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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, October 02, 1911, LAST EDITION, Image 14

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THE WASHINGTON TIMES, MONDAT, OCTOBEE .2 1911.
u
SOCIETY EAGER TO
MORE ABOUT
BARB INCIDENT
Interested in Transforming
of Grecian Temple
. Into Garage.
MRS. HEMMICK MAY
RELATE THE STORY
Talk About the Und raped Statue Is
Revived Police Unable to
Interfere Now.
Natalie Clifford Barney, eldest daugh
ter of Mrs. Alice Clifford Barney
Hemmlck of Studio House, Shtrldau
Circle, is airaln in the limelight.
When her mother reaches "Washing
ton next Thursday from Paris, a great
many fclks cf wealth and culture will
be waiting to hear the family version
of how Allrs Barney has turned a
charmingly esthetic Greek temple dedi
cated to Love. Into a garage for her
automobile.
Mrs Barnoy Hemmlck and her hiibband
who is thhtv vcars her Junior,, landed
In ICew York yesterday. They had been
abroad since their wedding in Paris
this spring.
Coincident with their anival came
cablecrams from Paris, detailing the
candalizing of the little band of
esthetes who had grown up around
Miss Nntalle'3 garden in the Rue
Jacob. Paris, lv what thev call the
"de&ecration of the temple" which
stands therein.
Did She Pose For it?
Pincc Mrs. Barney Hemmlck left
"Washington many months ago, and
Chief of Polite Silvester discoveicd
upon her lawn the urdraprt figure of a
woman. Mi's Natalie Barney has been
, person of considerable interest, for
folks at first declared that she h.id
posed for the statue. When this wan
found to be wrong, however, and the
btatue. it was declared is to be de
stroyed, the ritory of the "desecration
of the templJ" was flashed across the
wlrwi. , .
Today. It Is said, that the police, who
Jn the spring ordered the statue diaped,
or removed, now find that if Mrs.
Barnev should not destroy it and in
sists on having the figure on her lawn,
they nie powerless undi-r th-ir regu
lations to fores her to drape it.
Major Sylvester, when he ordered the
statue taken from the iawn of Studio
House last spring, did so under the
regulations which gives Mm power ;o
ctnEor posters, books, and phomgr.iph-..
But a rareful search thi nvming h:is
resulted In finding no word In th regu
lations concerning statues In the nude.
Disposition Of The Statue.
So. with only the protection afforded
by a concrete wall which has recently
been buildcd about the Barney Studio
House, it lr thought quite likely that
Mrs. AHr Cliflord Barney Hemmlck
will leave the statue where It now is
And Just whllo circles of wealth and
culturo In Washington, to whi-"h SIr.s.
Barney-Hemmick belongs, were gett.ng
all ready to forget atout the statuo.
oer from Pails, where Mrs. Barney
Hemmick has iisen to promlnenc dur
ing the past year through her wealth,
patrcnage of the ails, and of See of
high pries'ess of the Bahalst faith,
comes the btory concerning the use to
which Miss Natalie put a Grecian tem
ple of love
Miss Natallo Barney purchased an
old estate at 2r Rue Jacob, sav dis
patches. In the old garden whei Ra
cine wrotp his famous plays, under the
ehade of century-old trees, stood thi
little Grecian temple. It was a replica,
built at the wish of Adrlenne Lecc.v
reur, to commemorate her love for Mar
shal Saxe, the he-o of the battle of
Fontenr.y.
According to dispatches. Miss Bar
ney's acquisition of the temple In the
Rue Jacob was hailed with dclignt by
the esthetes, poets, and literati, who
balled her as their queen of csthetlclsni.
and regarded the little temple of lovo
its lltUo les3 than an esthetic holy of
holies
And so It was there that Delvoir and
Mori-no of t:ie Comcdle Froncalse;
Pacha Guitri, tho actor; Isadora Dun
can, the danoT; Marcel Prcvoac, tho
novelist, and Dthsrj of the elect gath
ttvU to :omnvinc among themselves.
Esthetic Natures Shocked.
And when, coming to their place of
communion on a most esthetic evening,
they heard the hoarse explosion of a
big limousine instead of the tinklo of
a temple bell, ind were smitten by
fumes tjf nauseating napntha Instead of
the fragrance of frankincense, the one
time loiterers in the elyslum Melds of
the Ru Jacob wera properly horrified.
To the shrieks of "profanation" and
"vandalism," which Issued from the
esthetic throats of the elect. Miss Natalie
calmly turned, it Is said, and threw
their artistic prate back at them thus-
"I placed my car in the temple be
cause there was no plants else to put it.
I do it In th-i same spirit which led
Napoleon to -stabla his mounts in Hip
monastery at Milan, where, abovo them,
hung the fresco of Da Vinci'a "Last
Supper.' "
This Is Anniversary
Of Andre's Execution
Today is also the anniversary of
the birth, in 1452. of King Richard
HI. of England.
On October 2, 1710. the conquest of
Port Royal was completed by British
and Colonial forces.
In recent history today Is memor
able as the anniversary of the death.
In 1897, of Neal Dow. known as "tho
father of prohibition." Three years
ago today the battleship fleet, on It
tour around the world, arrived at
Manila.
'faded lfouMe0!
IT FOUNTAIN HOTELS. OR CL8EWHERK
Get the
Original ad Genuine
HORUGK'S
MALTED MILK
"Others Arc imitations"
Tfas Pood Drink for All Ages
SUCH MILK, MALT GRAIN EX.
TIIACT, IN POWDEU
Not in Any Milk Trust
?-.Rs!.t 6R "HORUCK'S"
HEAR
KANSAS LIKES TAFT, BUT CANT
FORGIVE TARIFF MISTAKES
Opinions Differ as to Probable Effect of Chief Executive's Visit to Sunflower State.
Gets Hearty Greeting From All Factions, With Insurgent Governor
4 Stubbs, Friendliest of All.
The Chicago Tribune, In an endeavor
to analyze the Impression that Presl-1
dent Taft Is making on the communities
he visits, and In which he speaks, has
detailed a special correspondent to fol
low In the wake of Mr. Taft's speech
making tour and Interview representa
tives of various classes as to the ef
fect on the public mind of his presence
and utterances. It Is the aim that
these dispatches shall be absolutely un
biased, and thev are prepared from and
based upon indiscriminate Interviews.
The Times leproduces the dispatch
from Hutchinson, Kan.
HUTCHINSON. Kan.. Sept. 27. Ad
miration for the personality of the
man but dissatisfaction with his poli
cies as Chief Magistrate of the Nation
sum up the attitudo of tho people of
this section of Kansas toward Presi
dent Taft.
Republican Insurgency Is rampant In
Kansas, and here, a little to the south
of the exact center of the State, this
rebellion against the old guard of party
politics is one of the first Impressions
made upon the mind of the stranger.
Nowhere is tho old guard of Republican
reactionaries in Congress hated more
sirlcerely and comprehensively than in
Kansas. Nowhere is the Payne-AIdrlch
tariff bill denounced more bitterly than
in Kansas. Nowhere is there greater
interest than In Kansas In the progres- !
sivo policies of conservation and trust
and railroad regulation made famous !
by Colonel Roosevelt than In Kansas. I
In addition to all this, Canadian
reciprocity met no opposition in tho j
whole country that was more vehement
than that of the great mass of Kansas I
farmers. In this vicinity the wheat !
raisers were greatly alarmed by the !
prospect of free trade with Canada and
were correspondingly gratified when
the agreement failed of approval.
The fact that the price of wheat roso
5 cents a bushel Immediately follow
ing the rejection of the agreement by
Canada convinced the farmers of this
section they wero Justified in the fears
they had entertained.
In so far as Pi evident Taft's actions
hao clashed with these opinions he apparently-
has suffered in tho estimation
of tho Republltans of this city and Its
tributary country. The majority of the
Republicans with whom the Trlbuno
correspondent talked today cited one
ir more objections to Taft policies.
Some criticised the President for sign
ing and defending the Payne-Aldilch
hill. Seme thought he ought to havo
hlgned the wool and cotton bills,
particularly because he had denounced
the wool schedule as "Indefensible."
while others complained of Mr. Taffs
toleration of Aldrlch and Cannon.
Defenders Numerous.
On the other hand defenders of the
President are numerous In this city
which in the main believed in tho
Canadian commercial treaty. These
constitute an Influential element of the
population and arc of the opinion that
the next year will show a tremendous
gain In sentiment favorable to Mr.
Taft.
They express the belief that before
election day rolls around the opposition
engendered by the reciprocity bill will
hae died away. Then, If Mr. Taft is
able to obtain from Congress a revision
of protective duties downward. In ac
cordance with the facts furnished by
the tariff board, it is believed his re
election will be assured.
The President undoubtedly made
friends during his stav In the city.
The regular Republicans declare em
phatically l.e made not only friends,
but thousands of votes In this section
of thf State bv his appearance before
the people here.
The progressives denv this quite as
emphatically, saying Mr Taft chang
ed no opinions regarding the big
questions of his Administration. Con
servatives and radicals seem to agree,
however, that the Presdlent pleased tho
people Immensely by his democratic de
meanor and infectious good humor.
Here, as elsewhere, there is a large
percentage of. progressive Republicans
who ar they do not wish to pass final
ludgmeht on the President at this time,
but believe ho Is (entitled to the oppor
tunity which will be afforded him dur
ing ihe next session of Congress- On
the whole, therefore. It would seem that
he advanced his cause by his presence
in Hutchinson.
The Tribune correspondents talked to
day with scores of residents of Hutch
inson and vicinity. Without previous
knowledge of the identity or opinions
of the persons approached he button
holed men in the streets, entered banks
and stores, hotels and restaurants, and
asked questions of proprietors and em
ploves Indiscriminately.
Of those Interviewed there was a
small minority of Democrats. Of the
Republicans the majority were progres
sives and inclined to oppose the Tart
policies in varying degrees.
The most noticeable aspect of the
opinions expressed by the progressives
was the serious discussion of La Fol
lette as a Republican candidate for the
Presidency. Elsewhere in the wake of
Monarch Touch
"NO THREE O'CLOCK FATIGUE"
Owing to the fact that it is so much easier to operate than any
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$3oOO Beat a'
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For One Month
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tho Taft party the Tribune correspond
ent has noticed a tendency on the part
of Republican progressives to regard
the La Folletto candidacy as a forlorn
hope. Not so here, whore the progres
sives refuse to concede the renomlna
tlon of Taft and earnestly urge the
selection of the Wisconsin Senator as
the candidate most available for de
feating the Democrats next year.
According to these progressives the
Republicans arc In grave danger of los
ing Kansas. They tay Woodrow Wilson
eaMIy could carry the State against
Taft because most of the progressives
would vote for him. They believe even
Harmon or Champ Clark would come
close to capturing the State if Taft
were the opponent. But La Follette
they contend, would hold progressive
Kansas against any candidate the
Democrats could put up.
The regular Republicans assert in
surgency is largely local and that not
enough Republicans could be Induced to
desert Taft to endanger tho national
ticket In the State. At the same time
intimations from standpat leaders that
the old-line Republicans wouid not voto
for La Follette are not lacking, although
all the regulars Interviewed today wero
scrupulous to say they would support
the nomlneo whoever he might be.
Certain It Is, however, that the pro
gressive movement is strong and stead
ily growing in Kansas. Its foremost
leader Is Senator Bristow, who has a
majority of the State's Congressional
delegation assisting him In the fight on
the "old guard." He was here yester
day and was prominent In the cordial
reception given the President, but he Is
unalterably opposed to the Taft policies
and all of the Influence exerted by him
self and his friends Is In tho direction
of promoting antl-Taft sentiment and
booking La Follette for the Presidency.
Governor Stubbs and his following
also are rampant progressives, and.
while the governor has not openly op
posed the President as yet, he has given
Indications that he is not in accord with
many of the Taft ideas of government.
Gives Welcome.
It was because of the widespread in
surgency In Kansas that the governor
everywhere sought to have the progres
sives give the President a specially
rousing reception. He was successful,
for nowhere has Mr. Taft been more
hospitably received without regard to
political differences of opinion. At the
State fair grounds yesterday the gov
ernor led the 20,000 people present In
doing some typical Kansas cheering for
the President.
It was during the visit of the Presi
dent, however, that tho populace
showed Its dislike of any disparage
ment of its progressive leaders. Secre
tary of the Interior Fisher said he wa3
a "practical" and not a "talking" pro
gressive. That was a shot which did
not take well with the crowd, according
to several narrators of the incident.
Mr. Bristow came forward with an
emphatic retort to Fisher and was tu
multuously applauded.
Mr. Stubbs Is a candidate for the
United States Senate to succeed Senator
Curtis, around whom the entire reac
tionary element of Kansas Hepubllcans
Is gathering in preparation for a desper
ate struggle. One standpat leader said
today he thought whichever 6ide lose
this contest will bolt the ticket and
help send a Democrat to the Senate.
Thn Democrats entertain growing
hopes of carrying Kansas. Wilson Is
generally favored as tne candidate,
although Clark and Folk each has a
btrong following.
One thing In the President's favor In
this vicinity is that this Is the district
represented In Congress by the late E.
H. Madison, a progressive Republican
leader but a warm friend of Mr Taft.
Mr. Madison was regular on the Payne
AIdrlch bill, but he fought the Aldrlch
and Cannon band of reactionaries con
sistently and as a member of the Joint
investigating committee he decided Bal
llnger was unfit to be Secretaryv of the
Interior. His opinion had lm.th to do
with shaping the popular verdict against
Balllnger here as well as elsewhere.
Madison's Death Factor.
At the same time Madison was a per
sonal admirer of the President. He
liked Taft but did not like Taft's polit
ical associates. He wanted to be regu
lar and his friends say that Madison,
d he lived, would have worked hard
for the rc-electlnn of Taft.
The Congressman was strongly op
posed hereabouts for his voto Jn favor
of reciprocity, and yet he had tho con
fidence of his opponents to a remarkable
degree. Mr. Madison's attitude toward
the "President, therefore, has helped
Taft in this locality.
It happens that the Issue between
Taft and La Follette Republicans will
be decided within a few weeks by this
constituency. A successor to Mr. Madi
son Is to be elected, and progressive
and star.dpat candidates for the
Republican nomination are taking tho
field. Lieut. Gov. Richard Hopkins will
be the progressive ;andldate, while the
tegulars are discussing former Circuit
Judges Lobdell. Price, and Martin.
"Taft was given a blr time here," said
President G. H. Welch, of the State Ex
change Bank. "He made lots of friend.
Of course, the farmers around here were
rore about reciprocity. They felt they
were right when wheat went up 5 or 6
cents the day after the treaty failed.
But the farmers will forget reciprocity
This exclusive feature of
the MONARCH TYPE
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in the next year. They will be. for
Taft" .. i ..
"I would not vote for Taft again,
said another farmer, as he cranked nis
automobile. "Reciprocity killed him po
litically around here." . ., .
The proprietor of a shoe store In Main
street said that Taft was unpopular
-ru... kiki. rr-n i with th Interests.
Aitty blllltfl mil to ...... J
but they believe Senator Bristow and
Governor Stubbs are working for the
, i. t, h- ooiH "I think the
State will go .Democratic If w,n?onvni"'!H
HBuuiBi inn. i near iw v- ,,
La Follette here In my store.
EDUCATIONAL
I
Georgetown University
School of Law.
The session of 1911-12 open on Wedceaday.
October 4. In the Law School bulldlnr W-S
B t. N. W'.. at :S0 p. m. m m
Graduate are eligible and qualined tor tna
bar examination In every State In tht
United State.
Tuition. 910O.OO.
FACULTY:
Rev. JOSEPH HIMMEL, S. J..
Preldent of the University.
Hon. HARRY M. CLABAUGH. LL. V.
(Chief Justice Supreme Court of the DUtriei
of Columbia.) .
Dean of the Faculty. Lecturer on Common
Law, Pleading- and Practice, and Equity
Pleading and Practice.
Hon. SETH SHEPARP. LL. V.
(Chief Juatlce Court of Appeal of the w
trlct of Columbia.) -
Lecturer on Contltutlonal Law and Equity
Jurisprudence.
Hon. ASHLEY M. GOULD.
(AMOclate Jurtlce Supreme Court of the Bl
trlct of Columbia.)
Lecturer on the Law of Contract. Peraona
and Domestic Relation, and Insurance.
Hon DANIEL THEW WRIGHT.
(Associate Justice Supreme Court of the Dis
trict of Columbia.)
Lecturer on t.:e Law of Corporation ana
Criminal Law.
CHARLES A. DOUOLAS. A. B.. LL. B..
Lecturer on the Law of Torts. Negotiable
Paper and Elementary Law.
D. W. BAKER. A. M.. LL. D.
(Former United State Attorney for the Dis
trict of Columbia.)
Lecturer on the Law of Real Estate and Evi
dence. . ,,
CLARENCE R. WILSON. A. B. LL. M.
(United State Attorney for the District or
Columbia).
Lecturer on the Law of Agency and Pleading.
JOHN J. HAMILTON. V B.. LL. JL.
Lecturer on the Law of Tjankruptcy and Real
Edtate.
ADOLPH A. HOEHLINO. LL. M..
lecturer on the Law of Evidence.
JAMES 8. EASBY-8MITH. A. M., LL. M..
Lecturer on tbe Law of Peronal Property.
FRANK J. HOOAN, LL. B..
Lecturer on the Law of Wills and Partner
ship. J. NOTA McGILL, LL. M.
Lecturer on Patent Law and Prmctlee.
Judge ot the Circuit Court: DANIEL W.
ODONOGHUE. A. M.. Ph. D.. LL. M.,
and JAMES S. EASBT-SMITH. A- JI
LL. M.
Court of Appeals: Messrs. LEIGH ROBIN
SON. J. NOTA McOILL.
Clerks of Court: FRANK E. CUNNING
HAM and RALPH D. QUINTER. LL. M.
Intructor In Law. DANIEL W. OTKJN
OGHl'E, A. M.. Th. D.. LL. M.:
CHARLES E ROACH. A. B.. LL. IT:
JESSE C. ADKINS. LL M.: HOWARD
HOYD. LL. M : EDMUND BRADT. A.B..
LL. B.: JOHN E. LASKEY. LL. .;
WILLIAM HENRY WHITE, LL. M :
GEORGE E. SULLIVAN. LL. B.;
CHARLES J. MURPHY. LL. M.: JO
SEPH D. SULLIVAN. A. B.. LL. M.;
CONRAD REID. A. B.. Lu, B.
RICHARD J. WATKINS. A. B.. LL. M.,
Secretary and Treasurer.
FRANK E CUNNINGHAM. RALPH D.
QUINTER. LL. M . AMUtant becreUrlea.
LECTURERS IN THE FOURTH TEAR OR
POST-GRADUATE COURSE.
Hon. HOLMES CONRAD.
(Late Solicitor General of the United State.)
On the Hlntory and Development of Law and
Comparative Jurisprudence, and on tha
History of the EnRlIsh Law.
Rev. JOHN A. CON WAT. S. J..
On Natural Law and Canon Law.
MUNROE SMITH. LU D.
(Professor In the School of Political Science
of Columbia University. New York City,
New York),
On Civil Law.
HANNIS TAYLOR. LL. D.,
On International Law and Foreign Relation
of the United States, and History of
Constitutional Government.
RALEIGH C MINOR. LU D.
(Professor of Law in the University of
Virginia).
On Conflict of Law.
JOHN W. YERKES. LU D..
On Railroad Law.
ALDIS B. BROWNE. LL. B.,
On Jurisprudence Practice of United State
Court.
WILLIAM C. WOODWARD. M. D.. LU M.,
On Medical Jurisprudence.
GEORGE E. HAMILTON. LU D..
On Legal Ethics.
Hon. D. W. BAKER. A. M.. LU D.
(Former United States Attorney for tha DU-
trlct of Columbia).
On General Practice and Exercises In Plead
ing and Evidence.
Students proposing to connect themselves
will be in ms omcts in "";" "1""S" V.JSU
Ing BOS-0S E street northwest, daily from
rollment. payment of toltlon, etc. For fur
ther information appiy w ".1-"S'"?:
Georgetown Law School. 606-CS E street
northwest.
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE.
(Day Classe Only.)
S!xty-econd sersion began September
27 1911. Entrance requirement and curric
ulum in accordance with the Association of
American Medical College.
FOUR-YEAR MEDICAL COURSE.
The first two years' will be spent In labora
tor? wo'rk and 'in the study of the funda
mental branches at the Georgetown Medical
CIn harmony with the demand of modern
medicine the Junior and senior tudent will
to broSght into actual contact with diseased
condition, and all work required win be
performed at the new U"'""" ogAM
and Dispenary. now enlarged to a. capacity
of over M0 beds, and also in other local
h AH m'mbers of this 'JSSSSt
obtained hospital appo """'" " J!
of competitive examinations within two weexs
after the commencement exercise.
For further information address the Dean,
DR. GEOM. KOBER. 0 H .met $.?
THHEE-YEAIl DENTAL- COURSE.
(Evening Classes.) ......
Thl department offers' unexcelled facilities,
and aim to equip for actual practice.
A feature of the course '""'.""SI.m
practical instruction in the recently enlarged
Dental Infirmary, where the .tudent 1. re
quired to administer treatment under compe
tent supervision. ....... ,,. rven.
For detailed lniornumon oa.v..... ". - .
Dr. W. N. COGAN. 920 H atreet nrthwet.
i The Army and Havy i
Preparatory School
A Modern Boarding School
for young Men and Boys
Offers ti a limited number ot young men
and boy an unuual opportunity to Pre
pare for college, univeraltlesr. tectalJ
ieboola and tha V. B. Acad.ro e. Small
classe. and Individual Instruction. Beau
tifully located In suburbs. High grouna
and quick transportation. Six modern
building. Athletic fled and ranna.
lum. Baseball, football, uatk teams.
Catalogue on request.
4114 Conn. Atn Wmihlngton. P. C.
-4-
The School With the Highest Standard
Saccess Shorthand School
1415 G St. N. W. Phone M. 657S.
SHORTHAND. TYPEWRITING, DIC
TATION. DAY AND NIGHT.
Catalogue On Request,
Old Residents to Meet.
The "AsocIatlon of Old inhabitants of
the District of Columbia will hold its
regular monthly meetlns tonight at S
o'clock. In the rooms of the association,
at Nineteenth and-H etreeta northwest.
A Skin Tightener
. To Reduce Wrinkles
(Prom Popular Medicine.)
In beauty culture, as In -the-treat-ment
of disease, the tendency now
adays Is to seek- the removal of
causes, rather than to treat symptoms
or effects. In the matter- of wrinkles,
for Instance, we know that the lines
or furrows are caused by the skin be
coming' loose in places, so It does not
perfectly fit the flesh beneath. The
skin then "wrinkles" or sags. Natu
rally the proper thing- to do is to
tighten the skin make It fit then there's
no room Tor lines, wrinkles and folds,
and no surplus skin to sag or bag.
The best known formula for the pur
pose Is: Saxollte. 1 oz.. In pint witch
hazel. Use as a wash lotion. The ef
fect is truly remarkable, especially as
results arc Immediate. Ask the drug
gist for tho powdered saxollte, which
dissolves more quickly than any other
form.
EDUCATIONAL
Forty-Third Year Opens Monday, October 2; 1911, at 6:30 P. M.
NATIONAL UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
NON-SECTAIUAN.
EVENING SESSIONS EXCLUSIVELY! TUITION,
FACULTY:
EUGENE CARUSL LU D..
(Ot th. Wnahlnrfnn Karl
Professor of Elementary Real Property Law.
oiu. UE.N. GEO. B. DAVIS. U. B. A..
(Judge Advocate General. U. S. A.)
Lecturer Upon International Law and Mili
tary Law and Courts-Martial.
JUSTICE JOB BAHNARD.
(Associate Justice, Supreme Court, District
of Columbia.)
Professor of Equity and Jurisprudence.
GEORGE A. KING, LU D..
(Of the Washington Bar.)
Lecturer upon Court of Claims Practice and
Prosecution of Claims Against tho
United State.
JUSTICE THOS. H. ANDERSON.
(Associate Justice. Supreme Court, District
of Columbia.)
Professor of the Law of Domestic Relations.
JACKSON H. RALSTON, LU M..
(Of the Washington Bar.)
Lecturer upon the Law of International
Arbitrations.
WALTER F. ROGERS, LU M..
(Of the Washington and New York Ban.)
Professor of Patent Law.
JUSTICE CHARLES H. ROBB.
(Associate Justice. Court of Appeals, Dls-
of Columbia.)
Lecturer on Appellati Practice and Chief
Juatlce of the Moot Court of Appeal.
FREDERICK U SIDDONS, LU M..
(Of the Washington Bar.)
Professor of Negotiable Instruments, Evi
dence, and Constitutional Law.
CHARLES COWLES TUCKER. LU M..
(Official Reporter of the Court of Appeals.
District of Columbia.)
Professor of the Law ot Sales. Admiralty
Law. and Lecturer upon Legal
Bibliography.
CHARLES F. CARUSI. LU M..
(Of the Washington FUr. and Dean of tha
Law Faculty.)
Professor of the Law of Advanced Real
Property and Contracts.
CHARLES A. KE1GWIN. LU M..
(Of the Washington Bar.)
Professor of Common Law Practice, Common
Law Pleading, Torts, and Judge of the
Moot Court (Common Law).
HON. SAMUEL V. PROUDFIT. LU M..
(Assistant Commissioner. General Land
Office.)
Lecturer upon Land and Mining Law of
the United States, and Practlc Be-
frv. trt TT H T-an1 frffli-L
.. . .. ..-..
rracucai xm-e.-y.-r ue. ..ng w
M"Sru7en"euaimX including those admitted to advanced .tandUig. may cempl.t.
Vrfd"" :XTlfclJZ WexaXtian In every Stat, in the
Unr&n?." Office open for registration, consultation, etc. frea .10 nOo O
National liw School Building. SU-SIS Thirteenth .treet northwest.
THE
GEORGE WASHINGTON
UNIVERSITY
The Nlnetr-flrst Sessions Opea
September 2T, 1911.
Vmr ud Late Atternoon SeaaloM.
Arts and Sciences
School of Graduate Studies 1SK H
BConee of Art- an Sclenee., 1538 I
Collece of Entneerlns Md Me"
chnnlc Arts, 1532 I Street.
College of Political Science 819
Teach era' ' College, 1534 I Street.
Professional Departments
Department ot Law. New Masonic
TDeS.rtmeBt of Medicine, H
Street ,,..
Department of Dentistry. 13Z6 w
otreer.
ASSOCIATED COLLEGES.
National Collece of Pharmacy, 808 I
Collece of Veterinary aiedlclnc 2113
2116 mh Street.
Secretary's Office, 1538 I Street.
The George Washington University
Department ot Law
THItEE-YEAR COURSE
Leadlnc; to Decree of ! B.
DAY SESSIONS
For those who desire to devote their
entire time to the study of lw.
i!aTE AFTERNOON SESSIONS
From :50 to 6:30 for those having
only part of their Umo for the study
of lstw
A MEMBER OF and the only Law
School In the District of Columbia
complying- wltn the standard at worts
and requirements of the
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW
IbDUUbS.
Next session opens and aotual worK
begins September 27th. at 4:60 p. m.
For catalogue and further informa
tion, write or call upon
The Secretary of the Department of
Law,
NEW MASONIC TESIPLB,
Utb Sfc, N. Y. Are. and H St. N. w.
Washington College of Law
Sixteenth Year Opens October 2
at 7:30 P. M.
Offers to qualified men and women,
course 3 years. degree LL. B.; $60 per
year. Prepares students for bar ex
amination; post-gTaduate course, 1
year degree LU M.. J50. Course In pat
ent law, 1 year, $30; prepares for prac
tice before U. S. Patent Office.
Evening sessions from 6:30 to J o clock.
Catalogues and application blanks on
request. Consult the dean. E. S. Mussey,
jl. AKW w.fc ..? ... .... y. '
THE PEARSON SCHOOL
Day and Evening Classes
Fourth Year, October 3, 18X1. ,
For Catalogue Apply To
H. C Jenaeas, (A. BJ Hasten. '
XTS3 G St. N. W.
Pnona M. (293.
"Battr to Our Motto
''BesrWhisteKBesfWiHBS
DCLIVERY FMB
m t
Pa. Ave.
STEAMSHIPS
Merchants & Misers Trans. Ce.
"Florida By Sea"
DIRECT ROUTE
Baltimore to
Savannah and Jacksonville
Beit route to Florida. Cuba, and the South.
Fine steamer. Excellent lervlce. Low
far. AH steamer equipped with wireless.
New steamer Suwannee and Somenet In
commission. Rooms de Luxe. Bath. Send
for booklet. B. & O. R. R. and N. & W.
8. B. Co. office. W. P. Turner, P. T. M..
Baltimore, Md.
EDUCATIONAL
9100.00.
U CABEL WILLIAMSON. LU M..
(Of the Washington Bar.)
Asaoclata Justice of the Moot Court of Ap
peal. ROBT. M. FISHER. LU M..
(Of the Washington Bar.)
Special Lecturer upon Patent Law Practice.
WILLIAM W. DODGE, LU M..
(Of the Washington and New Tork Bars.)
Lecturer upon Special Topics Patent Law.
HATDEN JOHNSON. LU M..
(Of the Washington Bar.) .
Associate Justice of the Moot Court of Ap
peal. HENRY HAYWOOD GLASSIE. LU M..
Formerly At. U. S. Attorney for the Dis
trict of Columbia.)
Lecturer upon Extraordinary Remedies and
Lecturer upon the Jurisdiction of the
Federal Court and Judge of th
Moot Probate Court.
EUGENE A. JONES, LU M..
(Of the Washington Bar.)
Professor of Corporation Law, Bankruptcy,
and Equity Pleading, and Judge
of Equity Moot Court.
FREDERICK A. TENNANT, LU M..
(Asst. Commissioner of Pension.)
Lecturer upon Patent Office Practice.
J. MILLER KENYON. LU M..
(Of the Washington Bar.)
Professor of the Law of Carrier.
CONRAD STME, LU M..
(Ot the Washington Bar.)
Professor of the Law of Partnership.
CHARLES II. TURNER. LU M.
(Assistant U. S. Attorney for the District
of Columbia.)
Professor of Criminal Law and Criminal
Procedure.
OSGOOD H. DOWELU LU M..
(Of the Washington Bar.)
Assistant Professor of Patent Law and Aj-
oclato Judge Moot Court (Patent
Causes).
WILLIAM B. KERKAM. LU M..
(Of the Washington Bar.)
Assistant Professor Patent Law and Aaso-
cuVu Judge Moot Court (Patent Causes).
EUOENE D. CARUSI. LL. M..
(Of the Washington Bfir.)
Secretary of Law Department,
JOHN U CASSIN. LU M..
lO: the Washington Bar.)
Treasurer.
..... r Bachelor Of Laws,
r""d;.e of Matw of
Laws and
GREGG
SHORTHAND.
Why did the Buffalo. N. T.. public
chools adopt Gregg shorthand? For tha
ame reason that Woods Commercial School
did. It is easier to learn and easier to
read than the Pltmanlc or Graham systems.
No shading, no line position, no discouraged
students. ZL.
ELOCUTION
The iclence and the art of pleasing and
effective modes of audible READING and of
SPEAKING, with ease and confidence. In
SOCIAL and BUSINESS CONVERSATION
and In public ADDRESS; whether a LEC
TURE, a SPEECH or an ORATION, on the
floor or platform, an ARGUMENT In debate
or at the bar. or a SERMON In the pulpit;
-it being (next in Importance to a knowledge
of what to say) an essential to success in
...i. .. ... A. .yH1..a nt nil nml dtarmirae;
to entertain: to Inform (teach or explain):
to convince; to persuade (solicit or request);
and to command (order or direct).
Mrs. Emily Freeh Barnes,
Teacher of Elocution and Singing.
143 Eleventh St. N.E.
Phone Lincoln 1733.
Make Your Days Count
By Taking a Baalnesa Conrae at
Washington' Leading Baal
nesa College
STRAYER'S
BEST FACILITIES
MOST COMPETENT TEACHERS.
Hundreds of successful business men tn Wash
ington today are living testimonial to th
efficiency of our methods of teaching. Over
100 students were In attendance during th
pat season.
The list ot studies Includes Shorthand.
Typewriting. Bookkeeping, English, etc, all
taught by experienced teacher. ,
TE OBTAIN POSITIONS FOR OUR
GRADUATES.
Eecure your desk NOW. Day and night
sen Ion now open. Write, phone, or call
Write AT ONCE for beautiful catalog.
GUNSTON HALL
1906 FLORIDA AVENUE N.W.
A Boarding and Day School For Girls
Opens September 29
Preparatory. Elective, and Post-Oraduate
Courses. Special advantage In Music. Art.
and Expression.)
Mrs. BEVERLEY R. MASON. Prlnclpnl.
Miss E. M. CLARK, L. L. A-, Associate.
National Cathedral
School For Girls
MOUNT ST. ALBAN, WASHINGTON. D. C
OPENS SEPTEMBER S3
Preparatory and Academic Department.
Students Admitted to College on Certificate.
Graduate Courses. Instruction In Art With
out Extra Charge. Special Attention Olven
to Music. Stelnway Plato for Practlc. Fire
proof Building.
MRS. BARBOUR WALKER. M.A.. Principal
ST. AGNES' SCHOOL fOR GIRLS
(Episcopal Church.)
M17 O STREET, WASHINGTON, D. C.
ylephon Wast 14S
1
Fairmont Seminary
Session Begins October 4th
AMUSEMENTS
ACADEMY
Matinees, Tues.. Thurs., and Sat
Bret.. Sc So and Ma Mats.. All Seat. So.
Cathrine Conntis
-IN
The White Sister
This Coupon TrSjSriSV
OB CHILD TO BEST RESERVED BEAT
FOR TUE8.. THURS., OR BAT. MAT.
Next week THE MAN BETWEEN.
NATIONAL
(CLOBED TONIGHT FOR REHEARSAL.)
BEGINNING TOMORROW NIGHT,
Hesara. Fellner and Dreyfusa Present
THE
THREE
ROMEOS
Boole and lyric by R. H. Burnslde. Music
by Raymond Hubbell-
Cast Include Georgia Calne. William Dan- '
forth. Ellta Proctor Otis. Ethel Cadraan.
Fred Lennox. Fred Walton. Shirley Kellogg.
Vivian Rushmore, Alfred Kappelar, John O.
Sparks, Sydney Barraclough. Mabella Baker.
and
Tha "New Thought" Chorus of Loveliness.
Matinee Wednesday and Saturday.
Next Week Kitty Gordon In
"The Enchantre."
E
LHENDORF
STbars&ay Afternoons at 4:3t
Dellsrhtfsd Hanrs at TrsTal
Oct. it. The Riviera: Oct. 19. Milan; Oct.
2t, Florence and Venice; Nov. 2, Rome; Nov.
9. Naples.
Course sale now open. Prices, 1J.50. 13.00.
and $4.00.
mmm
TonlgBt 8:15
Mats. Thar..
Sat. 2 1 IS
Joe Weber Offers
Geo. V. Hobart'a English Version of
The Musical Comedy.
"Alma Where Do You Live"
With Truly Ehattuck. Bernard Daly, and
The Original rew lorjc company.
Nit Wwk-THB OIRL IN THB TAXI
BELASCO
TONIGHT
at 8:2
Children's- Wed. Mat., 3:30 (50c to $1.M-
Sat. Mat. & Nights. SOo to IS.
The New Theater Production of
"The Blue Bird"
By Maurice Maeterlinck.
Dally Mats., 25a Eve's., 25c, 50c and 5c-
Wm. CourUeigh & Co.,
In Geo Hobart' Lamb Club Gambol's Hit.
"Ptache." a Comedy of the Paddock.
ROLFE'S FAMOUS COLONIAL SEITETTE
Mike Bernard & Willie Weston. The Dun
cdin Troup. Warren & Keefe Carl Mc
Cullough. Queenie & May Donegan. etc
Next Week AN IMMENSE COMIC BILL.
Walter C. Kelly. The Virginia Judge."
In His New Docket of Funny Court Caws.
JOSEPH HARTS "FOUR OF A KIND."
Six Other Stellar Offering Buy Seat Today.
LYCEUM
All ThU Week Matinee Dally
SAM RICE
and his Daffidyls
Next Week The Pacemakers.
GAYETY
The Whirlwind of Musical Burlesque.
The Belles of the Boulevard
With Lewis and Dody, Florence
Bennett and a supporting company of
50 Slerry People.
xt Week The World of Pleasure.
Conroy A .Morecroft
The Divers. Gaiety
Trio. Bob & Bertha
Hyde. Danny Ahearn.
Rand's- Musical Dogs.
Pictures.
fASINO
7th & N.W.
ELITE VODVIL
fiASINO
V? 4 BIG SHOWS
2:15, 3;45, 7:15,
9 to 10:30
AQUATIC WEEK
AMATEUR DIVING
CONTEST Wed. Night
fASINO
v Orehestaa, 20e
Entire Balcony, 10c
Reserve Seats Ahead
Box Office open for
coupon ticket, first
ten row orchestra,
any night. 30 cents.
Mai- MAJESTIC Eve-
in an4 2D Hoi ilen Players Present 10
Tuej., Thurs., TEMPEST & SUNSHINE 20
SaL Ne.it Week East Lynne.0
Continuous VaudevilI-B1
.AND PICTURES 1 TO H'P
6 ACTS. 3 PICTURES
9 ATTRACTIONS 9
GREAT
MD. STATE FAIR
LAUREL, BID.
RACES
OCT. 2-31
6 OR MORE RACES DAILY .
B & O trains from Union Station to with
in ICO feet of Grand Stand. Trolley from
Treasury and G Street. Admission. Including
Grand Stand, L0O.
FIRST RACE. 2:30 P. M.
Baseball Today
330 Washington
P.M. Philadelphia p-M
Bleacher Entrance on Oth Street.
EXCURSIONS
NORFOLK & WASHINGTON
STEAMBOAT COMPANY
Modern Steel Palace Steamers
EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR
Old Point Comfort and Norfolk
Leave Foot of 7tb St. Dally. 6t45 P.M.
Thru tickets on sale to all points
South with stopover at Old Point
Comfort and Norfolk.
NEW YORK AND BOSTON BY SEA.
ntv Tleknt Office. Bond BulIdlnK.
14 th and New York Ave X. W. t
MOUNT VERNON.
Str. Charlea Macaleater, .
Lt.ing wharf. 7th and it ts. st w earn
XCDt Sunday. 10 su m. and 2:39 P- k '
7AR1WS4 BOUND Vtuk
A
J
'ft
fi i
2
1 j" .&. . ?
U3w ji &?. i'l
'-J -H .-- '

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