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The Washington times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, December 21, 1915, HOME EDITION, Magazine Page, Image 8

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THE WASHINGTON TBlES, TUESDAY; DECEMBER 21? 1D15.
THE TIMES DAILY MAGAZINE PAGE
WhenThirty
Five Feigns
Seventeen!
r r
Telling of the Adventures of
thd Aged Forty-two Who
Dressed to Look Like
Number J 8 Misses! .
LA&T Hummer she languished alone,
and unattended, forty-two thlrt
waist and nil. .She lived by her
self In a big apartment homo
filled with people who know one anoth
er, and were congonlal, bujt she was
out ot It entirely. She had thirty-five
years" to her credit In addition to the
forty-two shirt waist size, and she work
ed for Uncle Sara. She used to tell
me once In a. while how lrab life was.
But yesterday she walked proudly
down F street with a wrist-watch youth
on either side of her, and at Fourteenth
and F 'when she passed the corner
wiser a bevy of college prodigal sons
were gathered, she received as ninny
admiring glances as did the girl ahead'
of her (who? to the piercing eye of wom
an was si bono- fide "eighteen misses").
In fact she might have been the young
woman's prototype. From head to toe
they were as alike as convicts. Each
wore a small fur-trimmed turban, each
a tight-fitting basque suit with a lUf
fle skirt, fur on the hem of the coa.
and far about the neck and sleeves.
Andr "high, side-laced colored' boots to
ifeiteh the salt were very evident by
virtus of short, spare skirts.
She chatted gayly, and talked not of
mundane governmenty mustinesses, but
of politics, and fashion, and Mrs. V.
Castle, and Rosleka Schwimmcr, and
made a joke about Noah and the Peace
Ship, and spoke of everything as be
ing "smart" or "perfectly corking," and
of adoring ever so many things right
oS hand. And when one of the. youths
said something which made the other
boy laugh she looked at- him and
crinkled up her nose (tbat same nose
which six months before was NEVER
crinkled under any circumstances and
greased with cold cream every night;,
asjd said: "Oh I I love it!"
Behind and before, from the sides,
in the face and even under her skin
and her li4 she was metamorphosed!
rfhe was FJ-APPBU!
Later In the week, at. a stool and
sandwich eatery abe confessed the
"hnnge, and out of the fullness of her
heart told how it came about.
"It all began with the suits this
year." She paused and pushed her
cup aside, so that she might lean lux
urlously upon her elbows. Her cheeks
began to get pink and her eyes (which
always wore pretty) began to -dance.
"I askd for my usual tailored
model, you know, lapels, plain and
severe, and I couldn't- set one. I
couldn't And one for love 6r moniy
that was what I would wear. And
there wasn't a thing to be had but
this fur-trlmmod stuff. Fur, fur, fur,
until In desperation, tired to death, I
bought this. Then I m ade the blessed
mistake of wearing it to the millin
er when I went for a hat and the
clerk simply choked this fur turban
on me. And here I am.
'"The first day I went down to the
office I was scared stiff. But, do you
know, from that minute, the women
who had always been pleasant to me
began to freete me out, and the men
who had never looked at me began to
hang on my desk, also my words. And
at my apartment people began to say
good morning and good evening to me
for the first time!
"And when my suit was a week old
a friend of my mother's from the West
came In and offered me a position in
his office at twice what I was getting
from Uncle Sam.
"The suit that I had hated because It
was merely a larger number of the
most popular version for "No. II
Hisses," has saved my life. I am no
longer thirty-five, and wear a forty
two that looks the part, but twenty and
plump, Just plump! And I have another
whole row of chances to get married!
"But it it hadn't been for theso decep
tive suits, which make the forty-two
and the eighteen misses absolutely ay
nonymous and identical and duplicates
of one another I would still be on the
shelf!"
While she helped herself to a cream
puff and made eyes at a ohooolate
eOlalr, a man who had heard the Whole
confession stared at her with even
greater admiration than before, and
nearly broke his neck to have her speak
to him.
Which merely proves that they all
wish to be fooled!
And the new suits according to this
perfectly true story would fool any
bodyanybody. Tf you don't believe It try separating
the mothers from their daughters some
thickly populated shopping day and Me.
The Chafing
By MRS. CHRISTINE FREDERICK.
(Copyright, l15, b lire. Chrtsi.ns Frederick,)
W
HT In
many homes is the
chafing dish relegated to
the sideboard as an almost
useless ornament, dragged
forth only for "company?"
If the chafing dish proves Itself a
useful and practical means of pre
paring a meal for guests, why la It
not equally good to cook family
meals, especially the lighter supper,
tea, and luncheon 7 Many a time
when the hostess heraelt has to pre
pare meals she would save herself
labor by using the chaflnji dish in
stead of cooking In the kitchen nnd
trotting back and forth With the var
ious foods. Perhaps, too, father
would not complain bo much that he
"doesn't get a chance to talk to moth
er" because she has to spend so
much time preparing a meal If moth
tr'tised tho chafing dish and talkod
while she cooked,
Once accustomed to the use of
cooking on the table. It becomes lust
as natural and easy ns cooking. In ft
special place like the kitchen. The
points In favor of the chafing dish
are that it obviates the necessity of
the hostess riling, that tho food can
be served piping hot. nnd that with
Its btaser and pan it In one of the
most sanitary food vessels to use and
rlean.
Many aitlclrs used in fimlly sup
. per, such as creamed chip beef, oys
ter slew, broiled or panned chops,
THE' VERY LATEST COLLARS
"Sttr" .jt4
LovtS &'&-)-0jL
t HERE is always .art interesting tale to be tpid
' of neckwear, for it is in this phase of dress
that the designer best shows his originality.
He depends upon the collar to proclaim the period
or the character of the frock, and the student of
fashion who would the "tale unfold''- has only to
glance at the neck-line.
History repeats itself in the upstanding collar of
the Louis XV, and the Directoire periods. It is de
veloped in rich materials, such as velvet, embroidery,
fur or brocaded satin, andhugs the neck snugly,
extending high. o:er the ears. The example shown
here is attached to a coat and is fashioned of kitten's
ear cloth banded with velvet. It is lined with fur
which rolls over the edge. Only the short-haired
peltries such as sealskin, beaver, moleskin and
ermine are favored for this purpose.
If your prefer a tale of daring courage and bold
adventure,, the military collar will win your interest
and approval. It also savors of other days and in
spires a mental vision of the gorgeously attired and
A Few Easy Recipes
By ANN MARIE LLOYD.
Cheese Soup.
The Ingredients required for this are
one pound of Spanish onions, two
ounces of a strong cheese, such as
Gray ere, one ounoe of butter, half a
pint of milk, one ounce of flour, one
quart of stock, salt and pepper. Slice
the onions, pour boiling water over
them, cover them with a plat, and
leave for a few minutes. Then pour the
water off. Take the stock, boll it
put in the onions, and cook them
up.
till
Dish Supper
kidneys and very many more of the
dishes having a creamed sauoe can
be prepared fully as well in the chaf
ing dish as over any other kind of
fuel. Why not use the chafing dish
blazer, Instead of tho ugly frying,
pan to oook the hamburg steak balls
for tonight's supper T if the salad
and dessort are alroadv prepared,
the balls can bo made ready, cooked
In the dish at the table and served
directly to each plate without even
soiling the platter,
A winter breakfast of creamed cod
fish can be managed most effectively
in the blaser, as can bacon, sausages,
and other morning dainties. Oysters'
now In season can be sauted, frlod
with bacon, or made Into a etew be
fore our very eyes. The chafing dish
burner does not smoke and make
an odor as does the kitchen range,
and it used with a Percolator or
toaster, there Is no reason why an
entire meal cannot be made and
perved vis-a-vla.
t'olish up the chafing dfsh-lnstalt
It on the side table Instead of be
hind closed doors, and use It every
day In the week. Why allow an ex
pensive piece of equipment-to be used
once a month? If you have a cur
rent, use the connections and plug,
which, will permit your chaftntr dkji
to be operated electrically. It will
be a change and cosier than getting
breakfast all by yourself In the
kitchen these winter mornings.
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mance, from the
tender enough to pass through a sve.
Molt the butter in the saucepan: stir In
tho flour, add the onion and the milk,
and bring all to the boll. Then put In
the oheese, grated, a little salt and pep
per to taste, and serve very hot,
Haricot Beans or Lentils.
After soaking tne pint of haricot
beans or lenllM overnight In cold water,
with a very small piece ot soda, drain
off tho water and put the beans or len
tils in a saucepan with two ounces of
dripping or margarine. When thorough
ly hot just cover with cold water or
broth, cook slowly and remove any
scum. Pry two onions and a bit of ba
con cut up rather small for a few min
utes, add them to the beans, season
with pepper and salt, and cook slowly
till soft. Serve piled on a hot dish.
Jam Roly-Poly.
Take a Quarter of a pound of bread
crumbs, a quarter of a pound of flour, a
quarter ot a pound of suet, hair a tea
spoonful ot salt, one teaspoonful of bak
in powder, water to mix, Jam and cus
tard. Place th nour ana breaaorumos
In X bowl with salt and baking powder,
add tho suet finely chopped. Mix to a
stiff paste with water, Turn out on to
a floured board and roll into a long nar
row strip. Bpread this with lam, keep
inr nwavefrarm th nrtrfn of the nastrVi
noil up, seal the ends, and fasten in a
floured cloth whloh has been previously
scalded. Tie tho ends seourely with
string. Place in fast boiling water, and
boll for two hours, serve witn custara.
Clear Gravy.
Cr. unthlckened gravv Is the best
for all simple roasts. Pour away tho fat
from the roastlmr pan nnd reserve it Tor
future use. Add a small quantity of
boiling water to the nan and with an
Iron spcon rub down any glaze nr meat
juice whU-H adheres to the Hides. Doll
for two or three minutes, add suit to
tnstt. and remove any grease from the
surface with kitchen paper, Strain a
little ot the craw round the joint and
reive the roroalnder in a sauce boat If
a larger nuanttty ot gravy lit required,
u little stock may be nocemnrv
(Otnr't. 1MJ. by Ktwspaper feature Service,)
gold-braided hussars of the First Empire. You will
And this collar on the finely tailored costumes, for
only a master hand can get just the right flare over
the chin. In 'this model of velvet there is an inset
of cloth, pintucked in horizontal lines across the
front, and the military effect is emphasized by the
bullet buttons ornamenting the sides.
A fascinating intermingling of romance and poesy
is the Pierrot collar of pleated white mull. Of
course, it is a modern interpretation of the collar
worn by the beloved character of tale and pantomime.
It is fjtted very closely to the neck, and the lower,
frill is wider than that Which edges the top,
Last comes a tale of intrigue, spiced with ro
land of the Czar, for the Ust collar
in this collection was designed for the Russian blouso
suit of velvet or cloth. It also fits the neck snugly
and is fastened down one side with buttons and
bound buttonholes. It has a broad flare at the top
which suggests a "saucer,'' and the seam down the
front is ornamented with an embroidered arrow-head.
(Copy'L ISIS, by Newspaper Feature Service.)
iii'vip:
ALCOHOL 3 PEH CENT.
AVcgelabkEreparalbnfirAi-
suTwaiing tie rood;
unguieMomacns
Promotes DijestlonCk enU
ness andfestfontalnjnrifcr
Opium-Morphlne nurMJaaaL
Not Narcotic
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Aperfwt Remedy forCflagR'
ttoh , Sour 8tooeth.DwrWtt
WfmnsoiwusumiJtTaBW
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NEW Jtimn
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Xxm Copy of Wrapper.
Advice To
Girls
pear
Miss Laurie I am In love
witn
a bOV dIM Vtil tnv unlni. TT
has always been speaking to me, but
lately he has not I hear ho is going
with another, girl. I always keot
r dates with him, and would not
to drop him. What would you
iiks to arop mm. wnat would to
advise me to do write and ask him
what is the matter? H. u. O.
T
SUB very Inst thing you must
uo iu write uu p-ss xor an
explanation. If the boy cared
to make engagements with
you he would ask himself, never fear.
Just a word of advtoe to you, my
dear. Even though you meat a boy
Jind grow to love him to distraction,
et him do the love-making. It is
just possible that the young man has
guessed your feeling for htm and Is
shall I say It 7 afraid of you.
Dear Annie Laurie We are two
high school girls,, and we each
feu desperately in love with a high
aohool boy, a year our senior.
We never met him, but wo tele
phoned him last summer. Our
first conversation -lastea an hour
nnd a half, He Mlced us to meet
him. and we refused. He asked
to call, and one evening he and
a friend came. Since theft one, of
us has met a second boy and be
come rather InUmato with him.
Now what shall we. dot Ignore
tnem, continue anoaiunr, or wnau
wa never wouia nava
nhoned
them In the
beclnnlnir
had we
it nerl-
known they
would take
""'two pehplkxed ontLa.
Uii Laurie toilt tesleome letters
et inquiry on tuofeatt of fafereit
from reader of thU paper, and will
reply to them in thete columns.
They ehould be addreittA to her,
care tMt of Hoe,
(Copy't, till, by Newepeper Feature servile.)
What They Say
About Us
iVhen Is a Teacher "Hopeless," Dr,
Martin?
The effloienoy bus?
has more vie
tlms.
blue tne rauacy
. ." - T - -
that if a
thing Is "modern" It Is perfect,
tne emeienoy naoit nas crept upon
us. We have efficient nurses for
our children. We have efficient
bookkeepers, and now the board
of education wants efficient teaoh
ers. Hot only this, but Or, Mar
tin proposes to dismiss the older
teachers, whom he designates as
"hopeless," and to install "young
blood with ginger and efficiency"
in their places, He Intimates, but
does not guarantee, a pension for
the discarded schoolmarms. What
is this efficiency whloh is ousting
the older women, anyway? Is it
real merit, or Is it only Dr. Mar
ttn's private notion of what a
teacher should be? Young blood
and ginger sounds well enough as
a figure of sneeoh, but It cannot re
place experience in handling the
problems ot the schoolroom. It
cannot .give balance and dignity
where those qualities are lack
ing. There Is no sentiment in
bUHlneRK, but there should be jus
tice. Philadelphia Evening Ledger.
The Health of Teachers.
The Investlratlon Into the health
of school teachers, and into the
school conditions which affect It
adversely. Initiated by the Brook
lyn Teachers' Association, ought to
brlnsr rood results.
Nothing is so conducive to good
work In a classroom as stood health,
good tamper and enthusiasm on the
oart of the teacher. No matter how
willing tho spirit may be, it Is al
most imoosslble to maintain good
temper and enthusiasm without a
foundation of sound physical health.
A teacher mav triumph over such
a condition by strength of will for a
dav or two occasionally, but nobody
can do good work under tho pres
sure of habitual strain, nr under
conditions which cause Irritation,
If there are conditions, either In
the arrancement of school buildings
or In the distribution of the work,
whioh produce this habitual strain
anions' teachers, thsv should be
remedied. The first thing to learn
what proportion of the teachers are
Chabltuallv tired, and whether It is
tho work of the schools, the condi
tion of the buildings, or the outside
activities of the teachers which are
responsible for the strain. Brooklyn
Dally Kaole.
GASTQRIA
For Infants and Ohildren
Mothers Know That
Genuine Castoria
Always
Bears the
Signature
of
In
Use
For Over
Thirty Years
CASTORIA
lenv.
mBt,m bh saKr
fa Jfv
Skilled Physician Sees
In Eyes, of His Patient
Key To His Diagnosis
By DR. LEONARD
(Oopyrirht, HIS, by Newspaper feature Servloe. Inci
"W
RAT the ere teeth, no man
may deny." is not any
mors true than the equal
Ijr absurd saying that
"seeing is believing." experiments day
by day prove that simple, acta or events
staged for the purpose are seen very
differently when described under bath
by forty honest observers made up
from various walks of life namely,
clergyman, detectives, salesmen, social
workers, doctors, teachers, policemen,
bartenders, students, upllfters. and
militant moralists.
Newspaper reporters, policemen, de
tectives, and boy under ton years ot
age tell more accurately what takes
place than do most other men. Per
haps the most inaccurate and far
fetched Accounts pf what M seen are
made by teachers, students, social work
ers, upUrters, and moralists-all of
which goes to show that -the eye de
ceives very often, as Harry Keller,
Charles Ouralsr. and other famous ma
sTiotans are fond of claiming.
As a means, however, of conveying
information to physiolans who have de
voted many years to the perfection of
skill in diagnoses, the ejres of patients
are no fallow fields of facts.
Soma Danger gicnals. .
When the eyes "op out almost." as
In fear and fright, the alert physician
examines the patient's Adam's apple
for an. enlarged thyroid gland. If only
one eye bulges he considers a possible
infeotlon or tumor behind the eyeball.
If the eyelid Is 'narrowed there Is an
affection or the "sympathetic" nerve
controlling the eye. This nerve extends
Into the neck, where search is made
for pressure from goitre, enlarged
glands., "aneurysm." enlarged blood
channel, or spinal cord disease.
When there occurs a constant soasm
or twitching of the eyelids in the form
of winking or convulsive movements,
the eyeballs should be look at, the
eyes examined for glasses, or even a
toothache suspected.
A watery eye. Associated with in
ability Wholly to close it means either
fefthl paralysis, locomotor ataxia, or
middle ear disease. Dropping of one up
per lid occurs in paralysis of the eyelid
Troop News
G
IRL Scouts ot Washington are
anticipating the Christmas
party at which they are to
be hostesses for the children
of the city's special schools on Thurs
day. There la now on enrollment of
1W children at these schools. Three
or four girls from each troop will
accompany the captain to act as
hostesses. A turkey dinner is to be
served and fruit and candy bags
distributed,
Mrs. Archibald Hopkins has urged
the executive board of the Wash
ington Olrl Boouta to ask the girls
to visit Red Cross headquarters and
observe the work of the surgical
dressing committee. They are also
asked to begin ooUectlng old white
material for the use of the commit
tee. After semaphore drill and gym
slum practice at the last meeting of
Troop t the srtrls adjourned to the
home of Mrs. Qlles B. Hotter, where
Mrs. Archibald Hopkins gave an
address on the work ot the surgical
dressings committee, co-operating
with the Red Cross. She asked that
the Olrl ncouts send them rags of
any description, as long as thoy
3;'M-I-I"-I"M'I"I-M l - t - l"l"Il"M - l"l"l"l
SORQSII
SHOES
A Christmas Reminder
Shoes Make a Very Acceptable Gift
Sorosis Shoes Always Please
Any Woman Would Be Pleased With a Pair of Sorosis
Shoes ot Evening Slippers
Felt Slippers for Women and Men
Very Comfy
Try Ihe certificate plan to make your Christmas gifts.
SOROSIS BOOT SHOP
1213 F Street N. W.
$
2n XMAS CARDS, 94-u
V Each In Knvelope For Mailing &$B
Presidential Choco
lates, the dollar kind;
made on the premises
fresh daily, 50c lb.
BSaaBBBBBBBBBBBBBBSSBSBSBSSBBBBBBB
Solid Gold Laval
lieres, in unequaled va
riety, price, $1.50 up.
Ogram's Gift Store "
KEENE HlRSHBERQ.
nerves and in locomotor ataxia. In
children it points to injury at birth.
If both exhibit an unduo amount of
lacrymotlon, the thyroid gland must bo
examined. When the tear glands them
selves arc swollen and innamed. mumps
should be sought In the usual ni. ii.
fore the ears.
Dropsy oT the eyelids, or "bags under
the eyes" Is present when the Individual
so afieoted Is anemic, loses too S
loses too muoh
II I A An. fmwi fnnMllnBita1
cesslvely or has diseased kldnTvV
worries ex-
Fullnoss under
Me llnAe.ei .. .!. .
one eye indicates
possible stye. Faulty
vision may also
uni
ring tbts to pass.
JtPJlX' "" nd "Peted move
ments of the eyes may be made vertical
ly, stdewlse or In a rotary fashion; If
present since birth it Is almost a certain
sign of color bllndnoss: if acquired later
JP Je It makes tho physician think of
syrlngomelia" and "multiple sclerosis?"
two maladies ot the spinal cord. It oc
? also after one kind of appoplexy.
and in two Inner ear diseases.
The color of the eyelids gives a clue
of the quality of the blood, as well as to
the absence or presence of bile, silver,
,eaA or other poisons. Tiny points or
red inside the eyelids also Indicate high
blood pressure and brittle arteries in
flArlyvtrona. Found in children, they
lead the doctor to suspect whooping
oougn.
Exaggerated redness of the eyelids
oocurs in "pink eye" and other more
serious inflammations such ae "iritis "
A patient almost lost his eyesight re
cently by regarding this serious ailment
as "only a little inflammation of the
eyea," and treating It with "rosewater"
and other ever-ready remedies.
It must be plain from this that the.
else, quality and condition of the pupil.
the lens, the Iris, the eyeball, and all
the other structures yield an abundance
of valuable aid to the observant phy
sician. PERSONAL ADVICE.
Readers deslrins advice should
remember:
1. To address inquiries to Dr. L.
K. Hirshberi, tare of The
Woshinttton Times.
2. To enclose a stamped and ad
dressed envelope if a personal
reply is desired.
of Girl Scouts
were clean and white. Old blankets,
table and bed linen, .underwear,
bath toweling, bedspreads, excel
sior, and oakum are suggested.
Louise Williams and Josephine
Cbllds were admitted to the troop.
All the girls of Troop 3 passed
their .tenderfoot examinations at the
last meeting, and Mrs. Henry T
Ralney. president ot the Washing
ton Olrl Scouts, nresented the pins.
The troop cave the scout cheer, fol
lowed by an address from the na
tional secretary. Miss Cora Neat. Mrs.
Giles Rafter, national vice presi
dent, spoke to the parents on the
value of the scout movement
Troop 6. of Takoma. is still help
ing the destitute family whose home
was destroyed by fire several weeks
ago. They are also planning to
distribute Christmas baskets among
the poor families of Takoma Park
A basketball game followed the last
meeting.
Troop 11 Is planning a tree foi
Christmas. Tho girls have drawn
names and each girl will receive a
present The girls have donated
money for a turkey for an old cou
ple In the neighborhood, letters
or sympathy were sent to a aictc
scout.
- i - - H - - l - I - l - M - l"! M-M-M-H'! H
I
I
I
V
T
V
t
H-H-W
?H"I-K"I";"t-Hfr M-fr.X"M-l-M-I"H;
Parisian Ivory
is in great demand this Xinas.
Makes handsome gifts, especially
when MONOGRAMMED IN
COLORS. We have Parisian
Ivory Toilet Sets, Mirrors,
Clothes Brushes, Shoe Horns,
Manicure ' Sets, Jewel Boxes,
Powder Boxes, Hiiir Receivers,
Clocks, etc., at low prices.
Ave.

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