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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, November 02, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 4

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WASHINGTON
T3ATURD, XOn-.jmEK l 1018.
i- if
a
SAYS DEMOCRATIC
. VICTORY ASSURED
Advice today from every State, ac
eording to Homer S. dimming, net
ne Chairman of the Democratic Na
tional Committee, point to a sweep
luff Democratic victory.
His statemen is to the erect that
the Democratic majority in the Sen
ate will be Increased and that the
party will control the House of Rep
resentatives. He denounces Republican leaders
in attacking President Wilson and
for' helr plan to reorganize the
House and Senate if successful in the
election, He Laid:
"Our advices from eery State
point to a sweeping Democratic vic
tor' The Democratic majority In
the, next Senate will be increased and
we -r III control the House of Repre
sentatives by a substantial majority.
Reliable "estimates of net sains by
the Democrats in the House of Rep
resentatives range rrom thirty to
sixty." The tide is mnins strongly
in our favor, especially In the Middle
WeBt and far Western States, with a
pronounced drift toward Democratic
candidates In every State.
"Republican leaders. in attacking
, President Wilson, have said they
wbuld reorganize the House and Sen
ate if successful in the election, and
place new men at the heads of com
mittees. "Senator Smoot would head the
Appropriations, and Senator Penrose
the Finance Committee in the Sen
ate; Senator Lodge, as chairman of
the Foreign Relations Committee,
would round out a notable triumvir
ate of the President's 'supporters.
Comment on these names Is Just as
superfluous as comment on the fact
that Senator Norrls of Nebraska
would' bead a Republican railroads
committee. Senator La. Follette a Re
publican manufactures committee.
hd Senator- Gronna & Republican
ricultufe committee
"Senator 'Warren, who wonld bead
Lthe "Military Affairs Committee, hat
Ibeen quoted as saying, me l-reamem
hinxM his President 01 w wnoie
Sorld2-tMs. In themldsfof.a delicate
abtrflatlonal situation.- .
FINE WOBK
tixx cera&na u jnucn oc iae
eyes Vbra yev have reached 4S
a you did when you -were 2S
yexr 'old. Nature has not pro-
Li Tided Tor this; aj one becomes
ft Dider th vision ranee loses Prt
Of its elastic i accomraoaaimg
power.
VDcnt allow yonrsalf and work.
to oe hahdlcappod coBSttltrXJr.
IK.Krasnn, , ocr uftvus
TJQgT yesUhi epedall-rt -who
wilt Mmrft Mt amm -aarlffi a 'thw
ifct gUss taytx?jma near in
m oltd lens that shows no dl-
Ttilnc-Uoe(or nelltale-eam.
;a;.:B:ahi5
Optoojensts SOpticteos-
SStktt N.W.fp
j'ty---
naAJzE3323&95SEB3
tfJlV "
i&morrow
Efe sure you get your
The Sunday Times
I With its full newspaper
Magazine
. Eight from the front cover a gorgeous full page
m tout colors py xne
fell Brinkley
i Nnmber eight in her descriptive series-of "Golden
Byes and Her Hero Bill Over There."
Cheating the U-Boat
5 i The develish 'ingenuity displayed by the Hun sub
marines rouses the inventive minds of famous inventors
to the creating of ships
.
jAt Dime Novel Thriller
:From Real Life
Stella. Vessel, night operator at the Hy Tower,
K' Mormt Braddock, Pa single-handed, in her lonely
tower outwitted three enemy desperadoes bent on
wrecking an ammunition train. It actually happened
and it is told in a full page, with illustrations.
5. Miss Mardiganian's
-TDf the Armenian
r Which she actually suffered and witnessed, is con-
tiima4 in 4 ffnrniic fnfn.fl1orA inctllmpnt
3 UUUbU U WiWJVfcW trv
!The Fires of Hate"
-
!- A ssp-nn-ntner cfinrf ctrk-n rtmnlt- in ihlC ICCllr hi RrtCr
M U-aiArfAf
3 luiuuJUu.
ealth, Beauty, and
The Home
rThis department, as usual, is brimful of interestipg
as informative articles.
3 At Your Newsdealers or
Delivered to Your Home Jt
Famous Fi-cncli
Flyer Killed
nsae&si-uC'
Y - .
uvarff"'"-
hJffirg: v
ltUUAMJ It.VKUUb,
noted aviator and one of the
pioneers In flj-ing In a heavler-than-air
machine, who was killed
October 5 and burled at Vouzlera,
according to Information received
by the American Red Cross.
S
TO AID PRESIDENT
Nathan Straus, the great New-York
merchant and philanthropist, has
given out a statement throughlfomer
S. Cummlngs, acting' chalrroan''pf the
Democratic National Committee, to
the effect that It would be a national
calamity at this time not to support
the President by electing a Demo-
cratlct'House and, Senate.
His telegram folloWST
"Our President and his able assO'
elates-have carried the country suc
cessfully through perilous times and
the most important problems that
have ever been before-the world still
confront them. It.would be a national
calamity not to elect a Democratic
House and Senateand deprive the
Administration pf.our united support.
Any one discussing' politics at this
critical "time and for selflsh partisan
reasons trying to weaken our prestige
before the world, commits 'a neinous
crime, NATHAN STRAUS."
H1LEMPL0YES TO.vVOTEJ
Instructions issued to railway
manarera br Director General McAdoo
are to4 the effect that rallroademj
pioyes roust do bitch cTcry4uiiur0
opportunity tovoteat elections op
Tuesday," provided rach privilege does
not interfere-wlthr necessary railway
operations.
na ut i i ,i liMirtl tmr aniiiTt
or-roar csOldrCB eSJUvate the rlsMj
nirir. i
k
-
copyof ' t
size four color i
mimiiaDie
that cannot be sunk when hit
Account
Atrocities
f-fMejW. ,..
"n .-. '
Lt -v zm5 -. er r t
STRAUS URGES ALL
WALCOTT URGES
POLITICS CEASE
Trederlc C. Wolcott. of the United
States Food Administration, who has
Just returned to Washington from
official conferences with the allied
I military and political leaders, ex
pressed himself as "shocked at the
political disturbances here."
Mr. Walcott. who two and a half
years ago accompanied the German
army ih Poland, and who has since
scored the German methods practiced
in that starving country, appealed
In an Interview to the American peo
ple to set aside their political dif
ferences for the duration of the war.
During his tour Mr. Walcott visited
Kngland, France, Italy, and Switzer
land. "I hava Just returned from Europe."
be said, "where I have spent many
months during the last three years
on official business, and although
Republican, I am genuinely shocked
at the political disturbances here,
hlch will be misunderstood In Eu
rope and seriously threaten to dis
tract the American people at tn
most critical period of the war.
"If the people at home could look
on at close range and .see this drive
that is pushing the Hun bock to his
own frontier see what It costs In
life and suffering and human energy
If they could realize to what ex
tent our troops are fighting for an
Ideal and how a decisive victory de
pends upon onr thing 'team play.'
"There is no time now for being hy
persensltlve. There is only one thing
worth, while; imly one thing of vital
Importance: to present an absolutely
united front and work unceasingly
for that unconditional surrender
which must come, which Is absolutely
assured bur w hlch may be delayed
days, weeks, or months by our aulb-
onng and cost thousands or uver.
Therefore, let us set political dlf-
ferences to one side until the Hun
admits he Is beaten, then we can vent
bur family differences to our hearts
content. It may. do us good at the
rlghf time, but now.lrpeparable harm.
The War has developed us and'welded
us into a great haUon. Let us prove
this to the world., .Let us continue
this, unity of 'command to the end."
FORDTEtLSHUGHES
.
J DETROIT. Nor, 2 Henry Ford" to
day issued., a statement defending;
Carl EmbU,1 headof the draughting
department in ttha Ford Motor Com
pany -.plant,' who iwas, the-subject of
conunent in the'alrcraft investigation
rtjbrt- made ' by ," Charles : Evans
uagnee. .
'tMrSF.ord said':
'The Ford Motor Company has
manufactured' W2 Liberty motors
during-"the 'past month. That was
about 200 more than were manufac
tured 'by the.-next highest factory. I
do not know1 -what better answer
jcould be made to all 'the criticisms.,
We, started .-later, than others and
have pused-l),'the production atandr
lfic-ut. to-the? most rigid Inspection
inievry particular.
"Our policy "Is 'to make men. not to
break' them." In'times of panic great
Injury rnd injustice. are often done
to j Innocent $ persons, and we try to
keep our heads.
CW;e -.would' not allow injustice to
begone to an old, trusted and valued
empldyeeven though he was born
laGerr4anr. The results speak for
themselves. Mr. Bmble. referred -to
asjthe", special example in the Hughes
report, has-been with us a little over
twelve. years and he Is a most able
and excellent 'engineer and has al
ways given perfect satisfaction.
"Not one word -of fault could be
found by Dr. Hughes or any one else
with regard to Mr. Emble's actual
work. We in the plant know he
gave valuable assistance and many
suggestions with regard to the de
velopment of the Liberty motor cylin
der, which are being furnished to all
manufacturers with, a saving -of $343.
000 a month to the 'Government over
former prices." ,
OF
Madame Brechke Brechkovskala,
"grandmother of the Russian revolu
tlon," was shot at Petrograd Sunday
by, the Bolshevlkl, according to diplo
matic advices from Amsterday.
Madame Brechkovakala was exiled
In Siberia at the time ofi the Busslan
collapse, and she became a personal
adviser to Kerensky under the revo
lutionists.
PRINCE MAX AT FR0HT
COPENHAGEN. Nov. 2. Following
Important decisions by the Crown
Council. Prince Max of Baden left
for the front Friday, according to a
dispatch from Berlin.
CROATS BURN CHATEAUX
GENEVA, Nov. 2 "The skies are
reddened every night with the fires
of Hungarian magnates' burning
chateaux," the Wiener Journal de
clared, describing the revolt of the
Croats In Hungary.
Plenty of exercise, fresh air,
regiflar hours is all the pre
scription you need to avoid
Influenza unless through
negfect or otherwise, a cold
gets you. Then take at
once
CASCARAK9U1NINE
Standard cold remedy for JO ytats m tablet
-. T I fin - iTTi trrilrl
So. 14 heuri cxTitTTS grip inJ days. Money
tMckUttfzO. ZlieiasUKtwxbssaSjdtttp
'-
GRANDMOTHER
RUSS REVOLT SHOT
wtta Mr. ubti picture, ju aji xjtbi buo.
Let the Wedding
By JEAN
M:C1F0R
E
The "Wir Department today; issued
a new call for civilian applications
to the new Infantry officers training
school which, wtu be opened. Decem
ber 1 at Camp Fremont. Cat. ' v
The new school will have a' capacity
of 20,000 men. All registrants be
tween1 the aces of eighteen and forty
five are eligible for entrance except
those in' deferred classes on account
of industrial or agricultural! occupa
tions. ,
Maryland Is allowed 210 entrants to
the new school, the District of Co
lumbia 60 entrants, and Virginia-380
entrants. Physical requirements for
I the new school are the same as for
the regular army. All registrants
Who enter the Camp Fremont school
land who fall th. qualify- for a com
mission may revert to' their present
Civilian status except those now In
Class Vwho will be required to re
main in the service whether they re
ceive a commission or not.
Washington men who wish to enter
the school must report and leave
their names with the officers in
charge of any of the local students'
army training corps on or before No
vember 20. Units of this corps, offi
cers in charge -of which wlU receive
applications, are stationed at Army
and Navy Preparatory School, Bliss
Electrlcar School. Catholic University.
Georgetown University, George Wash
ington University, Gonxaga College,
and St. John's College.
FLYER GIVES LIFE
E
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMT
NORTHWEST OF VERDUN, Nov. 2.
Lieut. Wilber W. White, an Ameri
can aviator, from New York city,
sacrificed his life to save an inex
perienced flyer In his group.
The novice was attacked by a Ger
man and was unable to vanquish him
with machine gun fire. White de
liberately crashed his machine into
the Boche plane enabling the other
American to escape White had a
wife and two children at home.
URGESU.S.TOTAKE
LONDON, Nov 2 The Spectator in
an article discussing the disposition
of the German colonies after the war.
suggests that the peop.e of G-eat
Britain and her colonies would be de
lighted to see the United States tak-i
over and protect as large a par: of
Germany's former colonies as the
United States could be Induced to ai
cept. Tho editor opposes the ldei 1 1
placing them under International con
trol because, the newspaper says. In
ternationalism was tried In the Congo
with results none could wish to see
repeated.
SPAIN TAKES FOE SHIP
MADRID, Nov Z. The Spanish
Transatlantic Corbpany provided a
crew for the German steamer Crefeld.
which was handeit over to Spain by
Germany, says a dispatch from Cadiz
The steamer was renamed Espana TV.
and sailed this weik for Tencrlfte.
DARK ELECriON NIGHT.
NEW YORK. Ndv 2. In refusing
to grant a special Illumination permit
allowing newspapers to flash results
of the election. Mercer P. Moseley,
chief of fuel conservation for New
York State, stated tha election nt-rlit
would be "llghtless" the tame as any
other Tuesday night.
( OOHN. VJE wlU- I ( NO, BUT I
HAUE. "TO SEND ) EcEMBER.That
j-SOM FLOWERS l.1 lSl JlVfERSARv
fAMD I -JUST VIELL THEM
KN0WTHEyvE WKV
fPav I FoROTTtM ) REMlMD
Jym ALLt ABOUT THEM,? )
OFFIG
RSHRAINING
TO SAVE COM
RAD
ERIN COLONIES
Bells Ring Out
KNOTT
Knockeed down by a heavy wind
storm oVXXWeet in the'alr and forced
to land in the Everglades of Florida,
where, 'exhausted and starving, the
was , rescued br Seminole Indians,
were among .'the recent experiences
of tLleut. Walter L. O. .Smith. ;of the
photographic detachment at Carls trom
Field, War Department records made
public today vreveaU
, Lieutenant Smith, -who had under
taken the work of photographing a
shorter Une of flight over the Ever
glades to Fort Meyers, bad reached an
altitude of 7,000 feet above the great
swamp when be observed a storm ap
proaching from the south. Unable to
;et around it by changing his course,
ho started to climb! At 8,000 feet.
;howeverr he encountered a terrific
wina irosq we aorw, waica ibcu
the plane, first on one wing and then
on the other, and forced a hazardous
Describing the territory In which
he was forced to earth the aviator,
who was accompanied by Sergeant
O'Connor, as a passenger, says:
"The sameness of the Everglades is
almost appalling Just one small
Cyprus hummock after another; water
and muck everywhere; innumerable
mosquitoes, alligators, water mocca
ilns and black snakes. The mos
quitoes attacked us In swarms. Mean
while we could drink no water for
fear it might be Infected. After spend
ing a miserable night we started to
drill through the knee-deep mud and
without food. We were compelled to
spend the night again In the swamp,
sleeping on ground covered with
water. By this time we were so
nearly exhausted that we took a
chance on the water, but we were ap
proaching starvation.
"The next morning we resumed our
way through the muck and finally
sighted a hummock upon which was
a camp inhabited by Seminole In
dians. By elg-n language we ac
quainted them with our needs. After
being given food, we managed to
make them understand that we wish
ed to reach Miami. We were poled
In a glade boat through a perfect
maze of waterways and reached the
dredge at the end of the Tampa
Miami trail, where we were given
food and a bed. The next day a motor
boat took us down the canal, where
we. hired a motor to take us to the
flying field at Miami."
BY LACK OF LABOR
A' scarcity of labor, together with
a shortage of materials, is holding
back the building program of the
District, according to the annual' re
port of Municipal Architect Snowden
Ashford, which was submitted today
to the District commissioners.
Ten buildings were under con
structlon during the last year, and
a total of slightly more than a quar
ter of a million dollars was spent
In new construction. Appropriations
for several school buildings, author
ized nearly two years ago, are un
spent because it was found Impos
sible to secure bids within the
amounts allowed by Congress.
Chief among the new buildings
constructed Is the municipal fish
wharf and market, in Water street,
between Eleventh and Twelfth streets
southwest. This market was com
pleted last July at a total cost of
slightly more than $118,000. School
construction was limited to the
building of the Elizabeth V. Brown
School. Connectlcuat avenue, between
McKlnley and Northampton streets
northwest, at a cost of $63,772 88.
Other building work consisted prin
cipally of additions to present struc
tures and the erection or garages ror
District automobiles.
The report recommends that the
present frame buildings at the District
Workhouse be encased In brick walls
as soon as possible, thereby permit
ting the use of the present structures
until more permanent and comfort
able buildings are completed.
fMNTSlfS
BUILDING HALTED
SPECIAL TOPICS IN
SUNDAY'S SERINS
Tastor and congregation will meet
again tomorrow, after having been
separated for four weeks by the "flu."
Some of the churches will have
special services to celebrate the
abatement of the epidemic and the
reopening of their services.
Many of the sermons will be based
on various phases ,of the war or
deal with questions arising therefrom,
one being entitled "Is God Asleep!"
while another Is "1m the Devil
Deadr
Ta Held Meeting.
Bishop Shahan. rector of the Catho
lic University, will be chairman of
a mass-meeting at 4 o'clock tomor
row afternoon at Liberty Hut. The
object is to raise $10,300,000 for
work among the soldiers, sailors and
marines In Europe. Mme. Ernestine
Schumann-Heinle prima donna of the
Metropolitan Grand Opera Company,
will sing. The Marine Band will play.
Another mass-meeting will be held
at 4:30 o'clock at the First Congre
gational Church, with the Rt. Rev.
Charles Gore, lord bishop of Oxford,
as the principal speaker. Moral alms
of the war will be discussed. Bishop
Gore will preach at the Church of
the Epiphany at the 11 o'clock serv
ices. "The Wonders of the Vatican."
will be, the subject of a sermon by
the Re'v. James L. Gordon in the
First Congregational Church at the
morning services. His subject for
the evening will be, "Why Did Na
poleon Divorce Josephine!"
War-Time Cities.
"War-Time Cities and Their Stor
ies" will be the subject of the sermon
by the Rev. Wallace, Radcllffe at the
New York Avenue' Presbyterian
Church, tomorrow evening.
"The Best Thing About the War"
and "Mr. Brltltng Sees" It Through"
svlll be--topics for the sermons to be
delivered by the Rev. Howard L
Stewart at the morning and evening
services, respectively, In -'the Second
Baptist Church..
"Europe, Yesterday, Today and To
morrow" willibe 'subject- of a. sermon
by the Rev. Dr. 'Henry Allen, Tup
per, of New York, in.thelFIrst Bap
tist Church, tomorrow evening. ..
The Rev. 'Dr." Charles Wood pastor
of the Church of the Covenant, will
preach at the morning and evening
services. Assistant Attorney General
Huston Thompson will address the
All-Comers' Bible Class at 10 o'clock,
and "Every Girl's Bible Class" will
consider the subject of "Prayer.
The, Great Epidemic and Its Cure"
wUl be discussed by the Rev. Grove
Griffith- Johnson at the evening ser
vices of the Immanuel , Baptist
Church. The Rev. J. Dwlght Roberts,
of Johnstown.-Pa., will preach at the
morning service.
"Some Washington, Happiness" and
"ThefCommander" are' the,subjects of I
the .morning and evening sermons by
the Rev. .E. Hex- Swem. of the Cen
tennial Baptist Church.
Nlae Tears of, Serrlec
The Rev. Earl Wllfley, of the Ver
mont Avenue Christian' Church, will
begin the ninth, year of -his. pastorate
of the churchV tomorrow -and", will
preach special sermons on the t sub
ject. Petworth Baptist Church and Sun
day school will resume; activities to
morrow, With the Rev. F. 'Paul Xang
home, the pastor of the church,
preaching at morning and evening
services.
Revival services, beginning tomor
row and continuing through the week,
will be held in Mount Vernon Place
Methodist Church, with the Rev. Dr.
Chappell delivering the sermons.
Judge Joseph W. Thompson! of the
Bureau of Mines, will address the
Men's Bible Class in Calvary M. E.
Church at 0:30 o'clock in the morning.
The Rev. Bernard Braskamp will
preach on "The Questions of the
Hour" at the 11 o'clock services of
the Gurley Memorial Presbyterian
Church. ,
"Is God Asleep?" wil be answered
by the Rev. J. A. Brookhouse at the
evening service in Peck Memorial
Church.
SLAYS HER 7 SONS,
HABANA, Nov. 2. Grieving over
the death of her husband, wlho had
died of influenza, Mrs. Carmen La
yers, thirty-four years old, of near
Camagucy, killed her seven sons.
She then placed the livestock of
the farm in c hut. which she set afire,
and then leaped Into the flames.
She was rescued by soldiers, and is
In a serious condition.
Tk Store Tour Payslclaa
iircvpL
SICK!
Rreopuseada
ROOM and Invalli
Supplies. In this
big stock you will
find Just what you
bwant, at a mod
erate cost.
roEGIBSON CO.Inc917GSt
INKS-PASTE ETC.
n carry a full line of tM best
made Inks, paste, muell- S
age, mat, etc. And at aBa
low price, too. Quality
high delivery quick.
KAUM Stationery Co.
Qni "7lli Ql Opposite Go!denberga,
3U3 IH OU Phone Main 7S20.
Tourists
Attention!
KODAK
Developing and Printini?
Satisfactory Work or Ko Charge.
The National Remembrance Ship
(Mr. Poster's Shop),
14th St and Pa. Ave.
Wash. Dancing Academy
TEACHINO LATEST BALLROOM
Dtfnclnr;. also fancy dor and soft shoo
dtndnr for stars. IT YOU CAN WALK
TTB QUARAKTEC TOU TO DANCE. Ladv
t reotluasa uaehsrs. T r st. J. W.
LEAP INTO FLAMS
liina
15- Picturing All th Battl Front-l
ALLIES
Official War Review
"Exclusive First Showing"
At AH the CRANDALL THEATERS
m-m-mii-i
' Pre-Eminently the
Re-Decorated
atnp.t MQN
The Season's Patriotic Event
HO ADVAKCE TX PniCES
fiSU. S. Official War Pictured
TOES. W1LS02T
"The Man Over Bcrr"
issssssssssssl3W&BiBssssS!
Answer
!i ft Following the
Q The Glorious Part America Is Playing in the Fighl
2 for liberty American Boys Going Over the Top
E The'CowartJly Huns Falter and Breaklnto Foil Re-
treat- Triumphant Attacks of the' Intrepid Allies
EL Tanks and 'Aeroplanes in Action.
If Your Boy is "Over There"He May WOverHere"
in This Graphic, Soul-Stirring Production That WUl Make
You Proud To Call Yourself an "AMERICAN."
so advance
First ghwin WFTV
Mae
Marsh
FlrrtSaewtmr pflT
1
Carlyle
Blackwell
EXTRA-
BEN TIBPIH -
MON.
Constance Talrnadge
la a Delightful Version of the Stage Comedy Success
"Mrs. Leffingwell's Boots"
Hon. HAIUes' OtSelal Wax Review."
WED. THURS.
Dorothy Gish
In a Thrilllnjr Drama of Spy Activities
"The Hun Within"
FRI,
Ethel Clayton
In a Charming Romantic Drama
"The Girl Who Came Back"
M-M.-M.WH
ALL STAR CAST
In the Patriotic FUa-Spectaele
"TO HELL WITH THE KAISER1'
Hon.
Tu Constance Talrnadge in "Mrs. Leffingwell's Boots"
Extra i "Allies Offlelal War Review."
v Alice Brady" "The Better Half
LEWIS STONE m "Inside the Lines'!
fa Edith Storey '""The Silent Woman"
Spetlal "linns nnd Hyphens." yitaarspli 3-Reel Comedy
Shows Continuous 2:30 ta lttOO P. M.
Sat John Barrymorem"On the Quiet"
Extra l Chas. Murray In "Ills Wife's Friend."
uo. SHORTY HAMILTON
In The Iiancer'
tues. MONTAGU LOVE
In To nim That Hath"
, Hxtrai TInn and Hyphens"
WED.
MABEL NORMAND
.....ir- nf rclrl"
Extras "Ullc' Official War Hejrlew
"JOHN BARRYMORE"
11111.
In -On fhcQniet-
FruT WALLACE" REID
In "The Source"
sat: edith'storey
In "The Silent Vromnn"
Polly Moron nnd lien Turpln,
"She Loved Him Plenty"
House of Refinement
Re-Famished Throughout
yf.it.
-TT-F6 g-3""1
America's
CEfL. PETtSHUTft
H
TA Jfo Ouen Tsers"
Flag of Freedom B
is rrucES cBf Es
THTTRS P1"' 6t'wteg
In
"Hidden,
Fires"
VT Ftrmt aThTtM
1
in
"The Road
to France"
.SSy "SLESTHS"-
-EXTRA
TUES.
SAT.
fc-ilJ-UI
MO JOHN BARRYMORE
la "On the Unlet"
Extrni "llunm and Hyphens"
tues. ALLA NAZDrlOVA-1"
InToya of Pate"
wed. Conatimce Talrnadge
In "Mr. Lefllnirwell's Boots'
Extrai Jlleo Offlelal War Hevtevr
"" WALLACEREID
In "The Sonree"
Fni- LEWIS STONE
In "Inside the Lines"
Chaa. Murray In "His WlfeV
Friend."
SAT.
SYD CHAPLIN
In "The Submarine Pirate"
OBSSSSBBftt'r' .SSUwSBBBBH
'BSBSPP. SEBRSBSSSBSKV'
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