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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, May 06, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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Today
One Billion to Spare.
Inaccessible' Woodrow Wilson.
The American Backhead.
Bnying Land' With Corpses.
Four American soldiers In France
"ere ordered to be shot, presuma
bly for disobedience, going to sleep
at the wrong time or other mili
tary crimes. Two of them are par
doned by the President, and for
two the death sentence is com
muted to three years' imprison
ment Some "big" Americans, with
headquarters not far from Old
Trinity Church looking down Wall
street, complain that "Woodrow
Wilson is inaccessible, keeps him-
. self aloof. -
Apparently he isn't Inaccessible
to the appeals of mothers of
American soldiers, not too much
"alooP to give careful personal
attention to the death sentences of
courts-martial.
That being so, the average cltl
ren will cheerfully condone his
aloofness as regards Wall Street.
The people of the United States
lend more than four thousand mil
lion dollars to their country In this
third loan. There were some dra
matic and some comic displays of
patriotism.
Policeman Walston, of Chicago,
for Instance, stood In the most
crowded part of the loop in a bar-
V rel, having auctioned off his coat,
his policeman's' club, and finally
his trousers to patriots willing to
buy bonds in exchange for a souvenir.
Germany may say that our pa
triotism breaks out y in strange
ways, but the money is here, that
is the main thing, and there is
plenty of it.
Chicago, home of the patriotic
policeman, has bank clearings of
twenty-five thousand millions. And
there are many other American
cities. Such figures ought to inter
est the German rulers.
The Kaiser's fighters are still
"burins land," as Lloyd George
puts it, piling tip their dead bodies
to pay for slight gains.
American troops, for the first
time, 3,300 of them, started out
entirely on their own hook, using
only American artillery. They
went through the first, second and
third German lines.
They will, before the war ends,
jjo farther than that This, may
safely be said, without bragging
or in any -way belittling the mar
velous courage and staying pow
ers of the German fighters.
A young American fighter is
not, as regards costume, quite as
spick and span, peculiarly "well
dressed" as the young English
man. He hasn't that squareness of
body, legs, head, and neck that
you notice in marching Germans.
But the American has, lodged
In the back of the head, a power
that in one way or another will
carry him through the other
man's line.
Seen from the front, German,
English, and American heads look
somewhat alike. But, taking a
aide view, you notice that the
average young American skull ex
tends back of his ears about 50
per cent farther than the English
man's and 90 per cent farther
than the German's. The power
that GOES THROUGH is in that
back head.
Seventeen million Americans
subscribed to the Liberty loan.
That means something more im
portant than money. It means
"solidarity," solidifyinjr the na-
fj a tional mind and purpose.
In the North Sea, to trap and
destroy German submarines as
they go out, the allies have plant
ed with mines more than a hun
dred and twenty thousand square
miles of ocean.
What wonderful things men can
no when they must.
What things infinitely more
wonderful they will do when they
become civilized, and, without de
stroying life or wasting territory,
collect and spend tens and hun
dreds of BILLIONS for the im
provement of the earth.
Less money than has been spent
in this war would drain the
swamps and irrigate the deserts
of the world, wipe out consump-tion'-rnive
a E0(1 education,
and FOOD WITH THE EDUCA
TION, to every child.
However, things must not come
too quickly. All the money In the
world could not civilize the Congo
until the people of the Congo had
first had time to change the shape
and frontal angle of their skulls.
All the money and all the peace
In the world probably could not
civilize this earth except with the
aid of a certain number of years.
But we do improve and move up
ward. We feel sorry for Russia, cursed
with Bolshevik anarchy, murder,
chaos; but Russia Is better off
than in the day of Peter the Great,
when three out of every four chil
dren born died of smallpox and
the whole population of the coun
try was about fourteen millions.
Query: If Russia has grown since
the day of Peter the Great from
fourteen millions to one hundred
and eighty-seven millions, -what
will be the size of that population
n nunarea years irom now ana
what will be the problem that will i
Come up with such population 1
PERSHING'S BOYS COMING TO
WEATHER:
Increasing elendlncs
and warmer tonlghti
Tuesday showers. Tem
perature at 8 a. m B.
3 degrees eaaler than
average fer- Star '
lat tklrtr years.
NUMBER 10,520.
BRITISH
ADVAN
GREGORY ffi
LAWYERS' 1
TO SUP OUT
WAR LYNCHING
Attorney General Declares Mob
Murder of Germans In Amer
- ioa Is as Bad as Boche Atro
cities Overseas.
By DAVID LAWRENCE
(Copyrltht. J'11- & 1ir Tork ErMilni Pott
Company.)
Congress having pasted much of
the legislation sought by the Depart
ment of Justice to curb disloyalty,
the address of . Attorney General
Gregory to the American Bar Asso
ciation s executive committee, urg
ing an educational campaign against
lynch law, is an opportune document
to examine.
Mr. Gregory not only points out
ways in which lawyers can aid the
Government by volunteering, their
services as prosecuting attorneys,
but urges that the several States of
the Union supplement the action of
the Federal Government and pass
laws dealing with disloyalty and de
struction of property.
Lynch Law Cowardly.
"We must set our faces," he aayi,
against lawlessness within our
own borders. Whatever we may lay
about the cause for our entering
thla war, we know that one of the
principal reasons wu the lawlessness
of the German nation what they
have done In Belgium, and In north
ern France, and what we have reason
to know they would do elsewhere.
For us to tolerate lynching- Is to do
the same thing- that wa are condemning-
In the Germans.
"Lynch law la the most cowardly
of crimes. Invariably the victim Is
unarmed, while the men who lynch
are armed and large In numbers. It
Is a deplorable thins under any cir
cumstances, but at this time, above
all others, it creates an extremely
dangerous condition. I Invite your
help In meeting It
"From all the facts I have been able
to gather concerning the lynching of
Kobert Prager In Illinois, I doubt his
having been guilty of any offense. Bueh
happenings grow out of a condition of
mind where people say: The Govern
ment Is giving us no protection; spies
are blowing up our factories; they are
giving Information to Germany, our
boys are being shot In the rear; our duly
constituted authorities are doing nothing
to protect us. and we will take the law
Into our own hands This appeals to the
excited and drunken mind. Unlets
stopped. It is going to result In condi
tion most deplorable.
The two excuses Usually given are
that there are fio adenuate. laws anil
that the laws we have art not prop-
(Contlntied on Page IS, Column 8.)
Rented Same
Day
Mrs. Jackson, 1811
Hiatt place, rented her
rooms after only one
insertion of an ad in
The TIMES. If you
want to Rent a Room,
telephone Main 5260
right away.
A "Result Getter"
will be inserted.
See the Remarkably Interesting "Graphic View" Map, Page 2
Ik Itototfifott
GERMAN
PEACE TERMS
Sent to
ENGLAND
Promise Renunciation of All
German Claims in the West
and Restoration of Belgium.
East to Remain in Present
Status.
By FLOYD MacGRIFF,
International News Service Staff
Correspondent
LONDON'. May C-Germany has
made her first definite move In the
new peace offensive 'by lending out
a peace feeler to England, consist
ing of eight terras, .two of, which
promise the renunciatten of ajICer
mah claims In the west and the res
toration of Belgium.
The peace agent that Germany Is
said to have sent to London Is com
monly supposed to be a former war
minister of Holland, said a Central
News dispatch from The Hague.
Terns ex Proposal.
Advices from the Dutch capital
this afternoon outlined the German
terms as follows:
1. Germany renounces all claims
in the west '
2. Belgium to be retored to au
tonomous Independence.
3. AIsace-Lorralnev to recele au
tonomy within the German federa
tion. . The status.ln the east to remain
aa at present.
6. Austria-Hungary to make con
cession to Italy In Trentlno.
6.' The Balkan questions to be de
cided at an international conference.
7. All questions affecting Africa
and Asia Minor to be solved at the
peace table.
8. Germany to abandon all claims
to Kiao-Chau but to require certain
economic concessions from China.
Hade Known t Ilrlttafe.
There Is a disposition In German
circles to speak freely of the new
proposals, which. It Is reported, have
already been made known to the
British foreign office, the dispatches
from The Hague addert It la re
garded aa certain that they rie In
spired from Berlin
Klao-Chau. which Germany prom
ised to give up. n a leasehold or.
the Chinese coaKt Germany secured
a ninety-nine-year lease on the tract
and built a strong fort there The
fort was attacked by Japanese and
British forces at the outbreak of the
war. and It was redured. The allies
thea occupied Klao-Chau
LAW UPHELD BY
Men raised under the draft can be
sent any where In the world to fight for
the United States, the Supreme Court
today decided.
The action of the court today upholds
the selective draft law In every particu
lar.
The right of Congress o conscript men
for foreign jervlfe was attacked b Rob
ert Cox, Kansas City, dr&ftee sent to
Camp Funston.
He asked for a writ of habeas corpu.
directing Major General Leonard Wood,
In command of the camp, to release him
from serrlce on the ground that there
was no Constitutional right to compel
him (o fight In foreign lands. This was
denied by a Kansas court.
Chief Justice White. In announrlnr the
decision. also denied the motion to hold
General Wood In contempt for sending
Cox to France while his case was pend
ing.
SELECTIVE DRAFT
SUPREME COURT
WASHINGTON,
AND AUSTRALIANS
CE
THE WOMEN
AND MAN FACE
DEATH 3 HOURS
ON CANOE TRIP
Frail Cratt Caught In Potomac
Current Lodges Against
Rocks Rescuers Finally Get
Rope to Imperiled Party.
Their canoe caught in a swirling
current of the Potomac river after
It had gone over the partially de
molished "feeder" dam midway be
tween Chain Bridge and Glen Echo,
four persons last night faced almost
certain death for three hours before
a brave attempt to rescue them
proved successful.
Suffer from Shock.
Today Mr and Mrs. Leo B. Taylor
and Miss Alma Barker. H02 S street
northeast, and Miss Edith Anderson,
also of thl city, are recovering -from
the effects of the experience. All
are suffering from shock and fright
and slightly from exposure and
bruises austalned when they were
dragged through the swiftly rush
ing stream to safety after being
held fast In midstream for hours.
The party m canoeing. In the
upper Potomac on the broadwater
above the dam at about 7 o'clock. In
some manner the canoe was caught
I in the current, and despite efforts to
I halt Its rush it was swept over the
dam, the top of which waa carried
I away by the Ice Jama In the spring.
Jammed Against IlocLs.
. About Id feet below the dam the
rAnoe Jammed against a group of
rocks and held fast by the force of
the current. Not daring to move.
lest they dislodge the canoe from its J
precarious position, to send it crash
ing down the stream against other
rocks and toward Little Falls at
Chain Bridge, the four persons sat
motionless, calling for help. They
were unable to leave the boat and
make their way to shore because of
the force of the current
A large crowd of picnickers and
campers, hcarlnp the cries, congre-j
gated on the shore, and plans to,
rescue the canoeists were discussed.
Three young men, braver than the'
rest, attempted to save those in the
canoe b going after them in another
canoe. These men Leroy Delaney j
D. L. Springman, and O. V. Sullivan -
soon were caught In the rurrent and!
forced to abandon their canoe, which
swept down' the stream whllo they
struggled to shore and safety through
the trescherous rapids.
Hope Thrown To I'nrty.
Finally a long rope was provided,
and a party of men waded out as far
as safety would permit. One end of
the rope was neld by persons on
shore, while the men In the stream
threw the other end to the canoeists.
They weie finally dragged, one by
one, through tne seething river to
the shore, a distance of fifty yards.
The rescue was accomplished In dark
ness, as It was well after 10 o'clock
before the canoe load had been saved.
The women were taken Into a nearby
shark, given dry clothing and coffee.
and taken home In an automobile.
SENATOR THOMAS TAKES
OFF WIG; SUMMER HERE
Rummer wnn offlrialH ushered In to
day b the Senate, when senator Thomas
of Colorado, apix-arril minus Ills toupee.
Thomas puts on (he nig late In the fall
and wears It until warm weather comes
to stay. Banking on his prediction, other
Senators today appeared in Palm Beach
suits.
MONDAY EVENING,
NORTH OF SOMME
SECRETARY BAKER ORDERS
PERSHING'S VETERANS TO
REPORT AT THE CAPITAL
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COLOR SERGEANT JOHN J. HEFFERNAN,
Twelfth Field Artillery, U. S. A.
Who Is In charge of the fifty "veterans" of Pershing's army who are
coming to Washington to aid in Red Cross drive.
MAN WHOSE WIFE
T OF
HAS D SAPPEARED
FRKDnillCK. Md.. May 0. Harry
G. TrKapoe. head of a private detec
tive agency here, who evaded arrest
here last winter for six days. Is
again being sought by sheriff's depu
ties who believe he Is In hiding
somewhere In Maryland " The same
officers whom he eluded beforo are
again on his trail.
Mis Amy I. Mahony, for the past
four years Trltapoe's stenographer.
Is In the city Jail awaiting trial to
night before Justice llru.it on a
charge of disorderly conduct.
A square of cnurtplastcr tin Miss
Mahon's nose tells the story. Be
neath It is the wound Inflicted by a
bullet from the revolver which Mrs.
Trlt.ipoe carried to her husband's
office Saturday night at 9 o'clock,
with the confessed purpose of kill
ing the typist.
Trltapne rushed Into the front o'f
flce or his wife started to fl: e a sec
ond shot at the stenographer, and.
striking the weapon from her hand,
the second bullet went wild and was
burled In the ceiling of the office.
Mm
MAY 6, 1918.
S. BINGHAM'S
MILLION DOLLAR
EMI
LIIXINGTON'. Ivy.. May 0. Another
chanter In the les-al tansies that have
surrounded the disposal of the estate
I of the Hte Mrs. Ilobert worm uing
I ham. Is about to be written, nnder the
title. "The Mlislng iiuiion-uoiiar
Nacklace."
The contest In the courts here over
the Inheritance tax alleged to be due
from the Bingham estate has brought
to light the fact that the estate Is
now vnlued at from X130.000.000 to
SlfiO.000.000, and that the necklace for
which Mrs. Bingham paid J900.000 Is
rot mentioned In the inventory.
The necklace Is worth a million, de
clared John Stiles, president of the
Louisville Trust Company, who says
he saw the Jewels last summer. He
also disclosed that Mrs. Bingham had
tin denoslt In the Guaranty Trust
Company of New York l,33S.C93.33 at
the time of her death
It is probable that the court will Is
sue an order to force the produeticn
of the necklace. Mrs. Ida Bemley. for
Htxteen years housekeeper for Mra.
Bingham, denies knowledege of the
"million-dollar necklace."
NEKLA
SSING
WASHINGTON
'
r
FIRSTOF SQUAD
TO ARRIVE
TONIGHT
Pershing's boys are coming. Bis
boys from the trenches. The boys
whose deads we have rsad about.
They are coming to Washington.
Secretary of War Baker has sent a
telegram to each one of them to re
port at once in the Capital, and TOD
are going to be given a chance to aee
these the first .of the American Ml.
dlers returning from the front, to visit
Washington- in a Body.
Assurance that the Prhfn Veter
ans will come her was obtained thla
morning by a committee of Washing
ton citizens, who asked Secretary of
War Newton D. Baker and George
Creel, head of the committee on pub
lic Information, to bring the men
her.
The committee Included District
Commissioners Brownlow and Card!
ner. Congressman Julius Koha of
California. F. A. Walker, managing
editor of The Times, and Henry B. F.
Macfarland, head of the District Red
Cross. .
Store Veteraaa CetaJag.
And there Is more good news. The
Blue Devils of Francs every one a.
veteran, every one a wearer of a eras
of honor, 100 of them In all are
coming to Washington.
And the Anzacs. a score or more
of whom are In this country, are
coming here. They are the boy
from Australa and New ZesJsjid who
have done such, valiant deeds agalait
tn Hun hosts.
" And the Belgtns are coming. They
are Just landing today on tne Paclflo
coast after a trip through Buss!.
They could not go home the way they
went to Russia. o they are coming
the other way round and via Wash
ington. But best of all. of course. Is the
news thatth e fifty American boys
from the trenches are coming. And
they are coming Just In time to help
with the raising of the Red Cross
fund here in the Capital. When Sir.
Macfarland said to the Secretary of
War this morning that It the boys
were here they would have a Big In
fluence in making tne campaign for
Red Cross funds a success, Mr. Baker
said. "I am heartily In sympathy
with the plan to have them help the
Red cross."
Seme t Arrive Teday.
The American veteran wilt some
of them arrive today and the rtt
not later than tomorrow, a none qj?
them had gone farther than Chicago
in tnelr wor for the Liberty loan. A
(Continued on Page IC. Column 8.)
OFFICIAL PROBE OF
ILi
The White House announced today
that President Wilson ha Ordered an
official probe of charges made by Outxon
jjiorglum against the aircraft production
board.
Having ordered Secretary of War
Baker to Inquire Into the possible need
for a court martial heating In the mat
ter the PrMlH.nt tnrtnA naked th Jul-
Itlce Deportment to sift down the Borg-
-If .1 .- J.. t .(.A ..A.t --
turn uncK.iuonj 10 auerminc mo hcvj ivi
grand Jury prosecutions.
The President has suggested further
Uun any Information the Senate Mill-
(Continued on Page 2, Column 2.)
PRESIDENT ORDERS
BORG
MCARGES
H'll mPk. BH
EDITION
PKICE TWO CENTS.
FOR ALLIES
Advance of 1,200 Yards on
Mile Front Recorded by
British Two Smashes Made
by Colonials.
With Preack. aad te fr
British rur?M aw arralbOUe,
the allied ettaatWa la T--
"a vraJtMraXIr'prtrVtoV u
: tkewsaiiWrtalJi t be "uxlotu jer
socle tut .Yet.w xk llrttUk war
acre -aaaemeec tsxay.
By Wlffiam Philip SImm,
United Presa Staff Correspondent.
WITH THE BRITISH ARMIES
IN FRANCE. Mi? 6. Bri&L
troops have tutraactfti 1,200
yards on front of more than a
mile between the Arnore and
Sofomc,
North of the Somroe the Aus
tralians also advanced 700
yard on a 1, 600-yard front,
and at another point they ad
vanced another 100 yards on a
2,000-yard front
The first AstraHan advance
was made faf the darkness early
Stsxday momma;. Soddeary and
silently they swept forward,
surprisJnjr the thin German gar
rison in the front fine just north
of the Somroe and tald&g some
prisoners.
Similarly, in pitchy blackness
early today, they poshed on de
spite strong opposition. There
are many German dead, and the
Australian casualties are not
heavy.
Intermittent shelling continue.
It is raining.
FOE'S LMAVY,
IS HAIG'S REPORT
LONDON, May s. British advanced
their lines on "a considerable front"
on both srldeS of the Somms, despite
strong- enemy resistance. Field Mtr
shal Halg reported today.
"Between the Bomrae and Anore
and wst and southwest of Uorbtn
oourt (midway between Albert and
the Somme), we adranced our lines
on a consldrrablt front, In spite of
strong opposition," the statement
aid.
"We captured 130 prisonsrs, two
machine guns, and n trench mortar.
''At Morlancourt. the entmy's losses
were heivjr."
"Our losses at Morlancourt last
night were alight.
"In local nghtlng- during; th night
we Improved our position la th
neighborhood of 1-ocon and on tn
Lawe river (southern portion of tn
Flanders front)."
PARI?. May ft. "A Crma attack,
following a vloUnt bombrdmnt.
failed southeast of Anchln farm." the
French war ofTIc announced today.
"The enemy Uft numerous dtao.
"Beconnolurlng parties bronsjsU
(Continued os Fat -. C oluma L)
SURPRISE
BLOWSNET
BIG GAINS
4

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