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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, July 13, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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Today
Hr. Bnrleson Beware.
Stady Xenophon
And Themistocles
And Poor Socrates.
WEATHER:
Pmlr tonlehti StmdaT.
t air ami svmewhat mm.
ex. Temperature at 8
a. n,eO deem. Jforraal
tanprratnre on July 13
for the laat thirty years.
77 decree.
PublUned rerr trenlnr (roelndlns- 8oncar).
Entered u accond-cUu matter at Um poet-
ofne at Wuhtncton. P. C.
WASHINGTON, SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 13, 1918. fOosag Wall Street Prices. PRICE TWO CENTS.
NUMBER 10,588.
an w
FINAL
EdltlON
I , i ;
v. ,i t . say
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By ABTHDB BBISBA5E.
Congress will go home soon for
rest. Republicans Improve the re
maining hours, OBJECTING.
Senate and the Lower House do
not oppose or attack the Presi
dent, realizing that it wouldn't
suit the people. But each Republi
can, soon to vote for Government
control of telegraphs and tele
phones which will mean Govern
ment ownership prints his little
objection In the Congressional Rec
ord. Imagine a moving picture hero,
bridegroom of Mary Pickford car
ried away struggling 00 arms
of Theda Bara,
He turns to Mary and says: 1
can't help myself. I wouldn't be
going in this direction If I had my
way about it"
So the eminent Republican Sen
ators, married body and soul to
little Mary Pickford Trust and
borne away by the rough hands of
Theda Bara Government owner
ship, turn their .heads toward
Mary Trust to assure that If they
had their way they would not go
away with the Government owner
ship vUlalness. They will vote
for Government control when they
all finish objecting.
Man for centuries has been
climbing up a long winding spiral
from selfish, unlimited individual
ism, to this beginning of govern
ment ownership.
You see the Government today
controlling those powerful slaves
of civilization, the railroad steam
engines.
Go Tack twenty-three centuries,
and find the wise Xenophon, pro
posing government ownership of
human slaves that were the work
ing machine of his day.
The interesting story is told on
rage 42 of the fifth volume of
The Voyage of Young Anacharsis
in Greece, about the middle of the
fourth century before the Vulgar
era.
We translate a few lines from
an edition printed in Paris in
1810.
Ancient Greece was rich in
silver mines, worked by private
Individuals who paid to the state
a small amount for the franchise
or right to operate.
Formerly wealth from the
mines was distributed among the
people.
Themistocles persuaded the Gen
eral Assembly to use the proceeds
from the mines to build the fleet
This upheld the Greek navy during
the Peloponneslan war. Then pri
vate Individuals began to get. rich
cy we exptouauou or in jniaeav, I icy oi sewn? coniroi m mi """
MdaMeatol a theaaandareaWre at the flcVoMb.
rent (for. the slaves) one thousand
obblesper'tiay. Hlpponlcus at the
same time had In the mines six
hundred slaves that brought him
In six hundred oboles. Xenophon
proposed that the government (in
stead of private individuals) should
own the trade In slaves destined
for the mines. One Investment
would buy twelve hundred of these
slaves, and the number was to be
gradually increased to ten thou
sand. This would have brought
the government an annual revenue
of one hundred talents. This (gov
ernment ownership proposition)
aroused the enmity of the private
contractors and nothing came of
It
Wise men those old Greeks
feat the world was not ready for
them.' It is not even ready for
Hr. Burleson of oar day, who
urges that the Government own
the wires carrying messages, as
Xenopnon urged that the govern
ment should own the slaves which
were the machinery diggers and
message carriers of his day.
Mr. Burleson, whom the Repub
licans now attack with all the vic
ioosness that they dare not pour
cut on the President, should re
member what happened to ancient
Greek gentlemen who tried to help
the people.
Xenopnon was exiled from
Greece. And his great teacher.
Socrates, of whom you may read
many interesting anecdotes in the
"Young Anacharsis" volumes,
tried to help the people of his day
and was condemned to death for
his pains.
Themistocles, who persuaded
the people to use the revenue
from the mines to build a fleet,
instead of squandering it, is an
other warning to Mr. Burleson.
' He interpreted for the people's
benefit the words of the oracle.
When a man offered to teach
him the art of remembering, he
answered, "Teach me rather the
art of forgetting," which was
wise. When two men, one rich,
one poor, courted his daughter, he
would rather she should have a
man without money than money
without a man." That was wise
also.
But, Mr. Burleson, Themistocles
wisdom didn't save him.
The Athenians banished him,
handing him the disagreeable oys
ter shell, as they had done to
Aristides, his great rival. Then
they accused him of treason, and he
had to seek refuge at the court
of the Persian king against whose
power he had defended Athens.
Finally when the Persian king
ordered him to fight against his
own country, Themistocles killed
himself.
We 'don't suppose these valu
able historical warnings will do
.Mr. Burleson any good. When it
comes to government owneranip,
THREE U. S. ARMY CORPS
VON HEMG
PEACE DBMS
FUTILE, INSIST
U. S. OFFICIALS
American Authorities Emphati
cally Declare German Chan
cellois Efforts at Ending War
Are in Vain.
Br CAUL D. GROAT,
rnited Freaa Staff Correspondent.
German Chancellor Hertllng's peace
balloon U useless at this time. Ameri
can authorities declared emphatically
today."
Whether or no he Is serious In try
Ins to draw a peace offer from the
United States and the entente, his ef
forts are vain. The authorities de
clared that never were the nations
fighting- Teuton autocracy firmer In
their unify and in their determina
tion to press on to victory.
Some did see -the possibility that
the Austrian and German Internal
situations may be growing worse,
having an Influence, upon Hertllngs
remarks. But in that case, it was
argued there is all the more reason
now to press on to victory.
The general feeling is that Ger
many was merely making another of
her peace suggestions, at the same
time attempting to cast the burden
of responsibility for continuance of
the war upon President Wilson and
the entente.
References to Russia were evident
ly intended as a sop to that nation.
In line with the known German pol
icy of getting control jn, that conn-
XTPrjaven u,
in-.the West
It was recalled that Germany more
than once has preceded a military ef
fort by a peace offensive.
There is little doubt in official
minds that from now on, Germany
will Increase her peace propaganda
efforts, realizing that as American
aid grows the tide will turn against
her. To the extent that she desires
to strike a bargain while yet she
may Germany is regarded aa sincere
in suggesting that the entente make
peace efforts. But no authorities see
any other than selfish motives In any
peace propaganda atep to date.
"NO COMPROMISE," IS
LONDON PAPER'S REPLY
TO HERTUNG APPEAL
LONDON, July 13. London newspa
pers agreed today that the principal
point in Chancellor Hertllng's ad
dress in the Reichstag Thursday was
his hope of an allied peace offer. They
pointed out that this is impossible,
(Continued on Page 2, Column 3.)
PLANT COLLAPSES
MONTREAL. July 13. Two men
were killed today and it Is believed
several others were burled alive when
part of the munitions factory belong
ing to Lymburner Bros, collapsed.
The factory was used for making
shells, and It is thought the weight
of these stored In the building caused
the third floor to cave In, and the
falling material followed the two
lower floors into the basement.
The firemen made every effort to
reach those burled beneath the debris,
but there was little hope of saving
them.
TODAY
and the right of the people to
own their own railroads and tele
graphs, he is a stiff-necked and
obstinate person.
When this writer saw him yes
terday, he showed no signs of
contrition, didnt expect to be os
tracized or banished or condemn
ed to drink hemlock because he
had dared to uphold the public's
right to control national monop
olies. On the contrary, he acted with
strange gayety, pounding the
palm of his left hand with his
right fist and saying, as though he
had been addresing the whole of
Texas, "The Republicans havent
got an issue not one, not a single
issue. What have they got!"
WORKMEN BUR ED
WHEN
HI
Sends Tropnies
To President
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CAPT. PAUL BROWN,
Former police guard for President
Wilson, who captured German
flyer.
Tve sent President Wilson the cap
and shoulder straps of a Boche
aviator, captured by the old, handcuff
method In a wheatfleld near Paris,"
Capt. Phil Browxf, formerly of the
Washington police .force, and guard
for Presidents Wilson, wrote Mrsl
I -n,i..j fJt7rynM ..
ifgg JlrhSwaS&S!
Franee.
Captain Brown aided President Wil
son In getting past crowds In theaters
and other places when on the Wash
ington police force.
That the former policeman is using
against .the Boche the excellent quali
ties that distinguished him here, is
substantiated by modest letters to
Mrs. Brown and by a War Depart
ment dispatch last night.
Received Recognition.
Brown, who is now a captain in
the quartermaster corps of the na
tional army, received recognition of
his exploit with the German flyer in
the Stars and Stripes, the American
expeditionary official news organ.
But Brown's letter to his wife tells
the story in his own words. It reads:
"On June 7, a German air squadron
bombed Paris. Along with French
officers, I was on the outskirts of
the city. Two German airplanes were
discovered. They were soaring high
above the clouds directly over the
French lines. The anti-aircraft guns
immediately opened fire, and two
French planes ascended to pursue
Fritz's machine.
Soon lilt Or Shell.
"One of the German planes was
soon hit by a shell from a French
plane, and it came shooting from the
sky toward the earth like a star In
the night, completely enveloped In
flames. When It got wlthli a few
hundred feet of the ground, the burn
ing ceased and the aviator regained
control of the engine. He glided the
machine safely to a wheat field.
"The French officers and I drove to
the field in an automobile.
"I approached the Hun first. lie
was very nervous and excited. Cover
ing him with my revolver, I snapped
a pair of handcuffs over bis wrists,
no unusual stunt for me. When I saw
the bright helmet and aviation shoulder
straps, I immediately thought Presi
dent Wilson would like them .or
souvenirs, so the next day I made a
special trip to Paris and sent them to
him through Major Pullman."
ROMS, July 13. A military bulletin
decrees the retirement with loss of
rank and pay of Generals Cadorna,
Parro, and Capello.
General Diaz, commander-in-chief of
the Italian armies, has been decor
ated with the Grand Cordon of the
Military Order of Savoy.
General Cadorna was commander-in-chief
of the Italian armies last
year when the Austro-German drive
forced them back to the Plave river,
following the Caporetto disaster.
URGED TO REGISTER.
LONDON, July 13. The London
morning papers today printed a no
tice from the American consul general
requesting all Americana of military
age in Great Britain to rrclitr.r.
1
PRESIDENT'S POLICE
GUARD HANDCUFFS
ERIN AVIATOR
TALY DISMISSES
AD0NAAND2
OTHER GENERALS
MAKE
Smashing Advance Follows
Close on Success in Picardy,
Where Cartel and Other
Strongholds Are Taken.
PARIS. July 1& Making another
rapler-Uke thrust the ' French ad'
vanced more than a quarter of i
mile near Porta farm, between Mont-
dldler and the Olse, the war office
announced today.
Prisoners were taken In raids north
of the Avre between the Olse and the
Marne and In the Champagne region.
"Between Montdldler and the OLse
French forces progressed S0O meters
in the region of Porte farm, eleven
miles northwest of Complegna and
eighteen miles southwest of Montr
dldler." the communique said.
"North of the Avre between the
Olse and the Marne and in the Cham
pagne we took prisoners In raids.
"On the Picardy front the French
advanced a mile and a quarter on a
front of more than three miles yes
terday morning, capturing the village
of Castel and several strong enemy
positions.
-The- advance yrtM mace Between
Castel and Mallly-Ralneval .and. cava
tbe.Fxsnch-TJoxseeslon -or the "heights
dominating-the Avre river. JV '
The French attack on the Picardy
front was made three miles north of
Alnval, which la reported to be the
northern extremity of the American
Cantlgny sector.
SUCCESSFUL RAIDS
ON BRITISH FRONT
LONDON. July 13-Suecessful raid
ing operations by the British on both
the Flanders and Picardy fronts were
reported by the war office today.
English and Australian troops took
part.
In the sector of Vleux-Boquln and
Merrls. nlnety-slx prisoners were
taken. Twenty-two more were cap
tured In the Hamel sector.
FRENCH ADVANCE
GAINS MOMENTUM
LONDON. July 13. French forces In
Albania are now driving northward
with apparently the same speed that
characterized the Italian advance In
the first dys of the offensive.
Latest reports from the battle front
Indicate that the Italians have slack
ened their progress to permit the
French on their right to bring their
lines forward and maintain a prac
tically straight front from Lake Ok
bldra to the Adriatic
The Italians, except on their right
flank, were aided in their advance by
the comparatively level terrain bor
derln gtbe sea, while the French have
(Continued on Page 2, Column L)
5 DEAD, 20 TO 50
HURIAS WESTERN
SAN FRANCISCO, July J3. Fl ve are
known to be dead and from twenty
to fifty are reported Injured as a
result of a San Matto Interurban car
Jumping the track on a sharp curve
near San Brunn early today. Every
emergency ambulance from here was
sent to the scene, and ambulance
physicians stated several of the In
jured would not survive.
LOST AND FOUND
COLD WIUST WATCH-IUturn lo 1CI Oil
Utln it. N. W. or phon. n, rtward. M
FOCKETBOOK Black leather; two 110 bins
and chance, thtrmomtttr In fountain pan.
ear Ueluu. two raealpu. luturn to ISO D
. 8. K. tot. BEA&LET. liberal reward.
. Ml
sononmr pin with or lettm "e. r.
P." Initials K. B. on back. Flndtr call U
1U0, Branch Ixt, between ( a. m. and i JO p.
m. Howard. u
m AOcallemad m ClattVUd PageeJ
u
ANOTHER 1;
BLOW STRUCK QUARREL fllH
ON OK FRONT
GAR JUIVIPS TRACK
Von Hindenburg's Death
Is Again Reported
U LED
1
LONDON. July 13-FIeld Marshal
Von HIndenburg. chief of staff of the
German enemy, is dead, according to
a Reuter dispatch from Amsterdam
today, giving the Dutch newspaper
Lea Nowelles aa authority for the
statement.
According to the Amsterdam dis
patch HIndenburg died suddenly, as
the result of a stroke, following a
story Interview on May IS with the
Kaiser regarding the offensive on the
western front.
The Interview took place at Spa.
OFFICIAL SLOW
TO CREDIT RUMOR
'On the heels of reports emanating
from Germany yesterday that Gen
eral Von HIndenburg was 111. the re
port was circulated In cotton brokers
offices here to day that he was dead.
Owing to the fact that his death
has been repeatedly reported in re
cent weeks, officials here were in
clined to ba 'skeptical at the latest
report.
In recent weeks, however, more and
more has been heard of General
Ludendorft- and Jess of Hlndenburr.
PerslstentrepQrU of his death have
rm,rsX.Tnttnrila'-,duTliig the'Tfreat
drive on' ta wcat"
eat
t
F
The following nominations
were
sent to the Senate today:
To be major generals in the line
of the army Maj. Gen. William
Crozler and Maj. Gen. Henry C
Sbarpe.
To be quartermaster general with
rank of major general for period of
four years Brig. Gen. Harry L.
Rogers.
To be chief of ordnance with rank
of major general for period of four
years Brig. Gen. Clarence) C. Wil
liams. U. S. LENDS $8,343,000
TO FARMERS IN JUNE
The Federal Farm Loan Board loan
ed $3,313,000 to the farmers of the
United States during June. It was an
nounced today. This will make the
loans of the farm loan board to date
total 1109,517,000.
The largest sum placed In any dis
trict went through the Spokane bank,
where farmers borrowed $1,262,000.
FRENCH FLAG TO RY
BY PRESIDENT'S ORDER
By executiveorder of the Presi
dent, the French flag will fly tomor
row. Bastille day, from every Govern
ment building. An additional flag
pole will be erected at the White
House, whrre the Trl-Color and the
Stars and Stripes will float together.
FOR SALE AUTOMOBILES
i .
FORD TOURING: thne new tins: One
condition: Jnrt OTerhauled; ISS; call after
130 p. m- fS Fensirlrula An. 8. E. 21
Mr. Bortman sold his car
after the above ad. had
been in The Times only
two times.
The Times is recognized
as the. best medium to sell
used cars. If you have a
car for sale
Phone Main 5260
Ask for the Used Car Boreas
SIROKE
EN
CROZERAND
SHARPE NOM NATED
OR L NE OFFICES
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Whose delta, la'agaJn reported.-
TY COBB ML QUIT
AT SEASON'S END
TO ENLIST
This season Is Ty Cobb's
last in baseball until the war
h over. He intends to set
into the thickest of the fray.
"Every time I loot at the
American casualty lists I feel
mean," said the scrappy Geor
gian to a Times' reporter at
the White House, and his eyes
moistened perceptibly.
"I am in a deferred class
of the draft because I have a
wife and three children, but I
feel that I must give tip base
ball at the close of the season
and do my duty to my coun
try in the best way possible.
"Baseball is good for 'the
entertainment and morale of
the people, and I love the
game, but the close of the
coming season will see me out
of it until the war is over."
E
By JOSEPH S1IAPLEX.
TTnltrd Press Staff Correspondent.
STOCKHOLM, July II. M- Alexan
drovltch. one of the assassins of Ger
man Ambassador Mlrbach. has been
executed, according to dispatches re
ceived today from Sfoscow. The other
assassin, M. Bloomkln, has not been
captured.
It Is reported that Germany will
also demand the execution of M. Kim
koff and JIme. Splrldonova. two of the
social revolutionaries arrested In the
Moscow revolt which followed Mir
bach's death.
Passengers arriving here on a boat
from Petrotrad brought news of riots
In that city. They said that several
hundred soldiers and workmen, led
by Letters, left the Parshsky arsenal
and fought the Red Guards for hours.
They were subdued only after an ar
tillery bombardment of the arsenal.
Cholera Is reported to be sweeping
Petrograd.
ONE OF ASSASSINS
OF GERMAN
NVOY
EXECUTED BY RUSS
AT FRONT
E
SENATOR LEWIS TO
IE
Rearing that Senator J. Ham Lewis
of Illinois might decline ta run for
re-election this fall, President Wilson
tcday wrote the Senator a letter urg
lnr tm to change his dectslrn.
The President's letter follows;
"My Dear Senator:
T have heard with concern that yon
thought of not accepting a renomlna
Uon for the Senate and undertaking
a campaign.
-I hope sincerely that, if that has
been your inclination, you will recon
sider your judgment In the matter
and undertake the race.
"We are counting upon yoa to put
your usual spirit and energy Into a
campaign which. I am sure, will assist
to make the Issues clear In Illinois."
HOOVER COMPLETES
WORLD FOOD REPORT
Food Administrator Hoover has
completed an important International
survey of food conditions. President
Wilson has approved the report, and
it will be made public tonight.
As recently stated by food officials,
the allied food situation today Is bet
ter than at any time since the out
break of the war. Just where saving
must be effected for future safety
has been carefully analyzed, and will
be shown In the report.
FIRST OF AUGUST
DRAFT CALLS ISSUED
Provost Marshal General Crowder
today Issued the nrst of the August
draft calls summoning 12J43 men
for special technical education, to
start for schools between August 1
and 23.
Of the men called, 11.8S9 are white
and 154 negroes
It Is contemplated to call approxi
mately 300,000 men during August.
BRITISH CASUALTIES
TOTAL 14,817 IN WEEK
LONDON. July IS. British casual
ties published in official lists during
the week totaled 14.ST4.
They are divided aa follows:
Kill). Wourhld. lOrarag. TottL
Officers .. 125 39 42 496
Men 1.034 10.012 1.633 1078
Totals... 26 1X241 1,874 14
PRESID
IE
ENTER RAC
AGAIN
I) $.
TROOPS
POUR OVER
5EAS, SAYS
Chief of Staff Tells of Organiza
tion of Nearly Million Ameri
can Soldiers Abroad, Givrtif
Their Commanders.
Three American army corps, t
from 225,000 to: 250300 fat ead
have been organized laFrance, Chief
of Staff March revealed today.
March also revealed that .ahlpmeak
of troops is proceeding withoofclet
np, the same as in previous mosths.
His review of tie weekly activiti
pointed oat that there has tern
practically unvaried success for tlw
allie daras. The only strDdh? ad
vance for the week was on the Mace
donian front, TnsVrng twenty-tw
mites in reaching Berat.
Questioned as to ,tha reasons far'
the delay of the German offeashrs,
March declared ha had no bffiftal
cablegram aligning reasoaa to ae
count for it There- was s taggm
tion that continued heavy ahjpwewtsi
of American troop wffl male the de
lay initio Testa cffsaejre mat
costly
.. t3tawC9.fCiy
- TheIr composition f ogawsT ' "
First corps is composed at two raff
alar divisions- and four national (
divisions, as follows:
First division regulars, uimttjm
General Bollard-
Second division regulars, lectin! rue
marines, under Major General Bsssgpv
Twenty-elxth (ew England) dtvis
Ion, the first division seat to Itasca,
many of whose members saw Xexlca
border service, under Hsjor Oeseral
Edward.
Forty-second, the Rainbow dlvisloa;
-from manyy States, Uajor General
Uenoher. commanding.
Forty-Orst (Sunset) division, frost
Pacific Coast States, trained at CasJ
Greene, and which was originally
der UaJ. Gen. Hunter Liggett, now
temporay corps commander.
Thirty-second (Michigan and Wis
consin) trained at Camp McArther.
Major General Haan commanding.
Secaad Cms.
The Second Corps, consisting of
two national army, one regular, and
three national guard divisions as fel
lows: Seventy-seventh, national army, th
New York division, first national array
outfit sent to Franca and seat to the
nring line. Maj. Gen- George B. Dun
can, commanding-. Originally trtiaed
by Maj. Gen. Franklin Bell.
Thirty-ntth national guard division.
Missouri troops, trained at CaS9
Doniphan. General Wright, command
ing. Eighty-second National Army. Ala
buna, Tennessee and Georgia, Major
General Burnham. commanding.
Thirtieth National Guard, troops
from District of Columbia. South Car
olina and Tennessee, trained at Cams
Sevier. Major General Read command
ing. Twenty-eighth National Guard.
Pennsylvania troops, trained at Camp
Hancock, commander's name omitted,
Fourth regulars. Camp Greene, Ma
jor General Muir, commanding;
Third Corns.
The Third corps consists of twe
regular army divisions, two national
army divisions, and two nations!
guard divisions, as follows:
Third division regulars. Cams
Greene, Major General Dlckmaa,
commanding.
Fifth regular army divisions as
sembled from army posts, Maj. Geo.
John K. McMahon commanding.
Serenty-elghth national army, third
to go to France, consisting of troops
from Delaware and part of New Tork.
Camp Dlx. Major General MeRaa
commanding.
Elshtleth national army. Pennsyl
vania. Maryland and Virginia troopa
tralncd at Camp Lee. Major Geo.
Cronghlte commanding.
Thirty-third national guard. Illi
nois troops, trained at Camp Logan,
Major Gen. George Bell. JiC, com
manding. Twenty-seventh national guard.
New Tork troops. Camp Wadjworth.
Major Gen. O'Ryaa commanding.
GENEVA. July 13. The great
achievement of America In putting a
million soldiers In France and Ger
many's diplomatic failure In Russia
are the chief topics of conversation
in Germany, according to a traveler
who arrived from there today.
Strikes are now constant occur
rences, and frequently the police sym
pathize with the strikers and fall t
suppress the recurring disorders. It
was stated.
Only the rich are able to buy auf
flclant food. The informant added
that Germany could not possibly es
dure another winter oX. warfare.
ON. MARCH
&.

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