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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, October 01, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 16

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SURE, PM
Etitem'DryiTeittjill to Give
Mora Boys Physical Training
There Ain't
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EASTERN HIGH SCHOOL WITHDRAWS
TEAM FROM GRIDIRON
there will be no football at Eastern High School. For the first time
in the history of scholastic sports here the Capitol Hill institution -will cut
the gridiron game from the sports curriculum. Eastern will compete in
basketball, baseball, and track.
' At a meeting of the principal, Charles Hart, andDr. L. H. Bat
tersby with the boys at Eastern yesterday it "yfdj&rtfily decided to
cancel all games and to ask the High School AthfietJc" Board to be allowed
to retain a standing in other sports.
The action of the Easterners was
taken after a canvass of all boys In I Georgetown unit and will have a
the school. A sizeable squad of coach in a few days,
twenty-five, one fifth of the students I J. Heaphy picked as All-South At
' , . .....vi.. i,..i I lantlc center last season. Is being con
In, school, slenlfled their intention, Bi(jered for the posIUon ,t , .
of' playing football this falL Of these stood. Heaphy was operated on for
but four boys had played football oe-i
fore and two of them are of last sea
son's team.
tt was seen that football' for East
ern 'would be absolutely out of the
question In view of the fact that
physical development could be given
to the majority In other lines of work
to,a decided advantage.
We are going to help out the ma
jority of bpys In the school rather
than give attention to a few. said
Dr. Battersby today. "It will be pos
sible to develop boys in -other lines
atr once. All boys are required to
take physical, training, and will be
turned out for basketball, Boccer.
track work and cross-country run-
nlng.
"With so many boys ineligible to
compete In football on account of
tnt residence rule, ana so lew re-
tufnlng from last season who have
ever played before it was seen to be
Impossible to put out a team.
"we believe that the larger Interest
will be conserved. It may be of
tereat to note that not one of the
boys reporting weighed more than HO
pounds. The team would have aver-
aged something like 115 or 120. which
would have been unable to compete i
with the other schools."
Eastern has signified Its intention '
oi piaying in omer sporis mis sea-
aoit The athletic and military pro-
gram announced at Eastern Is com-
prehenslve and is expected to develop
th? boys along all lines J
Georgetown Preps are expecting an
augmented squad In a few days when
physical examinations are over Many
of the Prep lads will drill with the
COLGATE STOPS IT
HAMILTON'. N. T. Oct. L Colgate
ccUegs has decided to abolish all Inter
collegiate football this season and has
released Ray Ziegler. former I'ennsjl-i
vama star guard, who had signed to
act as coach.
Frtas of military duties, together with
lack of experience on the part of tt.e
students, made It Impossible for Col
gate to carry out its pretentious sched
ule arranged last ear.
BARTFIELD WINNER
PHILADELPHIA. Oct. 1. Soldier
Bartfield easily defeated Jack McCar
ron last night In six rounds at the
' Olympla.
McCarron was In poor physical con-'
ditlon and. stopping a stiff right on the
nose in tne inira round, re lost what
f,..i. .,...i.... v. -.. .t j
little aggressiveness he had il.owc and
contented himself with hugging.
BOARD TO MEET
The District Baseball Association
will meet Tnursday night at t p. m..
at Spalding's, according to a notice
sent out by President Robert E.
Doyle. The board of auditors will
meet at the same place a half hour
before the regular meeting. The
board of auditors Is composed of Joe
Giebel, Lane Macy and L. Nelson
The championship of the District
Association, won by Naval Operations.
'Will be formally awarded.
SPORTS POSTPONED
Gallaudet College will postpone
football practice for awhile. Manager
Ozler reDorts that more Man half th
Kquad Is suffering frontthe Spanish
"flu" Capt Thomas Osborne had
a large squad out last week but as
the players were on the sick list had
lo abandon the practices for awhile.
BUYING MORE LIBERTY BONDS; THEY'RE THE CHEAPEST HIGH CLASS BUY ANYWHERE SAYS.SWAMPOODLE PETE
THE
No Such Animal
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- Jiiitiin a ir ii i i i 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 m . c- ;'i 1 1 1 ii i i i i m i m r m 1 1 it 1 1 j r i ff f f j j j s jj .' 1 1 1 x. "" l
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WMWil'':ryW I sflHHk wmJi .". ;' wi -aligns jii& eSKKm
appendicitis last June and may be un
able to come out for the unit eleven.
The withdrawal of Eastern from
the High School title games may
cause a change in the schedule. There
will now be but six games Instead
of ten and It Is expected that the
dates will be rearranged In order to
straighten out the gaps caused by
Eastern's withdrawal,
Scholastic football teams will get down
to real action, this week. Many players
of last .year"B"eleTensr-wlll return today
"" -JvjSTOraeraoie numoer
of youngsters uotktri n farms or else-'
where during lhe'utnnSer and are pack-'
ing up to get Into School at once.
Central Is reported to have fifty boys
0r the senior class oat at work at nr. !
ent. Tech will gain something like
that number while the other schools
will find many boys cettlnc back.
By reason of the draft this jear the
Doys on the teams will be younger
than usual. Several teams here have
In-Host plaers who would have returned,
! Enlistments durinr the .iimm.r l.
mused a wholesale departure or boys
who were expected to count In forming,
the football teams this season. I
Atherton Hastings. Western's big)
guard of last seas'on. Is back in school.!
Hastings worked al lsummer in Maine
and came back early only to succumb
to an attack of the Spanish "flu." He is
expecting to play shortly.
"Sally" Bosley, captain-elect of Tech,
Is at Maryland State and Is -expecting
to make good at football Bosley is a
high Jumper and should be able to
make the track team also.
NAVY YARD READY
Navy Yard football players are on
the lookout for games with Inde
pendent teamn. . Manager J. C. Mc
Comas, G13 Pennsylvania avenue
southeast, will handle all correspon
dence. The team has been working out
more than two weeks under "Bumps"
Turner. Tlayers who are making
progress with the cleen are Ilitz
man. McMahan. Bejers, McBride,
Luscombe. Cox, Snow, Heed, Durlty,
Burns. Towers, Turner. Deakino.
Bass, McComaa and Meyers.
BANCROFT HAS "FLU"
PHILADELPHIA. Oct 1 -Dave
Bancroft, the Phils' brilliant shortstop.
js ,irk n bed at his home In Wet
m.n.j.i.vi. ,i,t, c.,.i.h i-n,,..,,.
Philadelphia with Spanish Influenza
He was taken the early part of this
week, his temperature on Thursday
being over 103. He was slightly im
proved yesterday. Bancroft secured
essential employment at Traylor's
shipyard, Cornwalls, Pa., as soon ai
the baseball season closed, getting a
Job as a helper on a crane
CHANGES POSTPONED
After the war is oer Bannockburn
will change Its course. The popular
golf club had decided to lengthen the
course out tc eighteen holes and to
make many changes in the present
method of going around. It was de
elded recently that It would be wise
to wait until later to start work on
the course.
DRILL CUTS IN.
Drill has cut In on the usual foot
bill program at the Army and Navy
Prep School Coach Frank Newberry
has a sizable squad working out be
tween drills.
TIMES'
Camrlrfet.
FOR SEASON
Sol Metzger Pays
His Own Salary.
Sol JleUger, former football
coach at the University of Penn
sylvania, West Virginia, and
Washington and Jefferson uni
versities, and who is now a Y.
SL a A. athletic director at
Camp Dix, has signed a contract
to tutor the gridiron team aa
well, and the paper is probably
the oddest to which a coach ever
affixed his signature.
Sletzger in formal manner
agreed to coach the football war
riors for the sum of $1. Before
affixing his signature he Insisted
that he be permitted to contri
bute the dollar for the purpose.
Then he ordered equipment for
fifty players and the football en
thusiasts at the camp are cer
tain that they will have one of
the best elevens In the East.
Practice is already under way
Army Medical School football play
ers, fifty strong and led by Jack Dunn,
former all-America star of the Uni
versity of Michigan, are getting
ready for a protracted season here.
The team ha been gotten together
by Lieut Wesley Cox, wno managed
the baseball team last summer.
Besides Dunn there Is Wagner,
former University of Penn star; Hall,
a center from the University of
Maine, Langemade, of Kenyon Col
lege and all-Ohio back; Colle. an
other Knnjon man.: Chambers, of the
University of Michigan, and Well, an
other Michigan player.
With these cracks ready to form a
team. Lieutenant Cox has found sev
eral former high school stars In the
Medical School who are bidding for
the team.
Clarke, liar Land. MrQutllan and
Justh. the former Mohawk A. C play
er here, loom up as possibilities. The
Medicos are expecting to arrange
games with service elevens In the
cltv
Arrangements will be completed
shnrtlyt to fully equip the eleven
l'lfty mcn are now going through
daily drill at the Army Medical School
for physical development in addition
to the regular football work which
started a week ago.
The team expects to practice In
Potomac Park Dunn and Wagner
are in charge of the coaching
WILL PRACTICE LATE.
MOROANTOWN. W. Va.. Ort. 1.
With the student' army training
corps organized, football prartica has
been assigned for an hour dally be
ginning at 6 o'clock.
DOYLE IN FLORIDA.
Connie Doyle. Columbia Country
Club racquet star. Is in I'lorlda, but Is
expected back in time to get In the
exhibition matches chcdulcd for Oc
tober 12 and 13 here.
COMMISSION ATHLETE.
STATE COLLEGE. Ta Oct. 1. Silas
rage, of Pittsburgh, who held the pole
vault record 11-9 at Penn State, has
received a lieutenant's commission In
the army air service.
MAY SWITCH DATE.
STATE COLLEGE, Pa, OcL 1. Ow
Ing to the Government's edict In re
lation to intercollegiate football Penn
State Is peeking to switch the Wash
ington and Jefferson game from Oc
tober 12 to November 2.
BBteiaLi f' Wv-sa.
l.'Jlfl sy tz -z zC.VK. -v II -i VL-' IVI I
MEDICOS
POSSESS
MANY GRID STARS
COMPLETE SPORTING PAGE
OS, fcy Isternatlenal Km I
Penny Ante
ROOKING
By LOUIS A.
i.. .
wm. WHiiik
f FUNMV I NEVER) f 1 Upy P.DDIE,
AcJtic rS l 9-5G-S'- 1 COME IM
1 Cio-r A J ID uk TO f SUMP'M'5 j . .
V - S T THAT. L-iC I I DU ' )
I ( GIMME 1
) ANOTHER ? )
STACK ) S 7 y . f
) UOE, ( OH dOV.' f quce
I AlMT GOMMA )- I THAT POnTJ.J f AGAIN . m I
. MAKE. ME J ) 'AT'S THS. I MINE. ARE.
V VJEAKE.N- f BEST OWE OUST AS
Lost you forget what the unheard of athlete is doinp; on the battle
field of France, here's another tale, of bravery overseas in which the hero
is an athlete. You probably never heard of Samuel J. Morton, of Chicago.
You probably never even heard of "Kid Nails," his ring sobriquet I'll
wacer that many Chicagoans never knew he was alive, eifiier. But "Kid
Nails," now a sergeant in the 132d Infantry, of the "Prairie" division, has
been decorated with the Croix de Guerre for gallantry in action.
Morton, though extremely modest
In letters home, admits he has been
over the top three times after tne
despicable Hun. On his last trip Into
No Man's Land, "Kid Nails" was the
only one of his party to return. He
came back with the bull-! wound In
his arm and a shell wound In his leg
As soon as his wounds were dress
ed, he Insisted on going right back
Into No Man's Land, to seek en
geancc for the passing of his seven
companions. The surgeons refused.
however, but his bravery gave him
the War Croxs and a chance at pro
motion. "Kid Nails" is now at an officer's
training camp in the rear and hopes
soon to have the bars of a lieutenant
fastened upon his shoulders.
The point of all this is that the
leaders of the ring, who are safely
on this side, have much to learn from
the fourth rate boxers who never did
much over here, but are raising caln
over there.
Two Mitchell Tales.
Kred Mitchell, manager of the Chi
cago Cubs, used to coach the Harvard
baseball squad, and had considerable
success, too, it might be added.
Here's two tslcs he tells of experi
ences at Cambridge:
"One day Harvard was playing
Drown." says Mitchell, "and one of
the Brown coachers stood at first base
and yelled at th batter:
" Now, old kid, give It a kiss!'
"After the game the dean came to
me and asked, 'Did you hear the re
mark of that Urown playerr
"'No.' 1 answered. Innocent as all
gel out
"'He said. "Now, kid, give It a
ku.n
By TAD
TH M.U TGO I
A&AJ'- DIDN'T I J
OO A. 6OOPTD0 y
1"
THE BIG POT OF THE
EVENING.
-M QVER
DOUGHER
"Seems to mo I did hear him say
that.' I replied.
'Oh. I an eo glad th"at It was not a
Harvard man." aid the dean."
Another time Mitchell gave the
Harvard outfielder Instructions about
shifting around in the gardens for
certain batters.
"One day," h"5 sas, "I was on the
bench and the left flelder failed to
move ovor when I gave the signal. I
lest my temper and yelled: "Blank-
ety-blank you! Move over!" j
"After the game the dean called on,'
me 'Did you hear that profanity on j
the bench this afternoon?' he akcd '
Who was It?"
"I looked him in the eye and an
swered right back: 'I don't know,
but when I And out I'll tear off his
uniform and Arc him off the squad'
' 'That's right.' said the dean, and I
let it go at thaL"
I.ynn 'a Ileal Sport.
Hand it to Marion Lynn, of the War
Risk team, for real sportsmanship.
There' a real lad Hh the right idea
When the District sandlot title sc
ries threatened to end in a disgrace
ful quitting. Lynn stepped in and
cried a halt. He came In to notify us
that, "win or lose. War Risk wasn't
going to quit " And, though losing.
War Risk U entitled to great credit
for playing out the string.
Twenty ears from now It is
doubtful if Lynn or any other plaer
in the final game will remember the
s-ore I!ut the fine example set by
the War Risk learn, whleh declined to
nuit under tire, will go on forever
Fine thingK never die and War Risks
action was a fine thing.
...- . . . ..,.
Ctauj Ilt, 9&U T i
GEE WOUUCATT 1
it tMr A fluw 1
By Jean Knott
BUY LIBERTY BONDS
NEW YORK. Oct. 1. Horsemen
and patrons of racing bought nearly
a quarter of a million dollars' worth
of Liberty bonds during a twenty
minute drive yesterday at the Ja
maica track. It was the opening of
the fall meeting of the Metropolitan
Jockey -Club, and everyone of the big
crowd came prepared to aid In put
ting the fourth loan "over the Jop."
Among the big subscribers was
John A. Fulton, who took J25.000
worth. Cad Doggett subscribed to
the amount of $:0.000. More than
forty of the so-called "lawn lizards'"
loaned the Government $10,000 each.
John B. Madden aroused a lot of
enthusiasm when he wrote his check
for JIO.OOO. This represented the
Madden family, he buing a $3,000
bond for each one of his sons. Capt.
Joe Madden Is now In the front lines
In France leading an Infantry regi
ment. In all $244,050 was pledged.
The drive will be continued every
day during the present meeting, and
.!. ma... ft,., mnr than a million
IUI liitaiiii .tint ...-- - -
dollars will be subscribed before the
end of the week.
JENNINGS GOES OYER
Hughey Jennings, manager of the
Detroit Tigers, has been appointed an
athletic director by the Knights of
Columbus and Is awaiting his pass
port before sailing overseas
Jennings made his application be
fore the. baseball season came to a
rinse. He has closed all his legal
business at Scranton. ra- and ex
pects to remain In France or Ger
untll the Kaiser is soundly
licked.
PLAYS ST. ALBANS.
Western High School will open Its
schedule with St. Albans on Saturday
morning. The Red and White play
era engage Episcopal High at Alex
andria on October 12.
SEEKING BATTLES.
Central. Western, and Technical are
seeking games with Baltimore schn.
lastlc football teams this season Th
Raltlmore.ans hae been slow in on.
swerlng challenges from the local
ele ens.
'or WE"
CA MEVf
jvrrt'w6'
T
SHADOW PRACTICE TO BE
GEORGETOWN'S 1918 JOB
By LOUIS A, DOUGHER.
Only two days a week will the football players of the Georgetown ,
Unit, as the Eilltoppers are to be called this season, be seen in gridiron-)
clothing. Scrimmage wilhbe held on Wednesdays and games, will fct
played on Saturdays. On other days the football candidates will not- don
their mud suits, but will engage in light practice for an hour, Deginning "
at 4 o'clock, then returning to class.
Ne.iertheless, even with this handicap, John D. O'Reilly, physical -director
at Georgetown, expects fo produce some good players across ki '
creek and to stage games really worth seeing.
Heaphy, All-South Atlantic center of I
1517. Is on the Job with the gridlronen.
with P. J. Etzel an end. and Pete
Hampston. a halfback, from last year's
-eleven to assist him.
Here are the lads now working out ati
the Hilltop: Moron, Le cendre. Jreury,
Byre, Cole,- Scrivener. ReId.' -Hauler)
Sharburgh, Roneche. Hymarnn, Carlln,
formerly of the Preps; tTarin. Goggin.
Flaherty, Caranangh. of the 'Preps;
Leary, from the high- school at' Med'
ford, Mass.: Keller. Buckler, of the
high school at Manchester, N.' H. 'pro
ducer of Johnny McQuade; Donnelan,
another player from Medford. Mass.;
Carton. Carroll, RoOrke, Smith and
Connelt-
A younger brother of Johnny Gllroy,-
Georgetown s star of the last two years,
is expected to Join the squad today or
tomrrovr. He played at HaverhllL
Mass., before coming to Georgetown.
May Disappoint Quakers
Pennsylvania, which expected to open
its gridiron season Saturday ' with
Franklin and Marshall, may be disap
pointed. The F. and if. candidates be
gan work yesterday for the first time
and it Js not thought, likely that they
will be In shape for a game on Satur
day,
Tom Keady and. Bill Okeson are work
ing nard with the Lehigh squad and
promise to have a fast team on the
gridiron this season.
"HUrry Up" Yost starts In with
about a dozen football players from
the 1917 squad and the Wolverines'
outlook Is said to be good.
YON KOLNITZ FIRST
Alfred von Kolnltz, who used to
play the Infield for the Reds, Is prob
ably the first professional baseball
player to-win the rank of major la the
United States Army: There are two
majors among ths magnates, the most
noted being the widely known and
Immensely popular "Cap" Huston of
the Yanks, and the other Is Percy
Haughton. who headed the Braves be
fore he resigned to go Into the chem
ical warfare service.
Incidentally, the number of profes
sional ball players In the service, and,
who. too, were in before the work or
fight edict became operative, exceeds
by a big majority the number who
flopped to shipyards.
N. Y. A. C. CELEBRATES
NEW YORK, OcL 1. The New York
Athletic Club, one of the foremost
organizations of its kind In the coon
try. celebrated Its fiftieth anniver
sary last night.
Of the original leading spirit Har
ry Buermeyer alone survives, and he
occupied a place of honor at the ban
quet table.
The club was organized September
S. 1S6S. and its leading athletes have
been Tommy Conneff. Ray Ewry,
Bernle, Wefers, Martin. Sheridan,
Mike Sweeney, AI Kraenzleln, Eddie
Carter. Harry nillman, Maxey Long.
Charlie Kllpatrlck, John Flanagan
George Gray and Jim Mitchell.
HELLUM HAS "FLU"
NEW YORK, Oct. 1. John Helium,
Metropolitan A. A. U. pentathlon
champion while competing for the
Pastime A. C. has been stricken with
Spanish Influenza. It became known
yesterday. Helium is at his home,
where his condition is reported as
critical The Tastlme A. C. athlete
was one of the local team which com
peted In the national A. A. U. track
and field championships at the Great
Lakes Naval Training Station two
wreks ago He finished second to
Avery Erundage In the all-around
lest.
x i. rGecget;AWkV Payers' WH'tB:l
Allowed- Two Days' Real Drill I
Oh, Those Women
fwou WOMEN CERTAIN L-A
Aie VJOMOET with .
GEivrroacr.Ar
MA N
LEAGUERS
J
Potomac and Lafayette and Hiram
and Pentalpha will take the alley
.tonight in the blg'Masohlc Bowling
League, which got tinder way last
.night for- a winter of pin spilling.
Matches will be rolled every night
except Saturdays and Sundays. Cd-f
lumbla took two out of three last
night from the Harmony aplliers.
while Acacia managed to get two oat '
of three from the Naval Lodge.
laeman. of Harmony, got high hon
ors, with a. suing of, 342. while Oli
ver got high game honors S4h 127.
Three One games were- rolled by
th6 Navy Yard bowlers last night at
.the Manhattan alleys. Torpedo, -with
scores of SSI. 632, sad 022. made a. J
dean sweep of the Radio Shop "
men. The Radio bowlers got 430.454.
and 517.
CARTER IS SATISFIED
Young in spirit la Eddie Carter and
not so terribly ancient In years. He
only stalled one day last week when
confronted with the fact that his last
record had been wiped off the athlsUe
slate. 'and remarked: "That fellow
Pores Is a great little runner."
The time -was. thirty-odd years ago,
when Eddie Carter held every Ameri
can record from two to ten miles,
and he ranks today as on of the
greatest distance runners In the his
tory of track and field, sports. He hu
lived to see all his records wiped out
one by one. not by much. It Is true,
but still wiped out, and now Charley
Pores has taken the last of his marks
by winning the five-mile run at the
national championships a few- days
ago In 24 minutes 36 2-3 seconds. This
Is a championship record and not an
American record, as Kolehmalnen ran
Ave miles In 24 minutes 29 1-5 seconds
In 191X Eu-le Carter Is philosophical,
too.
"I had my day," he said, 'and It's
only fair for Pores to have his. Im
provement must come in everything."
PLAY rN FINAL.
Gordon Smith and 7. G. Sellers,
finalists In the Red Cross tournament.
held at Dumbarton Sunday, are ex
pecting to play today.
RACING
Laurel Park
October Meeting
1st to 31st Inc.
First Race 2:15 P. W.
Seven Races Daily
Admission, SI .65, Including War Tax
Ladies, $1.18; Boxes, $3.3
B A O. train leave TJnJoa Stattasfc
111.', p. ra. Regular 13 nv scad 3 3-.mt
tzala sty ax cuuse
ROLIi
GHES

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