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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, November 20, 1914, HOME EDITION, Image 11

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THE WASHINGTON TDIES, FRIDAY; NOVEMBER 20, 1914.
"y fri!
CIA IK DK NEED
OF MONEY FOR lllff
Two Emissaries Sent Here to
Try to Float a Loan in the
United States.
NEW YORK. Nov. 20. The Chinese
government Is understood to be In dire
straits for money because of its inabil
ity to negotiate a new lonn. The quin
tuple loan of $125,000,000 which the rov
ernment negotiated with capitalists of
England. France. Germany,' Russia, and
Japan a year ago is almost exhausted.
If money is not soon forthcoming the
Chinese army of nearly 1,000,000 men ill
become ineffective. Because of the Eu
ropean war it Is impossible to negotiate
a loan with European ' capitalists. An
American loan is the only recourse left.
Two emissaries of the Chinese gov
ernment arrived in this country two
weeks ago. They are Von,r Chin-Fau,
secretary of the board of llnance, and
Fai Chu Tons, of the boavd of com
munications. It is understood to be
Wong Chln-Fau's desire to obtain an
audience with President Wilson to gain
from him some sanction for the loan,
as a year ago the President discounte
nanced participation by the United
States in it. His reason was said to be
that money was not Intended for a re
construction fund, but to down oersonal
enemies of President Yuan Shih-kal.
The official organ of the Japanese
government, the Tokyo Ashai. in the
latest issue received in this country, has
an article on "China's Financial Diffi
culty," which says:
Unable To Pay Interest.
No matter how economical the Chi
nese government is to meet its ex
penditures, it Is necessary to have
an amount of $2,500,000 a month for
the payments of the ministries and
soldiers under its direct control.
During the first semester of this year
the government seemed unable to
pay all the Interest on the indemnity
and on the foieign loans, although
there is a residue of about $6,000,000
of the money advanced by Belgium,
France and other roreign countries
(the so-called industrial loan) to
cether with the income of the salt
taxes and custom duties. The re
mittance of a financial support from
all the provinces of China which is
said to amount to over $16,000,000 for
the last six months, was just enough
to pay the outstanding government
expenses. Unfortunately, not only
has a big loan expected from Euro
pean countries fallen through, but
further advances of money cannot be
hoped for until the war is over.
As a result, of the fact that th
business of China is not progressing
at present, the custom duties and
excises have decreased. It is re
ported that both the custom duties
and the salt taxes arc recorded at
not more than $300,000 a month, and
that the only hope for the Peking
government Is the remittance from
all the provinces which at the most
can only afford $1,000 000 a month.
Amount of Deficiency.
The total amount of deficiency for
the Peking government Is, therefore,
$1,500,000 monthly. If no loan can be
successfully concluded, the salaries
of the officers will have to be sus
pended for at least two or three
months, and the soldiers under the
direct control of the government
must be cunningly handled, so as to
maintain their allegiance. It Ts said
that President Yuan Shih-kai 1?, in
bad straits, and that he is trying all
possible ways t6 get a loan abroad.
A loan of 10,000.000 between Sam
uel & Co. and the Chinese govern
ment was said to have succeeded,
but the contract for this will not be
concluded until the European war is
over. The proposed contract called
ror 1,000.000 payable in advance,
but, contrary to this, nothing so far
has been paid by that company, nor
has anything been arranged in re
gard to the issue of the bonds,
either in Europe or in America
Furthermore, the British govern
ment did not recognize the Chinese
government In regard to the loan.
Representatives of the revolution
ists are now In this country trying
to prevent the proposed loan.
Charges Involve Premier
Of New Brunswick
ST. JOHN, N. B.. Nov. 20. The royal
commission, which Investigated charges
that $100,000 was extorted by government
oinclals irom holders of crown land
lumber licenses, found that $71,000 col
lected frqm this source was obtained by
extortion, specifically named J. K. Flem
rolng, premier of the province, as responsible-
for the alleged extortion.
Mother Killed When
Son Drops His Gun
MIDDLETOWN. N. Y.. Nov. 20.-A8
Mrs. Daniel de Blaker was wishing her
fourteen-year-old son good luck on a
hunting trip, the stock of the gun
dropped to the floor, ex plod nc a
charge of buckshot in the mother's
face. Death was instantaneous.
Club Invites Redfield.
Secretary of Commerce Redfield and
Charles S. Hamlin will speak at a lunch
eon of the Common Counsel Club at the
L,ock Tavern Club tomorrow afternoon.
President J. E. Davies. Commissioner of
Corporations, and Secretary R. W.
"V oolley have already received accept
ances from thirty members of the or
ganization. RESORTS
Winter Social
in the South
mi nowtirrim with out-of-door sports golf; tennis,
motorinir, ridin and driving-. nd with th. 6Tble
lif. characteristic of tbo Southern hotels, clubs and
cottage colonics.
There is a vast number of attractive localities to choose
fro, including Ashevillt in The Land of the Sky,
Augusta. Aiken. Columbia, Charleston, Summervill. and
the Gulf Coast resorts such as New Orleans, Mobile,
Pass Christian, Biloxi, Gulf Port and points on the
Florida Peninsula. Round trip tounst tickets honored
via. Aahevilla without aaaiuonai iu..b
CpUTHERN
J M Premier Garner
C "IV. Wcatliiiry,
TO,'. Flftcnth
WsiHlilncrton,
Shakespeare and Howard Are Two
Of a Kind That Beat a Theory
r--x ww SWf V WMMlIu m
r ' sst rjm. m n riiiaBVMr7.BvivavMB iit wt ir Brv
H FNjTBATFbfteH-AAtoM.
'"TiVe giRTurye cQfVy.pefc
Author of "The Story of the
Rosary" Was Also Born
in
the Famous Village of Strat
ford-on-Avon.
By GARDNER MACK.
One of the things that the profes
sors who teach dynamics overlook
in their learned treatises is that
the smallest sort of a fact dropped
lightly In the center of an impos
ing theory will frequently cause
such a tremendous explosion that it
requires the services of the embalm
crs of thought of a score of uni
versities to convince the average
citizen there ever was a theory
there. The workaday world leaves
the business of piecing together the
shattered remains to the ant.quar
les and trims its sails to meet the
new mental drift. All this is intro
ductory to the statement that the
real striking qualities of genius and
lightninc: have a great slmilar.ty in
that, despite the ancient theory,
facts prove they can both strike
twice in the same place.
While It is not a frequent hap
pening that the two geniuses w.th
the same kind of proclivities for
plain and fancy genlusing are struck
from the identical mold of environ
ment, etc., it has occurred a suffi
cient number of times to prove a
rule to the contrary cannot be es
tablished. Sometimes the popp ng
up of genius in the same locality
like Indiana and its literary prod
uctbecomes almost as perfect a
tatto as the thunderous reverbera
tions with which all . Washington
is familiar when the beautiful
marble shaft erected in honor of
the Father of H-s Country becomes
the object of special attention from
the lightning. That one sentence
contains proof enough of the un
tenability of the lightning and ge
nius theory. And we could rest
both ourselves and the so-called
gentle reader by quitting now we're
it not for thje fact that Felix and
I are earning our living these days
by hooking up all the queer and
curious things we can think and
draw and write about with the thea
ter. Whenever we evolve a par
ticularly fine mental effort it must
be applied to the theater in some
way in order that we mav continuo
those pleasant and profitable ex
changes with our very dear friend,
the cashier. Here goes for this one:
Shakespeare's Humble Start.
As it may come as a shock of sur
prise to many people, we announce
with a certain amount of diffidence
that some 250 years ago the foun
dations of the fame of the village of
Stratford-on-Avon, in England, were
laid through the birth of a son in
the family of John Shakespeare, an
eminently respectable g.ove maker
of that place. Two other births had
occurred in the family, but the chil
dren on each occasion had been girls.
With the family traits of the Shake
speares pretty well known, It Is re
garded as a certainty that had these
ladies lived in our own ase they
would undoubtedly have joined the
prank-hoisteis in their merry play
and laid some foundations of fame
themselves.
However that might be, the third
child, and the first foundation layer,
was a boy, and he was named Will
iam for no particular reason other
than that Mr. and Mrs. Shakespeare
both liked the name, after the usual
family discussions and recrimina
tions. There is neither the time nor the
space to dilate on the way William
laid the foundations of the fame of
Stratford-on-Avon, because most
people who have any interest in the
subject know it. The only point that
we wish to emphasize is that he had
to leave his native village flut on its
back for a long time before he was
able to accomplish this great feat,
and that his first step toward that
accomplishment was cither the job
of holding horses in front of a thea
ter or af-slsting th prompter lvehind
the scenes As most of his most emi
nent biographers are t'ivided In opin
ion as to just which It was, we cer
taln'y can't be expected at this late
date to take sides. Whether he first
held horpes and 4.ncn the prompt book
or didn't hold horses and started In
with the prompt book, is not at all
RESORTS
Capitals
Write or
'phone for
information
and for our
illuitratad
literature.
Slxtralns
dally to
Southern
cities and
retorts.
RAILWAYS
or tne ooum
ficnersil AktiiI,
St. V .,
1).
aws
n-f . i amnrrsstzm1 mjo? av ...' -r33 r-& - um
(T fV my i 1 lKMWM0KXKjPy dirt .v-f jl'-V,.." Vl Ctiff3 J54-7
I rt f ffef amaaemmKgr w. v'7Jr.."V- - 1:. . x. mmtt : Jyrj'7rS
rirJBBPjfllVVS tr lav. ; &. r .it.l..
i I ImUKlM' fit' ,v:r. 3 Vir
KOWAtpJ J f J -
ACrot, i jr ill x
AWAG
material. He did hold the book at
some time or other, and not liking
the way It was written, proceeded to
write one himself. That was the be
ginning of Shakespeare, the dramat
ist. Genius Strikes Again.
Now for the second stroke of ge
nius lightning that hit Stratford-on-Avon.
More than three centuries
swept over the peaceful village. The
foundations of the fame that
Shakespeare laid must have been
crumbling. Anyhow, Just after the
three centuries had finished 'their
sweeping, on the same street that
Shakespeare had lived there was an
other boy born. He was born In tho
Howard family, which was quite Weu
known In those parts. And he was
named Walter. Historians haven't got
ten around to statistics as to the nu
merical strength of the Howard fam
ily at that time, or the sex inclinations
of the Howards who preceded Wal
ter, if there were any. But Walter
came into the world in the same un
ostentatious way that his famous
fellow-townsman had come, and he
grew up amidst the same surround
ings. Walter declares that Shakes
peare isn't half the man in Stratford-on-Avon
that he is elsewhere,
and that there are not a whole lot
of people In the town who would
tt
0
&WK
j
QUICK SERVICE ABSOLUTE CLEANLINESS
POPULAR PRICES
Special Dishes on Steam Table Prom
11:30 A. M. to 8 P. M.
WHITE PALACE LUNCH
1417 G St N. W. 314 9th St. N. W.
LOUIS MANDES, Prop.
in
EZVlt f
C
1WELVC
lw$ Pj V
know the house where the bard was
born If it were not for a sign on it.
Walter Howard followed the usual
course of being educated in the town
schools, and when he came to an
age when he could choose things for
himself, he chose to leave It Just as
his distinguished fellow-villager had
done some three centuries before.
And1 he. too, went to London. There
he decided that the drama of life he
wished to study was being more suc
cessfully played In a military way.
and he became a soldier.
It might be said that even here his
career was somewhat similar to
Shakespeare's, and that he held tho
prompt book on the war drama. He
was In the hospital corps, and it was
his business to correct the errors
made in the soldiers in battle and
send them back to the field again.
He did this with some success, be
ing an actor in tho drama occasion
ally himself. In the dull hours be
tween fights ho amused himself and
his friends with acting behind the
footlights those temporary foot
lights that shed soft, rosy glows on
amateurs. And Walter Howard also
took umbrage at the things that
were written in the prompt books
for the players of his day, and pro
ceeded to write a play to his own
liking. He called it "Wearing of
the Green," and It made a big hit.
That was two years before he quit
"BUGS" BAER'S
FOOTBALL SELECTIONS
"SCORING"
A Great Success
Jardin de Danse
I ,, I I I I - ! - ! IH.I
ISfhand F Streets N. W.
SPEND THE EVENING HERE AFTER THE GAME
Special Luncheon, 50c 12 M. to 2:30 Daily, except Sunday. Admission Free,
Music, Splendid Cuisine, Dancing.
Tea Dansant from 4 to 6:30 P. M. Admission .50 cents, including refreshments.
Supper Danse from 8:30 P. M. to 1 A. M. Admission 50c. All service a la Carte.
Appointment for DnnciiiK Instruction In nil the l.nicst DnnvcM may lir ninde liy telephone:
.lluln 'MH From 10 n. in. to l:: m. and ::-30 to 4.00 p. in. Private Lesson, 55.00. Private Course,
of .Six I.es&ons, $25.00.
Special 1'rleen fr 'lneN Five people, 2.00 per person. Moro than live people, $1.50 per
peihon. The Lessons are yiven by our Special Instructors.
PRIZE DANCING CONTEST TONIGHT
Professional Singing and Dancing -Open to All Admission 50c
"FOLLOW
THE CROWD"
to the
White Palace
Lunch Rooms
For Dinner This Evening
iiPteftmircb Ifi fAY
-AUAfJjJNMAncjJjrrcR..
Big Military Drama Written a
Year and a Half Ago a
Curious Forecast of Present
European Conditions. v
the army. The two years that fol
lowed were filled with study and
preparation, for, acting on tho ad
vice of friends, Howard determined
to adopt playing and playwriting as
a business, and he spent his last
two years In her majesty's service
preparing himself for the career of
an atitor and playwright.
Produced Sixteen
Coming from the army some
eighteen years ago he immediately
set out to establish himself in his
new profession and because of his
ability as an actor and his keen in
sight to human affairs he became
a success at the start. For sixteen
j cars he has annually produced a
new play in Manchester, England.
And usually the play has gone
through, all the English theaters end
ing with a run in one of the big
London theaters. Walter Howard
became a name to conjure with in
theatrical matters in England. Ho
was one of the actors whose work
attracted a steady patronage of
thoughtful jcople and his plays were
given a high rating. Once he at
tempted a war play. He made Rus
sia its setting. The play was re
hearsed and 'was just on the eve
of production when Admiral Ro
jestvensky of the Russian navy re
pelled the memorable "attack" of
the British fishing fleet in the North
Sea with his big squadron of Rus
sian war ships en route to the
Orient to fight the Japanese. Any
thing Russian became immediately
so unpopular In England that How
ard decided not to produce his play.
But the war play had a very warm
place In his heart and a year and
a half ago he decided to try his
luck again. This time he took the
precaution to make Iris play a neu
tral affair. He gave it no distinct
locale. It might be anywhere. He
called It "The Story of the Rosary."
because of the beautiful sentiment
of the song and because he made the
rosary an Important feature of the
play. The play was produced In
Manchester as usual and then went
to London where It scored a trmen
dous hit. The conditions that formed
the basis of the play the critics
called highly fanciful, but they
praised it. Within a few months
after the play was produced the
Get the Biggest
10c to
Z' s07, i?. ii
fli zju '. n.r
Jm$ h lm
GUDE BROS. CO.
1214 F St. N. W.
war cloud that has now settled over
Europe made its first appearance in
the east anil to the astonishment of
everyone the conditions that were
found in the Howard play were prac
tically repeated on the Belgium and
French battlefields. So startling was
the similarity that Interest was im
mediately renewed in tho play -and
four companies were organized that
are now producing it throughout
England.
Indorses American Playwright.
Howard's own company had con
tracted to -come to this country with
the play long before the war was'
thought of. As was usual with all
the Englishmen as soon as war -was
declared, Mr. Howard offered him
self as a volunteer. He was re
jected on the ground tbat ho had
passed the age limit of thirty-flvo
years. And so he came to tho
United States with his play, hoping
that some of its lessons of war
might help to bring about the peace
which is now so earnestly desired.
"The Story of the Rosary," which
comes to the Belasco Theater next
weak, is a simple, direct play. It
deals with war and has a battle
scene, which its author was enabled
to construct from his long personal
experience with military affairs. It m
is a story that need affect the neu- "
trallty of no person or nation, and
yet it brings homo in a powerful
way the big lessons of the war that
. is now In progress and tells a charm
ing love story- at tho same time.
Howard's success as a -playwright
he generally accredits to his fol
lowing the American rather than tho
English method of building a play.
He ,has always admired American
plays becauso he 'believes them to be
direct, strong, and uncompromising.
Strength, humanity, and tho essen
tial dramatic elements are found In
all of them, he declares, while the
British playmaker of today Is being
smothered In a sort of over-nicety.
London dramatists, he believes, are
too ladylike In their attack. He has
tried to make his plays more after
the American model than that fur
nished him by his fellow country
men. A big. forclful man, an Ideal
type of the British soldier and gen
tleman, Howard ha3- not only upset
the moss-covered traditions of the
English playwrighting fraternity,
but, as we have tried to point out
In giving this sketch of him. he has
but read th first few para
graphs! Appeals for Belgians.
LONDON, Nov. 20. Cardinal Francois
Joseph Mercier. primate of Belgium,
who has just returned to his own coun
try after a visit to England, sends m a
stirring appeal through the American
commission for relief in Belgium for as
sistance for his starving parishioners
of Mallnes and the suroundlng neigh
borhood. In Mallnes alone, the cardinal
says, 12,000 mouths have to be fed daily.
YOU CAN'T BRUSH OR
WASH OUT DANDRUFF
The Simplest and Quickest
Way Is To Dissolve It.
The only sure way to get rid of dand
ruff Is to dissolve it, then you destroy
It entirely. To do this, get about four
ounces of ordinary liquid arvon; apply
it at night when retiring; use enough
to moisten tho scalp and rub it in
gently with the finger tips.
Do this tonight, and by morning most
if not all of your dandruff will be gone,
and three or four more applications will
completely dissolve and entirely destroy
every single sign and trace of It, no
matter how much dandruff you may
t have.
i'oii will find, too. that all Itching and
digging of the scalp will stop at once,
and your hair will be fluffy, lustrous.
glossy, silky and soft, and look and feel
a hundred times better.
If you want to preserve your hair, do
by all means get rid of dandruff, for
nothing destroys the hair more quickly.
It not only starves the hair and make3
it fall out. but it makes it stringy,
straggly, dull, dry. brittle, and lifeless,
and everyone notices It. Tou can get
liquid arvon at any drug store. It is'
inexpens've and never fails to do the
i ork. Advt.
Subs
There is No Substitute
For a
Chrysanthemum
Everybody will wear
one at the Game
Today
and Best at Special Prices
$1.00 Each
Phone Main 4278-79
J
ASKS SOCIETY GIRLS
Belgian Relief Workers Want to
Swell-Bind to Aid European
Sufferers. - - -
Belgian, relief workersiin-Avashlngton
,will try to enlist the -services ofa score'
onmore of the younger society- men afid
women of , the city to sell newspapers
to swell the .fund for tho European vsu-
ton committee in charge, of the relief,
work. to, ..set a. special day" forVtheCsalo
of the newspapers and to, herald this
day as a- banner occasion in ithe cam-;
paign to augment the monetary collec
tion. ' .
While these plans are under wayUhe
members of the committee, of which,
jVflM. .TrtTin A T.nrror la tVi ioarl a
hard at work sorting; "and packing 'the
citmmg anu otner contrimitions whlcn
arc being made at-the committee head
quarters in the Cripps building, 425
Eleventh street northwest. -
Tho pnmmff aa Vtnc ,s,t Kaam nW-tj
In this worlc hv tho -pofnool -fVio TWe
trict Commissioners to appoint a com
jinnee oi men to co-operate with -nv
The members of the committee under
stand the point, made by the hads.,of!
that the official appointment 'of a-com-mittee
of men as requested Vwould'prol'
ably be construed in s'otne quartersias
a breach of neutrality, "
Mrs. Ellis Logan, president of the Dis-.
trict Federation of Women's Clubs is
at work, today with her aids-collectlng
the "mile of pennies" for the. relief fund..
Mrs. Logan addressed members of the
Petworth Woman's Club last night ap
pealing, to them'to do all'in-their power
to aid In the work for the relief of the
Belgians.
Your Eog Craves
VERM I LAX
- X- '
because It supplies a certain- vesetable
laxatlvc his Instinct warns him Is neces
sary to health. VERMILAX brightens
eyes, purifies the blood and intestines and
makes his cdat beautifully Rlossy. It also
removes vitality sapping. danxerotis
worms, which Infest S0 of doss-, rotten
undetected by ownersl. "For Tour Dok'b
Sake" keep VEItMILAX on hand and
use it resularlv.
By Parcel Post. 50c and $1.00. or at
The Christian! Drue Co.. O'Donnell's.
People's. Affleck's, Riker-HeKeman's. Oe
ram's. "Walter R. Hill's, F. A Tschief
fely. Jr.'s. Leon Drug Co.. and Schmid's
Pet Shop.
VERMILAX CO., (lac.)..
Df pt. 28. K!0 W. 421 St. Aw York.
AMUSEMENTS
ToalBht, 8 115
Matlaee,2il5
Tbart.A Sat;
A Three-act Comedy Drama by "Wlliard
Mack (Author -or "Birds of Prey.")
MSo Much PorSo Mueh"
With the Author, ilarjorio Ramblau. and
"William InBersolI.
NEXT WEEK
Seats NawSelllHK
Haf$.Wei,TiintSt
t ThanksclTlna;
Triumphant return to "Washington after
200 nishta at the Hudson Theater. evr
York.
THE DUMMY
An absorbing;
.Detective Comedy
With LaUKhs-Calore
By Harvey O'HlRsins and Harriet .Ford.
Who Wrote "The Arsyle Case." The
Original Cast Intact.
1HB1 COH .Mill A THEATER Hsssl
BURTON HOLMES
TQ SUNDAY If 8:30
I MO MONDAY . 4:30
ENGLAND
Popular Prices, 25c, 50c. 75c, $1.
iim
MAX SPIEGEL Offers the
WATSON
Sinters and Their Company
Country Store Friday Night
Ladles' Matinee-Every Day, 10c
Next Week THE BEAUTY PARADE.
DANCING
DANCING .,iH,"FLES
Monday Eves. Country Store Dance
PRIZES FREE.
Mon.. Thurs. and Sat. Eves.. 8:30-12. Two or
chestras: old and new dances: favor dance:
dancing contests: prizes: exhibitions.
PROP. WTNDHAM. 816 12th X. W.. hesita
tion, one-step: also waltz and :wo-8:ao
taught: children taught: nuarante-d. Phcna
Main S79.
TONIGHT First Grand Danse of the UO
HEMIAN CL.VU (fiasco Attaches). Mil
ler's Dancini? Academy, atop the Uelasoo
Thf'ro Tickets 51.00. InclinllnK lady.
COLUMBIA SCHOOL
of Dancing. UH Harvard st Co! 1ST8. Kates
no higher than Instruction given demands
DAVISON'S, I'rof & Mrs . 719 6th st. n.
Two teachers of authoritj all in nlern duices.
1-step. hesitation, canter & wave waltzes, fox
trot, tango. m;ile. .u hi fado Prlv. anv
hour. Select class & danco Tue. veg. M. 4SS4.
MAY IH'RSEY. teacher of all modern dances.
Appointments anv hour. Studio 1204 O st.
N W Phone N 3ol6-J.
MISS MABEL FAIRFAX.
JAItDIN DE DANSE.
Ph M oiS. 1210 G STREET 1
WYNDHAP1 BROS., $&&&
Modern dancing taught, private, class Instruc.
M. SHANE C. HODGSON
STUDIO 1306 G ST. N. W.
rh. M. 2029. Second Floor.
HF!l y Belasco Theatre tsiag. F.
lwllllPI i11- 6S3-Y. (Lulu-Fado,.
A'' I maxlxe. hesitation. uo
,t,p. tc. Prlvateonly Select.
MIJSS LEONA CALLAN
Uu6 6th iT. N. VV. All modern nances tsugat.
Latest erase, the Fox Trot. Fancy dancini
Mode'Jlo prices. Phonw North 7628.
CHAMBERLAIN tT
11 th & F Sts Phono M. JM.
GLOVERS. 613 22nd ST. N W.. Ph W. 1129
Prl. lessons any hour. 60c. Flshwalk. one
step. Boston. Tango. Hesitation, etc. Clasa &
dance. Tug.. Thurs.. Sat eve.. 50c. Ladles free.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Wm. Harrington
TEACHERS OF MODERN DANCES.
61 E 8t. N W Ph. Line. 29t7.
MRS. COBB'S DANCING SCHOOL. 100 Ky
t. N. "V. Dance every Monday evu.. 3:31
Phone M. 22.
KOBEY
STtmiO OF MODERN DfNSE.
N. W. Cor Uth aad You N. W. N. liK.
iltfiVTVwm
Babe in Arms Killed.
PARIS, Nov. 20. A baby, born in a
Lorraine church which was under Ger
man fire, was struck by a piece, of
shrapnel two hours- later and kMled
wljlle in Its mother's arms. The mother
vr&s unharmed.
COSH BOILS,
mwm
No .Headache, Sour Stomach,
;Bad' Cold or Constipa-
'.ffon by morning.
Get- a "1'0-ccnt boy now.
," .Furred tongue, Bad Colds, Indigestion,
Sallb.w- Skin and Miserable Headaches
come frqm a forpld liver and clogged '
bowels; "which cause your stojnach to be
comeV,fllled with, undigested food, which
soars:" ,and ferments like garbage in a
swill barrel. That's the first step to un
told misery1 indigestion, foul gases, bad
breath.. yellow skin, mental fears, every
thlng that Is horrible and nauseating, A
Cascaret tonight will give your consti
pated ""bowels a thorough cleansing and
straighten .Vdu out bv morniner. Thev
work while tou sleep a 10-cent box
from your druggist will keep you feeling-
gopa Tor; montns. Minions or pnen and
women take a Cascaret now and then
to keep their stomach, liver and bwwels
regulated, and never know a miserable
moment. Don't forget the children their
little insldes need a good, gentle cleans
ing, too. Advt.
AMUSEMENTS
Wv""Vj;'A,MatIee Saturday
,The only .theater In Washington offering exclu
sively American and foreign stars of first rank
World' Biggest and Beat.
ZIEGFELD FOLLIES
10A-ZIEGFKd BEAUTIES 189 ''
ajrw wt - Seata Wow Selllaa-
xiexi jnreeK siat. wLf st.
Extra Hatinee Thanksgiving
Henry W. Savage offers
THe- operetta that has
charmed two continents.
With MlirJ Vfalr,.
SARI
Charles. Meaklns.' .Entire' X
T. Cast.
. WOniJi'S GREATEST DANCE It
PAVLOWA
AND HBOl OWJf COMPLETE
Ballet aad Symaaoay Orchestra.
Natloaal Theater, Friday, Nov. 27, 3:13
Prices: $3.00, $20, $2.00, $UI. fl.OO.
Boies, 135.00.
OX SAM AT 13KOOPS, 13th AD G.
" ' FIRST CONCERT
PHILHARMONIC
' SOCIETY OF BT. Y.
ORCHESTRA
JOSEF STRAXSKY, Ceadaeter.
3 Mmi. GADiKI, StStist
TIekets075e to ss at Tlclcet OfSc.
T,. ARTHUR SMITH, -130 G.ST.
WASHIXGTOX season.
P
HI LA DELPHI A
ORCHESTRA
LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI, Coaductor.
Three Taesdaya
Dec. 15 Mbk. Schanaana-HeiHlv.
Jaa; 10 Alma dock.
Feb. 23 Olga Samaroff.
Stibfccriatloaa to Miss Harlan, 183.1 31
St., S6.00, 95.00, $-00, 9ZS0, S2.00.
PKBLTC SALE. NOV. 20..
BELASCO-Mat Tiwrraw.
Taalsat At 8:29 2c to $lJf
OLIVER. MOROSCO Presents; J. Hartley
Manners Exuberant -Comedy.
PEG O! MY HEART
JYlth, ELSA RYAN and the New York
. '.' Company.
SUNDAY
8:30
CHINA
aid JAPAN
OSTRANDER
Peerlessly PIctareil.
TRAVEL TALK
25c, 50c, 75c, $K0O.
Thanksgiving 1 31atlaees "Wed.,
"Weefe I TaaaksgivlaK
Seats Xovr j Day, aad Sat.
Majnmoth Drama of Love aad War.
The STORY of the ROSARY
Nights, 25c to 91.50 ; Hats 25c to $1.
Moaday, Benefit of War S offerers.
Every Evening and Dally Matlace.
The Greatest of AH Plays.
MADAME X
IUFVT UFFIT&e 'w PH riven
I1LAI TILLIll
la ''THE GAMBLERS."
B
F.KEITHS SK:o.;l.
.. m.n.n Iffiln 44S-1 .IHrt 4483.
Mat 25c. Evealags, 25c to 91
EMftilCftRUS CanATl
IZETTAJEWELHALF0RDE
NVxt iVpek-ETHF.r. BARRTMORE
EXCURSIONS
MERCHANTS & MINERS TRANS. CO.
FLORIDA TRIPS
"By Sea"
Baltimore to
Jacksonville aad retura, 933J
Savannah and retura, 925.06.
Includm' xueals antl stateroom accojnmoda
tlons ihrouKh tickets to all points, i in
steamers. Best service Staterooms . a
Baths. Wireless telecraph. Automobile
carrleJ.. .Steamer Tuesday and Wa. Sttjl
lor Doojuei. u k u. n. "-
"w.'p. TURNER. t. a Baltimore. Md,
.OKKOLK dfc WASHINGTON
STEAMBOAT COMPASi.
Palace Steamers "Northland" and "South-
land" Dally, at 6:15 d. m irom loot
of 7th st. S. "W.
For OLD POINT COMFORT. XOB
FOLK and ALL POINTS SOUTH.
NEW VOHK aad BOSTON B SEA.
City Ticket Office. 731 15th t UooJ-
ward bulldlnK.
HEADACHE, COLDS,

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