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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, October 29, 1918, FINAL EDITION, SPORTING PAGE, Image 14

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RW
IF NO
HDItoppers and Tankers Hope
To Play College Game Saturday
Indoor Sports
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GEORGETOWN HOPES TO OPEN SEASON
SATURDAY AT HILLTOP WITH TANKERS
BY LOUIS A- DOUGHEE.
'Washington's college football campaign of 1918 is doe to get trader
xrsy Saturday, unless the "fla" ban persists and" hinders the clash at
Georgetown between the soldier students of Georgetown University and
the college stars attached to the tank corps training school at Camp Colt,
Gettysburg. The Hilltoppers are hoping that permission 'will be granted
them to stage their game.
The make-up of the Tankers is as yet unknown in the Capital, but
they are said to number many former
as hard as nails from their military
syhrania.
Oeorretcnrrfa sqnad has been sadly
handicapped toy lick of practice,
espflcjslly within the past couple of
weeks. Seldom do the embrojro sol
diers set e. chance to work out two
days, hand rtmnlnjr. so severe Is the
Wfftoen at the Hilltop. Bat they are
hopetul. Just the same, of making a
rood showing acainst the Tankers.
' "football at popular prices" Is the
elosaa at Georgetown this season.
Fifty cents will admit to any seat In
the ble stands and that price wi.
be maintained throughout the sea
son; 20 matter what the attraction.
"All we want Is enough money to pay
for the equipment of the squad," say
the- authorities. "We're not looking
for pronts."
Wary Is Rejalelns
There is great rejoicing today at
the. Naval Academy. CapL Bill In
gram has unexpectedly returned.
Furthermore, instead of coming back
a physical wreck from his pneumonia
attack, he Is in prime condition, and
Is Jikely to play Saturday against
thi Philadelphia Marines.
With Captain Ingram in shape to
plajfc the Navy's backfleld should de
liver, the goods. Butler was In fine
lernal. the sleek brown colt, son
of (Sweep and Hazel Burke, stands to
dajChampIon of the Juveniles on the
American turf. He proved beyond all
ea-fB his superiority over the re
nowned BUly Kellr at Laurel Park
Dexore a wondrous throng of race
loy
drawn thither from eveywhee
in the East.
Getting away slightly In the lead.
Bill) Kelly held his vantage for half
a gbeen strides, but at the first six
teenth Schuttlnger bad his mount
Inront with daylight to spare. Both
bosses were using all their speed and
the'erowd stood spellbound.
Quickly Eternal romped away from
hUrtout-hearted rival. Two and a
halt lengths in the front he flashed
past- the quarter. He held this easily
at Ahe half. Then Sande. on Billy
KeTy. seemed to realize the dlfficul
tle;,of his task.
Calling on his mount. Sande slowly
crept up on Eternal, pounding away
in front. Turning into the stretch.
Eternal held his lead, but as they
straightened out Billy Kelly began
closing the gap between them.
The big crowd broke Into cheers as
the two speedsters headed for the
finish line, with the brown colt show
InC Istrength In his vantage. Little
by'.JIttla BUly Kelly came upon
Eternal. He was on his quarter
Then, with a sixteenth to go, he was
on, his saddle. Both jockeys were
uijn'g the whip, their mounts responding-
nobly.
In' all his races this year Billy
Kelljr had come from behind, run
ning away from his rivals In bruising
finishes. But here he had a flying
demon. Eternal had the speed to
stay, in font and flashed across a
heiad $o the good.
Governor Harrington, of Maryland,
presented to the winner the John R.
McTen memorial cup and 15.000 peo
ples' tors the skies apart with their
cheers.
ARE PLAYING GAMES.
SaJUmoTB schoolboy elevens are
tWX playtnr footban. Gtlmsn. cham
pion eJera of last year, U slated to
Ef ERNAL CHAMPION
IF AMERICAN TURF
f:
X
SUITABLE RING OPPONENT CAN BE
THE
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'ft
stars of the Middle West, who areJ
training in the hill country of Fenn
fettle Saturday. Severn, the big
plebe from SL Paul's school, New
York, proved his undoubted class and
seems assured of a place somewhere
lnthat haokOeld..
Ewan. tight eno is rapidly recov
ering from the lumbago which kept
him. out of .the Newport, game last
week. He is expected to be. at his
old place against "By" Dickson's
Marines.
Tech "Will Play Penn.
Georgia Tech and Pennsylvania
have agreed to stage a contest on
Franklin Field on December 7. This
glad news has set all Philadelphia
wild, for the "Golden Tornado" will
be the best attraction of the season.
Last year, Penn. scoffing a little, went
to Atlanta' early In the campaign, and
before the Quakers could get their
second wind, received a 41-to-0 beat
ing. That defeat has rankled ever
since and every effort will be made
to wipe It out this season.
On November S3 Georgia Tech is
due for a game at Pittsburgh against
Glenn Warner's Panthers. Last
year neither Tech nor Pittsburgh
lost a game. Each had champion
ship claims made for It. though It
should be said here that neither
school itself made any such claims
Efforts were made to have them
meet, but not suitable date could br
arranged .and the meeting did not
take place.
Hay Pot BaelC Game.
Pennsylvania is still holding open
Thanksgiving for Cornell, but the
Ithacans are strangely silent, and
there is no football now being play
ed up in the New York hills Un
less Penn hears from the Ithacans
soon, the Dartmouth game, now
scheduled for November 0 at Frank
lin Field, will be put back to Thanks
giving. The New Hampshire au
thorities are tickled at the prospect
of plsylng to a holiday crowd In
Philadelphia.
Columbia is also endeavoring to
clinch a game with Cornell for No
b" "'.""i" h"? " ?
college world with its promise of sup
porting football, but no signs of
football are to be seen up there.
Lehigh will not lose its football
eleven Just because of the study
periods. The athletic authorities have
got together with the Instructors, and
all athletes will be given their re
quired periods for relaxation. This
means that Tom Keady's sturdy eleven
will complete Its campaign as out
lined.
GRIDIRON GOSSIP
Next Saturday Georgetown opens
Washington's football season at the
Hilltop, facing Camp Colt's Tankers.
Kllnger, Penn State's brilliant end
of a few seasons ago. Is now a lieu
tenant In the array and playing with
the Camp Merrltt eleven.
West Virginia, starting with the
best of prospects, has had Its whole
campaign ruined by the influenza
epidemic All the students were sent
home.
Lieutenant Larry Bankart. former
Dartmouth coach, now In charge of
aviators at MIneola, is against foot
ball for his charges. He says they
can't risk injuries to their noses.
Sam Webb, star fullback of the
Lehigh eleven. Is lost to football for
at least six more weeks. His phy
sician says be will need that time to
recover from the "flu."
Virginia was preparing for a mod
ified football campaign and then
along came the "flu." ruining every
thing. It is now unlikely that the
LCharlottesvllllans w
unariottesvwians will have any foot
--'- -
TIMES' COMPLETE SPORTING PAGE
Copyrirht 1J18, ey International News
Service.
orU CM B EH. TH-f?"
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This Bactfleld Is
Real Classy -
Talk about classy backnelds,
take a peek at the four stars
on the eleven representing the
Cleveland Naval' Reserves.
Stlnchcomb, Ohio State's won
derful quarterback, at his old
.berth, "Duke Ducote, of Au
burn, co-star with Everett Strap
per for the last two years in
Dixie, and Harlan, of Georgia
Tech, Strapper's running mate
behind the Use -at" Atlanta, fare
halfbacks. Holmgren, Minne
sota's bone-crushing fullback,
completes the quartet.
RUTGERS TO CLASH
NEW YORK. Oct 20. Rutgers and
Pittsburgh, meeting In what should
be a football classic. Is to be a part
of the big sports drHe. Both teams
are willing to play the game, but the
location has yet to be determined.
Pittsburgh will play Georgia Tech
at Pittsburgh November 23 and Is ex
pected to offer no difficulties to the
plans of Bill Roper's committee to
have the Rutgers game played at the
Polo Grounds.
"We'll do anything to help the big
drive for war funds," says Foster
Sanford, Rutgers' coah. "Whatever
the committee does will suit us."
BASEBALL CHATTER
Rumors continue that the major
leagues will make an attempt to
stage regular campaigns next sum
mer. Same Crane, New York's veteran
baseball writer, has It "from a
wealthy man" that the war will be
over this winter.
Boston writers hasten to deny the
statement that James E. Gaffney
will take over the Braves under a
mortgage be holds.
James A. Gllmore, president of the
Federal League In 1014-15, has en
listed as a motor truck driver for
duty overseas.
Charles A. Comiskey, the White
Sox magnate, has donated the use
of his baseball park for two football
games featuring service teams.
Joe S. Jackson, president of the
Baseball Writers' Association, writes
that the "By Johnny Evers" series
Is the bunk and suggests Hughey
Fullerton as the probable real author.
Pitcher "Speed" Martin, the Chi
cago Cubs pitcher, who appealed to
the National Commission for a larger
slice of the world's aeries melon, has
been drafted for service In the army.
A majority of the New York Giants
have been playing exhibition games
around New York ever since the
season ended, appearing on Satur
days and Sundays. Most of McGraws
players are engaged in "essential
work" la the vicinity of the metrop
olis. Pat Maloney. an outfielder, who
received a trial with the Yankeej
In 1912, and previously with Brook
lyn, Is wounded In France He is at
tached to the 310th Infantry which
trained at Camp Dlx. Maloney has
been playing professional ball abou.
eight years.
WILL MEET TONIGHT.
Service elevens will meet tonight
at Spalding's at 8 p. m. to form a
league and to schedule c-amea for the
hiMlndr - T)r"the - seC9oa; "
WITH PITTSBURG
FOUND FOR.SMLOR WILLIE MEEHAN, WHY NOT LET
By TAD
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ar
Penny A rite
o-iy
SEEKING TROUBLE
CHICAGO, Oct. 29. Two Chicago
newspapers have nominated Charles
W. Murphy, former owner of the
Cubs, for president of the National
League when the war Is over. The
report here Is that John Heydler does
not want the office, that he would
rather remain as secretary of the
league, and that since a fighting man
is needed Murphy would fill the bill.
He's a fighting man all right, all right.
LIEUT. O'NEALE DIES
NEW YORK. Oct. 20. Lieut, James
S. O'Neale. nephew of Secretary of
I the Treasury McAdoo, died October 2
oi wounas receives, in Dame, lie was
one of the leading tennis players In
this city, and at Columbia, where he
graduated in 1915, played end on the
football eleven and captained the
varsity nine,
HE'S BUSY REFEREE
Art Shock, referee, of Tacoma,
Wash., Is said to have made a record
In the number of consecutive bouts
refereed by one man. Shock In eight
years has refereed C10 bouts and all
for the Eagle A. C., of Tacoma. Other
referees are said to have acted In
more bouts than Shock, but have had
to divide the number among different
clubs and cities.
SIGN UP A SAILOR
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Oct. 29 The St.
Louis National League club has
signed Joe Doyle, a promising young
ster who now is In service at the
Great Lakes naval training station.
The contract is to take effect upon
Doyle's discharge from service after
the war Is won.
PLAY ST. JOHN'S
Gallaudet is down for a game with
St John's, of Annapolis. Saturday. If
the influensa ban Is raised In the Dis
trict, the cadets will visit Kendsll
Green. If not, the Gallaudet eleven
will go over to Annapolis and battle
the cadets on tbvfcwn field.
if- m utv, tax WW'&W Twm,
I O'VE THiUK V9-I j OOMT 7 I0,N' ' Ofty DuTy? WW
I OUR OVERCOATS rUWTHE IDEA yZf AVBC IU WM
ARE SkFE J O'BEiN" J et IN The Ww
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,TH01E WHO HAVE" CbOTlEX )
J1EP TrE PCer fbRjw'AR.0
w-thbjdey-eoom.
TEN YEARS AGO
IN SPORTS
Jim Corbett was selected to
referee the Papke Ketchell fight
to take place In San Francisco
on November 25.
Battling Nelson announces be
will take a trip around the wnrld
In 1909. Nelson writes he is over
seeing the building of fifteen
double flat houses. His book Is
reported as being on the press.
Business and Eastern quit their
football game with a scoreless
tie.
I The high school principals an
nounce they 'will adopt a set of
rules to govern all athletic con
tests for the schools. The eligi
bility rules are to be ready
shortly.
"Mickey." Kellher was elected
captain of the Company G basket
ball team. National Guards.
Tom Farnsworth played right
guard for Eastern High School.
Ted Whitney played left guard.
WILL HOLD SHOWS
Jack Reddy, manager of Billy Mlske,
the St Paul boxer. Is planning on
holding a show in St Paul next month
for the benefit of the Red Cross fund.
Besides Mlske, Reddy expects to have
Willie Meehan, Battling Levlnsky,
Ted Kid Lewis. Jak Britton, Johnny
Tillman, and other boxers take part
BORRELL IN FRANCE
Joe Borrell. the Philadelphia boxer,
who used to fight around the light
weight limit is In France and has so
lncresaed in weight that recently he
took part in a tournament the win
ner of which was to get a chance at
,GOLres.,arpen.tie.r..-tbe. heavyweight.
Ull, by Isternstlonal Nnra
Service.
CAPTMu.l 1 GOVS AJEED A .
I BEA(tAW?eD Trt" (
V COOTIET ARE A SG?cJOA-
-J
"V
By Jean Knott
INDIANS ON TEAM
ROCKFORD. IIL. Oct 29. New ad
dl Lions to Camp Grant's football ma
terial Include three representatives
of American Indian stock. Willie Red
beri. an all-around athlete from the
White Eearth Reservation of Minne
sota, can boast of his pure blood.
James Kajune. a Chippewa from Oda
nah Reservation, and Frank Smith,
formerly of Carlisle, who halls from
northern Minnesota, are the others.
Camp Grant defeated Wisconsin
University Saturday at Madison, 7 to
0. Mansfield, right end, intercepted a
forward pass In the last quarter and
ran half the length of the field for a
touchdown.
LOADMAN FORGETS
Dick Loadman Is now laying claim
to the bantamweight championship
by virtue of his knockout of Johnny
Ertle In three rounds, and the fact
that Pete Herman, the holder of the
title, has thus far failed to meet
him. Loadman seems to forget that
Kid Wolfe, the Cleveland bantam,
before going overseas, administered
a sound beating to him which should
eliminate any thought of the cham
pionship that he ever had. Other
boxers have also defeated Loadman.
ITS-MERELY RUMOR
Knockout Brown, of Chicago, no-
In the service overseas, has been re
ported several times as seriously
wounded, but thus far Brown's right
name, Contas, has not appeared in
the casualty lists. Brown for a num
ber of years boxed as a middleweight
WILL PLAY V. P. I.
TTawlanri Rtafa Is scheduled in ntiiv
Virginia Polytechnic Institute Satur
day, and Coacn J. ru is driving Ms
young eleven to, the limit The Vir
ginians have an unusually strong
eleven, coached by Bemier.
WILL MEET SUNDAY.
Naval Gun Factory and the Seaman
Gunners will probably be hooked up
Sunday afternoon at American League
Park If the "fro" ban ta r!d
VT'V
H& S'
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i
HIM BOX THE CGFtSF.-SS?
TJiey Play
" I'iiTArTeNO
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ROOKING
By LOUIS A.
Thoiig:h it'a a bit earjy we are Tight out in- front today- with our all
American selections for 1918. It may be said that few games have Jbeearx
staged, but there have been' enough to prove oof contention, la- fact, thV
very small number of contests seen this sason only aid us in our choice
Beany, it was possibFe to make the selections in a few minutes.
Making matters as .brief as possible, i
here is our all-American eleven of
1918:
Player. -Position. Team.
Antiseptic, end Spanish "Flu"
Fresh Air, tackle. .... .Spanish "Flu"
Ice-Pack, guard. ......Spanish "Flu"
Gargle, center Spanish "Flu"
Alcohol Rub, guard. .Spanish "Fra"
Castor Oil. tackla. ..., .Spanish "Flu"
Mask, end Spanish "Flu"
Quinine, quarterback.. Spanish "Flo"
Aspirin, halfback .....Spanish "Flu"
Ol 'Llkker, halfback- ..Spanish "Flu"
Sleep, fullback Spanish "Flu".
Every- player tin this Jfam has
played a wonderful gams, during the
past month. Indeed, such playing
baa not been seen In-thfs country in
yearan'-'gu- bckflelasl;fat. very
Cist especially Ol Llkker.whlje Sleep
gained1 more ground than any other
backfleld man In- the game. -
lt 'Is not believed that any team
could have stepped ta many others as
has Spanish 'Tin' within (he past
month, randncall over the-land -from
coast to coast Its record wlU stand!
for. years.
The G4 Old Days.
We "recall once in tha long ago cf
playing football against a team on
which two coachea played, men In a
garme of boys. Yep. they did thing
to us, as -might have been expected.
Back are the old days of long1 ago.
Over at Annapolis Saturday Coach
Fred Walker, finding himself without
a quarterback, jumped in andT played
himself, though he must be thirty
five years old. If he's a day.
Up In New York Lieutenant Robb.
who played stsr football in Penn
State's backfleld. performed for Co
lumbia, practically winning the gams
himself from the Camp Merrltt offi
cers. Robb is an instructor of tho
S. A. T. C at Columbia.
More Trouble Here.
A bright young fellow from Marine
headquarters came into the sanctum
(highbrow for office), and. borrowing
our prized and petted soft lead pe-n
dl, extra size, dashed this off:
"How about your valuable page,
which Is read by all the sporting pub
lic of Washington, starting a league
for basketball among the girls of
the various Government departments?
To start In. Tom Crooks should be
able to get the girls at the Navy Yard:
Sergeant Moore, of the Marines; Bus
Hager or Lane Lacy, the luavy .de
partment It would be like old, times
to see the above names In the paper
once again.
"It would certainly help the girls
of Washington If some one in each
department would get on the job and
start it It would be not only recrea
tion, but would provide a place where
young girls could spend the early part
of each evening, now that the theaters-are
so crowded.
"Come on War, Labor, War RI'.k,
and all the rest what have to sayt"
And Echo says, "What have you to
sayT"
He Makes Discovery.
Charles "Chick" Evans, open and
amateur champion among tho golfers,
has made a remarkable discovery, ac
cording to the papers.
"Many familiar faces will oe miss
ing when hostilities are over." said
"Chick."
lfl i Youth's Came
Jimmy BarTy. a wonderful physi
cal specimen at the age of forty
eight, received an appointment In
the army. He was to learn the
rudiments of bayonet fighting !n or
der to become an Instructor In the
national army. It was admitted that
he knew box! tig. u naa reurea
the undefeated bantam champion of
the world. He could still do a man's
trick with the gloves.
But that bayonet fighting was
different It called for more snppto
muscles, for faster footwork, for
more real vlrJouii. which means
strength of body, which mean
youth.
So Jimmy Barry went hack to
Chicago a wiser man. Ho hid gain
ed seven pounds during his two
weeks at Camp Gordon, but he- had
also discovered that bayonet flgat
trur was not for any forty-eight-yoar-old
kids.
Eternal Held Juvenile Crown.
Downing Rocs' ,. Great Horse
No Favorites
TO if.
t5Cr
PKSJ
ff-
'
JM QVEB
DOUGHEB
Same Old Stuff Is
Always Seen
If a race horse Js greajit Is
"as great as ever looked through T
a bridle;' in the case, of a fooU
ball player he is tho "greatest
thai ever wore a eleated shoe;
If a fighter, the "best- that ever
pulled on a gKbre;" If a baseball
player, the "greatest that ever
swung' ajjat;" rf s jockey, the
'"besTthat everpOTe'aTlTr,Air
a blUiara player, the "best that
ever chanced a. cue.'"' . ' -
I1AED1I
-LIKELYTOAPPEAR:
NEW YORK. Oct 29.-Jess WUUrdsJ
Is not likely to bo seen "doing hla
share to help the fund" under thsj
dlrfctlon of "Sunny Jim" CoOroth.
Since the telegram of acceptance. In
which he declined to defend his tltlej
and asked tc pick his .own opponent.'
ndthing has been beard from him.
jAck Dempsey has stepped into the
limelight and will probably replace
Wlllard as the big drawing card of
the boxing carnival in this city.
"Dempsey Is ready to box Wlltart
any number of rounds." says Jark
Kearns. Dempsey a manager. "H
offers his entire services free. If
Wlllard cannot be obtained, he wilt
meet the next best man. -or anybody
the committee chooses. H doesn't
want a cent forhls work, either."
Wlllard suggested that he box "at
some training camp." with either
Willie Meehan or Jack Monoghan. tb
champion's sparring partner.
THEY HAVE STARS
Athletically, the Great Lakes Naval
Station hxs a rant lot of experts ta
dlvorse line. Joe Stecher, the
wrestlrr. Is there, acd Stecher ' at
tho hesd of his crsft Rltctto Kit
chen does the Instnietlpx n box
tng. and Red Faber. ona of the klsgs
of the mound, pitches for Lho blue
jackets. Wlllamaa and- Halea, two'
noted players of the West ere on"
the football team, and MrGlllvrari
and WaUen do the station's swim
ming. 'A
RACING
Laurel Parle
October Meeting ,
1st to 31 si, Inclusive j
.
First Race 1:45 P. M. !
Eight Races Daily
Admission, St. 65. Inclut-ficg War Tat
Lsifl3,UC;Bcs,3.S0
A
JESSV,
B. A O. tvatn dlraot to Bra! wtMmii I
traves uaw rtntl.a li30 r 3.
.1
33
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