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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, July 26, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 2

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THE WASHINGTON. TIMES; FRIDAY,' JULY 20,' 1918.
a
I
Y
i
k
fr
t
Franco-American Forces Smash Ahead in Drive
AiHrnmrriiiM li '.. . ' : - .
MLLItOWlinitM
LESS THAN 4
E
EN TARDENOiS
(Continued fromFrst Pass.)
between Solssons and Oulchy-le-Chateau.
Hundreds of additional pris
oners were taken.
""The French captured "Vllleraon
toire yesterday evenfng after a fierce
struggle, taking 200 prisoners and
twenty machine sum," the com
munique said.
"Oulchy-Ie-Chateau fell Into French
hands. We progressed east of the
town toward Fere-en-TardenoIa and
captured four guns. t
"During yesterday's fighting south
of the Ourcq we took several hun
dred prisoners."
FOE FACES FURTHER
STRAHGIC RETREAT
MILESOFFER
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMIES
TN FRANCE. July 26. Under pres
sure from the Franco-American farces
- driving; upon Fere-en-Tardenols, the
Germans now face withdrawal across
the Ourcq in the same costly clrcura
stances that marked their retirement
across the Marne.
The allies; advance, despite tem
porary setbacks at some points, is
generally' steady along the three
highways leading Into Fere-en-Tar-denols
fromache south and southwest.
Particularly 'hard fighting is under
way in Fere forest, but the Ameri
cans and French are systematically
cleaning the enesny machine .-gun
nests out of these woods.
While practically all the Interior
of the salient is under fire from allied
- artillery and airmen, specially heavy
bombardments are being directed on
Fere-en-Tardenols, where the Ger
sums' elaborate railway and highway
system has been practically wiped
out. The Boches losses ln'this region
axa staggering.
BRITISH HOLD OFF
ENEMY ONSLAUGHTS
J.
T ftWTkAW T.. n - ... .
i( -nisrat ana tnia rnnraitf cii .
Marshal Haig reported today.
"In e Hebutome- sector XPIcardy
front) yesterday evening, the enemy
attacked our new positions under
cover of a heavy barrage and was
'driven off with severe losses," the
statement M r
Early this morning a strong
enemy local attack was repulsed In
the neighborhood of Ueteren (Flan
kers front) after sharp fighting."
- "?!i!?ne the nlcht V ot our troops
'"" . "mh macnine gun post in
the Merrls sector.
"Hostile artillery has been active in
5 vauey and In the neighbor
ioSB of Boyelles."
SNEEZE SHELLS FAIL
TO STOP AMERICANS
"WITH TIIE AMERICAN ARMY AT
THE -MARNE. July 25 (10 p! m )-A
large number of German "sneeze
-hells," mixed with high explosives,
were thrown into our advancing lines
aortheast of Chateau Thierry today,
ut only a few casualties resulted.
The boches also tried to hinder our
forward movement by machine gun
ning and bombing our marching
troops from the sky. Two German
airplanes were employed for machine
on work, while another dropped
bombs, but the missiles fell harm
jessly In a wood through whlcti the
troops were passing.
Our advance on Wednesday was
o rapid that one American organiza
tion which went forward to align It
self with an attacking unit, marched
all day but was unable to catch up.
The Americans move up ahead of
some of their ration wagons, and the
men began to complain that "If the
first unit, did not stop chasing the
boches and let tbem. catch up. they
would starve to death."
Despite the rapidity of the German
retirement. It must be admitted that
Jt was carried out In orderly fashion.
The Germans le t behind only a small
amount of booty and few prisoners
were captured.
A 10 Inch howitzer that was stuck
in the mud was the biggest gua the
Americans have yet captured In the
war. It looked as 'If the breach had
been removed.
We captured an 8-Inch piece In the
sjame vicinity after a direct hit from
our artillery had killed practically
the entire German crew.
ITALIAN TROOPS
AIDINIRANCE
ROME, July 2C. TirlUiant work by
Italian troops In Franco was de
scribed by semiofficial dlspalchts re
ctlved liere -today.
On the heights west of Rhelms
Italian units participated Wrdnriutav
in a counter "attack. Co-oprratln
vlth the French, they started from
Sols de Vrlgny and reached all their
objectives, beyond Ferme de Mery
Scores of .prisoners, three guns, and
ten machine guns were taken.
'ELL-Ari
AVicnTii'fTslTr Tr-'rinvhal
Indigestion. Druggists
irrfund money if- it fails. 25a;
relsTd.e'trom en'atuc".!"' "their flght gone,
the Hebaterne'and lleterep aeciors t?ok ,,t:" """J ,to 1ISU' "elr
Oh, Man!
HEkRV DEAR t WISH
You'D Gis we tbuR
uuorvionD attcktion
For. a- Pfw mwotbs-
i vuatt To' Talk
ABOUT OTlMMld
WHEe. Vo -SAY
of course wt-v a
Be all -Right with
MC- JlMMlC MAD?
ME. PTAOMI5C TJ
.JPfZAK T& TOU
ABOUT IT.
(Continued from First Page.)
-"
The French were tired, it Is true.
but f,o were the Germans. The latter
delayed longer than the French
thought they would, the reason prob
ibly being the necessity to allow re
operation of slightly wounded men
ind to get the classes of 1819 entirely
ready for the campaign.
Gonraad Geee Abes.
At first the French were certain
the attack 'was coming July 7, and
that it would be In the Champagne,
west of Ithelms. Oh July 10 it was
thought the 14th surely would be the
late, anticipating the Germans would
expect the French notto be ready,
because, of their national fete, and
would hope to accomplish a great
moral advantage from the effect of
hitting the French on their Indepen
dence Day.
When it, didn't Ane the night of
the 14th. General Gouraud ordered a
oup de mrln, capturing twenty-seven
prisoners, from whom definite knowl
idge was obtained " that the battle
Aould start at midnight. Thereupon
.he artillery opened up on the Ger
man lines.
It was realized from Jhe outset that
the French first lines could not be
held, so a zone of outposts was
formed, with little -groups of officers
and men. whose duty waa,to fire and
break up the advancing waves as
much as possible, while maintaining
areful communication with the main
force by means of underground wires.
pigeons, etc
Gourauds army consisted entirely
of French, except an American re-
lerve division 11.500 men).
General Bertolet's army, beside the
French, had one Italian corps and
two American divisions one in the
line and one In reserve.
Big Gunn Let Loose.
When, at midnight, the movement
began under cover of shells, gas and!
smoke, the fourth army dropped i
bade, leaving only Its outposts. Then1
f'r,nrh T's and ifhr f-Mna urt.1 .
had been silent several da) a and
.aa
meir presence unKnown to tne
encmy, cut loose, guided by tho out-1
nsttst inritrtirtlnns Thuv nrniifrtir
terrible havoc and seriously inter-!
ered witii the German advance. Ini
many cases the German second lines,
keeping a time table, walked direct-
la fnln ttisilr Viaawla lo.... .
where did they reach the line of 're-
sisunr tne nrst Hay. and Gouraud
was able to report the Champagne
altact stopped. t
l - ) T MlillTARY "3CH00L '
101 PRINCE
BEATEN BECAUSE
ALLIES KNEW PLANS
,n.M.S ,!,: . ,h "r"n the success of the American Govern
enabled them to pass the Marne the, , . ., . . .
r Hiv nrt in r-n ..ii rnru.o-H ment In landing vast forces In France
reaching the line of resistance a,
some points. ining inai inaue iuc oanns operation
The next day the Champagne ef-'possible, since it enabled the allied
fort ended, while the other pushed command to take a risk that other
1 Khtly toward Kpernay. It waa wl" would have been forbidden,
now seen that the German plan wasJ Tne critical moment of the war is
to take Hpernsyisnd Chalons. Jolnlnow '' passed.
.hnr two armies,1 thro7 In sll their
erver. and smash one or the other
if the divided French "Srmler. This
was obviously Impossible "Of real!-'
zatlon. and the .French counter at
tack was then decided on.
The minimum number of men need
ed to hold theaJlnes were set aside
for that purpose. All other avallables
were planted In the region between
Complegne and Montdidler. When It
was certain lle Germans were thor
oughly engaged, th10 were conren
inted In the Villert.Cottcrcts forest.
Trrasan Cfcnrsra Made.
Previously, French local operations
ad obtained the needed base fur
,x. J....,.., .v- . :.
w. "-' ""'" -.
Chaudun.
On the night of the 17th, '
.-
I X OUGHT 10 dcuiju i - iSL.r 1
I , 1 To TrllMK ABOUT I V R FOR JfeU I
( " -l Should Lirfer - W " - S
J --S v ' To SCr Mf I J , , ' f
j f ) To 60MC GOOD 1 4
i-li I' -" - i
-AMO I T&U.D Hirv .) IM .SO ?LAD TOO
i i vuc t iauh rr ii -nmc nurt i
I oJER TBMisht AMD I T6f3ifirlT SO lXE I
I LET1. Hya WNOVd IM COULD. 5J OUEWI
Tne ' MOrTrfING V it TOGETHER
r rNU : ;
ss i
Over Top" Author Whrose
Discharge Is Mystery
l " s.sjstHiMLHMsHH&illllilsliMsiitecs-!L i -
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ARTHfJR GUY
Best known as "Sergt. Empey,"
honorable discharge as a captain
of the War Department.
wich waa dark and stormy, the
centratlon In the forest was com-1
1 pleted.
well as all necessary
ulle,y emplacements.
The result Is known more than
25.000 prisoners, over 400 guns, s
thousanl machine guns and destruc
tlon of lhe Gerra,ul mon rlou
"""c -"'"l "ul"' u
with treason.
The Krench command freely admits
o far ahead of schedule Is the only
U. S. LANDS SUPPLIES
OF FOOD FOR SWISS
Complete success In the moveraent
of a large quantity of food supplies
to relieve threatened famine In
Switzerland was reported today.
These supplies now have been
landed by merchantmen totaling 107,
000 tons furnished by the Shipping
jsoara. j nis innnacre was more than
ooub" e irao rail promiEM last De-
cember to the wi.a government
All of tho merchantmen carrying
- V" ,r7 ..; . -BUT l V THINK I
ICoPTrtrht. UK. by Um
EMPEY.
of "Over The Top" fame, whose
in the National Army is a mystery
eon-'supplies were Convoyed by American
. a
aistroyers because Germany had re-
ar-i'""1 lo Prorniso tnem a sate pas
w
-
DEFECTIVE CONTROLLER
SHOCKS MOTORMAN
L. M. Smith, thirty years old, a
motormon of the Washington Rail
way and Electric Company, who lives
ct C3S Pennsylvania avenue north
west, today is at Freedman'a Hospital
suffering from an electric shock re.
ceived from the controller box of his
car at Georgia avenue and W street at
4:30 yesterday aftertnoon.
Smith waa starting his car, when
he received the shock and was thrown
back In the passage way uncon
scious. Defective Insulation Dermlt-
tid the current to pass through hlfr
100 KILLED IN MUNpN
EXPLOSION IN GERMANY
ZURICH. July 20 A hundred per
sons were killed and a number in
jured Wednesday when a German mu
nitions factory blew up. copies of the
i-iauen xeue Vogtlandlsche Zeltung
received here today stated.
The factorv and several houses In
the vicinity were destroyed.
By Briggs
"
--fci
Trtbno AtsocUllon'rltw Tors: Trlbnael.
An air of secrecy s.lmost amount
ing to mysjery, was thrown today
about the honorable discharge .from
the national array of 'Cs.pt. Arthur
Guy Emper, the famous- Sergeant
Empey, of the British army woo
wrote the book, "Over the Top,'
that has been sotd In this country
In teas of thousands.
The dlschsrge order was dated
July 10. and reports the (honorable
discharge under section 0 of the act
of Congress approved May 18, 1B17,
authorizing the President to dis
charge officers In the national army
at win and without a hearing.
V Baker la Sliest.
Secretary of War Baker said: "I
cannot talk about it," when asked
about Empty's discharge. Adjutant
General Henry P. MCCaln likewise
declined to discuss the matter. Other
officials said the case Is "confident
ial" and therefore not to be dis
cussed. Officials at the War DeDartment
not only declined to comment on Can-
tain Empey's discharge but announced
f- ' I i .i-
I HEAXD
I WHAT YoO.
SAID
p Xr-C ,
Bs guffi
SILENCE SHROUDS
EMPE)f DISCHARGE
FROM U.-S; ARMY
Heahl,bIW..U.,d 1? .r'n'S1"' pS,b?hff condlUons. effected a saving of
lie bis address. .At the Bellevue Hv . . ..
lei nere, where Captain Empey
stopped. It was said he had cone, to
New York and at his New York ad
dress. 220 West Forty-second street.
It waa said he had left for the West.
Empey's Werk.
Empey was commissioned in the
national .army July IS, and was as
signed to the adjutant general's
corps. Announcement of his hnnnr.
able discharge waa made officially
ycsioraay in war Department orders.
Empey probably la the him.Vnnwn
veteran of the war In Washington.
no nrsi appeared Here In the lecture
course of the National Geographic So
ciety and" recently appeared at the
National' Theater with Rose Stahl In
"Pack tip Your Troubles." and also
has been seen in the nim. "Over the
Top," a plcturizatlon of the story of
his adventures In the trenches In
France with the Canadians as told
In his book.
Empey aided In the Red Crss and
war servings stamps campaigns and
lt,wf" expected, when he was com
tnl ffffilnisaH as da.a-.sflBtfl At a. .
missioned a captain, that he was to
aid the War Department In a similar
line of work.
CABINET'S POLICY
VIENNA. July 25. Germany will
approve the appointment of Baron von
Hussarek, former minister of educa
tion, as Austrian premier, under the
provision, mat nis influence Is directed
toward German plans. The new pre
mier has been promised unlimited
military credit from German sources
If his policy proves agreeable to the
Kaiser's counselors. It was an
nounced. Baron von Hussarek has announced
a plan to the chamber of deputies
which will permit the selection. of a
cabinet from all parties. Portfolio
changes will be mado later when par
liamentarians are available.
Your country needs etery pennyt
teach roar children to b. v nv.
I lags Stamps.
GERMANWARPARTY
C0NTR0LSAUSTR1
Against Crown Princess Army
ilnmrnroi ciinr It - .. " - ' :J- L-
tT
T
(Continued from First Page.)
path about flftyfeet away from me.
The machine was onthe Inn's private
property and was not on a public
road. 'I didn't take much notice of It
until the man saw me standing back
of blm, looking toward the' automo
bile. Ha then backed the machine to
where X was standing- and drove up
to me. saying: 'Well, wnat do you
want aroutvl here? Wb4t are you
following me forT
"He had girl with him.
"J. answered: "Ths is private prop
erty and I am the caretaker, and I
have a perfect right to go where I
wish on this property. I am nqt fol
lowing you at alt.'
"For the next' few minutes we had
an arguments Finally 1 got tired of
arguing with him and left, walking in
back of the machine. At the time I
had an ax over my shoulder, which
I used for staking cows, I was walk
ing away, not paying any more at
tention to him when X heard him
start his machine and start away.
Sheots From Automobile.
"Then, I stopped, turned around, and
watched. He bad gone about twenty
feet when he reached out of (he ma
chine while It was running, and shot
me In the leg.
"I stonned & nasaine motorist, who
ran after th man.' and got the nura
ber of his machine, so that I could
have the fellow- arrested. Then I
went to Casualty Hospital."
George James told The Times today
that- he aijot Rldgeway in slf-de-V
tease, as the man naa tnreatenea to
hit him and his girl with an ax. He
said: '
"We' parked in a public road about
a mile from Anaeostla and we were
eating, some candy, we Had been
there about fifteen minutes when the
grl noticed a man creeping around in
me nuanes near ny. cne 101a me, ana
we watched him.
GfeeyaCp' On Antonotjtle.
"I dlexVt see the si at that time, but
saw him creep around 'about thirty
.feet aljead of us and come down to
ward the machine. Be then tried to
creep up on us by circling around In
back. When he was about ten 'feet
away I sild to htm:
"What do.you.'wantr
"He answered, rne, "Get off this
property '
"Then I -said to him, Do yon own
this propertyr
"He replied,' Tea,' and began walk
ing toward us. dragging the ax along
the ground. , .
"This Is, public properfy aid if
you don't get off L'll hit you with this
ax.' The he drew the 'ax back' over
his head" and I thought he was go
ing to nit tne girl, so t -tooic an au
tomatic ,32, which I carry; in my ma
chine, and shot at his feet, thinking
1 couia scare mm. Tbemtl drove off
and I didn't knowsj shot him until
tne ponce arrested me last night."
That installation of automatic tele
phone beginning April ,1. 1017, would
have given the District more efficient
service, caused less inconvenience
to noTurnmint antrvMiMf. fian vlat-
$3,851,117 In capital and other ex
penditures over what the local phone
company proposed In extending the
manual system now In use, and made
certain a saving of ? 1.000,000 a year
in operating costs, were the final and
definite conclusions of the United
States Bureau of Standards submitted
this morning to the District Public
Utilities Commission bv Dr. Frank
A. Wolff, engineer expert for the bu
reau.
He also recommended that the au
tomatics be Installed "without delay."
Questions Settled.
Apparently all questions of yester
day as to disagreement among the
bureau experts were settled, by Dr.
Wolffs statement that three confer
ences had been held at which he and
six others were present, and that not
one of them demurred from the con
clusions he had submftted. Those at
the conferences were:
Dr. K. B. Rosa, head of the electrical
division of, the bureau: Dr. Delos F.
Wilcox, of New York, one of the lead
ing public utility experts of the
United States; Dr. P. G. Agncw. G. &
Macomber, W. D. Brown, engineers,
and J. P. Crawford, law clerk of the
bureau.
The examination of Dr. Wolff pro
ceeded this morning. The lawyers
of the Bell Interests rtt placidly,
making notes as Dr. Wolff went on
with. Is statement, which he read
from a typewritten manuscript.
It analyzed the financial phases of
ADVERTISEMENT
MOTHER ALL RUN-DOWN
Had to Have Health, to Keep House
for Four ChHdren What She Did.
NARRAGANSETT PIER. R. L
"I was all run down, back ached and
tired all the time. I keep house for
my husband and four children and
could hardly keep around. Finally I
tried Vinol and it has restored my
health and helped me wonderfully, so
I recommend it to others who are in
this condition." Mrs. Hannah Ran
dall.
There is no secret about Vinol. It
owes its success to beef and cod
liver peptones, iron and manjjanese
peptonates and glycerophosphates,
the oldest and most famous body
building and strength creating tonics.
O'Donnell's Drug Store and drug
gists everywhere. . i
UMILIMfLIOnU
BY MAN IN AUTO
STORIES GONFLIC
PHONE D(PERTS SAY
AUTOMATIC SYSTEM
AV
MILLIONS
K. C. B.'s TOWN GOSSIP
TO THE conre.
ACROSS THE street
A GREAT W tn-dL
HAD JUST drtTea op.
ALL FILLED TcXCh mOor.
FROM TH tratelns static.
AND ONE of taa atUors.
BLEW A liom
AND AH isle crowd.
BEQAN TO garfces.
AND WH.ERE I W.
A HUNCHBACKED txgt.
WHO WAS seOfeS mper. "V
AND CKYRtQ
IN Asraatloat
CEASED CY-fMI
AND LOQKED sjmsg.
a
TO THE -nxxj track.
WHILE A maa. jv
AND STARTED to talfc
AND THE 1mxaamdke& "bay.
LAID K
ON AlKto
AND CROSSED Ow
AND JOtNED tie svri.
AND I followed
AND STOOD dew tre. "
i
WHILE A Jte iria suite.
FOR MOfUE-reendte
FOR NAVY bMj.
AND I tMnk Isw,
IN THEe7e of tie Hi
AND UPON his Aca.
A GREAT desire.
THAT COULDNT ease trae.
AMD CLOSE tarn
STOOD ANOTHER Tsojv
WHO LISTENED Tralte.
f
AND THEN sute'jjas wt";
e '
THROUGH THE txtmtog
TO THE side of tie track.
AN WHISPERED ssjstaQilax.
TO A savllar tfly.
AND THEY rstUed Mm ttj.
ANOTOOKlnt
Pershing and McAdoo
Exchange Felicitations
On U. S. Achievements
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMIES
IN FRANCE, July It General
Pershing received the following
cablegram from Secretary McAdoo:
"America, glories in the achieve
ment of your gallant army and your
French comrades.
"The country Is thrilled with the
valorous deeds of our heroic sql
dlers." , v
Pershing replied:'
"In the name of the American Ex
peditionary Forces. I thank you for
your cordial message. Our officers
and men are filled with the national
spirit of determination to win: They
are superb soldiers."
the conclusions and showed that in
stallation of automatics would have
oeen aone mucn cneaper than the ex
tension ot the present manual sys
tem which the company wished to
make at a cost of $6,217,000, and
would have given the District more
added phones than were proposed by
the company, and greater ease of op
eration . after automatic. Installation
by reason of the less number of per
sons needed. '
The five conclusions are to stand as
the opinion ot the bureau that economy.
efficiency, and convenience demand the
Immediate change from the manual to
the semi-automatic system for the
plans outlined by the bureau experts
called for a co-ordination ot the auto
matic and manual.
Dr. Wolff testined that he had
compiled with the stipulations of the
Commission, that he was to bring
Into court his conclusions based on
data already In his possession.
Tea can seal the Kaiser's
with War Savings Stamps.
late
T
LV 150
Made in America
by
American Labor
with
American Capilall
PHsl
L
T AND- SOME one ciappea.
AND WE took It 87.
AND THE htmchbadesd toy.
WA8 THEnoadesttaa
AND I looked at hiss.-.
AND THROUGH a sffiOs.
THAT LWHTED Jols ace.
,
4 SAW a ta
AND THE sfle -weta.-a.-nxr.
AND HE looked across. .
WHERE HI8 papers lay.
AND THOUGHT a Bcafflt
' AND TOOK from J JocXat.
WHAT MOKEYaAej.
AND COUNTED it.
AOT-HURRlEJssjff.
mLL fTJrtker.
AND BECAUSE of 3f1tSXWL.
1 .FOLLOWED iisa. v
AND HE Treat la Aora.
N TO . postal stsaV
AJSD'WHEN be caaw-caL
HE h AD two thritt fiasasW.
AND few mfcmtes latex;
DOWN AT his stasd.
a
HE WAS 'wcrkli aeatfl.
a
XHD 3 -wot cms.-
m
. AND .BOUGHT two :
A3CD -GAVE Wat -diae.
XHO TOOK lay ta
FOR I badAteeSas.
I COULQNT adwesUaau
TO A bay l&e OscL
.ITHAHKyca.
T
CUMBERLAND. Md, July 24. At a
special meeting of the mayar anil city
council for Trostburg last night.
Bailiff Henry Fischer, chief of po
lice, was given a hearing on the
charm of allepftd nraftrmaTilirm and
lot conduct unbecoming an officer.
The charge was brought by ex-Officer
Henry puckwortb. formerly of the
police force, who resigned the first
of the month. Duckworth claims
that he was asked by the chief to
tear down war chest-posters at night
when no person waa about.
After receiving testimony the may
or and council voted to take time to
deliberate, decision to be delivered at
the next regular meeting in August.
There .was considerable excitement
when Duckworth called Mayor Sam
uel R. Tlddy a liar. The mayor or
dered him locked up. but a number
of citizens who were present Inter
posed and expressed their opposition.
The mayor called for order and. at
one time thy demonstration portend
ed a riot, with scores jumping U
tlrelr feet.
Fischer admitted that he told Duck
worth to remove posters that were
flapping In the wind from having
been torn loose by storms.
BALFOUR WARNS SLAVS.
LONDON. July 28. "If the allies
are not victorious In this year, Ger
many will dominate all Europe." said
Foreign Minister Balfour, addressing
a Jugo-Slav organization .meeting.
s.
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