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The Washington times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, November 04, 1916, HOME EDITION, Image 14

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THE WASHINGTON TIMES,' SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1016.
14
"7 :
i
Raising Pantomime Froth Zero ,
Is Film's Benefit to Stage
Manager of' Washington Square
Players Tells How Pictures
Help Drama.
INFLUENCE IS FOR GOOD
Aotors and Actresses Learn to
Express Emotion Without
Resort to. Words.
By EDWARD CORBETT,
Washington Square Playora.
It Is In the revival of the
pantomimic art, through the de
velopment of pantomime In people
who have no state experience, but
hitherto undiscovered acting ability,
that I believe the motion picture is
to be of tremendous benefit to the
drama.
To that decree the picture play
offers an almost unlimited field of
study and observation for tho actor
or the manager of any theatrical
venture. It was J. Stuart Dlackton,
the head of the Vltagraph Company,
I believe, who first majlo use of un
trained workers In film productions.
Once when his company could 'not
find In professional players Just the
type that Vu wanted for a certain
part Blackton bethoflg-ht him of an
explosive grocerman of his ac
quaintance. lie secured the services of the
grocer who. In his roly poly body,
his round and Jovial face reflected
very passing emotion "moving
dynamically within." which the part
demanded. The crqer made good
and Is now, I understand, a motion
plcturo actor of high attainments
and salary.
From my experience with our own
company, of players In their Inde
pendent venture In theatrlcnl affairs.
I should say that pantomime lays
a foundation upon which an artist
can build a career that will be suc
cessful In attainment, at least.
Once Was Essential.
To express emotions without
words was onco as Important to
the actor as a sonorous speaking
voice wit' which to declaim the
classic blank verse. It was con
sidered essential for an actor or
an actress to be thoroughly
grounded In pantomime.
In the development of the star
system and the type system of
caatlnx parts, pantomime was
dropped because It required tedi
ous training: for an actor to per
fect himself In the art. It was re
garded as a help, but not an essen
tial leature.
The motion picture appears to
me to be destined to bring It back
as an essential because the mo
tion picture Is developing some
thing that Is more than mere ges
ture. In the pantomimic Interpre
tation of emotion.
In the Washington Square Play
ers, who are lust closing their en
gagement In Washington, tho local
motion picture patrons have seen
a demonstration of the practical
application of pantomime to the
sneaking ,stage in the presenta
tion of Maeterlinck's little trag
edy, "Interior."
In this plav the majority of the
characters do not speak a word.
TODAY'S BEST FILMS.
Strand, Ninth and D streets Enid
Markey and Howard Hickman In
"Civilisation," produced by Thomas
H. Ince.
Leader. Ninth between E and P
treets Mary P,lckford In "Ma
dame. Uutterfluy," adapted from
the play 'by David Delasco, based
on the Jitpry by John Luther Long
(Famous Players).
Masonlo' ' Auditorium, Thirteenth
streot and New York avenue E.
II. Sothern and Peggy Hyland In
"Tho Chattel," directed bv Fred
crick Thompson (Vltagraph).
Penn Gardens, Twenty-first street
and Pennsylvania avenue Valoska
Suratt In "The Straight Way"
(Fox Film Co.)
Garden, 43 Ninth street Richard
Bennett In "Philip Hplden-Waster"
(Mutual).
Loew's Columbln. Twelfth and F
streets Jack Plckford and Louise
Huff In "Seventeen," adapted from
the story by Booth Tarklngton
(Famous Players).
Circle, 2105 Pennsylvania avenue
Alice Brady and Irving Cummlngs
in "The Gilded Cage" (World Film
Corp.).
Crandall's, Ninth and E streets
Mary MacLaren and Phillips Smal
ley In "Saving tho Family Name"
produced by Lois Weber (Univer
sal). Savoy, Fourteenth streot and Co
lumbia road Valentino Grant In
"The Daughter of MacGregor"
(Famous Players).
Apollo, 624 H street northeast Pau
line Frederick In "The Eternal
City," adapted from the noVcl by
Hall Calne (Famous Players).
Avenue Grand, fH5 Pennsylvania
avenue southeast Pauline Freder
ick in "The World's Great Snare."
adapted from tho story by E. Phil
lips Openhelm (Famous Players).
PHOTOPLAYS
Symphony
Of Commanding Excellence.
Leader
Ninth Street's Fashionable Photoplay Theater
TO DAY
Mary Pickford in "Madame Butterfly"
SUNDAY AND MONDAY
Blanche Sweet in "The Storm"
TUISSD.1Y AND WICDNK8DAY
Marie Doro in "The Lash"
TIIimHDAY AND FWDAY
Lenore Ulrich
in "The Intrigue"
SATUnDAY
MARY PICKFORD in
"Little Pal"
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GAIL KANE.
Star To Bo Seen, at Crandall's Tomorrow In New Photoplay, Who Is
Ono of tho Actresses Who Havo Learned Pantomime In the Mo
tion Picture.
they are inside the house and are
seen through the large windows.
The people who gather on the out
side and look In do all the talk
ing. But those four people who
are Inside aro busy all of the time
about the natural tasks of such
people. They do mot Kestlculate,
they do not talk but they Per
form the essentials of real panto
mime. Develops Now Players.
I do not believe this play would
be as effectlvo as It is had it not
been for the opportunity our plaers
had to study motion pictures. I do
not mean by that to say that the
players in "Interior" got their in
struction from motion pctures. But
what I do mean Is that the forms of
expression that have been brought
out by picture plays which all of
these peoplo have seen from time to
time had a subconscious Influence on
thetr work In this Play.
Also I believe that the chief at
traction of tho Washington Square
Playcrs-thelr spontaneity and their
enthusiasm-la duplicated in the peo
plo we see In motion Pictures who
have been developed from what .wo
might call n dramatic scro to high
places of artistic preferment
It Is because of this fact that I be
lieve the players of the stsge who
hive gono'lnto motion pictures wilt
return to the stage with a much
better understanding of V?
and a way of enforcing their lines
with action that will make their
work twice as effective, that I say
U,o pictures will revive pantomime
and benefit the stage. I am i con
vinced this is so ly the poop' l
have seen who have worked in pic
tures. Sisters Star Together.
For the first tlmo In their lives tho
two dainty little sisters, Mary Miles
MInter and Margaret Shelby, will ap
pear together In a photoplay.
Picturegoers will see them-the one
Quickest Service to Baltimore.
Every hour on the hour, Baltimore A
Ohio. SL7S round trip. Saturdays and
Sundays 'LEO. Advt
PHOTOPLAYS
now
-ft V Penn Ou
Today
. Valeska Suratt
IN
"The Straight Woman"
Election returns
Tuesday night by ar
rangement with The
Washington Times..
Orchestra
j
fair and blue-eyed, the other dark with
gold-brown curls In "Faith." he third
of Mary . MJles Mlnter'a charming
Mutual pictures' which will be' released
October 30.
While the two charming young sisters
have appeared togothor on the stage, it
has never been their good fortune to
play in the same picture.
Their features are somewhat alike,
though their coloring Is distinctly different.
PHOTOPLAYS
Tomorrow, 8 P. M.
ALL SEATS 15c
DAILY-
Mats.lOc Eves.ISc
LEWIS J. SEJLZNICK PRESENTS
The American Screen Star and Popular Favorite
CLARA KIMBALL YOUNG
In the Crowning Success of Her .Career 7-Part Masterplay
COMMON LAW
BY ROBERT W. CHAMBERS STAGED BY
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Tomorrow. 3 P. M.
I ALL SEATS ISc
-DAILY
Mats. 10 c Eyes. 15c
SUN.-MON.-TUES.
LI o nil Barrymore
IN THE
Brand of Cowardice
NO. 2
Rosemary My, "Gertie's Garters"
MAX EN ROUTEWITH
, i tf ' A
Frenof) PhotoptoCfomwjfan at
Last on His Way to
America.
Max Linder, retired French soldier,
but an actre photoplay comedian of
international reputation, Is on his
way to America with forty-six trunks
of clothes. He is expected to arrive
in New York November 12, having
stopped for a few weeks In England.
George K. Spoor, president of the Es
s an ay company, Is now in New York
and will meet the French comedian
and escort him to tho Essanay stu
dios In Chicago,
Linder has signed a contract for
ono year, with the option of renewal.
He Is engaged to put out twelve
comedies, two reels in length, In a
year.
Max. as he is universally known,
acquired his reputation with the
Pathe company, for whom he worked
eleven' years, when the war started
he auit his work and Joined the army
as an aeroplane and automobile scout;
serving two years. He was seriously
wounded and was sent to the mili
tary hospital at Contrexvllle. It was
while In the hospital that Mr. Spoor
opened negotiations for nls serru
"I am' willing to give my life for
my country, out I believe i can serve
her better bv giving the salary, which
seems fabulous to me. to her cause,'
in hair rati a "
was Mr. lenders answer.
TT win .honorably discharged, and
after a month spent In Hwitxerland to
recuperate started for the United
States. Characteristic of Llnder's
dandyism, he cabled Mr, Spoor -that
ha waa 'leaving France with forty-six
trunks or clothes, nis warasooe con
slstlng of the most up-to-date styles
of Paris.
1 i
Ethel Barrymore in Film
Written by-Washingtonian
Ethel Barrymore's next appearing In
motion pictures will be In' a Aim adapta
tion of
mtchle."
"The Awakening of Helena
The play has been adapted
L
o the needs or the mm oy Charles u.
alcne. formerly a Washington news
paper man and a member of the staff
of The Times.
Mr. Malgne has made a very careful
adaptation of the story with the abilities
of Miss Bnrrymore particularly In mind
for the star part The result baa been
the best picture In which Miss Barry
more has appeared. John W, Noble, the
director responsible for the exquisite
Hunhmftn-Havne film production of
"Romeo and Juliet." directed the Droduo-
! Hon which will be released for exhibition
the latter part of November. ,
PHOTOPLAYS
GARDEN
STRAND
WED. THUR.-FRI.
VIOLA BANA
-IN THE
GATES OF EDEH
-r-NO. 3
Kate Price, "A Warn. ReceptiT
I
F
DUND MISSING BOY
IN W NEWS FILM
Pittsburgh Mother Looates Sop.
In British Army She Thought
Was Dead.
The motion picture news pictorial
has entered & new field. It has lo
cated n missing son for his grtef
strlcken parents, who long bolleved
him dead.
Six years ago Earl Btcscker, of 226
Zara street, Knoxvllle, a suburb of
Pittsburgh, Pa., Joined the United
States navy. He rematnod in the
service four years, and was ono of the
sailors who carried the caskets of the
Maine heroes at Arlington Cemetery.
At the outbreak of the European
war voung Blescker Joined the Brit
ish army, his term of servlco in tho
United Spates navy having expired.
Ills letters came regularly until six
mpnths ago. Then they abruptly
ceased. All Inquiry failed to reveal
his whereabouts, and ho was finally
given up ,as dead. The family went
Into mourning.
The Olympic Theater, In Pittsburgh,
last week showed the International
Film Service news pictorial contaln-
Ing views of the burial of the Zjd-
neiln dead in isngisna.
A neighbor
of
the Blesckors visited the theater
the opening day. He was startled to
see Earl Blescker In the first row of
the casKet Dearer. ,
Notified the Mother.
Before arousing the hopes of the
family he remained for the second
performance. Then, positive of the
identification, he hurried to 'the
Blescker home, where he told the
Boy's mother. She went to the thea
ter and almost collapsed from Joy
when ahe saw her son. Norman
Blescker, the boy's father, Is an en
gineer on the Pennsylvania rauroaa.
A telekram summoned him home, and
In., too. Identified nis son. 'ou can-
not realise my feelings." said Mrs.
Blescker, "when I saw my boy again,
his features and expression so plain
that there was ho mistaking the Iden
UflcatPon. The agony and heartaches
or these long months were Instantly
swept away, for I know now that my
boy Is still alive.'
Mr. Blescker Immediately sent a let
ter to the British war office, relating
the circumstances. He believes that
I this way he will be able to analn
get in communication with his son.
nilDCCEO FAIIES FOB VOTKIIS
Southern Railway. Consult Agents.
Advt.
..
PHOTOPLAYS
Complitt Rtturnt
Election
TuiB.Evi.lOilSShow
ALBERT CAPELLANI
Gimplito Returns
Eltctlin
Tuts. Evi. 10.15 Show
SATURDAY ONLY
DUSTIN FARNUM
-IN THE
IRON STRAIN
NO. 2
Oias. Hurray, "Game (Hd Knight"
Alan Hale, Actor, Began
Life as an Osteopath
Just four years aro, Alan Hale, a na
tive of this city, waa graduated from
the Philadelphia School of Osteopathy
wjth a diploma entitling him to practice'
naa cnosen proression. 'loaay, in anno
domlnl 11, Hale la finishing work In
William Fox photoplay In whloh he Is
featured with Oretchcn Hartman.
Mr. Hale was born here, butmost of
ma education was acquired in l'nm
ulrcd In Phlladtl-
phla, 'and most of hi
Is career maonea
out there. He had such a splendid
fihysique tnat Mike Murphy, tne atn
stlo trainer of the University of, Penn
sylvania, aetected him for development
into a champion strong man.
Mr, Hale says that his earliest am
bition was to become a singer. He was
accepted as a protege of Andreas Dip
pel, out lost his voice. t
"I have recovered It since; You might
LOCAL MENTION.
WE 'WOULD Ilk to doublejrour Income mar
we? The Mutual Life, Ttioe. P. Morgan.
Ucr., Southern bids. Qood terms to producers.
The Sunday 'Evening: Times has
11 tho acknowledged advantages ot
evening newspaper circulation with
none of the disadvantages of Sunday
morning newspapers of many sections.
PHOTOPLAYS
MMMltS
SYMPHONY
Robert Warwick'
Sun.
AND
Hoi.
Gail Kane
Thu.
J, Warren Kerrigan
Wei
Gladys Brockwell
AND
Herschel Mayall
Hra.
Fit
Sat
BANDALI.'
S A V O V
arren Kerrigan sun
PCTRA FRED MACE In
J. Warren
MONDAY
PAULINE FREDERICK in
"Ashes of Embers"
TUESDAY
NANCE 0'NEIL in
"The Iron Woman"
WEDNESDAY
EDNA GOODRICH in
"House of Lies"
IRAN DA Lli'
-V -APOLIO-
mae horry
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MONDAY
MAUDE FEALY in
"Tho Immortal Flame"
TUESDAY
ALICE BRADY in
"The Gilded Cage"
WEDNESDAY
LOUISE HUFF in
"Reward of Patience"
C RANDALL'
AVE. GRAND
ALICE BRADY
MONDAY
WM. H. THOMPSON in
"Eye of Night"
and Keystone Players in
"A Social Club"
TUESDAY
MYRTLE STEDMAN In
"An Amerioan Beauty"
WEDNESDAY
NANCE 0'NEIL in
"The Iron Woman"
not believe It uhless I told you W' hi
concluded facetiously, "but these fit the
dressing rooms who hear ma rehearsing
ballavelt." "
d
TUB LINK between the oealUt
and hl patient Is the skilled end
careful execution of his preeerip
none, we nr duiii up a er
vloe whloh carries out to the led
detail the requirements ot both
oeullet and patient. Mar we link I
our service with your sklllT
tut U st. N. W aootnern BUM
PHOTOPLAYS
THE CIRCLE
atM Peana. At.
, TODAY
ALICE BRADY in
"The Gilded Cage"
Toiuonnow
"Double Fentn re Bill"
EARL WILLIAMS In
"The Hidden Prince"
AND
"Tnn riuNcio chap.'
ORCHESTRA
"HEART OF
A HERO"
Baad on the Novel
"NATHAN UAtB."
I
"SOCIAL
BUCCANEER"
"Sins of
Her Parents"
1
14th and Colrabit Read
Mt. Plrasnnt'a Ontr Bxelu-
aWe Fentnre; Miato-
lar Hout.
J
"I
"SOCIAL
BUCCANEER"
LOVER'S MIQHT"
THURSDAY
H0LBR00K BLINN and
ETHEL CLAYTON in
"The Hidden Scar"
FRIDAY
WILLIAM S. HART
In "The Patriot"
EXTRA LOUISE FAZENDA
and CHARLES MURRAY
In "Maid Mad"
SATURDAY '
MAURICE and FLORENCE
WALTON in
"The Quest of Ufe"
634 H St. N. E.
Norheast'a Ontf Exolnelre
Featura Phatoplar Itaeuia.
spj"The Big Sister'
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THURSDAY
NANCE 0'NEIL in
"The Iron Woman"
FRIDAY
DUSTIN FARNUM in
"Parson of Panamint"
8ATURDAY
MABEL TRUNNELLE in
"Heart of the Hills"
345 Pa. Aye. S. E.
Southeast's Only ISxclMtva
Feature Phot tola? Horn,
"THE GILDED
CAGE"
THURSDAY
THEDA BARA and
HARRY HILLIARD in
"Romeo and Juliet"
Special Matinee At 2tOO I. M.
FRIDAY
DOROTHY GISH in
"Little School Ma'am"
MACK SWAIN in
"Madoap Ambrose"
SATURDAY
BLANCHE SWEET in
"The Dupe" ,
f

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