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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, October 03, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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The Times will print each day one of the thousands of Liberty Loan Slogans submitted by its readers. Today's is by THEODORE HOFFMAN, 3334 Prospect Avenue N.W..
"THE MORE MONEY WE LOAN, THE LESS BLOOD WE LOSE"
r.-.
Today
How Will IhTWomen Vote?
For Wilson and the War.
$2 An Hoar Shoveling Coal.
$17 In Eight Hoars.
By ARTHUR BRISBANE.
Mr. David Lawrence often
writes very intelligent letters from
Washington to various newspapers,
but he does not estimate as highly
as he might the intelligence of
women.
He says the failure of Demo
crats to pass the suffrage amend
ment wiu cause defeat of the
Democratic party at the election
this fall. Women will vote against
the party, says he.
If they do, they -will justify
many things that anti-suffrage
ladies and gentlemen have been
saying.
The Democratic party just at
present is ninety per cent Wood
row Wilson and ten per cent as
sorted statesmen.
No man has e.-er worked harder
for anything than Woodrow Wil
. son has -worked for woman suf
frage. He voted for it in his home
State, New Jersey.
His influence forced it throagh
the biggest State in the Union,
New York nothing eke could
have done it
And the most earnest, eloquent,
and noble appeal that he has ever
made in public was made by him
to the Congress of the United
States urging the passage of the
suffrage amendment as a war
measure.
Any -woman voting against the
Democratic ticket this year votes
against Woodrow Wilson, Commander-in-Chief
of the United
States army and nary. Let that
be remembered.
Any woman' voting against the
Democratic party this year votes
against the President of the
, United States, votes to weaken
, his influence in Congress, votes to
increase his difficulties.
The woman who votes against
the Democratic party, that party
being just now WOODROW
WILSON, votes against the most
powerful friend that has ever
1 worked in a great office for jus-
. tiee to women.
Nothing could please the
Kaiser on his present toboggan
slide more than to read that the
women of the United States, re
pudiating the Democratic party,
had repudiated Woodrow Wilson
and the war.
The women will not Vote to
please the Kaiser. They: will vote
for the party that upholds .the
President of the United States,
the war of theUmted States,
and the interest of the United
States.
A woman's vote against the
Democratic party is a vote
against Woodrow Wilson.
A vote against Woodrow Wilson
by a woman Is an ungrateful vote,
an unpatriotic vote, and a Vote
pleasing to Germany.
we can assure Mr. Lawrence,
who is a good Princeton man and
a good Wilson man, whatever he
may be as a Democrat, that women
know how to vote intelligently,
and will do It this fall. THEY
WILL SEND DEMOCRATS TO
CONGRESS TO HELP THE PRES
IDENT WITH HIS WORK. THEY
WILL NOT SEND REPUBLICANS
TO HAMPER AND HINDER THE
PRESIDENT.
Remember, as you buy your
fourth installment of Liberty
bonds that the Spanish Influenza,
closing schools and causing deaths
in America, Is a product of the war
which, in turn, is the product of
the Kaiser. The best way to ex
press disapproval of Spanish in
fluenza, and to end the condition
that produces the disease. Is to buy
bonds to influence Prussia.
Washington has closed the pub
lic schools, sensibly, to check the
influenza. Government depart
ments are to open and close at dif
ferent hours, in order to avoid
crowding all the employes into the
street cars at the same hour a
common-sense plan that should
have been adopted without wait
ing for Spanish influenza to
force it.
Keep your children away from
crowds. Keep away from indi
viduals that sneeze, or cover your
face, if they will not cover theirs.
See that children keep hands
away from mouths and noses, and
that the hands are well washed
when they come in from play. Get
plenty of fresh air while you are
sleeping, eat lightly and slowly,
and the Spanish germ will skip
ycu. Don't be afraid of it. Fear
diminishes vitality. Vitality re
sists disease.
The above statements are made
on the authority of a good doctor.
These are indeed days of good
wages.
In Connecticut avenue, north of
the big bridge, two piles of coal,
ten tons in each pile, lay on the
sidewalk three doors apart the
winter's coal for two families. Tho
coal man had dumped the coal and
left it on the sidewalk, taking
with him the price per ton and
the blessing of the householders.
There came the colored man,
his "tools, instruments and ma
chinery" being an old iron wheel
barrow, a wash boiler that would
hold coal but no water, and a
shovel.
Starting at 9 o'clock and finish
ing at 1. he had in four hours put
away the first coal supply ten
tons into the cellar. He took hli
reward, seven dollars and a half
itConllnuid on Pace 2, Column 0.)
WEATHER:
Fair and rooter tonight
and toraorroTT. Tempera
tore at ft n. m 00 At
fcrreai normal tempera
ture for Oetoher 3 for
last 30 yearn, CZ degree.
NUMBER 10,G69.
GERMANS BURN TOWNS IN
RETREAT FROM BELGIUM
100 PRIVATE
D. C. ASKED TO
Dr. W. C Fowler, District health
officer, today requested 100 private
schools In the District to close in
the fight against the Spanish influ
enza epidemic
Boarding schools, institutions
which house and feed studentswere
not included in this request. George
Washington, Georgetown and Catho
lic unirersitietrttill remain open!""
The schools were asked to close
as a "patriotic, duty" and to remain
closed until the crisis in the epi
demic has been passed. It is prob
able all private schools will remain
closed until the public schools are
reopened.
SeTen More Deaths.
Seven additional deaths from
Spanish Influenza were reported to
the District Health Department to
day. Publication of the number of cases
of Influenza wax ordered discontin
ued by Health Officer Fowler until
the physicians In the District make
complete reports of the cases they
treat Dr. Fowler says the physi
cians now are reporting only a frac
tion of the number of cases that ac
tually exist.
Camp Leach at American Univer
sity was placed under general quar
antine toda
Not to Close Churches.
Commissioner Brownlow today an
nounced that he did not deem It nec
essary to close churches in the Dis
trict. The opening of stores in the Dis
trict at 10 o'clock In the morning,
which was ordered yesterday by
Commissioner Brownlow. has been
misunderstood in some cases. Those
(Continued on rage 3, Column 1 )
PRESIDENT TO SET
E
President WIIon will soon order uni
form wages Tor the different trade in
all war industries
The President's proposed action 1"
said to hae been prompted by labor
turnore-s and strike In war plants.
Discrepancies between the wage. of like
workers In different pKnts caused ex
tensive movements of labor and dlscon
tent among the workers, it Is pointed
out.
It Is expected that the uniform ware
policy to be outlined by tho President
will establish relatively equitable condi
tion among the Indutr'es. and will
enable each plant to secure and retain
that quota of workers ncccsary to
maintain a proper balance In produc
tion. This movement I In concert with the
country's war program, uhlrh has
brought about price fixing of virtually
every commodity and a consequent limit
to tne profits of producers.
COINAGE SHOWS DROP
Coinage at the mints of the t'nlted
States for September was the email
est to date this year. The value of
the coins struck totaled tl.13ft.2i0
Included In the September issue of
coins were nearly 1 1.500.000 one-cent
pieces. Half dollars, quarters and
dimes coined aggregated only 2,088,000
for the month.
SEN. FALL NOMINATED
SANTA J"E. N M Oct. n - Senator
Albert H. Kail was nominated fr
re-election by the Republican part
by acclamation at the State (onv.ti
Hon here yesterday The Republi
cans claimed their party rhould be
In charge of war legislation.
SCHOOLS N
CLOSE 00! IRS
WA
STANDARDS
She TTOatomfo
Published every evening (IncltuUnc Bandar)
Entered as neond-cUu matter at In. peat-
olace at Waihlniton. O. G.
u
ME NEXT, "SAYS
LONDON, Oct. 3. Turkey has notified Germany that she
intends to propose peace to the allies, a Zurich dispatch to the
Daily News declares.
Germany is said to have replied at some length", partly in a
menacing and partly in a pleading fone. Turkey's decision is be-
It iSHr, f&iL dk
ibhhkpi
WmsElm
RECONSTRUCTION
BILL PRESENTED
The Administration reconstruction
bill was presented In tho Senate this
afternoon by Senator Overman of
South Carolina, chairman of tho Sen
ate Committee on Ilulea,
Tho principal difference between
the Administration bill and" the 'Weeks
resolution, unanimously Indorsed by
the Senate Republicans, is that under
the Overman bill the commission on
reconstruction whuld be nppolnted by
tho I'realdent while under the Repub
lican measure the commissioners
ujuld be members of the House and
Senate.
KING RECEIVJESTOMPERS
ny Agence Radio To the Interna
tional Rpwi Service.
HAVRE France, Oct 3 Samuel
Gompers. president of tho American
Federation of !abor, oil received in
audience by King Mbert, of Belgium,
today. Mr Gnmpers, who visited the
Belgian front, expressed admiration
for Lb,, spirit of tbo Belglaaa. J
WASHINGTON, THURSDAY EVENING.
CONT1NUEO ON PAGE 3, COL. 5.
"KAMERAD!"
P:5iSlllWifl8
HOUSES 10 BE
Tho District Liberty Ixan Commit
tee today announced that It has plans
which will prevent the epidemic of
Spanish Influenza in the District from
cutting down Washington' subscrip
tions to I a fourth Liberty lean.
The ft.Mi step In the campaign to
offset Ihe deterrent effect of the epl-
demln will be a visit to every Immel
In the District by a Liberty bond
seller,
"Have yon bought a Liberty Bond"
Is tho question that will be asked at
every front door, and if the answer
Is negative the salesman will shi '"I
am here now n take your subscrip
tion ns ynur pledge "
The visits of the bond salesmen will
(Cantlacsd on Pass 3, Column 3.)
MA
A
TURKEY
OF
SUPPLIES AFIRE
AN ATLANTIC TORT. Oct. ft. Fire
of unnown origin this afternoon dam
aged the cargo of a Government
llllhler here. No estimate of the loss
v. as given. The vesnel Is said to have
been loaded with war supplies.
TO BUHDLABORATORY
The Ilnusn this afternoon passed
a bill recommended by the Public
Health flrrvlco. for n new building
.for the Hygienic Laboratory to be
erected near the N'avul Hospital in
this city, and to cost sssn.uoo.
One of the urgent reasons given
on tho floor for the new building
was that the spread of Spanish In
fluenza made the work of the labnrn
tory, which la under tho 1'ubllr
Health Service, peculiarly important
at this time.
The bill came up under n rule
yesterday, Adjournment for lack of
a quorum prevented Its passage then
Today, a fight wan mad to amend
the bill ho as lo require that con
struction should be under .nnlra'l
with the lowest bidder l.fforts to
amend the hill failed, however, and
It was quickly put through.
CARGO
WA
nUtnes
OCTOBER 3, 1918.
II S. S. TAMPA
OFF ENGLAND;
118 LIS LOST
Ten oncers of the 103 enlisted
men. in addition to one British of
ficer and fire civilian employes were
lost when the U. S. 8. Tampa, for-
merlr a coast guard cotter, was tor
pedoed in the Bristol channel, Eng
land, on the? night of September 25,
the -Navy; DeoirUnent announced to-
Mv:p.-r
Heportpito tfie'Navy Department
fall to state that a submarine was
sighted, but said that all the erf
dence Indicated that the vessel was
the victim of a submarine. She was
escorting a convoy and for some
reason had run ahead of the other
vessels. At 8:45 an explosion was
heard, and a search by the other ves
sels revealed wreckage from the
Tampa, with one of her life belts.
The bodies of two men in naval
uniform, but unidentified, also were
found floating on the wreckage.
The Tampa was in command of
Capt C. Satterlee, of the coast guard.
The Navy Department is under
stood to have cabled for additional
details.
D. C. SAILOR MISSING
Taulsen B. Schwegler. 1S29 F street
northwest. Is "missing in action" as
a result of the torpedoing of the U.
S S. Tampa In foreign waters recent
ly, according to a telegram received
today by his mother. Mrs. C. T.
Schwegter, from the United States
Coast Guard Service.
Schwegler enlisted In the coast
guard Bervlce on June 6, 1017 and was
on foreign duty from October. 1917,
until the Tampa was sunk. He was a
student In Washington schools and
at Tolytechnlc University, Kansas,
until the Mexican crisis developed. He
enlisted In Troop B, of the Missouri
Vntional Guard Cavalry and served
'("-oughout the border trouble In that
unit.
i in is survived uy his mother and
one brother
E
BEDFORD, Ohio, Oct. 3. Twenty
six men nro known to have been kill
ed and several Injured early today
uhen a Pennsylvania flyer, from Co
lumbus for Cleveland, ran through
a crowd of workmen at tho Inter
state Engineering plant here as they
wero boarding a workmen's special
I rain to go to their homes after work.
Twenty-threo of the men wero kill
ed outright, and three died at hos
pitals shortly after they were In
jured without regaining conscious
ness. Two or three others Injured
may recover. AH of the doad are
from Cleveland.
3 DEAD IN WRECK
NKW YORK. Oct 3 -Three persons
ire believed to be dead and eighteen
ire known to be Injured In a rear-end
olllslon between two local trains at
he Jackson avenue station on the
West Farms division uf the subway
here today,
A five car local train crashed Into
he rear of another five-car train
thleh as waiting to bn switched
into another track
The motorman of the second train
rag killed, and a Kuard on the ttrs
rain Is believed to have been killed
The other man known to he dead was
denuded as Meyer BaralL
U-BOAT INKS
26 WORKMEN AR
KILLED BY TRAIN
"SUB" SHELLS SHIP
200 MILES OFF
COAST
AIT ATLAirnC POBTy Oct s.
Reports of 8 U-boat in opera
lion 200 miles off the Atlantic
coast were brought here today
by two merchant vessels. Both
vessels reported they received
S. 0. 8. calls, which told of
shelling by a U-boat, but neither
was able to catch the position or
name of the vessel under attack.
No reports of submarines
shelling Teasels along the At
lantic coast had reached the
Navy Department this morn
ing. WITH THE AMERICANS WEST OF
VERDUN, Oct. 3. Tho Americans
have now advanced from seven to
eight kilometers (four to four and a
half miles) through the tangled Ar
gonne forest since the start of their
offensive.
This forward movement baa been
accomplished by smothering; machine
gun nests, bridging great masses of
barbed wire entanglements and drag
ging up artillery and wagons by
hand.
American aviators are continuing
their remarkable work of observing
and regulating artillery fire, fighting
off German planes and strafing lnfan
try and transport. Some of tne planes
fly as low as fifty yards above the
trees.
In the region of Fresnes, east of
Verdun on the Metz front, a Franco-
American raid resulted In tne taking
of nfty Austrian prisoners.
BRITISH HEADQUARTERS IN
FRANCE. Oct. 3j Tha contingent of
Americans who had been holding out
since Sunday In a far advanced posi
tion between Cambria and St. Quen
tin against greatly superior enemy
numbers hava been rescued.
In our attacks around Vendhnlle
yesterday, we were able to fight
throogh and relieve this party, num
bering some hundreds, kho, having
taken up their position Sunday night,
were surrounded by the Germans
early Monday.
Notwithstanding that they were
opposed by such superior number)
and only possessed the ammunition
and rations which they themselves
were carrylnc;, the Americans made a
magnificent resistance. and the
ground was strewn with German
dead.
Severe criticism was directed at the
street car companies In Washington far
their failure to handta trafflo In n
proper manner, and to mee the con
irested conditions by Senator Jones of
Washington.
Senator Jon-i also decljrcl that the
rublla Hint j Commission had not
used the aimsorlty to give adeauate
service. He expressed the belief the
rnbllc Utilities Commission should be
distinct from the District Commission.
It Is plain to me. said Senator
Jones, "that the street car companies
of the District of Columbia have made
no special effort to meet the con
gested situation here They have not
Increased wages as they ought to
have been Increased, Thev did not
attempt to secure additional ears un
til the spring" of this present year
The companies seem to operate upon
he theory of getting eerythlng they
poaiilbly can out of the public and
renderlrK Just about as little service
as poMSrse.
YANKSjilN
FOURltES
IN FOREST
N
JONESATTAKS
CAR SERVICE HERE
B B bi -m win1. hi, ii ,,i , i,i,,'.iim
FISCAL
EDITION !
I
PRICE TWO CENTS.
TWO GREAT
WT BASK
MENACED BY
The Italian army in Albania
has launched as offeasiv
against the Aagtriass there,
cables to the Italian esabassy
stated today.
The German s -hava .begun, their-re-
i-temvJ3elgiuEi, arss-
BRITISH
AN
-TMT-efeax chaUT--oCtfiM i ne ci
u -.. ' .t srM' -ftr 1 1
wOTaa. jrpaj;ineonuieni earner j,io
Lens ix'h'elnE evacuated, the ens&jj
Ttitn wtltnvaa In tti?w V TOP
are hotly pursned by, the British, '
whose advance now menaces both
the great submarine bases on the
Belgian coast Ostend and Zee
brngge. The retirement had reached St!
maximum depth of two miles early,!
today, and indications pointed to a
continuation of the movement, per
haps destined to be the greatest of
the war.
Summarized, the news trom that
various battle fronts today follows;'
Fighting Spreads.
FLANDERS FRONT The flghtlnn
front In Flanders now has spread'
from Dlxmude southward, in a wldss
semi-circle, to Lens, a distance of
about sixty miles. The Germans yes
terday began a sew retirement on tha
lower third of this front, between
Lens and Armentieres. Already ther
have retreated two miles and are still
falling back.
PICARDT FRONT Tho British re
sumed their attack north of St. QuenV
tin this morning, evidently in an at
tempt to effect another breach in tha
Beaurevolr-Fonsomme subsidiary line,
behind the Hlndenhurg defenses.
The French, attacking south of St.
Quentln. are nearing the Olse river at
Berthenlcourt. thus extending tha
northern encircling movement which
Is destined to pinch off the St. Go
baln massif and Laon. In conjunction
with the thrust northward west of
Rhelms
LA FERE-RHEIMS FRONT General
Berthelot. attacking northwest of
Rhelms. has carried his line forward
to within less than three mile of
Berry-au-Bac and less than Ave miles
of Craonne.
RHEIMS-VERDUN FRONT Ths
French drive in the Champagne re
gion was resumed at dawn this morn
ing. Yesterday's attacks resulted In
the capture of Challerange. on the
western fringe of the Argonne forest.
In the Argonne region the Germans
are reported to be falling back be
fore the Americans between the
Meuse and the Argonne forest.
FOE FIRES ROULERS
AS ALLIES GAIN
PARIS, Oct. 3 (15.13 p. m.) The Ger
mans have set Ore to the Belgian city
of Roulers.
Roulers. which was one of the prlncl-
sl oblectlres of the previous British
drives In Flanders, has been practically
iuriouimt.-d bj Belgian and British
troops jt i about twelve miles north
east of Ypres
BRITISH HUE HUNS
BACK TWO MILES
LOVDO.N. Oct 3. The Germans ar
retreating on the 20-mlle front be
tween Armentieres and Lens. Field
Marshal Hals announced todar They
are evacuating highly organized posi
tions which they had held since th
beginning of trench warfare. t'
The retirement already has teacheS
5
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