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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, July 15, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026749/1918-07-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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Corporation Watcbpoodle.
Biting the President.
BeCarefnl,N.Y.riBes
Rough Days Ahead.
Today
i
t
E
Br ABTHTJB
Faithful are the defenders ol
private monopoly.
Ebndly the conservaUve news
papers lick the Wall Street hand
that feeds them, and' In emergen
cies bite the hand of their own
Government?
This refers to an editorial pnb
Eaheu la the New York, Times
yesterday.
Newspapers that, to serve cor
porations, fcoldly attack the Ad
ministration In war, Include not
alone half-starved beggars of the
press, "kept" Tiewspapers like the
Evening Mall, with common stock
bought and owned by the "Kaiser,
bonds bought and owned by the
Ogden Mills family, of the New
York Central and other railroads.
That a characterless newspaper
like the Mail, owned by the Kaiser,
serving him as much as it dared,
financed by railroad and trust' in
terests, and serving them openly,
should establish itself permanently
as the public defender of private
monopolies, is not Important.
The New York Times is a dif
ferent newspaper. It has, in its
Tvay, a character.
The proprietor alms to establish
it as "a permanent Institution,'
gives Interviews explaining his de
sire 'that the paper should remain
After he goes.
We render the owner of the
Times a service telling him. that
editorials such as he printed yes
terday, belittling the President of
the United. States In the effort to
help a corporation to conquer its
workmen and resist Government
control, are not calculated to make
a newspaper 'permanent, or to
make It live even as long as Its
owner. There are angry days
ahead on this planet when the war
ends. Servants of monopoly should
read history more carefully.
Privately owned companies con
trolling', censoring:, and for a con
sideration permitting wire tap
ping of telegraphs and telephones
declined to treat with their work
men. .
These threatened a strike, based
-on the fundamental right of men
to organize. That strike would
hive tied up the service-throughout
the country. The monopoly
said no, when asked by the Presi
dent to permit its men to join
.unions.
The President, assuring the
Congress that a serious emer
gency existed, asked for authority,
should it become necessary in -his
judgment to take over and operv
ate for -the people the Trfro' serv
ice that serves -allthe-people "and
is essential to the national de
fense in war time. '
' A r
Concerning this, the New York
Times, says that the impotence of
the workers would have been
shown:
"If tha promoters of it and
Government control and own
I ership of the telegraph lines
" , hadn't found in Washington
' too willing gulls of an 'emer
gency' that never would have
emerged.''
The President of the United
States is the man who told Con
gress that an emergency existed
and asked for authority to
meet it
The New York Times' editorial
therefore describes the President
as a "too willing gull" of the pro
moters of Government control and
ownership of the telegraph lines.
Having thus described the Pres
ident, because he saw fit to pro
tect the public in war against the
threatened tie-up of telegraphic
and telephonic communication, the
New York Times, abandoning its
Usual dull editorial tone, because
private monopoly is attacked, pro
ceeds to attack the Postmaster
General of the United States, re
ferring to him as "Postmaster
General Burleson, or some other
grandee of bureaucracy," and al
leging that the Postmaster, wishes
to control the wires "to establish
a censorship over the press."
Next comes a personal attack
on Creel, chosen by the President
as his subordinate in most impor
tant work.
.And finally comes this serious
FLYER KILLED, D.C.
I INJURED,
AS PLANE FALLS
r
. BUFFAIX), H. X July 15. Aviator
S". S. Hale and Student Homer B.
Sharps, of Washington. D. C, fell 100
feet In an airplane at CurtUs Field
today. Hale was dead when picked
up and Sharps was removed to the
rle County Hospital with a frac
tured skull.
It la believed the motor stopped
while the machine was In the air.
War Department records show that
the only Homer B. Sharp on the rec
ords Is First .Class Private Homer B.
Sharpe, of the signal corps. His
emergency address Is 909 Lipscomb
Street. . Tort Worth, Tex. He Is the
eon of Mrs. Sophronla M. Sharps. No
identification with Washington Is
found.
AMERICAN AVIATOR KILLED.
TORONTO. Ontario. July IS. Lieut.
X. W. Hill, Maiden, Ma.. Is dead here
today, as tha result of a fail in an air
STUDEN
BBISBAJfE.
charge against the Administra
tion and the President:
"We may be sure that in its
supervision of telegrams the
Government would take pains,
' as It has steadily taken pains
in the case of newspapers,
never to bother disloyalists,
unless they bear German
names." . -
This is a charge by tie ,New
York Times, that the President of
the United States and the' Govern
mentof the United States are
treacherous to the people of the
Untied States.
If the President did take pains
"never to bother disloyalists" he
would be guilty of a crime and
unfit to hold office.
The New York Times leave no
uncertainty as to its opinion of the
President and his methods.
The last four lines of the inter
esting editorial read as follows:
"However, no disloyal news
papers in English will have, to
worry. They are sacred to, a
government, if wise, mysteri
ously so."
This attack on the President
with the direct charge of Govern
mental treason to the country ;is
enlightening.
It cannot, of course, injure the
President or change the opinion of
any man concerning his devotion
to duty, the absolute impartiality
and sincerity expressed, in his own
acts and those of his subordinates.
Such accusations as this in an
ordinarily cautious newspaper are
enlightening, because they show,
the hold that organized finance,
private ownership of public prop
erty have upon publicity in the
United Stale. '
What the Now York Tfms says.
In' so many words you may read.
What it says between the lines
Is:
"Why do you interfere with pri
vate ownership? Why are you the
too willing gull' of an emergency?"
Why not use your army, your
hundreds of thousands of men? It
employes of telephones, telegraphs,
and railnads bother you, why don't
you shoot them? Why do you
disturb a half-dozen Individuals in
their pleasant ownership and con
trol of the nation's wire 'service.
In the editorial quoted, one of
'the most conservative newspapers
shows you the vicious power, the
dangerous recklessness that reside
In private ownership of public
monopolies.
The moment the President
touches that sacred calf of gold, he
becomes, in the estimation of the
chief organ of plutocracy, an out
,law, not entiUed, even as head of
the nation; to-the faintest respect
He is thev'hob .willing gull" of
treacherous and.. constructive
working merkS.' '-'
He Is the friend of "disloyal
ists," and "has steadily taken pahn
never to bother them."
And under his government ".no
disloyal newspapers will have to
worry."
Was ever false accusation, bold
defiance of decency and respect
for the nation's leader in war dis
played so recklessly?
Remember that, there has been
quoted here no ordinarily' violent
newspaper, given to expressing
strong opinions. We quote the
New York Times, the mildest, oil
iest, hind-rubbing servant and
ally of capital
When such a newspaper turns,
accuses, and savagely bites the
hand of the President of the
United States, it is as though
some sheep bit the shepherd.
The interests that the New York
Times represents have been al
lowed to steal from this country in
the way of extravagant profits
hundreds of millions of dollars.
That could not be helped.
But it might be possible to pre
vent the organ of the profiteers
from bringing most shameful ac
cusations against the President of
the United States simply because,
in a case of absolute necessity, of
great emergency the President rc
quests permission FOR THE
PEOPLE to control for a little
while the telegraph and telephone
lines, necessary to the national
defense a control that has long
been established in all civilized
European nations.
L
L'
FALL RIVER, Mass., July 15. The
lower half of a Ctrl' body, undoubt
edly part of the corpse whose head
and less were found In lit. Hope Bay
last week, was discovered early to
day floating pn the water at the
foot of Davol street on the Fall
river side of the bay.
The condition of the part discovered-today
Indicated that the girl had
been a victim of Illegal surgical
treatment, and that her body had
been dismembered and cast into the
water to cover up this crime.
The place of discovery Is about
one mil from where, the head and
lower limbs were found last week.
The arms and upper trunk are still
missing.
tHE WEATHER REPORT.
Fair tonight: Tuesday partly cloudy;
little change In temperature -Temperature
at 8 a. m 84 degrees. Nor
mal temperature at 8 a. ml on July
IB for the last thirty years, 77 decrees,
OWER PORTION OF
S BODY FOUND
FLOAIG
V
: : . . ,lv j , ' : - "y'i'iM
NUMBER 10,589.
Fuel Administrator Announces
142,912 Tons Are Now in
Bins, Making Future Famine
Seem Unlikely. -
About one-fourth of the coal Wash
ington householders will ,use during the
coming winter has'.been ' delivered, by
the fuel administrator for the District,
It was announced today.
This .means that in spite of the coal
shortage of last winter and the fact
that more spalwlll.b needed next win
ter than was asked for last year, there
is likely to be enough coal to provide
against any repetition of the suffering
through shortage that tha cold spells
last winter brought to 'Washington oeo-
Ple.
14312 Tons Delivered.
Frank B. Jones, administrator for the
District, announced today that 3W51
tons of coal have been ordered .for house
hold uses and of this amount UlJU tons
of coal had been delivered prior to
Jnlyt ..
There are in Washlnrton about M.0M
homes. The admlnlitratlon has' estimated
max about six tons of coal per home
will prevent suffering. , . t
The administration -hecan .rectsterinr
ordenPorwluter eo' April. iwhn a.
ctfPoTa) cents" a ton went into effect
xw price was enforced to stimulate
ordering Xot future, tise The. total re
quirement for Washington next winter
is estimated sit 6G&80O tons. Including
both Governmental and private houses.
Householders are being asked to
accept a ton less anthracite coal than
their total estimate and jtake In ' its
place a ton of bituminous-coal. Where
dealers have knowledge that house-
noias require more than six tons,
two-thirds of the additional require
ment may -be delivered with the six
tons. The other third is' to be sup
plied after the six-room householders
have received their full quota, The
six-ton estimate Is based on houses of
six rooms, larger houses are al
lowed a larger estimate.
To Be On Equal Footings
By this plan it is hoped that every
home In the city will be placed on an
equal footing. All steam and hot
water heated buildings owned by pri
vate citizens arc to be heated next
Winter with bituminous coal. Owners
have been asked to lay in so far as
possible, at least half their estimated
need for the wlnUr. Soft coal Is
bulky, and as most of the large
Buildings have not room for more
thanhalf the amount they will re
qulrcjit was impossible to store the
entire, "amount.
Last year up to July 1. only 30.483
tons of domestic anthracite coal had
been received In Washington. This
year the total is 142,912 tons, all of
which Is in consumers' bins. This
means that there is almost five times
as much coal in Washington today
there was at this time last year.
17
U. S. ENVOY TO
BOLIVIA, DEAD
John D. O'ReAr. (minister plenipo
tentiary from the United States to
Bolivia, died at La Paz, that country.
yesterday, according to information
reaching the State Department today.
O'Rear was born In Missouri, March
21. 1870. and was appointed United
States minister to Bolivia In 1913. His
home Is In Mexico, Mo.
HELP WANTED FEMALE
TTPI8T
Rudolph Ic Wot Co. require stiilce of
a young taay a billtnjr clerk: permanent
position and sood salary. Call to
MB. QROESBECK, 135 N. T. aye. N. W.
The above ad appeared
in The- Times for three
days. The advertiser se
cured a good typist and
says they are very well
pleased with Times Want
Ads.
Phone us your ads.
Main 5260.
Bill will be sent-
GERMANS
FOURTH OF
CATS COAL
DELIVERED
OHND
IA
WASHINGTON, MONDAY EVENING, JULY 15, 1918. Qem
The Story of
Two
Mountaiip
Belles
One YaUhy Farmer,
Meeting on Lonely Road.
And a lawsuit... '
FREDERICK, MA, July- 15
The story of two'mountaln belles,
each of whom "set her cap" tor
the son of a prosperous 'farmer,
will be revealed here soon when
Alta llelnes suit to recover
$5,000 from Lloyd Lewis for breach
of promise, is tried. Another suit,
for $10,000, on grounds' of seduc
tion, has been filed by Miss Mets
ncr's father against Lewis and.hls
father, jointly.
Alta Melsner and Mary Herman,
both beauties of the Blue Ridge
mountains, were rivals three
years ago. Lewis ardently courted
both, and gossip said . that he
might marry either. Finally be
chose Mary Herman.
Since that time, gossip says,
complications have arisen In- Un
usual numbers' in the triangle,
culminating recently In the filing
of the two suits.
A chapter of the story, which
may be repeated at the trial, is
what happened a week ago, when,
according, to Mrs. Lewis, the
rivals met on a lonely mountain
road hear their homes in-Flxville.
There were no spectators. Mrs.
Lewis showed a face to, tho
officials, torn and bruised, which
she alleged was the result of .the
encounter. Miss Melsner was ar
rested and tried In Frederick for
assault Saturday.
Her mother and her grand
.mother testified that Miss Melsner'
was at home at the time of .the
alleged encounter.
Mrs. Lewis marshaled four wit
nesses who declared, jthey had
heard Miss Melsner say that she
. intended An wlna .00 Sha'cround-
wltlf 'ift: IkitiK? TheVcisebOKasJia,
dismissed, out only aervea ioyJ""fr
crease.th feeling between the
-lamlUievC 4
At -the trials of the damage
cases. It Is expected the whole
. long story of the relations of
Miss Melsner and Mary Harman
with Lewis will be bared.
0F13EL0PM0
t
FREDERICK, Md.. July 13. Fred
erick county, long famous for its
arduous Romeos and Its sensational
triangular and four-cornered love
affairs, has added yet another ro
mantic escapade to its list In the
elopement of Jere Ridge, seventeen,
and Florence Shook, thirteen, both of
Catoctln Furnace, fifteen miles north
of Frederick.
The same day Jere disappeared his
father missed a roll of 1700 in bills
from Its hiding place under his pil
low. - The youth Is the son of Grant
Ridge, and the girl Is the daughter
of Charles Shook. Both families re
side at Catoctln Furnace, only a field
separating their homes. The boy, It
Is said, has been making violent love
to the moutaln lassie for some time.
The elopement took place on July 4,
and, despite a thorough search, the
couple have not been located.
The father of the youth has always
carried large sums of money. By
the day he carried It around In his
trouser pockets and by night he slept
with it under1 his pillow. He awoke
on the morning of the 142d anniver
sary of America's freedom to find the
money gone, a bar of soap being sub
stituted. Likewise his son was gonii
as search later revealed.
ENTENTE FREED
OF BLAI
The entente has been exonerated
from all blame in the assassination of
Count MIrbach, German abbassador to
Russia, and the Left Social revolu
tionary party accepts full responsibil
ity, according to a confidential com
munication to the State Department
today.
The communication stated that
fighting in Moscow bad quieted.
HAITI WARS ON GERMANY.
Haiti declared war on Germany
July 12, the legation announced to
day. HOUSE AGREES TO RECESSES,
The 'louse, by unanimous consent,
today agreed to a series of-three-1
oay recesses until August i.
B0Y0F17ANDGIRL
IS ALSO MISSING
FR
1RBACH DEATH
CROSS
Americans Counter Attack;
Hold Foe at River's
i
UBH1N
niD IN
FIRSTTHRUST
Enemy. Gains Temporary Foot
ings In Vaux, ,But Counter
,,. Attack By Sammies Drives
SThem From Village.
By HEIVRY C WALES,
K Jf. 5. Staff Cerrcspeadeat.
WITH- THE AMERICAN' ARMT AT
THE MARNE, July 18. (11 a. m.)
The Germans launched a sew offen
slve.st 6 o'clock this' morning during:
which they succeeded in crossing the
Uirae, establishing bridgeheads on
the southern bank.
The-emplacement sfflfty pot?
afrlstf ThVGrBJsisrtre:elval vTr-i
powering re-enforcements, but the
American, counter attacked, liberat
ing their comrades, who had previous
ly been captured,, and taking a few
German captives.
German IAssan!t Again.
The counter blow gave time for a
withdrawal of the artillery,.
The Germans then assaulted again.
advancing further, while the Ameri
cans organized another counter at
tack.
The German attack at Vauxr (held
by the Americana west of Chateau
Thierry), which was delivered early
in the morning, was a feint.
The uermans succeeded in getting
a temporary footing In the, village,
but the Americans immediately de
livered a, counter thrust and drove
them out.
Batabllih New T-laes.
The Americans then established new
lines a quarter of a mile In advance
of their old positions, capturing some
German prisoners.
The uermans oegan tneir attacKS
from the east' of Chateau Thierry as
(Continued on Page 2, Column 4.)
E
T
The Curtlss Aeroplane Company Is
endeavoring to develop an airplane
with in engine of their make, said
to be more powerful than the Lib
erty motor.
The Government is encouraging
the Curtlss effort, as It Is all efforts
appearing likely of success. Details
of -the new machine are withheld.
Should It prove available, quantity
production undoubtedly will be
sought, but officials here are unin
formed thus far whether the new
model will prove desirable.
Liberty motor production was char
acterized today as 'doing very welL"
SON SAYS EDISONMI
NOT RUN FOR SENATE
ORANGE, N. J, July IS. Comment
ing on a report In newspaper dis
patches that Thomas A. Edison con
templated running for the United
States Senate, Charles Ellson, the ln
venor's son, at his home in this city
last night, described It as a "wild
rumor."
"My father is too busy to even con
template such a thing," the son added.
"He Is not here to deny the story, as
he has gone, down the coast for a trip.
i" "V. eunnln',: i'VESE."
.. BtKiKvS- npnkhkln .-... . ......
land some one thought Mr. Edison, who
Is one of his close friends, might do
iixeww in
CURTISS CLAIMS
NGfNE SUPERIOR
LIBERTYITOR
THE
Led Americans in Ffcst
v Victory in France
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MAJ. GEN. ROBERT L. BDLLABD,
Cornmarider of the First Division, A. E. F., -who captured Cantigny
from the Germans. The First Division under General Bollard went
direct to France from the Mexican border and It was:
First to enter the trenches;
First to conduct an American raid;
First to take German prisoners;
' First to capture a town from the 'Germans.
IDENTITY OF U. S.
UNITS WHICH BE A T
FOE ANNOUNCED
WITH. THE AMERICANS ON THE MARNE, July
14 (night). It was the First division that captured Can-
tigny, and it was the Second
mans on the Marne, it is now permissible to state.
Marines Follow Up.
The marines then captured Boure
schts and Belleau wood, now of
ficially designated on French war of
fice maps as "Cols de la Brigade
Marine." The Ninth and Twenty
third Infantries, with the marines,
captured' Vaux, while portions of
other Infantry regiments held the
right of the second division's line,
and did excellent work. Artillery,
machine gunners and all unlu of the
second division share in the glory
of the historic Marhe fighting.
The First division Is a unit which
came over directly from the Mexican
border, and was tha'Arst to land
In France, first to enter the trenches
for training snd first to enter a
permanent American line.
Rushed To rieardy.
They were rushed from the Toul
front to Picardy late In March, and
entered tho line west of Montdldler
on April 24. There they withstood
LOST AND FOUND
H-ImluUon pru form busen or
Mt vainaa a hlim n wu. - .-
call Clove. 1ST, reward.
OOLb BARPIN-About ene-lnch lonr.
en-Rs-U
navea -tjumo. ,--., , .
torn to B st. N. w.
Howard.
noo-Groat Dane; Mack with whit otar In
tJrWL SkSoiLM. W. Doubt reward.
D0O-8maU black and whit, earn Tlrjr:
rtrayid from SM New York avo. N. W. Re
ward If mturned to Apartrooat a.
STOATERNmr FIN Ull, tnsraved TTlora,
TOssiT" Call Columbia 3MS-W. Addnu
tU Willow avj. Takoma Park. U
TRt-DKtrTA MN-Crjyrt ? .
tan: namo. "Mary WU. T-tt. nsravd
en back. Teleobon yranklln 413. .Howard.
ICofttiaiMrf e Clauifiti JPotfos.)
WafStrnt Prices.
division that stopped the Ger
heavy enemy bombardments and con
solidated their line. Their artillery
did effective work, and the Infantry
and other units gained ascendancy
over the Bdches. The climax of their
work was the capture of Cantigny,
which they are holding despite re
peated counter1 attacks.
The First division, according to
announcement byCeneral March Sat
urday. Is Composed of regulars under
Major Qeneral Bullard, who com
manded the Brownsville, Texas, dis
trict for several years. The Sec
ond division Is composed ,of regu
lars. Including marines under Major
General Rundy.
LOXDON. July 15. A Central News
dispatch from Amsterdam today
stated that Vienna reports serious
rioting by 4he pro-Slav element.
The pro-Slav element Is hostile to
the Austrian government. The Slavs
have banded with the Cxechs In Bus
sla; and are waging a determined
revolution against the pro-German
BoIshevlkU
VIENNA REPORTS
SERIOUS RIOTING
IN PROMS
PRICE TWO CENTS.
MARNE
Edge
FRENCH ARE
FORCED TO
FALi BUCK
AT POINTS
River Bridged at Several Points,
London Learns Number ?
Villages Are Taken by In
vaders. PARIS, July 15.
Tbe long lug
bairdsBeBt of Pans
i-Mused Out etftaraeoa
ftr eueioatiwa. w
,vwt- jrt
Tke ffuxhfirc ob tW
battle rraat im be r
stHBlUe cc early tait
moraing. -
l.
LONDON, "July 15.
The Germans have crossed
the Marne at several points
in -their new drive, it was
learned authoritatively here
this afternoon.
French positions have.
been penetrated at some
points to the, depth of 5,000
yards (nearly three miles).
Some villages have been"
captured.
French Are Holding
Foe In Outposts
PARIS, July 15 (4:i5 p.
m.). The French army of
the Champagne is holding
magnificently against the
new German drive, accord
ing to dispatches received
from the battle front this aft
ernoon. The enemy concentration
appears to have been great
est between Dormans and
Rheims (a front of twenty-
five miles). The Germans
are reported to have crossed
the Marne at several points
between Chateau - Thierry
and Dormans, which should
be easy, because of the naiv
rowness of the river. FJve
wfiere the FrenclT are hofcl
ing the Germans huiheir.
outpost zones.
PARIS, July 15. The
Germans launched an attack
this morning, on the 50-mile
front extending from Chateau-Thierry
eastward . to
Main-de-Massiges. The bat
tle is continuing. The at
tack followed a violent artil
lery preparation. The French,
y
tf-si) . 4. i .- -..,
,- ... i- j ik abJl - a-rfi-rfji

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