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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, December 24, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026749/1918-12-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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-.- "Vr?,9raT)l1r8B"-r-flP5,7 ""??tJ tr-f '"B."1" BTrt Wivfl
I-
Today
liefer Cousin From Prisei.
Bresgfct Public. EdncatioB..
Wbt Will Mr. Wilson Brkg
Fran Fraice, Eaglaad, Italy?
Br ARTHUR BRISBANE.
(Copyright, lilt.)
"What will President 'Wilson
bring back from Europe? It Is
said that the traveler who would
bring back information? from for
eign lands must take Information
with hint Mr. Wilson Is that kind
of traveler.
Many things they do in. Europe
better than we do them The
most useful man is he who brings
back the best that another country
possesses, especially the other
country's best thought
"When the President attends
learned lectures at the Sorbonne
he will see on the outside of the
building a tablet announcing that
It contains the magnificent library
of the philosopher Victor Cousin.
Cousin was a good Influence in
France all his life. His think
ing, advice, and protests were
sound, and he was a great teacher.
But the best that he ever did for
France, and for the United States
as well, was to bring back from
the prison in which the Prussian
King kept him for six months a
careful study of the Prussian sys
tem of public education.
He stndied in that prison, took
back and developed in France
the Prussian public school system,
which was then by far the. best in
the world. And as a consequence
he did more in one year for the
education of youth in France than
had been done in all the history
Jt France all the way back to
Charlemagne and earlier. Said he:
To carry back the education of
Prussia into France afforded a
"Hobler (if a bloodless) triumph
than the trophies of Auslerlitz
r Jena."
The book that Cousin wrote on
Prussian education for France
ran through innumerable editions
there and in translations here.
And "because Cousin, luckily, was
pat la the Prussian prison, mil
lions of French and American
boys were released from the prison
et igsorance through an.admlrable.
paouc sccooi system, borrowed by
Coesiiirdci riLr Prussian, jailers.
"What will the President Taring
back for this country, after he
has seen real democracy in France,
a real republic disguised as a
monarchy in England, the ancient
seat of romance, art and science,
the modern nation of power and
courage 4n Italy?
With his power of publicity, the
force with which he impressed
Ideas upon the nation, the Presi
dent might bring to America in
one corner of his brain freight
more valuable than all the gold of
all the countries of Europe.
To do a thing you must know
HOW. ,
Every little while it is neces
sary to discover over again the
soundness of that axiom.
Russia is the most recent dis
coverer of 'the fact that things
dont run themselves, and that you
can't satisfactorily replace ef
ficiency with high sounding words.
The Russian Bolsheviks, showing
the high intelligence of three-year-old
children deciding to take
charge of the nursery, have paid
out so far more than one thousand
minion rubles to make up the loss
on factories that have been run
ning under what they call "social
isation of industry." which means
turning the factories over to work
men without any directing boss
cr bead.
Scientists perform a slight oper
ation on the brain of a pigeon.
After that, when it files it turns
over and over in the air until iU
strikes the ground and breaks its
neck. Bolshevism performed that
slight operation on the brain of
Russian industry, which is also
'turning somersaults and breaking
its neck.
The feet seed the head to guide
them.
Cables from Europe say that
the problem of feeding starving
populations in liberated countries
is Just about solved. "The United
States will do the work without
claiming credit for It" That
ought to be satisfactory to every
body. One Interesting difficulty is the
' wheat problem. The United States
crop will be Increased by hundreds
of millions of bushels, this coun
try having guaranteed the farmers
more than two dollars a bushel for
all the wheat produced.
In Australia yon- can buy wheal
Or one dollar and eighteen cents,
sad in the Argentine for a dollar
and thirty-five cents a bushel.
Europe, now that the war is over,
will not pay us for wheat more
than the price in other places.
Uncle Sam will have to dig pretty
deep Into his pocket But if he
(takes the wheat and gives it away
to the starring, that will settle
his' probUsa nicely, and, after all,
to nm mffnH it
WEATHER:
Bala T anew tenlght
and tomorrow! Increas
ing clsadlness. Tempera
ture at 8 a. m., 41 decrees-
Normal tempera
tore far December M for
last 30 years, 34 degrees.
NUMBER 11,022.
Berlin Revolutionists Make Military Commander of City
PRISONER IN ROYAL PALACE
I
TOWSON. MA, Dec 24-Dr.
Norbu Ishida, the Japanese psychia
trist must face trial for the murder
of bis fellow worker. Dr. George B.
Wolff, early in April.
All possibility that an ins&alty
commission mighty be appointed and
Dr. Ishida sent at once to -an insti
tution has been dispelled by the- in
vestigation of. Prosecuting Attorney
George Hartman, of Baltimore
county. Attorney Hartman spent all
yesterday afternoon going over the
scene of the murder, conferring'with
Dr. Edward N. Brush, in charge of
the Sheppard and Pratt Hospital,
where the crime occurred, and in
Questioning hospital employes as to
the relations between Dr. Ishida and
his Tictim up to the time of the
tragedy.
DA AN
H
A
m
CeM.SIoo4ca Crime." mental diseaseor tte oeteon-
r -JTTsgallii'rfVe f,cW.Uiat-heJrUJfr:iKas-OtS
la a'Japanese aaft an insanity ex
pert; jur. isnlaa. -will be prosecuted to
thef ull extent of the Maryland law."
iif. Hartman announced at the end
of his preliminary Investigation. "He
committed a deliberate cold-blooded
crime and without any justification
as far as I can discover.
"Jealousy was the motive an un
founded, unreasoning Jealousy of a
woman who had not encouraged him
and who wanted none of his atten
tions. Perhaps he was Insane, but
If he was, it was with Jealousy and
not insane In the 'sense that he wu
not responsible for his act. I am
convinced that he knew what he was
doing, and that he realises the con
sequences of his act"
Brings Woman In Limelight.
Hartman's announcement that he
will bring the Oriental alienist to
trial means that the young woman
who was the pivot of the tragedy will
be forced Into the limelight. Up to
now everything possible has been
done to shield her name and Identity
because she Is believed to have been
as much the victim of Ishlda'a un
reasoning affections aa Dr. Wolff was
of hi uncontrolled suspicions. At
the trial, however, her presence and
testimony absolutely would be es
sential to the progress of the case.
It would be her testimony that would
prove or disprove Dr Ishlda's charges
against Dr. Wolff.
In his cell. Dr. Ishida speaks of the
young nurse over and over again.
"I liked her," be says. "I liked
her very much. and then his face
clouds and he lok puzzled as
though he canot understand why his
"liking" was not reciprocated.
Another nurse at the hospital Is
unhappily Involved In the tragedy.
She is the young woman to whom
Dr. Wolff really was attached, and
(Continued on rage 2, Column 8.)
511 iPSlED
i . . ..L - .
LONDON. Dec. 24. Five hundred
and seventeen ships have been added
to the British navy since August,
1814. it was announced today.
The new vessels include seven bat
tleships, five battle cruisers, twenty
six light battle cruisers, seventeen
monitors, 230 destroyers and 232
mine sweepers and special service
craft.
ROOMS FOR RENT
M ST. St. W SOS Mecly faml,htl
front room for two rentltmen; ma
nlnr wmt.r: el.ctrle llthti
This is the Ad.
"I shall always use Times
Want Ads in the future. I
put the above ad in the Times
J and rented my rooms immedi-
jaiciy. mrs. narmDerg.
Phone The Times your ads.
Main 5260.
(
TO BUSH NAVY
Published rery evening (Including Sunday)
Entered as second-elsss matter, at the post-'
office at Washington. D. C
DOES THE STUDY
Of Mmtal Diseases
Drive Doctors Mad?
&
c
By DB. ADOLPH XETEB,
Head of Johns HopkUs Hospital.
I am convinced that the study
of insanity does not induce in
sanity. On the contrary, I be
lieve that a deep study pf that sort
develops the brain, broadens its
scope, and widens JJae perspective
as nothing else can. ,It is the man
of limited scope who is most apt
to lose his reason. It is the man
who thinks too much of the same
things or gets one Idea too rigidly
in mind. The more-interests, -the
more studies, th emore mentality.
To be sure, were the individual
unstable at the start, the intricate
and complicated study of the hu
man mind might unseat his reason,
but not to any greater extent than
concentration on any other-scientific
study. Although I personally
have known a number of psychia--trists
and alienists who have had
mental disorders, in practically
every case the real source of the
trouble was known in some cases,
,ll was from infections, and in'
others family inheritance.
It is my unequivocal t'oplnhm;
that in no case was it the'.stndy
which caused the mental collapse.
N
By Dr. D. PEKCY HICKLING.
Official Alienist for the District
of Columbia.
I see no reason to believe that
the fact that Dr. Ishida was a stu
dent of mental diseases in any
way affected his own mental con
dition. Mental disease is not
caused from any Rerm and is in
no way contagious or infectious.
And as for the study of mental de
rangements, a man studying law
for instance is equally as liable to
insanity as a man studying in
sanity itself.
It is a fact that there is a larger
percentage of physicians and
nurses caring tor mentally de
ranged people In Institutions for
the care of such persons who go
insane than physicians and
nurses in other medical institu
tions. This seems not to be because
of the character of the institution
in which they work nor the condi
tion of the people with whom they
are thrown, but because a larger
percentage of such nurses or phy
sicians are permanently attached
to such Institutions.
Summing up the situation. I do
not see how the fact that Dr.
Ishida was a student of mental
disease could have affected his
mind so as to render him abnormal.
.7
The District Public Utilities Com
mission will hold a public hearing
on January 7. at 10:30 a. m. In the
board room In the District buUding
to consider the establishment of inter-company
transfers.
The agreement between John A.
Beeler, traffic expert, the Capital Trac
tion company, the Washington Rail
way and Electric Company and the
Washington-Virginia railway, together
with the recommendations for trans
fers offered by Mr. Beeler with which
the traction companies are not In ac
cord will be disclosed.
As the matter of lnter-company
transfers Involves not only, a question
of service but a question of rates
the commission Is required to give ten
days notice of the hearing.
HIS MONEY SAVED WHEN
STREET ROBBERS FLEE
Robert Hill, of 0 P street north
west, was held up at the point of a
pistol by three young white men
while on his way home early today.
The highwaymen were frightened
off.
Hill told the police that the three
men Jumped out from behind a tree
at Ninth and II streets northwest
and ordered him to turn out his
pockets, but fled when they saw a
pedestrian approaching.
PUBLIC HEARING ON
TRANSFERS JAN
WASHINGTON, TUESDAY EVENING," DECEMBER 24, 1918.
MUD AND RIM - Ride, in State Coach With King
MA
M
OF PRESIDENT
FRONT
By HENRY O. "WALES.
, GENERAL HEADQUARTERS O?
THE AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY
FORCE 'IN -FRANCE, Chatraont.
Dec 24. Bad weather may impair
the pleasure of 'President and Mrs.
Wilsoa's trip to Genera) Pershing's
headaaarters on Christmas Day. It
haOjeen raining steadily here "for
weeks, and the ground has .become
so saturated that doughboys were
busy today 'constructing "duck.
boards" In every direction across the
deep mud for the distinguished visi
tors to walk over. The skies are still
gloomy, and it is leafed that more
rain will' fall Christies Day.
It is unlikely that "tae American
airmen, will be able .to go through
their aerial antics as planned -so ac
count of weather. If is possible
that the Fres-Meat wirrilaK aaWrt
SSPtiSf
Bister to "Be steaaotnbe.
Tlie Presidential party vHll not eat"
from mtu wits when they sit down ts
a good old-fashioned noontime dinner
at. Montlgny-Le-RoL but everything
will be Just, as democratic, aa it Is
Impossible to scraps up enough crock
ery and silverware In this section of
France for 200 covers, even If every
thing were commandeered.
There will be the regular tin forks'
and steel bladed knives, aluminum'
plate and big ellpse shaped cup the
same as the dough-boys carried on
their way to battle when they were
sometimes compelled to utilized this
bandy lntrument for trench digging
purposes.
If the President decides to talk It
will be to the officers of the Yankee
division, after the meal.
M Elaborate Menn.
An elaborate menu is lielng pre
pared. It will be printed on a topo
graphical map of the sector the divi
sion held and will contain the history
of the division's battles.
The dinner will be held In a big
building that was formerly used for
a French hospital, and tho great
white cross giving warning to raiding
airplanes of the character of the place
is still there.
The review will be held at a hamlet
containing 100 houses, a brewery and
a cheese factory. It Is Just outside of
Langres and a main line railroad
passes the field. The big guns and
tanks that are to take part in the
procession were brought upon this
line and dumped off right into the
field.
Although the field Is on high
ground the entire country Is swampy
with mud.
noy Proud Why Kotf
On the way from Chaumont the
President will pass numerous war
hospitals, Including a base hospital
and a couple of prisoners' camps,
where German soldiers captured by
doughboys In battle are Interned.
The huts are surrounded by great
fences of barbed wire. These captives
are employed chiefly as wood cutters,
but a few are working on the roads
filling in the holes over which Presi
dential automobile will pass. The
Presidential party will pass also an
aerodrome where machines guarding
the headquarters of the American ex
peditionary force are located.
The noon dinner Is In charge of
Mess Sergeant Hoy. and he Is on"
proud roan. He handled the first roll
ing kitchen that the United States
army received on the Mexican border
In 1916. '
LIFTS COKE EXPORT BAN.
Prohibition of the sale, or delivery,
of coke for export by ocean transpor
tation except upon the prior Issuance
of a permit by. the Fuel Administra
tion was lifted today.
NO SNOW FOR
XMAS
Taere will be anew for
Christmas.
Ss aalth the prophet at the
Weather Bureau.
On the contrary, thrre will be
elands and rain and moderate tem
perature tonight and Christmas
Day, wltfc the possibility, how
ever that It may clear oft eel
Ch rista
sight.
YANK
LONDON, Dec 24. President Wilson will ride from Sharing Crow
Station to Buckingham Palace in the state carriage with King George,
it was announced today.
Mrs. Wilson will
which form a guard of
escort
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THE KING'S CARRIAGE AND ITS ATTENDANTS
This photograph was taken in Fleet street, through which the President will ride,
on the occasion of an appearance of the King and Queen, and shows a scene which will
be practically- repeated on the President's visit to the King.
YANK BATTLE FLEET
DELAYED BY STORM
NEW YOKK, Dec 24. Men of Amer
ica's battle fleet, coming home from
the war, must spend Christmas at
sea. The squadron was expected to
enter New York harbor tomorrow
morning, but storms delayed It. An
nouncement was made today that the
fighting ships will arrive at 0 a. m.
Thursday for the review.
The Presidential yacht Mayflower,
from which Secretary Daniels Is to
review the mighty procession of dread I
naughts and smaller battle craft, will
anchor near the Statue of Liberty. The
fleet will anchor In a line nve miles
long In the Hudson river.
Secretary Daniels Is scheduled to
reach New York tomorrow.
After the review 10,000 sailors are
to parade on Fifth avenue.
New York expects the greatest
crowds on record even surpassing
those which attended the Hudson-Put
ton celebration.
JAPAN LOOKING TO SOUTH.
Japan seeks a substantial share of
Brazil's foreign trsde. Latin-American
advices Indicate. Announcement Is
made of the opening of a Illo de Ja
ests in both Brazil and Argentina,
poratkin already represented at Bue
nos Aires. Japan already has made
special financial arrangement to care
for the expansion of her trade Inter
ests' in both Brazil and Argentine.
limes
ride with Queen Mary. "
honor on all state occasions, will constitute the
, !.. ,
GIFTS FOR WALTER
REED TOTAL
8000
The gifts contributed
by Times' readers to the
wounded soldiers at Wal
ter Reed total in number
about 8,000. They have
all been packed for trans
portation to the hospital,
and will rejoice the sol
diers Christmas morning.
HEAR EBERT TAKES
ACTION ON KAISER
J The Russian "Prlmorskoye Provln-
' leal Zenntvo" has appealed to America
AMSTERDAM. Dec. 24 Chancellor for motion pictures showing agrlcul
Ebert was reported today to have tural production, highway construction
exchanged communications with the and forestry work In this country as
Dutch government regarding the a means of educating Russians In
former KsJier. The result Is not) these activities. The Alms have been
known. forwarded.
The Second Life Guards,
RETURNING D.C.MEN
WILL GO TO MEADE
The troops from the District arriv
ing In New York tomorrow from
France on the transport La France,
will be Isolated In a. camp near New
York for about ten days,-where they
will undergo a medical examination.
I' The District troops probably will be
sent to Camp Meade, lid., after leav
ing New York.
The War Department has officially
, announced that Camp Meade, Md
i would be used as a demobilization
center. The policy of the War De
partment, as announced recently is
I to send men returning from overseas
to a camp or fort near the place of
their Induction for demobilization. In
this case the District troops will In
all probability he sent to Camp Meade,
IMd.. for del- yillzatlon.
The Dlstrlcr troops arriving in this
country tomorrow are attached to the
137th Field Artillery. Batteries C and
I F In this artillery, which Is composed
I of 500 men, troops from the District.
1 Illinois. Arkansas. Mississippi and
Alabama are attached.
WANT EDUCATIONAL FILMS.
f
EDITION
PRICE TWO CENTS.
FIERCE BAM
CALLED TO SEA
Br FRANK J. TAYLOR,
United Press Staft-CarrwpiHwlwt
BERLIN, Dec. 23-(Nitt) Jfa-
tinous marines, who revolted wba
ordered to sea, are eatreacked ia
the royal palace here, after a battle
with the- military jroard.
Upon .receiving their orders, sev
eral regiments of marines revetted,.
kidnaping the military
of the city asd holding hla '
la the fighting which ensaed. for
mirlBesTverekilkd aadtenwojmdesL
ROYAUSTS START ACTIVE
PROPAGANDA DRIVE TO
RE-ESTABLISH THROftE
BERLIN, 2ec 23 Relayed). Soy-
.allsta have started aa active- prop.
ruii- i iiiI Tin w lj,'hT'
tec i-OTtflHUftsnifi oi m jaussi m.
ltseease apparent today.
F The movement center In Bavarts,
Irecaxded as the. pivotal state of th
.Ausiro-uerman political situation. 41
being conducted, by the clerical
group, who at present are devoting
their strongest 'efforts to the rural
populations.
The republicans are convinced that
formal establishment of a German,
republic and election of a president '
scheduled for the last of this month
or the first of next will effectually
end the aspirations of the mem-s
f arcblsts. As a result, they are re
doubling their efforts to combat the '
monarchical propagandists.
Oppose 'Separatists.
Bavaria, In addition to Its; territo
rial and economic Importance, would
bring into the German republic a
large portion of German Austria,
which would replace any territory
lost through the aspirations of the
French and Poles. The German news
papers, therefore, believing a strong
central government absolutely essen
tial to the life of the German rspub-
.-f lie. are vigorously opposing the re
publican separatist movement In Ba
varia, on the grounds it would "weak
en the democratic movement and ba
playing into the- hands of the royal
ists. The plan for establishment of sevea
semi-republics In Germany and Aus
tria, to be confederated like the
United States, was being strongly ad
vocated in Saxony.
Here's Hew Frogrsaav
The newest program la this con
nection provided tho followlnr
line-up:
Dresden as the capital of tipper
Saxony; Hanover as capital of lower
Saxony: Coblenz ass capital of thai
Rhlneland: Stuttgart aa capital of
Schwaben. which would be called
Neckerland: Munich as capital of Ba
varia, which would bo called Danube
land; Vienna as capital of German.
Austria, which would ba called Alp
land, and Berlin as the capital of.
Oberland. which would include Prus
sia, Posen. and Silesia.
Each republic would have a. local
president or governor, who would be
under the confederation's president In
matters of national Importance. Eith
er Berlin or Dresden would be the
national capital.
Electioneering In the balloting for
delegates to the national assembly is
proceeding. The army la taking an
active part in this. General Von Gou
tard, commander of the Fourteenth
Baden army corps, has Issued a proc
lamation urging the army to vote
against the Sartacldes.
GEN. GROENER THREATENS
TO OCCUPY FOE CAPITAL
ZURICH. Dec 2i. General Croo
ner, who succeeded Ludendorff as
first quartermaster general of ths
German army, has sent an ultimatum
to the Ebert government that he will
occupy Berlin unless order is quickly
restored, according to information
from the German frontier today.
8ERBIANS WOULD RETURN.
Serbians, naturalized as Americans,
who returned to their mother coun
try at the outbreak of the war. are
apparently anxious to get back to
the United States, according to Red
Cross advices today. C
Cables say that while passing
through Palermo. Sicily, mora than
500 of them marched along- ths street
ENSUES
we
MARN
ARE
II
5l

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