Elizabeth Cady
Stanton! look at George Franois
Train 1 TGreat laushter.i And. sir:
I say it with a bowed head and deepest
veneration, look at tra Metier of
Washington ! she raised a boy that
could notlie-coMcZnorZie Vpplause.
But he never had any eance- Oh!
Oh ! It might hre been different
with him if he bd" belonged to a news-
nnrvnr nnfvacnnnflftnt.'a olub. rLaUsh-
ter. groans, hisses, cries o
out.'' Mark looked ui
I " 1 ' . v-vi,.f'-- .
rut him
.1 placidly
upen his
sua.edT
excited au
r.
ugu re-
T
repeat, sir. t.s a -!
:.evc:
po
or -e
to
has
Eli ion you r.lno.: a 'vonaii --namt-nt
to 'society, ';,; '- ;
n.n.i,i. As a sweoaieaii.
few esaala and no superiors Iaugh
terj as a cousiu she is convenient; as
-wealthy grandmother, with an incur
able distamper, she is precious; as a
wet nurse she has no equal among
men! TLaushter.
What, sir, would the people of the
earth be without woman ?
They would be scarce, sir almighty
scarce ! Then let us cherish her, let
us protect her, iet us give her our sup
port, our encouragement, our sympa-
,
'
NUMBER 8.
thy, ourselves, if we. get a
ft .Qilrrhfpr 1
chanos.
rt,?t wtino- aside. Mr. President,
woman is loveable, am;,
heart, beautiful-worthy f aH I
t n M(Mm nf all defference. JNot 1
--"v j a '
kind of
ui an caiuwu., - .... , I,. 1
any nere wuiiv . ----- -
1 : 1 1 MAttiaA tA 11 r 1 11 ik. 11121 uciftiku 1 m .
K ner ueuim
right cordially in uus
for each and every one of us has per
sonally known, and loved, and hnor
ed, the verv best one of them all his
1- hc ror. 1
own mother. I Applause. j
1 Beit Strange Case.
fFrom the La Crosse Democrat.
k 1 . a. -! 4-n.a via frnm
correspondent wr.-
terloo, Iowa asking if we know ot one
Udgar Uurnbam, and ot nis nwy.
m o uu. Ana as ip is a ewaubv, -.
one, known to hundreds, we give it iu
tho Democrat as it is, that we may cor-
rccv?ome errors tboiso who .1 sRcafc 01
him hare ku into. Eight jea
"au???CX y
!r . at?iUWauK
cu iu laisotato an eaitar namea row-
ell M.M..rf.4-:(i.m.:-MM.
. - . ' 7 ' O l 1
we think, lie is, unless he has quit
it lately.
In 18G2 Powell was married to a
Miss Ellep Burnham, of Broadhead,
Wisconsin, after a courtship of some ,
- -. - u J LI.Il W1LII A I Hi it . 1 u IiaUlft I
months. Miss Burnham sparents were
old residents of Broadhead, and of high
respectability. The daughter taught
music, had a large number of pupils
and wa3 very attractive. Powell lived
with her as a husband two years, ehe
being all that time a good wife in all
respects, presenting him with but one
child. At the expiration of two years,
when about twenty-one years of age,
Mrs. Powell's voice changed, she grew
light whiskers, and gradually changed
her sex, developing into a man, in all
respects as if nature, anxious for a
freak, bad turned a portion of herself
wrongsiae out
The husband and wife separated
when the wife became a man, and Mrs
Ellen Powell took the name cf Edgar
Burnham donned male attire, soug
ht
and obta'ned employment as a clerk in
Chicago; aud lived a single yonng man
for one year.
During this time he fell in love with
a neiee cf Senator Morgan, of New
York, but did not marry her for reasons
not pertinent to thi3 article. But
about the end of the year he did marry
a young lady of Broadhead, u is.,
Mi?s Oeria .t-verett who was a music
pupil of his when he was a Miss Ellen
Burnham, over three years previous to
the marriage. This second marriage
was about two years ago. Soon after
this marriage "EJgar" Burnham and
wife removed to Waterloo, Iowa, where
they now reside or did not long since.
The former girl is now a man, the
former wife is now a husband, the for
mer mother is now a father, the former
young lady teacher of a young lady is
now that' ycuug lady's husband! j
Truth is indeed stranger than fiction,
and the above simple statement of facts
borders so upon the marvellous we
could not believe it did we not person
ally know nearly all tho parties.
A.nv one can be convincod, by writ
ing to the parties in either of the places
we have named, of the full and entire
tiu h of this most wonderful transform
ation, which puzzles not only the med
ical but the entire scientific world, and
which fact appears now for the first
time ia print though the particulars
have long been kuown to us and to
many other newspaper men and promi
nent citizens of this State, as to nearly
all the citizens of Broadhead, where
the parties so long resided.
The following is not by any means
the worst story which we have heard
for a week ;
Shan 1 liiTE J1E.' There was
a fellow in a certain neighborhood in
Arkansas, who was strongly suspected
of sheepstealing. There were a good
many cases of the mysterious uisap
pearance of choice mutton from the
flocks of the planters which wore traced
to his door ; but being a very wild
and ingenious chap, he generally suc
ceeded in proving an alibi, or some
other defense, which reduced the charge
to a mere suspicion. At last, howver
a planter riding through tho woods
perceived the suspected sheep thief
stealing from the woods, and, after
looking around to see that no one was
near, walked up to a lock of sheep
aud deliberately knocked over the lar
gest and fattest. At this moment the
planter rode up and confronting the
thiet, exclaimed :
'Now, sir, I have got you! Yc
can't get off, you are caught in te
act!'
'What act V indignantly icuiffid
the thief.
' Sheep stealin,' was the confident
reply.
' Sir, you had better mind bow you
charga a respeptable Aiceriian citizen
with such crime as sheep-stealing!' re
plied the gentleman with tho penchant
for mutton.
Now, will you deny that I saw you
kill that sheep V
'No, sir,' was the prompt answer, 'I
did kill him, and I'd do it again. I'll
kill anybody 's sheep that bites me as 1
go peaceably along the road !"
"Betsey, ray dear," said Stubbs.
giving his wife a damaged pair of un-
:itionables. '-nave the eoodnrsn t.n
Mead these trowsers; it will be asgooc
us going to the play to-morrow night.'
d
Mrs. S. took her needle but oonfossinc
she could not sea the point, remarked,
'How so?' 'Why, my dear, you will
see the wonderful Ravels in the panto-mine.'
Mrs. S. finished the job and
handing back the unmentionables, said
to S. 'that's darned good.
. m 1
" Nigger, who am de fuss man dat
introduced salt perwishuns into the
navy ?" " Dar, now, you's too hard
for this colored individual." "It was
Noah, nigger, wheo he took Ham 00
boayd hia ark."
The Tarboro' Sntncrncrt
A Medium for Easiness Communication
Treaenting facilities aud inducements un-
surpassed by reason of ft location id the"
finest Agricultural spefioh bl theSoutb, Ths
oombernee will insert avt:rii-,!euieiits rep-:
rcacimng business or reapectaoiUtJ. onra
ter and standing, ui the following' 'rates for
any epecihed time not less than ef montu
One square one ycar, .'. . . $li 00
: Une-Fourth Column one vear,. i ; .. . : 50 00
une-Half Column yo 00
One Column one year......".. 130 00,
transient advertisements are charged
One Dollar per square of one inch for tli
nrst, and &eVenty-f'ive cants for each suK
sequent 'insertion
The Liar.
"The wretch that has often deceived.''
Though truth he speaks is ne'er believed."
what a man could gain by uttorin5
iUwIiJoa., ' ha ' ipSIf "Xot to f4
,. , ', , .. ... . , i
ii ueu nnsioiie was once asiteu,
oieuuuu wuen ne sup 1 ten tne truta
m, , , ,.., . .1 it'"
xhe character ot a liar w at once Q
hateful and contemn'tibla. that from
the violation of truth they should h
r- 1 - ' . 1
restrained by their pride." "Alini;
every "other vice that disgraces huniarj
nature may be kept in countenance
by applause and association. Th
ard, and only the liar, ia inyariapjj
and universally despised, aDanqon
and disowned; he baa no domestic coQ:
solafcions whi4 h tQ t-
cen8Ure of mankind; he cap retio ' to
rraternitv where . his Crimea mav
. . . of tirtueB. ft
. of the 1.
ritude Without friend and without
3 pccuH
ton of falsehoad. to'be equally de?
and bra'd: "The
: c- tk.. Ti.-r.'
devils," says Sir Ihomas Brown,
do not tell lies of one another: for.
truth fis necessary to all flooiefcies,' por
can the society of hell 'subsist without
it.'?
The late Archduke Mazimil:
ian. The New York correspondent
of the Waterford Mail mentions' 'the
following curious rumor. 'The letter
is dated Dec. 6: "Admiral Aflgetvon;,
of the Austrain navy, is now cnroiiie)
for home, with what ho believe to bo
the body, of the unlortuoato Ilaxi:
milian. My connection with the Mexl
ean agents in this country forbids my
entering into minut'ue, but I can as
sert that the remains which will be
honored by Austria are not those of
the ill fated scicp of the $Plwe of
Hapsburg, but of Hanwrp, a noted,
bandit and guerilla, who in life WW pot
unlike poor Maximilian. The latter ia
pining in an obscure dungeon in
Queretara, fed wih felon's food, anJ
awaiting the welcome arrival of death.
The night before his supposed exeptt
tion, Juarez, uncertain of hjsown bhi
cess in seeking the Presidency, and
perhaps unwilling to imbrue his hands
in royal Wood, had the noble captive
conveyed by stealth to a secret den,
and substituted in his stead the ruffiaj
Hamerp, hoping, had he not succeed
ed in his political aspirations, to have
made a fortune by delivering him eafor
ly to Austria.
A Horrible FRAUD.-r-The St.
Louis correspondent cf the Cincinnati
Enquirer says :
I here is uo telling the ways that
1 f a
men, greedy lor gain, win not avail
themselves of to advance their fortunes,
especially during and since the war, is
men have been found willing and anx
ious to sell soul and conscience for p.
little filthy lucre. A few days, sicca
an accident occcurrca which very forr
cibly illustrates this. An Irishman
was employed to dig up and remoye
some of the bodies of Uuion foldiers iu
the Wesleyan Cemetery of this city.
In liftiug tho cofhus lie thought they
seemed unusually hollow in their aouu'l
and opening some of them fund that
no bodies bad ever been placed in them
at all, nothing hut planks or square
blocks of wood. The mystery to the
loosest Hibernian was great, but when
it was told him that Union soldiers
were buried by .contract, the underta
ker receiving so much per eoH)Q, and
that the bodies could be sold at a hand
some profit to some medical college
the doubt was at once jrjmover1,
and the avenue to a large fortune im
mediately disclosed. This was only
one of tho ways that the war made mta
rich.
Here is the best and most sober
thing that " Brick" Fomeroy ever said.
We find it in a Latter written to tho
Southern Opinion :
"We are fighting Republicanism lit
the North ; wo ask you of the South
to keep still to sudure but not en
dorse tho power tfcat would murder
you and rob us. haws W Demo
crats as people no Juitter words for
the past. W c are working for the
fnturc, as our forefathers did. We
ask you to raise corn tusteai of cotton.
We ask you to endure, to live poor, to
support your families, to honor your
dead, to obey such laws as are in force,
till the coming sense of the land wilj
do away illegal ones apd make better
3nea.
We ask you to raise for consump
tion more than for export. If you,
send nothing to New England ejfeept
negro paupers she will soon let yo
alone. I would, if I bad the power,
blast your cotton crop fbr the next
five years, till the hum of the cotton
mills of New England had stilled, and
till her voice wbs one of supplication
for fibre to make her machinery profit?
able.
Posing a Pedagogue.
" Sally
l ones, have yon dona that sum 1 set
you?" "No thir, I can't do it."-,
"Can't do it ? I'm ashamed of you.
Why, at your age I could do any sum
that was set mo. I hats that word
cau't ! for thero is no sum that can't
be done, I tall you." " I thick, thir
that I know a thuni you can't thier
out." " Ha!! well Sally, let's hear it."
" It ith thith thir :-If one apple
cauthed tho ruin of the whole human
rath, how many thntch will it take to
make a barrel of thidcr, thir 1"
" Miss Sally Jones, you may return to
your parsing lesson." Yeth thir."
-' SJ 1
Breathes there a man with 60ul so
dead, who never to himself hath said,
I will my county paper take. both for
my own and family's sake f If such
there be, let him repent, and have the
paper to him sent; and if he woujd,
pats a happy winter, he ia advance
should pay the printer.

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