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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, January 20, 1919, FINAL EDITION, The Times' Complete Sport Page, Image 15

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"GENIUS AND COMMON SENSE PROPERLY BLENDED INVARIABLY SPELL SUCCESS," MUSES THE SAGE OF ROCK CREEK
4
The Times' Complete Sport Page o Before Meebpg Scotch-Wop
Ir \
Leonard Meets Dundee Tonight
For Fifth Time in Newark Bout
DUNDEE HAS CHANCE TO
WIN LIGHTWEIGHT TITLE
BY DEFEATING LEONARD
9
By LOUIS A. DOUGHER. |
Tonight at Newark, N. J., Johnny Dundee tackles Benny Leonard for
the fifth time. It will be the first time, however, that the "Scotch M-op
has had a chance at the title. They are to meet at catchweights for an
eight-round bout- Under the laws of New Jersey not more than ten pounds
| difference can exist in their weights, but there is small likelihood of this
rule being broken. Dundee is a legitimate lightweight, easily scaling un
der 133 pounds. Leonard's actual weight is a mystery, but may be known
today when Chairman Smith, of the New Jersey boxing commission,
watches him climb upon the scale. Ring dopesters believe he will scale
around 138 pounds at 3 o'clock, and about 140 pounds when he enters the
ring. Dundee will in all probability weigh in at 133, thus making seven
pounds difference between them.
It will be possible for Dundee to take the lightweight crown from
Leonard. All he has to do is knock him out, that's all, he said, that's all.
If Leonard is above the weight, nothing matters so far as the shift of the
title, providing Dundee weighs in at the limit of the class. If the "Scotch
Wop" puts Leonard away tonight he will be world's champion lightweight
Leonard and Dundee clashed for
the first time in 1915. going ten
rounds without decision. They bat
tled three times in 1916, all without
deciaion, twice in New York and once
in Philadelphia. According to ring
side critics, however, Leonard had
the better of these - battles. In one
of them each scored a knockdown, but
lacked the strength to finish his op
ponent.
Dundee has been the most consis
tent challenger of the champion of
all the lightweight world. Thorugh
his manager, "Scotty" Montleth, he
t has hurled challenges right and left,
but all aimed at Benny Leonard.
Dundee has gone out and beaten
every opponent suggested, only to
come right back with the same li 1
ol* challenge for the lightweight title
holder.
Tonight's contest has come as a
result of weeks of shilly-shallying
about the weights. Dundee wanted
Leonard to weigh in at 135 pounds,
but the champion refused to make
better than 136 pounds. With thej
promoters waiting to match them, at
last Dundee waived all weights,
agreeing to meet Leonard at catch
w eights.
L??uN Has Piitk.
As between these two leading
weights. Leonard has the punch. It
is doubtful if Dundee can hit hard
enough to upset the champion. Le?""
ard has gained in strength since his
service as a boxing instruction ?n the
army and he always had a heavier
wallop than did Dundee. It would j
not surprised the fan* if he kayoed
Dundee at Newark. .
Three years ago Dundee was a
whirlwind. He has a peculiar style
of battling, being able to leap from
(one rope to the other and hit while in
the***. His terrific speed, coupled
with this awkward style of boxing,
has won many bouts for him. ?ve
eaw him put away Johnny O'Leary. the
Canadian champion, in nine rounds at
Boston in August. 1916. and the blow
that turned the trick came over while
Dundee had both feet oft the floor. It
was positively uncanny.
Leonard, though, knews exactly
how to battle Dundee. He knows that (
he will be heavier and stronger, quite j
as fast, and just as endurable, if not,
more so. Dundee's blows will hardly i
have such punishing effects as those
of the champion, who hits like a.
middleweight. I
Lew Tendler is making cries for a
Bare PERKINS
L*e Fohl. manager of the Cleve
land Indians, says he thinks one grand
young catcher in the American League
ia being overlooked by critics when
making up their lists of Ban's back
'stopping stars.
"Tluit youngster. Cy I'erkins of the
Mackmen." taid Fohl, "looks to me
just about the sweetest article of
catching talent that has broken into
our circuit in year.5.
?'He uses his brain ail the tim^ an?.
is always full of pep. He'll measure
UP easily with A1 Walters, traded by
ill,. Yank* to the Red Sox.
"This Terkins seems to size up
opposing batsmen as if he had beer
playing against them for years, lie
vja a gr^at throwing arm and
tho ba.ll down to second as accurately
u the best of them. He was one of
the real finds of 1918."
bowlingTcongress seeks
SEVEN HUNDRED TEAMS
TOLKDO, Ohio, Jan. an.?That there
will be more than 700 trams in the
nineteenth annual convention of the
American Bowling Congress to be held
here in March, waj the assurance
.riven by A. L. 1-angtrv. .secretary, at
1 It meeting h*l<i here this afternoon.
Langtry reported that 110 t-ams are,
coming from Chicago. 3? nill be en
tered from Toledo. 2o from Buffalo,
?3 from St. !x>uis and ."C from Detroit.
Cntries close on February '_'0, the
secretary announced. The tournament
will begin on March *. the first four
?r five da) s being given over to local
**jv?bert W. Brown, of New York,
president of the American Bowling
Congress, was at -the meeting and
reported the bowling game prosperous
la ail parts of the country.
PLAN BIG SERIES.
CHICAGO. Jan. 20?Thomas J.
Hickey. president of the American As
aoctation. is planning for a world s
aeries second only to that of the
majors, with the winners of the Inter
national League meeting those of the
American Association.
IK NODE MAKES GOOD.
"Bobby" Knode. State's eaptain
?lact in football for next season, is
all-around athlete. He Is a flrst
baseball player, haa an enviable
reputation on the gridiron and is
playing guard on the basketball
Georgetown Arranges
Game With Navy
Georgetown and the Naval
Academy will clash on the grid
iron at Annapolis on November
8, 1919, according to advices re
ceived today from Annapolis.
As Georgetown battles its an
cient rival, Fordham, on Tues
day, November 4, at New York,
the Hilltoppers will be rather '<
hard put to oppose such a strong
team as Gil Dobie's on the fol
lowing Saturday. However, at
least four elevens are expected
to be in uniform at Georgetown
next fall and there may be
plenty of available material for
two such hard contests in one
week.
battle with the champion. He may be
accommodated later in the season,
probably in the summer. Tendler is
| a southpaw with a fair wallop, but
I even his greatest admirers in Phila
delphia wonder how well he could
stand up under Leonard's punish
ment.
Then there is Billy Whalen, the St.
Paul lightweight, in the same stable
with the Gibbons boys. He, too,
wants a chance at Leonard. His
! manager, Eddie Kane, says that Leo
; nard will have the time of his young
life beating Whalen, if they ever step
into the ring together.
| Richie Mitchell, of Milwaukee, who
j competed in the service boxing tour
ney in London, is also in the field
I lor a chance at the lightweight
I crown. There should be no difficulty
i for Leonard to keep busy, if he really
I wants to take on all the challengers.
The woods are full of them. Dun
dee is only one, perhaps the most
persistent, but only one.
JOHNSTON DENIES
SOUTHPAWS' JiNX
First Baseman Doc Johnston, who
received his second chance in the
American League with the Indians
last summer, claims he can hit south
paw pitching if given the proper op
portunity.
In the Southern League, where
Johnston made his big reputation
before first Joining the Cleveland
team, he hit left or right handei;s
with equal ease. But when he came
to the American League he discov
ered the southpaws in the Johnsonim
organization had a bit more stuff.
He had his troubles getting them
safe, and in a short while was taken
oot whenever a left-hander opposed
Cleveland. He was Anally turred
loose, getting a chance with Pitts
burgh and then drifting back to the
minors.
Last sea.sroa in the American As
sociation he was the sensation of the
league. All pitchers looked alike to
him.
Four American League clubs were
bidding for him. when Jim Dunn put
over the deal that made him an
Indian.
Johnston went great for a whiie
against southpaws, but had a cou
ple of bad slumps, and every now
and then was derricked when some
left-hander opposed Cleveland.
Johnston- contends ?hat if *.\er
gets a job on a club, that hM ?o
j other playtr capable of hotoinK down
first, he will demonstrate he can hit
southpaws consistently.
REDS WILL LAND DAUBERT
IN DEAL INCLUDING KOPF
NEW YORK, Jan. 20.?The table Is
srt for a tradf between Brooklyn and
Cincinnati. The Robins are to let
Jake Daubcrt go to the Reds in ex
change for Larry Kopf and another
player yet to be named. It all hingers
on Daubert's suit in court. As soon
as he withdraws hia legal action, he
will be traded.
Clarence Mitchell will b? tried at
first base by the Robiny. He has
played there before with fair success
when with the Reds.
GIANTS WANT CHASE.
The New York Giants want Hal
Chaae to play first base next summer
and will make every effort to land
him. A hearing will be given him
within a week or so on charges of
gambling in baseball. He is ex
pected to be exonerated and imme
diately cold by Cincinnati to Now
York.
Booby Hatch, He's In Again
(Copyright. 191 >. bT International Fe?t?r?
(" Service, Inc.)
By Berndt
TWO I THREEl
? with ?
"BUGS" BAER
\ y
There will be no limit to big
.league clubs' payrolls. A player
can get all the money he can
get if he can get it. I
CAST TELL WHETHER PRO
HIBITION IS A SUCCESS OR NOT
UNTIL WE LA UP NEX T SEA
SON'S GOLP SCORES.
About time to shed a nimble tear
containing less than 3 per cent alco
hol. Hang out a service star for the
old barkeep, for Kink Tremens Is
deader than a ham in a smokehouse.
This kink craft seems to be the bunk.
First ol' Ferdinand curled up like an ant
on a hot rock. Then the Bullshevlki
knocked the Cza' for a row of adobe huts.
The Keeser too). It on the loop for Hol
land exactly one Jump ahead of a fit and
two jumps behind his halibut-eyed son.
Now old Kink Brew flopped, which makes
it unanimous. Crowna are as empty as
picnic grounds On a rainy Tuesday after
noon. a
ATHLETIC FANS AREN'T SATING j
ANYTHING ABOUT THE SLIPPING
OF THE 154-GAME SCHEDULE TO
140. IF A GUY CAN STAND 140
ATROCITIES, HE CAN STAND 14
MORE.
Average man's idea of heaven is a
place where a barber's chair is al
ways empty. Beautiful vision, but the
only ointment in the fly w tAat there
mould never be any barbers in a i
place like that.
Bill Donovan has ferryboated out
of the big leagues into Jersey City.
Bill is only a 3-cent piece away from
his former glory, but gosh, they don't
make 3-cent pieces any more.
Benny and Johnny will shake hands
with each other's jaws this evening.
Although the world is as peaceful as
a glass of Bevo and as happy as a
kitten drowning in milk, these two
cuckoos w>ill endeavor to hang each
other over the ropes like an old
madras shirt.. You'll have to take the
ferry to get there, but it's worth it.
When Ban Johnson starts buzzing
they all bend their ears his way.
You've gotta hand him credit. That
bird could sell tickets to a park
bench in a blizzard.
Nebraska slipped the Big Stymie to
golf. You can run a flivver on gaso
lene, but golluf is something else
again.
I)iw Kultz'a Fourteen Point*.
4. The League of Small Leagues de
mands the protection of the Monroe
doctrinc.
5. Territorial and racial rights shall
be respected by the major powers. No
Dinner Pail League shall be belgtumed
by scouts in search of two-handed
batters, two-footed runners and two
eared pitchers.
6. The waiver clause is declared to
be a foul ball.
< To Be Continued.)
Why should the Legislatures waste
a lot of time killing the shimmy
dance and lounge lizards when a
spoonful of roach powder will do the
trick f
Only salary limit in the National
League is the sky. Reminds us of
the Fed League. All the players got
in their pay envelopes was the sky.
BACHMAN WILL BE COACH
OF NORTHWESTERN TEAMS
CHICAGO, Jan. 20.?Charles C.
Rachman, the former Notre Dame
s'.ar, who played center for the Great
Lakes eleven last fall and was given
all-star honors by Walter Camp, will
be g'-neral director of athletics at
Northwestern University, receiving
his appointment within a few days.
f!a<hman performed wonders at
Notre Dame and later for the Chicago
A. A. lie was outclassed only by the
great Arlie Mucks in the hammer, dis
cus, and shot.
WESTERN GOLF DATES ARE
ANNOUNCED TO EVERYBODY
CHICAGO, Jan. 20.?Now everybody
knows all about the golf classics in
the Western Golf Association, for
they have been made public. The ama
teurs will play June 16-26, with the
Olympic team contewt on June 14. The
open tourney is booked for July 24-26,
while the youngsters will mingle Au
gust 13-15.
Sunset Hill Club, of St. Louis, will
have the amateur tourney, with the
open championship going to Mayfleld.
TRAIN AT TAMPA.
The world's champion Red Sox will
train at fftmpa, Fla., next spring,
leaving Hot Springs, Ark., after years
of training there.
Penny Ante
the BIG winner f> / V ax
going home Dj' JCCLfl I\>TlOtt
G05HI "THC5' IS
A Comely
NEiGndoRHOoD,
njot a cop
/w 5<Cr?T
Either
A maw
n(5 L(pt f>o
HIS HAWOS
Ev/EfcV Tf/M.t
Hfc. <3ro?s
OOT AT i
WICiht ^
- Afj AE. HERE
U^ITH AC.C Tms
vIACk. t
I shoulpa
Put it in; ^
MV <5HO{L. m
TiHC3 t3 \just
TH? IOuDa
That
H<Gh ujav M6.
J.IK6. *
a fELLOto
COULO ?E
MOft.OERED
AM' WO0OOV
WOULD kNflfi
<T A-TA(2
"THIS Toujaj
HAS CroT MO
Police
PftoreeTiow
at All
Copyright, 1919, International Features Service. Inc.
APPLE IS SUCCESS WITH
ATHLETES AT McKINLEY
Wilbur M. Apple, coach at the McKinley Manual Training School, is
beginning his second season with the Tech athletes. He is beginning to
produce victories and develop athletes. Tech's stock is on the boom.
Apple is directly responsible for the awakening of interest at Tech and
the rounding up of numbers of boys in football, basketball, track, and
swimming.
It is doubtful if any other athletic coach in the country has as dif
ficult a job as the Tech man who admits lie has excellent material.
Apple is at a loss to know where to develop his athletes, as he has no
gymnasium, no track, no swimming pool, and no playing field. Accord
ing to all accounts he is being ranked with the eighth wonder of the
world. ?
Apple I,and* Thtrr.
Up to the time Apple took charge at
Tech the Manuel Trainers had many
iifferent coaches. Several years ago
Jakey Roberts started basketball, and
finally got faculty permission to have
his team represent the school. In
track another student, Monroe Shee
lian, took charge and developed a
first-class team.
In football, Wayne Hart, IJaggy
Ellis, Cuppy Farmer, and others took
a hand in proceedings over different
years. In baseball Austin Howard,
Billy Martin, and others too numer
ous to mention, got a crack at the
Tech teams in coaching.
Just a year ago Wilbur M. Apple
blew in from the West and took
charge of Tech's athletic training and
physical development. He was con
fronted with a number of boys, nearly
'.)00, who were more than anxious to
get into the various lines of athletic
activities.
Put Tech had no field, no pool, no
gymnasium?nothing but boys and
Apple?so the new coach started
things going. At the outset he de
cided to get the youngsters interested
in athletics. The fourth-year boys were
given every opportunity to make
good, but Apple began to take stock
of the younger kids and encouraged
them in every way.
ItoaultM Soon Show.
Last winter Tech pat out a lirst-class
basketball team, although the boys
practiced at Epiphany gym and on
the "Y" floor. The second team was
given games and the first and second
year kids were offered a chance to
play.
Tech's track team took a sudden
boom, and Apple succeeded in putting
out by spring one of the best all
around teams ever developed here. The
Manual Trainers came through to a
win in the high school meet and won
their feature relay race at Philadel
phia.
The baseball team, composed of sec
ond and third year players, won sec
ond is the titlo race. 11m freetrmen
came through for second place. In
swimming Tech got into the tank game
with a will an<J Tech athletes cap
tured three South Atlantic A_ A. U.
titles in Baltimore.
War Stopped Cane.
r
Tech would have had a first-class
football team la??t fall had it not been
for the war. Gurevich. Bosley, and
Moore went out to Maryland State and
speedily made good. Bosley, who had
another year at Tech. was the star of
the State team and was picked for
all-State honors.
The war took these lads away from
Tech and stopped the annual football
struggles in the high schools. With
the resumption of basketball Tech
came rapidly to the front. At the
start of the campaign Tech's basket
ers were not figured in the running.
Apple's team took the measure of
Kastern, Western and Central, and
tost by a single point in the Business
game recently.
The second team is a strong com
bination, while the freshmen are lead
ing that section of the floor campaign.
Swimming has started up at Tech.
with the use of the "Y" pool, and
Tech's tankers are expecting to be^in
a real campaign for the meets this
year.
Swear By Apple.
Tech's boys swear by Coach Apple He
has made a big hit at the school and
has begun not only to produce win
ning teams, but is getting Tech's boys
busy for physical training and de
velopment.
If Tech had a first-class athletic
plant there is no telilng just how far
the Manual Trainers would go. Apple
declares he is getting along with
what he has, but it isn't much when
po many boys could take part in ath
letics with a modern plant.
The Manual Trainers are expecting
to do great things in baseball and
track this spring. Basketball has
been unusually /successful so far.
The team has been well supported,
and has a chance to come through lor
a, tale win yet_
TEN YEARS AGO
IN SPORTS
Sixty championships were won
by members of the New York
Athletic Club in various contests
during: the year 190S.
Harvard and Princeton were
expecting to meet in football in
1(H)9. The annual rumor was
more persistent than ever when
it was said that the Crimson
would drop the Indians from their
Echcdulc.
Fat Nelfon came right out and
told James J. Jeffries that it
would be a crime for him to re
enter the ring. Nelson was the
first to advise the former title
holder that he could not come
back.
Hillman, Gissing. Porter. Bacon
and Mulligan said they would ap
pear here to run in the George
Washington indoor meet.
CLOSE GAMES PLAYED IN
SCHOOL LEAGUE SCHEDULE
There have been many close games
in this season's High School League
schedule. Business defeated Western
by 14 to 13 and hung a 17-to-lC defeat
on Tech. The Stenographers are
ahead of the circuit by two points.
Tech got in ahead of Central by a
15-to-J 1 score while Business repeated
on Central by 15 to 10. Te?'h handed
Western a ?4-to-20 defeat. Prac
tically all of the games have been de
cided in the last few minutes of play.
KEEPS SAME FIVE.
Goorge Washington has practically
tho same basketball team that took
the floor last season. White, Witt.
L.ansche and Underwood of last year's
team and Hodgkins are out. Sutliff
is a newcomer at forward.
WILL PLAY POLY.
Central High School, after winning
four straights last week, will .stack
up against the Baltimore Polytechnic
Institute team tomorrow. Poly re
cently defeated Tech by a "4 to -0
scor?.
STANTON COMES BACK.
Forrest Q. Stanton, one of the great
est athletes ever dev* loped at the
University of Virginia, recently paid
Charlottesville a visit. Stanton was
a lirst-class football, baseball, basket
ball, and track star.
MORROW WILL COACH
WASHINGTON. Pa., Jan. 20.?Pavid
C. Morrow will coach the W. and J.
eleven next fall If he can find time
from bis duties as city ?ngincer here.
LENGTH OF FLOOR LIKELY
TO CAUSE SPLIT ON GAME
Georgetown and Gallaudet may split on their game of February fc at
Kendall Green on acount of the sire of the floor. The Hill topper* vast
to be assured that the Kendall Green athletes can offer a floor of so Orient'
4
length and breadth to allow a first class contest Georgetown accepted the
February 5 date, which will be a big time at Kendall Green on account of
the Founder s Day celebration, at the same time John O'Reilly, George
town's coach, is somewhat concerned as to the adaptability of the Gallaudet
gymnasium for a floor contest.
"We accepted the date of February 5," says O'Reilly, because we were
assured that the gymnasium is big enough for all hands to get around in
it The only thing that prevented our playing at Gallaudet in past years
i was the small floor there."
All of which but paves the war l?r
the argument &a to the regulation
floor for basketball games. The rules
state that a floor 90 feet In length and
50 feet in width shall be a maximum
floor, and 60 feet in length and 35
feet in width shall be a minimum.
Few of the floors here satisfy these
conditions, many being too long for
their width and others too short, with
a width out of proportion to the short
length.
Gallaudet's floor comes under the
regulations and the Hilltoppers have
accepted the contest. Plans have been
completed for the Kendall Green con
test in connection with the celebra
tion. At the same time something in
teresting in the way of argument* can
be expected.
Unless all signs fail there will be
something doing In the scholastic
league before the curtain falls. One
month of basketball will be crowded
in before time is called and baseball
started.
Central appears to have come for
ward so rapidly that Business is seri
ously threatened. Tech and CentraL
Business and Central, and Tech and
Business still have battles to fight out.
Western may take a chip oft some
body's shoulder before the series is
finally settled.
At present Business is leading tne
league. The standing of the teams
follows:
Won. Lost. Pet. |
Business.......... 4 ? *'222 I
Technical......... 3 1
Central 2 2 -MO
Eastern - 1 3 -50
Hcstern.......... ? *
Tomorrow Business meets Western
and Technical engages the Easterners.
Both Eastern and Western are capable
of giving their opponents enough of
a battle to come through if the
games are at all close. A defeat for
Business would give Central its
looked for chance.
Gonzaga is expecting to play the
Georgetown Preps soon. There is a
lot of rivalry between the schools and
Gonzaga jumped into a 22 to 3 vic
tory in the first meeting. The schools
will be brought together later in the
month. .
Gonzaca has won eight games tn
a row so far and is leading all of
the scholastic quints. Business has
suffered two defeats in nine games.
Central has won five games and lost
four. The Tech lads have won Ave
battles and lost three. None of the
other schools appear to have claims
to title honors.
A suggestion has been made to
hook up the winning scholastic quint
in the High school league with the
leader *inong the independents,
Georgetown Preps, Gonzaga. St. Al
bans. Friends and the Y. M. a.
boys to be considered among the
dependent teams and the five high
schools as the leaguers.
Western is out in front In the
Freshman Basketball
three straight wins. The Tech lad
will visit Western on Friday while
Central will play the Easterners.
Tech has lost one game and Central
one. standing at a tie for second
place The series is causing consid
erable interest among the yearlings
who have come out for the teams in
droves.
Georgetown appears to have a team
which must be kept going to produce.
Some teams are able to work the
floor easily and count consistently.
Not so with the Hilltoppers, who must
Ke?p at top speed to score. In re
cent games Georgetown, with a con
siderable lead, looked like a bunch of
loaters when they attempted to take
things easy with opponents.
Coach O'Reilly tent in a couple of
good ones who speeded up the team
and Rot things moving again. Fees.
O'Connell, and Zazelle. with O'Brien
and Flavin, work smoothly when they
are going at their top speed. There
is no question but that the Hilitoppers
miss Bobby O'Eone and his "To me,
to me," which kept them on the hike.
SOME DIFFERENCE HERE.
When Georgetown Treps playetf
Westein the other day iJanahv, Up
Prep guard, who weighs 214 and
stands six feet one, was opposed to
Bresee, Western's forward, who stands
five feet six and weighs 112 pounds.
There wu itcv opposition
?
Exit "Brewer?" For
Milwaukee Bug*
Patrons of the Milwaukee dab
of the American Association an
conducting a campaign to re
name the "Brewers," now that
the manufacture of beer. Milwau
kee's leading industry, has prac
tically been buried. The team
has been called the "Brewera"
since joining the Association. The
"Badgers" is favored.
YALE WANTS EVERY
MAN TO GET A SEAT
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Jan. 20 Prat
Mather Abbott bas assumed charf* as
faculty coach of plans for the Tale
rowing campaign, and no talk is heard
of the return of Guy Nickalla, the
high-priced English coach who had
charge of the crews three years ago.
Prof. Abbott today outlined bis
theory of rowing as keeping as many
men on the squad and at rowing as is
possible. Instead of starting with a
good-sued squad and cutting it dawn,
he plans to constantly Increase it Ms
membership and interest. He sra.~*ad
registration with 163 and experts ta
have the list increased to several b<r?
dred before the close of the aeaaoa.
His maxim is "a seat in a. b -it tor
every man who reports."
Aside from Caut. Winter Mead e??JM
veterans have returned to college sad
registered with the crew aquad. Tb?
are:
W. Austin, 1919: L. G. Adam tM?t
J. McHenry, 1920; C. D. Mtrai?n. 193k
M. W. Borders. 1819; IX Vail, 191?i &
H Knox, 1920; M. Patterson. 19?0.
From the second crew three nns
bers?J. C. Campbell. 1919; D. H. da
Pont, 1920, and A. Meeks, 1930?tmm
registered.
The entire 1921 crew has >, 1 it n ?d.
including R. Carston. captain- BL
Hemingway, P. Benson. G. RorkefeW
ler. D. Driscoli. W. F. C. Kwlng. k.
Hare. J. S. Moulton. and H Ma'l
NAVY PLAYERS GRABOFF
TEN WINS DURING YEAH
ANNAPOLIS. Md, Jan. 20.?'Tbm
Navy team is likely to go through the
season with an unbroken strinr at
victories. Coach Lush has gottea
together a strong bunch at
players. Two Washington boye
from the Army and Navy Prepe
are making a strong bid for the regu
lar team. Bolton and Watters have
taken part in several contests thla
season.
The Navy will play Georgetown on
I Wednesday and will meet the Vnlrer
sity of Virginia team on Savurdat
afternoon. Both teams are expected
to give the Navy tossers a run far
their money.
.
ST. LOUIS GETS BARNES.
ST. LOUIS. Jan. 20.?James M
Barnes, last years open champion of'
the Western Golf Association and
wifiner of the pro title, has signed
with the Sunset Hill club of this city
as professional.
McGOORTY SIGNS UP.
LONDON, Jan. 20.--Eddie VrGooi-ty.
the American light heavyweight, will
meet Sergt. Harry Rolph. of Canada,
at the National Sporting Club, Feb
ruary 10.
shift Mcdonough.
Capt Tom Tracey. c. V. basketball
coach, has shifted McDonough from
his center position to forward. The
Brook landers failed to find a forwaid
to take the place of either Dcnoraa m

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