OCR Interpretation


The Washington times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, October 20, 1917, FINAL EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026749/1917-10-20/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

THE WASHINGTON TIMES, SATURDAY OCTOBER '20; 1917.
Four Allied Nations In Tremendous Artillery Attack On West Flanders Front
GUNS
MEHIY
DUEL OF SHELLS
(Continued from First Page.)
ley's recent visit to the front and
drastic disciplinary measures had re
sulted In a new strengthening of
tne Russian army morale.
London does not expect Tetrograd
to be seriously menaced by any drive
before spring Even at the top speed
with which the Germans are now
carrying out their naval campaign.
It Is impossible iMt they could get
ready for a lant offensive against
the Russian capital before a Inter's
cold forces Inactlvit). In the mean
time Petrograd mill be abandoned as
the capital
Cermans Occupy Dagoe Island.
COPENHAGEN, Oct. 20 German
troops are today occupying Dagoe
Island, the second largest of the
group dominating the entrance to the
Gulf of Riga. Under heavy fire from
German dreadnaughts and cruisers
troops were landed at Serro and be
gan a drive across the Island, al
though their progress was hotly con
tested by the Russians.
There are six islands in the archi
pelago commanding Riga gulf, and
already the Germans hold four of
them.
(Dagoe Island contains approxl
tnately 478 square miles, and is given
over openly to cattle raising).
Advices from Petrograd today
stated the government archives are
being removed to Moscow. This was
sin expected move, however, as it nas
been reported ever sine the fall of
Riga that the capital would be moved
from Petrograd to Moscow.
STRONG GERMAN FORCE
THROWN BACK WITH BIG
LOSS IN AISNE SECTOR
PARIS, Oct 20. Strong German
patrol forces were thrown bsck In
spirited lighting In which the enemy
suffered heavy losses around Men
jean farm (Alsne sector), today's of
ficial statement said
The fighting came after violent
artillery firing
On the right bank of the Meuse. at
Bexonvaux and at Carlerea wood, the
war office reported very heavy artill
ery firing.
CHANCELLORSHIP CRISIS
AWAITS KAISER'S RETURN
AMSTERDAM, Oct 20. Th Frank
furter Zeltung learns from Berlin that
the crisis over the chancellorship will
not -be settled before the Kaiser's re
turn on Monday n
If Admiral von Capelle'a resigna
tion is accepted. Dr Michaells may
conclude to remain In office provi
sionally If, honeier. the resignation
of the minister of marine Is not ac
eepted. all political circles agree In
the view that the effect on the posi
tion of tbo Imperial chancellor will
be Innm-diate.
Vewspaper attacks on Dr Michaells
continue. Friedrlch von Payer, the
South German democrat. Informs the
press that there is no foundation for
the rumor that the position of vice
chancellor was offered to him.
"SHOCK TTIOOPS" TAIL
IN SURPRISE ATTACK
ROME, Oct 20 Austro-IIungarlan
"shock troops' made a surprise attack
against the Italian garrison holding
the summit of the mountain fortress
of Monte San Gabriels, in the Julian
Alps, but were driven off after a burst
of spirited fighting, said a dispatch
from TJdlne toda
In the meantime Italian guns keep
upon a continual bombardment of
Monte Sandienele, the twin of San
Gabrlele, which the Austro-Hun
garlans still hold
Both of these mountains are on the
southern fringe of the Dalnslzza
plateau, northeast of Gorilla.
HIBBEN HITS AT SPEAKERS.
PHILADELPHIA. Oct. "Ml Dr John
Grfer HIbben, president of Princeton
TJnit erslty. has openly charged that
those professors who are raising a cry
for freedom of speech and making the
claim that It Is essential to academic
freedom are guilty of treason. In ad
dressing a group of educators here.
President HIbben said that If their
claims be true, "then academic freedom
Is a farce."
BEnER THAN CALOMEL
Thousands Have Discovered
Dr. Edwards Olive Tablets
are aHarrnlessSubstitute
Dr-Edwards Olive Tablets the sub
sUtute for calomel are a mild bat rare
laxative, and their effect on the liver is
almost instantaneous. They are the re
sult of Dr. Edwards's determination not
to treat liver and bowel complaints with
calomel. His efforts to banish it brought
out these little olive-colored tablets.
The pleasant little tablets dothe good
that calomel does, but have no bad after
effects. They don't injure the teeth like
strong liquids or calomel. They take
aoid of the troubleand qukklyeorrect it.
Why cure the liver at the expense of the
teeth? Calomel sometimes plays havoc
withthegums. Sodostrongliquids. It
Is best not to take calomel, but to let Dr.
Edwards' Olive Tablets take its place.
Most headaches, "dullness" and that
lazy feeling come from constipation and
a disordered liver. Take Dr.Edwards'
OUve Tablets when you fed "loggy"ane"
"heavy." Notehowthey'cteir' clouded
brain and how they "perk up"thesplr'3
10eaad25cabox AUdrussLac-Advt.
Hole Made By Shell Hurled From Huge
PSBSSSSX
When the "Biz Berthas" speak,
so the Germans boast. And well
ELDERS COMBING
D.C.T0AI0L0AN
(Continued from First Page.)
12.000,000 a day. Hundreds of Wash
lngton workers are confident that It
can be done.
Subscriptions throughout the na
tion biased ahead today, as the cam
paign turned the three-quarter post.
Fifty-five army filers carrying a se
cret message from President Wilson
raided and bombed as many cities
with Liberty loan pleas today.
A national roll of honor, perpetuat
ing for future generations the names
of all subscribers to the Liberty
loans, was started by the Treasury
Department today.
With Boy Scouts throughout the
country, starting on a campaign slml
Iar to that In Washington and with
the same anards being held out In
eiery city, officials are still confident
that the maximum subscription of
13,000,000,000 Hill be reached, though
more than half the distance roust be
covered In the last Quarter of the
campaign
The roll of honor started by Sec
retary McAdoo will make no dlstlnc
tlon between the fifty dollar bond
bujer and the subscriber of millions
Only the names and not the amount
will be enrolled
Women Xrt (300,000.
The campaign of the women's com
mlttee In the District has netted half
a million dollars for the loan here
The million dollar mark will be
passed before subscriptions close, the
committee members believe.
The total for women In the Gov
ernment has passed the 1150,000 mark
The committee on hotels, under direc
tlon of Mrs William C Herron, has
raised 1241,000.
A meeting under the auspices or
the women's committee will be held
at the home of Mrs. Joseph Letter on
Dupont Circle at o'clock this after
noon Mrs McAdoo nlll preside, and
the meeting is open to the public
Army Men Take 132.000,000.
Latest reports to th- War Depart
ment show that the military forces
and civilian emplojes have subscribed
132,000,000. Men In the national
army have averaged 124 52 each In
subscriptions, and national guards
men 133.30 each
Roy Scouts of the District jester
day received from Acting Secretary
of the Treasury Crosby honor medals
In recognition of their services for
the first loan The presentation in
terrupted a conference between the
Acting Secretary and J Plerpont Mor
gan.
A mass meeting of the Italians of
Washington will be held in Poll's
Theater at 3 o'clock tomorrow after
noon for the loan The Italian am
bassador and a number of prominent
business men will speak
A second mass meeting will be
held by the Greeks of Washington
In old Maaonle Temple Addresses
will be made by John Laakey and by
a number of Greek citizens.
Banks To Keep Open.
Cvery bank and trust company In
Washington will keep open until 9
o'clock every night next week to
handle loan subscriptions The banks
are prepared to finance liberty loan
subscription In any amount Notice
has been received from the reserve
bank at Richmond that notes for
Liberty bond pajments will be re
discounted for member bank At i
meeting last night of the District
Rankers' Association John Poole
made a motion thtt the limit of $100
IijKtJmmmmtAmiaMdBSFF&BKS8KSSriKiKKM9 JTsa-fcefiX--TcHBE? iv 1 aagHs.BssWWssHWssssrjsrjfrsBsssW
HtflixT .. " j -bisaasf saasaasaasaaV'sisaaT" sssPVifaissssssssl LsssssiPssPHsisaasisrsf 'JasslsEelsaasaaaaaaaB
ssassssssssssssssVf t "APtyfW" sTy .stfi5iBssBsssss..ssBsfej5 t9SBM4mKtttKf9KKlCSllBK P-QstssssssW
(3 saasaasaasaaVTlV M jxVity 3Ly jjUBiy SlSrf!, Jt"USiBKStSBBBtBK IHKKKC Nsssfc fe-MrSJ TssTssssssssssssfl
I C v, 4J3V X sisaflS5slwjlls3sisisaB
laaaitsssagssasasssssssBt-.'.jM-"'--j ijwisb..i'jm s ii ' mmu..jn it m .mmmm,m" ineimmii ssiswssBssssssssssaMssssssM
BOY SCOUTS AND
sssassssssgsiisasBxsisa
the "very earth trembles in dread
id" 1
It
it might Just look at this hole 1
EUROPEAN
NEWS
The progressive land and naval operations of the Germans among
the islands of the Kiea archipelago have either created a panic within
the military and naval staffs of the Russian provisional government,
or those directing commands have definite information that the Rus
sian army and navy ofthe Baltic defenses are unable or unwilling to
maintain an offensive stand against the invader. On no other apparent
grounds can there be explained the precipitate determination-of the
Russians to abandon the Baltic port of Reval and to move the capital
to Moscow.
The official Russian explanation for beginning the evacuation of
Reval is the fear that it will be taken in the rear. At present the Ger
man land forces of the Riga front, on the mainland, are no nearer the
rear of Reval than they eter have been. The German forces that have
been landed on the Riga islands have not yet reached the mainland, and
the islands themselves are some seventy miles southwest of Reval.
The only possible way that Reval could be taken in the rear would be
either through the abandonment of the Russian positions east and
northeast of Riga, followed by a general Tetreat, or through the land
ing of German forces from the Riga islands followed by a turning
movement east and north, involving progress over 100 miles or more of
difficult Russian terrain.
MOVING OF CAPITAL SHOWS PANIC
The decision shortly to abandon Petrograd as the capital and
transfer the government to Moscow merely intensifies the impression
of panic in the Russian command or the utmost weakness of tne Rus
sian defenses. Petrograd, at the eastern end of the Gulf of Finland, is
supposed to be protected, first, by the naal fortresses of Kronstadt
and Viborg, about opposite each other, on the Golf of Finland, some
seventy miles from Petrograd. The second defense of the capital is
the naval fortness of Reval, on the southern side of the Finland Gulf,
and Helsingfors, capital of Finland, on the northern side.
Petrograd is approachable by the German Baltic fleet only if all
these Russian defenses are oercome. The Russian Baltic fleet, al
though far inferior to the squadron the Germans have at their dis
posal, nevertheless would prtne an effective defense in support of the
fortress land batteries, especially in conjunction with the mine fields
supposed to protect the Gulf of Finland. Apparently, the Russians
have no faith even in their mine fields.
The progress of the actual German operations is steady, but cau
tious.. After capturing the whole of Moon Island, adjoining Oesel Is
land, in the Riga archipelago, they have now landed forces on Dagoe
Island, north of Oesel. The Russian Riga fleet is still bottled up in
Moon Sound, and probably will make its last defense in the fortified
harbor of the town of HapsaL fifty miles southwest of Reval. The
Germans hae captured an additional 5,000 prisoners through their
occupation of Moon Island.
HEAVY ARTILLERY FIRE ON WESTERN FRONT.
On the western front evidences are increasingly apparent of forth
coming actions of importance both on the Flanders and on the Aisne
fronts. In Flanders, the artillery fire has reached a pitch of drumfire
intensity east of Yprcs, particularly in the sectors of Zonnebeke and
northward near St. Julien and Steenbeke. The British are shelling the
German positions vigorously from their lines on the edge of the Houth
ulst Forest. There is also considerable artillery activity near the North
Sea coast and along the front held by the Belgians.
On the Aisne front the French have begun a terrific bombardment
of the German positions in the salient at the western end of the Chemin
des Dames, for the fifteen miles of line from the Laffaux Mill, at the
point of the wedge, eastward to Braye-en-Laonnois. Reconnoiterlng
attacks have occurred along the line of the bombardment.
be taken off of subscriptions that
will be handled by the banks on the
partial payment plan
A stirring appeal to the bankers
to devote all of their energies to
ward financing the war was made
by Edward Clifford, Chicago bank
er, at this meeting
ITALIANS WILL HOLD
LOAN MASS MEETING
All Italians are I ml tod to participate
In mass meeting to be held tomorrow
afternoon at 2 o'clock at Poll's Theater,
in conectlon with the Second Liberty
Loan Campaign. The meeting will be
excluslely Italian
Dr. Enrico Castelll will preside. Gen
cral Gugllelmottl, military attache of
the Italian embassy, will explain to the
audience the achleements of tha army
indcr General Cadorna. The relation
hlp of the Liberty loan to the Italian
military campalsn will be explained by
A. It. PincL who will Interpret the alms
Is a crater made by a German shell
is
in
the Aisne district. French soldiers
WAR
SUMMARY
of the United States In the present con
flict Admission is free. All Italian residents
are urged to be present Sunday Is to
be known as Italian day In the Second
Liberty Loan Campaign
EXECUTORS GET COURT'S
PERMISSION TO INVEST
ESTATE FUNDS IN BONDS
Permission to lnest ums belong
lng to two Washington estates In
Liberty loan bonds, was granted by
the District Supreme Court to local
attorneys today.
George E. Sullivan, attorney for
William J Dante, collector of the
estate of Stllaon Ilutchlns, asked the
court to permit the collector to In
vest 525,000 of the estate In bonds. II.
Wlnshlp Wheatley, receiver in the'
case of Hartman against Masters,
filed a petition to be allowed to pur
chase (10,000 worth of bonds from
the money which he now holds. Doth
petitions were grunted.
German Gun
in the courtyard of a French home
are shown surveying the damage.
t
LpNDON, Oct. 20 Developments in
th Ekengren- situation are being
watched here with keen Interest but
without much apprehension of any
very serious results The attitude of
th Swedish minister In Washington,
it Is believed. Is likely to undergo
1 modlficatlob 1ft View of the formation
of a new government in Sweden.
The whole Incident, has served only
to strengthen tha conviction that th
utmost precautions are necessary to
counteract German machinations, and
especially to circumvent Germany's
unscrupulous use of neutral agents.
It Is remarked here that Minister Ek
engren himself may be above auspl
clon. but recent experience has shown
British officials that even ministers
of neutral atates may be made Inno
cent victims of German wiles. With
in the 1at few weeks a curious Inci
dent of the kind has come within the
cognizance of the British secret serv
ice.
A South American, who for some
J ears held a diplomatic post In Ger
many recently arrived in ixinaon,
bringing with him diplomatic pouches
carryln. the official seals Through
a variety of circumstances suspicion
fell upon the traveler, and representa
tions were made to his minister In
London, who had the pouches opened
and discovered that they contained a
large quantity of a special German
product used In the treatment of a
particular disease It developed that
the South American traveler had In
vested a small fortune In this product
expecting to sell it at a greatly en
hanced price in his own country
- As this specific clearly did not come
within the description of diplomatic
dispatches, the minister ruled that his
subordinate must make amends by
presenting his stock to British hos
pitals $100,000 LIBERTY LOAN
BONDS FOR THE W.R.&E.
To dispose of at least J 100,000 of
the Second Liberty Loan Is the aim
of the Washington Railway and Elec
trie Company, whlcw has appointed
a committee of eighty members, with
L. B Schloss as chairman, to work
for the loan through the medium of
personal appeals among employes, It
became known today
The company has given the loan a
boost right from the start by taking
$50,000 worth and will finance partial
payment purchases by any of Its em
ployes. Prominent speakers have been
obtained to address the emploves at
all of the barns beginning Monday
The sum of $20,750 was the record
of the company and Its employes for
the First I.oan. the company larking
$3,000 worth and the rest being raises
among ICO employes
YEGGS GET $22,000
IN MICHIGAN BANK
GRAND RAPID, Mich. Oct 20.
Bandits blew the vault of the Farm
ers' State Bank at Mlddlevllle early
this morning, and escaped with ap
proximately $12,000
Tjfere were foil- explosions after
which the thieves escaped In sn automobile
HNDK
" MAIL POUCHES
ANTILLES' SINKING
1YAR0USE-U.S.
. TO OFFENSIVE
By DAVlD LAWBENCE.
(Continued from 'First Page.)
th British admiralty for a naval of
fensive. Britain's censoring of the
article written by Arthur Pollen, the
English naval critic. In which ha rep
resented the American Navy Depart-!
ment as desirous for a naval offen-
lve. caused much surprise hsro to-j
day. Mr. Pollen bad exceptional op-1
portunlties to learn th views of
American naval officers and high of
ficials, and his at forts to. Influence th
British navy to adopt a more .vigor
ous policy really have sad wide sym
pathy here.
Th-nounarant In th British j
House of Commonsto the effect that,
the publication of his story would
only-emphasis a lack of co-operation
between the British and American na
vies and would give comfort to tha
enemy caused much regret because,
there Is a- school of thought here
which Insists that the naval party In
England will cot b thoroughly!
aroused to th need for a change of!
policy unless full publicity stimulates
public opinion there. j
-Thus far th American Navy Depart-)
ment too. has followed a policy of abv4
soiuie suence concerning tne convoy
system, and th strength of America's
defense against submarines.
Th. fear has been that Germany
would learn the number of ships and
methods used by reading American
newspapers, when, as a matter of fact'
German submarines have had ample
opportunity already to observe In b'road
daylight what the American destroyers
have-been dotnr.
The .advantage. on the other nancT, of
Informing the American people details
of what measures are being taken to
ward off submarines might-it Is rea.
oned, have a reassuring, effect In many
ways and at least a healthful Influence
In. labor controversies which must be
eliminate dlf th destroyers now build
ing or planned are to be rush dto com
pletion In." tiro to- protect the national
arnxjt.ot drafted troops, when ready for
therjtyl overseas.
ANTILLES SURVIVORS
'COMING TO AMERICA
ON VESSELS OF CONVOY
Th survivors of the American
troop transport Antilles, sunk by a
German submarine with a loss of
seventy lives, are being brought to
Ithls country by the warship convoy
that waa with the transport wnen the
U-boat attack was made. It was at
first thought that the survivors would
be taken to England or Francs, but
at the navy Department It was
learned today that thty will b
brought directly to tha United States,
,",and that probably until they arrive
in xuu aetaus or ,ine oisasier win
not be learned.
' Secretary' Daniels was Inclined to
feel that perhaps it would have been
better If an outline of the disaster
had been made public immediately.
and he suggested that probably In tne
future the navy would modify Its
policy to the extent of letting the
nubile know about a disaster, only
-withholding details until after rela-
MTCs'aau pern nvimcu.
BROTHER OF LOCAL MAN
WAS FIRST OFFICER ON
TORPEDOED TROOPSHIP
John T Clancy, Instructor at the
Army and Navy Preparatory School
here, was anxious today to learn fur
ther details of the sinking of the
"United States transport Antilles, since
his brother. Andrew J. Clancy, or
New York city, was first officer on
the ill-fated vessel.
The Antilles was formerly In ser
vice between New Jfork and Nen
Orleans, and was In command of
Captain Clancy. When it was com
mandeered by the United States Gov
ernment and turned over by Its own
ers, the Morgan line. Captain Boyd was
placed In command. On account of
the letter's illnea. Captain Clancy,
according to his brother In Wash
ington, remained In command
Since dispatches stated that the
naval officers were saved, Mr. Clancy
believes that his brother Is safe, and
has been taken, to some port by on
of th torpedo boats that were con
voying the Antilles.
Captain Clancy has been a frequent
visitor to Washington. He spent the
Christmas holldaya here last Decem
ber with bis brother here.
The Antilles was due In New York
on September S3, and Mr Clancy
states that he had Intended going to
New York for a visit with his
brother.
DANIELS TO MAKE LOAN
PLEA IN COLUMBUS, OHIO
Se-retary of th Navy Daniels will
make a Liberty loan address In
Columbus, Ohio, next Wednesday
night, it nas announced here today.
The Secretary leaves Washington
Monday night for ChUago. where he
nlll Inspect the Great Lakes training
station.
SPANISH DANCER HAPPY;
SHE HAS LIBERTY BOND
NEW YORK. Oct 20 Albertlna
Llorat, a Spanish ballet dancer at the
Hoppodrome. Is the proud possessor of
a tl.CCO Liberty bond, which sh bought
outright nlth money she had saved for
a long time.
These are my savings." said pretty
Miss Lloret. "I was born In Hpaln, but
I am an American, and want America
to win the war"
SMALLPOX AT INDIAN 8CHOOL.
CARLISLE. Pa.. Oct. 10. Medical
officers from the State department of
health have placed quarantine regu
latlon on the Indian Fchool, because
of appearance of smallpox on an In
dlen from Cayuga reservation in New
York State General vaccination was
ordered of all students
ftbe 2)eab
This is the list of the men
who perished when the
transport Antilles was tor
pedoed and sunk:
Watter, third engi
neer officer.
Boyle, junior engineer
officer.
O'Eonrke, junior en
gineer-officer.
E. L. Kinsey, seaman, sec
ond class. Next of kin,
Thomas W. Kinzey. father,
Water. Valley, Miss. ,
J. W. Hunt, seaman, sec
ond class. Next of kin, Isaac
Hunt, father, Mountain
Grove, Mo.
0. L. Ausburn, radio elec
trician, first class. Next of
kin, S. Ausborn, brother,
2600 Louisiana avenue, New
Orleans.
H. T. Watson, radio elec
trician, third class. Next of
kin, Mrs. W. L. Soger, moth
er, Butland, Mass.
(Codtlnued from First Fage.)
put Into effect Immediately through
State food controllers and local com
mittees, as well as refiners.
May Close Stores.
Thousands of workers In many fac
tories are expected to ba out of. em
ployment temporarily. Manufacturers
who anticlnated the administration's
order will have this result as well as
closing up of retail candy stores. Soma
candy makers do not anticipate any
relief from the new beet sugar, crop
before December or barely In time for
part of the Christmas candy season.
The food administration Is prepar
lng a,ser!es of sugar-conservation ap
peals to me puoiic me nousewixe
faces -a short period of sugar famine
In which It may be impossible .for
many to obtain any sugar. Retail
sugar prices are slowly mounting, be-
lng held In check only by Hoover's
recent Indictment of retailers as one
of the principal factors In tilglt prices.
Arrange far Handling.
An Important detail In handling the
coming Cuban sugsr crop hss been
arranged tur th food administration
iHn securing a plentiful supply of Jute
bags from India through the British
admiralty's assignment of the neces
sary shipping.
The following telegram was sent
to all the sugar distributing agencies
of the country, notably the American-
refinery committee of New York
and the sugar distributing commit
tee of Chicago, handling, respective
ly, cane and beet sugar:
"We consider It essential to reduce
consistently sales of sugar for pro
duction of candy Must be reduced
In order to provide household and
allied needs
"This request applies to manufac
turers of gums, cordials, syrups, and
luxuries. Manufacturers of food pro
duats should have preference con
densed milk companies coming first.
SUDDEN RUSH OF BUYERS
WILL FINISH WASHINGTON
SUGAR SUPPLY NEXT WEEK
Due to the action of many Wash
ington housewives In hoarding sugar,
Washington's sugar situation is be
coming rapidly worse.
Despite efforts of the merchants to
limit sales, there will be little or no
sugar left In local wholesale am. re
tail establishments by the end of next
week If the present demand keeps up
With few exceptions Washington
dealers declared today that their sup
plies -n ere running low and that they
could not tell when a new stock would
be available.
Many housewives are going from
store to store purchasing all they can
get In small quantities, so that In
dlvldually they will have to make no
sacrifice.
A big system of chain stores report
ed todsy that It supply would prob
ably run out by Monday night, de
spite the fact that purchases were
limited to five-pound and two-pound
lots, and then only with other pur
chases, i
One of the biggest general grocery
retail stores has limited purchases
to two pounds to any purchaser.
One big chain store system reports
two carloads of sugar on hand
One of the biggest Jobbers is sell
ing to regular customers only in lim
ited quantities. The firm expects a
shipment next week. Its present sup
ply will last only three or four days.
One big wholesale establishment
has only enough on hand to run for
two days. It was stated at this es
tablishment that It had been cleaned
out by the run that started with pub
lication of the shortage
AIRDROME "EXPLOSION"
CAUSED BY HEAVY WIND
CLIFFONDALE, Mass, Oct. 20.
What watchmen claimed was an ex
plosion at the Saugus aviation field
early today In which an airplane was
damaged and a hangr wrecked, was
caused by a heavv wind. It was be
lieved toda. Firemen and police
found no reason whatever for the
belief that the damage was caused
by anything else than the wind.
FOOD COMMISSION
CURTAILSSUGARTO
LUXURY MAKERS
AMERICAN TROOPS
IN FRANCE INVEST
MILLIONS IN BONDS
By J. w. racnusH
rcaltad rresa tJt CXTssa't.)
AMERICAN FIELD HEADQUAR
TERS, Franc, Oct-SOt-Ojnarlea'a sol
dlers are not only going to "do their
bit" la the trenches, but they are
setting an example for- folks baelf
home In a record-breaklnr purchase
of Ubcrty bonds.
Beveral million dollars In subscrip
tion wer reported todar- The exaci
total is being withheld. The various
American .expeditionary units are
keenly competing for tha honor of
subscribing th greatest amount To
day th heavy artillery claimed th
top figure with nearly $300,000
pledged and several batteries still to
be heard from.
In some Infantry companies every
man and ersry officer subscribed to
on or mora bonds.
Th VJttafrtv lAtn drir has ben on
'ere "somewhere In Franc,' for two
weeks. The lists close next Thursday.
General Pershing himself inaugurated
th campaign by a proclamation urg
ing his men to subscribe for patriotic
reasons. The drive got Its first big
Impetus when the Idea of a competi
tion among all th different unit la
tha American expeditionary force,
which will pledge th biggest sub
scription was developed.
SAYS MISSING GIRL .
IS AIM AND MARRIED
TOUNGSTOWN, Ohio, Oct,- 20
Given up by her family as having
met. with foul play, Ruth Armstrong,
former school teacher here. Is be
lieved to still be alllve. following the
receipt of Information her by Charles
Ragan. from Mrs. Stella, McCullough.
of Windsor, Ontario. Mrs, McCul
lough wrote saying that she had been
rooming with Miss Armstrong until
thr weeks ago when, aba" Bald.
Miss Armstrong married and moved
to Wayne, Mich.
Just three days before she left
Windsor, Miss Armstrong disclosed
her Identity, wrote Mrs. .McCcUonzh.
IToungstown friends of th missing
school teacher are raising a fund
with which to continue tha search.
She was last definitely heard from
In Cuba by her brother, who spent
six months In searching for her in
the West Indies.
U-BOATS MAHNGHTOW
TOSMMYATERLAND
AXATLANTJC ,PQRTOet:r30
"Capr? Bans Mortensen. who has. ar
rived here on a "French steamer, re
ports that German submarines are
making a desperate effort to locate,
with a view to sinking, the Vaterland.
one of th Interned Gtrman ships,
seized by tha United States and now
bearing tha name Leviathan. Cap
tain Mortensen, who was on th
American bark Faollna. torpedoed
off tha Scllly Islands September 23.
stated that he had been asked
by the captain of the ' submarine
when the Leviathan would leava
America.
NAME EYING FIELDS
FOR KILLED AyiATORS
The names of three aviation officers
a ho were killed In flights at CUg
Park, ltd., have been given to new
signal corps aviation fields by the
War Department.
Baslehurst field at Jilneols, L. I.,
Is named for Sec Lieut. L. W. Hazle
hurst. Jr.. killed at College Park Juno
11. 1913; Rockwell Field, at San
Diego, for Sec Lieut. Lewis O. Rock
well, killed at College Park, Septem
ber :S 1J1Z. and Scott Field, -at Belle
vllle. III, for Corporal Scott, killed at
College Park while flying as Rock
well's passenger.
Selfrldga Field, at Mt. Clemens.
Mich, previously had been named for
First Lieut. Thomas Selfrldge. who
was killed while flying as a pnssenger
with Orvllle Wright In the first tests
at Fort iyer. S-ptember 17. 1903.
End Indigestion
Or Stomach Pain
In Five Minutes
"Papo's Diapepsin" makes sick
sour, gassy stomachs
foel fine.
Time it! In five minutes your sour,
acid stomach feels fine. No Indiges
tion, heartburn, or belching of gas, or
eructations of undigested food, no
dizziness, bloating, foul breath or
headache
Pape'a Diapepsin Is noted for Its
speed in sweetening upset stomachs.
It Is the surest, quickest and mot
certain stomach antacid In tha whole
world and besides. It Is harmless.
Millions of men and women now eat
their faiorlte foods without fear
they know Pape's Diapepsin will save
them from sucn misery.
Please, for your sake, get a large
fifty-cent case of Pape'a Diapepsin
from any drug store and put your
stomach right. Don't keep on being
miserable life is too short you are
not here long, so make your stay
agreeable. Eat what you Ilka and
enjoy It. without dread of acid fer
mentation In the stomach.
Pape'a Diapepsin belongs In your
home anyway. Should one of the
family eat something which don't
agree with them, or In case of an
attack of Indigestion, dyspepsia, gas
tritis or stomach derangement dua to
fermentation and acidity, at daytime
or during the night, it Is handy to
give the quickest, surest relief known.
Advt. '

xml | txt