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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, June 30, 1919, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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THE WEATHER:
Fair tonight, tomorrow, and Wedne
ctty. Temperatare at 8 a. m., 57 degrees.
Normal temperatare for Jane 30 for the
last thirty yean, 76 degrees.
INAL
Edition
Published erery eveoinsr (lnclndlnr Sunday)
EnUred as second-class matter, at the
postofflce at WasDJncton, IX C
WASHINGTON, MONDAY EVEKtSG, JUNE 30. 19;L&:
(Mi Wall Street Prices
PRICE TWO CENTS.
NUMBER 11,211.
ARTHOUAKE
ITALY
-1T
IN
KILLS SCORES
1 H
4 H
UNDREDS GO
ALTIMORE
FOR IKE 0
mm
BALTIMORE, Jane SO, Sam
vel E. Dennis, TJ. S. District
Attorney, ruled today that
s&Ioors ia this dry may remain
open after midnight for the sale
ef 2.75 per cent beer and light
wines. He framed, howeTer, that
the Department of jRStice would
' prosecute anyone who sold
fecTerages containing more alco-
- Bel than the above prescribed
ameunt.
The Attorney General's office
today declared no authorization
aas gone ont permitting the sale
ef beer, and light -wines.
The Department of Justice has
not ruled on what constitutes in
tfcjpcatiag beverages, bat has
aaaoHBced Its intention of prose
mating for Tiolation of the war
tfate prohibition act
Traffic between Washington and
'Baltimore -was taxed to its utmost to-
dy aa thousands of devotees of Jo-
Tianans Akoholis journeyed tokthe
Maryland, metropolis to 'attenpfche
yn&&- tontghl .o&John BaTieyrorjrc
JLa-3Bads-leBcifctoQretodayrt
Trains, interurban cars, automoBiles,
everything on four wheels, is carry
ing men and women eager to take a
last fling at the celebration in Bal-
txmore tonight, when the nation-wide
' "prohibition law will mark the death
of King AIcohoL
Hare Forgotten AIL
Thirsty Washlngtonlans have for-J
OB
-gotten everything, the peace treaty,
the Bolshevik scare, even the Wil-lard-Dempsey
fight everything
and tonight they will give themselves
up to one last round of merriment.
It Is said that 20,000 people will
ieave Washington for Baltimore and
a .Annapolis today. The exoduB began
early. Thousands scrambled aboard
trains and trolleys bound for the
Monumental City, and the roads
they were black with moving automo
biles, all bound for the cafes and res
tanrants where, for the last time to
.nlsht. alcohol will flow like water.
Terminals were beginning to ret
crowded as early as 10 o'clock this
" morning, and after that there was no
Ilet-up. At the offices or tne w. a. ec
Jl. It was said tnat tne rusn. sucu ao
had not been experienced foa years,
was on at an early hour. The traffic.
it was said, was almost a third heav
ier than usual, with every indication
'of a steady Increase by nightfall.
One company put on extra tra'ns.
reporting its traffic 50 per cent above
normal. By nightfall the company
will double its schedule, running tars
at fifteen instead of thirty minute in
tervals. Trains Are Crowded.
At Union Station last night ten
(trains for Baltimore were scheduled
between 6 and 11:30. More, many
-gnore 0f them, are leaving this after-
noon and tonight.
Taxi companies are hiring addi
tional drivers for service after mid-
frilght. Hundreds of automobiles are
to be parked at Union Station to meet
trains returning from Baltimore.
Every available automobile was
pressed into service by those who are
unfortunate enough not to own a mo-
tor car. Autos, with the familiar suit
aes aboard, passed down the road
toward Baltimore in-an endless pro
fession since early morning. Every-
body who can possibly get away from
'Washington will be on deck in Balti
more tonight to help bury John Bar
leycorn.
And, amid the revelry attendant
vpon the last rites over the remains
of King Rum, many Washlngtonlans
x will find time and the opportunity to
tote a goodly supply of the fiery
staff back home In time to beat the
Jaw which goes into effect at the
(Stroke of twelve. It is said that
Washington, which has always been
well stocked up with rum, will have
now more than ever, and bootleggers
will have days of prosperity awaiting
them. The harvest they will reap
will be golden.
Police officials made no bones about
the situation today. They admitted
that Washington has been dry in
name only and that the "bone dry"
law, far from eliminating the alcohol
evil, has only served to increase the
price and made it harder to secure.
That's all. The police do not believe
that even after tomorrow bootlegging
will stop. It will not, they say.
'Washington is too well supplied with
the stuff against the arid days to
come for that. Bootlegging will go
on, and there you are.
And, if the worse comes to worst,
there are still drug stores and barber
shops and hair dressing establish-
(Cestraued on. Page 2, Column I.)
SEARCHED FOR RUM,
1 HE SUES FOR
$20,000
Eugene L. Eby, acting sergeant
of police, who arrested Clyde B.
Ambrose, formerly of the Depart
ment ol Justice, last Thursday at
the District line near RoclrrlUe,
Kd was named defendant In a suit
filed by the latter today la the Dis
trict Supreme Court for 20,000
damages for alleged false arrest.
Ambrose, represented by Attor
neys Hnrrken fc Hsrrell, alleges
that he and three other occupants
of an automobile running from
Frederick, Hi to this city, were
arrested by Eby when they refused
to permit him to inspect their suit
eases. They were taken to the po
lice station, where, after their
satchels were examined, they were
discharged.
Ambrose complains that his
rights as a citizen were Invaded by
the action of the police. He de
clares that Eby "without cause
and warrant or other process of
law" paced hint under arrest and
subjected hint to "revolting and
humiliating search and selxure of
his person and package."
my DRY WAVE
WILL PASS IN
While the "ultra" prohibitionists
in Congress plan to begin today a
fight to keep the nation dry under
tho war-time prohibition act from
this midnight until constitutional
1 prohibition becomes effective next
January 16, In the opinion of some
of the best informed persons in Wash
ington, wines, beer and whiskey will
be sold legally again at the end of
three months. It is believed demobi
lization will be completed within that
period.
The President's recent statement
leaves no doubt that unless some
Congressional action is taken to pre
vent him doing so, he will lift the
war-time ban as soon as he can de
clare demobilization completed. As
the law now stands the action would
remove the restriction on whiskey and
other hard liquors, as well as wines
and beers. There is nothing In the
war-time prohibition act to authorize
the President to differentiate between
intoxicants, the sale of which was
legal before the act becomes effective.
Drys Begin Fight Today.
As the first step in the new dry
campaign. Congressman Charles H.
Randall of California intdoduced in
the House this afternoon an emerg
ency peace measure to prohibit
removal from bond or transportation
in interstate commerce any of the
70,000,000 gallons of distilled spirit
now stored between the date of tho
President's proclamation and the date
of constitutional prohibition.
The prohibitionists believe this
plan will prevent a respite for the
wets, because the stock of beer prob
ably will be exhausted by that time,
(Continued on Page 2, Column 5.)
E
I
LONDON, June 30. Monitors bom
barded the Soviet hcadauarters in
Budapest Sunday, said a Geneva dis
patch to the Central News. Gallows
were erected in the public parks and
leaders of the revolt against the
Soviet government were publicly exe
cuted.
350,000 SAILED
FOR U. S. IN JUNE
All records for transporting troops
between France and the United
States were broken during June.
the army estimated today, when ap
proximately 350,000 men sailed for
the United States.
This topped the May performance
also a record for transporting troops
flthftr from or (n tVi TTnlt4 fitnto,
by 20,000.
" 4te S Ya&-srIesWP)feB? V
.'.-ffSiTi SB Mnfi ITJlfl .el
nmxBr
RIIDAP
ST SOME
OPPONENTS HANGED
YANK DIES OF
WOUNDS A
WIFE
DIVORCE S
SYRACUSE, N. Y., June 30, The
wounded pride of Mrs. Minnie Fulton
Love in the belief her soldier hus
band, a Washington boy, had allowed
a New York chorus girl to supplant
her in his&eart, has been turned
into deepjjrief by learning she is a
widow.
Last week through her attorney,
Mrs. Love had sent to New York city
a summons and complaint in an ao
tion for absolute- divorce, asking for
her freedom from the man who had
wooed and won her just before he
sailed for France.
They were married in July, 1917,
and shortly afterward Love depart
ed with the Second Division. He
fought at the Argorme and Chateau
Thierry, and was wounded and sent
to a as hospital, finally being sent
home as sv casual on December 26
last.
Sent To Walter Reed.
He was transferred from camp to
the Walter Hoed" Hospital, Washag
ton, and wrote'4iIs wife .many', letters.
In some of "'them ha told, her of the
pretty, chor&s .girls from a New. Tork
muajcat,comeay company wiajmne
&&&&& A
.
Try Eebraary.lie.w'aa. tUsehJftjT-ritl'aAd
-T fcs&ed fas -vrtte td come to Washing
ton to live. He told her he would
be able to secure an excellent Gov
ernment position.
Disposing of her belongings, Mrs.
Lore hastened to Washington, fane
was directed to an apartment house
in a quiet street, and 'when she reach
ed txrere was informed Mr. Love was
not at home, but that she could see
"Mrs. Love" if she wished.
Returning to Syracuse, the wife
wrote to her husband that she never
wanted to see him again and that
she was about to bring suit for di
vorce. He wrote and pleaded for
forgiveness, but she was obdurate.
Saturday Mrs. Love received her no
tice from the War Department toll
ing her her husband died as the re
sult of Injuries suffered in ac
tion, and that she was entitled to
compensation for his death.
50-50 PUN SAVED
-a-
The half-and-half plan of appro
priations for the District was saved
at the last moment today when tie
House conferees on the District bill,
after a persistent deadlock, yielded
flnally in favor of it.
As a compromise, the Senate con
ferees receded on the Kellar amend
ment. The Kellar amendment pro
vides the payment of $3,820 to Thomas
W. and Alice V. Keller for ground
taken and damages on account of
condemnation proceedings some years
ago. The proceedings were the rs
sult of certain street improvements
made by the District.
The agreement was r.eached at a
final conference between the two
houses shortly after noon today.
Rather than delay action on the Dis
trict bill, which would prove fatal,
the House conferees yielded their op
position to the half-and-half. The
conference report will be submitted
to the House later today for final ac
tion. It is understood the House will
agreed to the half-and-half plan as
the only alternative. The conference
report then will go to the Senate
which will adopt it immediately.
ECIS1
MOIST HIS CAR
An undecided mind proved costly to
H. M. Saks, of 1239 Twenty-eighth
street northwest, today when he drove
his brand new $1,400 car between two
street cars running east and west
on Pennsylvania avenue. Mr. Saks
at first intended parking his automo
bile next to the tracks between
Twelfth and Thirteenth streets north
west: then changed his mind, and
started across the tracks, In order to
S
BIN
I
ASH IEYEDS
i
ON COSTS
park on the other side. He saw car
No. 705 coming east, but car No. 6S0
going west he did not see. The east
bound car struck him and he was
pinned between the two. Though he
escaped injury the auto was demol
ished. He bought It only six days
ago,
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MARY PICKFORD.
BOSTON, June 30. Mary Pickford
Is to retire, according to rTermother.
"Only nine more pictures and Mary
will settle down to enjoy the fruits
of her hard-earned savings" Is the way
Mrs. Charlotte Pickford puts it, "It
will take a number of months more
WHITE UN
Police are searching today for a
young negro who attacked and rob
bed Mrs. Bessie Gleason, thirty-six
years old, of 14 Nicholson street
northwest, in Rays Woods, between
Blaire road and Nicholson street,
early this morning.
Mrs. Gleason was' walking through
the woods to the car line from her
home when the negro, who is de
scribed as being five feet two or three
inches in height, thick set, very dark
skin, and wearing a blue serge suit,
approached her. He spoke to her, and
Mrs. Gleason, fearing an attack, of
fered him her purse if he would let
her go.
He refused, saying, "I'll get that
later." He then struck her over the
head with a club, rendering her un
conscious. Following his attack the negro
took her black leather purse, which
contained one J20 billr some change
and a door key.
When Mrs. Gleason regained con
sciousness she went to the home of a
neighbor who called tip the police.
It was the opinion of the police
that the assailant came to the city
on a Takoma Park car. They say the
man was a rough looking sort of indi
vidul. Ho wore a striped shirt and
a cap pulled over his eyes.
Mrs. Gleason's husband is employed
in the navy yard. He was notified by
the police.
i
BY GREEK TROOPS
ATHENS, via London, June 30.
Several clashes have taken place be
tween Turkish and Greek troops in
the region of Smyrna in which tne
former were dispersed, it was of
ficially announced today.
The Turks are reported to have
concentrated 40,000 soldiers in the vi
cinity of Smyrna.
STAB LAUNDBT'S $10,000 KQDIPMENT.
Insures your shirts and collars comlnt back
right, Judgo for yourself. Adrt,
IS ATTACKED
BY NEGRO
URKS ARE ROUTED
m
.lll i.li,VJir
dLf JB.V.?! M.W
to complete the present pictures, and
then Mary is going to enjoy life, as I
have entreated her for a long time
to do. ,
"She has received free leave to
spend all the money she likes to
make the new productions success
ful." ROOT WARPED
ON LEAGUE,
SAYS GERRY
Criticising former Senator Root for
changing his position on Article X of
the League of Nations covenant, Sen
atory Gerry of Rhode Island, in a
speech to the Senate today declared
IToot's judgment seems to have been
warped by partisan bias.
"In March," said Gerry, ''Root was
willing to support Article X for a
flve-year period, and in June he is
not willing to support it at all. I
cannot forego the thought that when
he speaks in favor of the Knox reso
lution the partisan purpose of which
is so apparent, his loyalty to his own
party may have biased his Judgment.
"Such a reservation as he suggests
regarding Article X would mean that
we reject the treaty."
All objections raised by league
critics are in Gerry's opinion wholly
without foundation, he said.
Says U. S. Is Europe's nope.
Reviewing his recent -trip through
the war areas, Gerry said that if pros
perity is to be restored to Europe,
"America, which Is looked to as the
main hope, must furnish credits and
raw materials."
Prance and England fought through
the war in the belief that "the days
of despotism would be ended forever,
and the days of right and Justice to
the average man must come," Gerry
said,
"It Is this spirit that is the founda
tion of the support President Wilson
has received for his league of nations.
The plain people of Europe feel he is
their spokesman.
Sees Crisis At Hand.
"We are at a crisis, thoughful men
are not only thinking what the league
will accomplish, but of what will hap
pen if it is not created. If there be
no league, what is to prevent Ger
many from dominating Russia?
"I believe the league contains pro
visions absolutely essential to the
safety of our country and the sus
taining of civilization."
DEATH FOR SHIPPING BOMBS.
Death penalty for any person con
victed of sending bombs on Infernal
machines in interstate commerce is
provided In a bill Introduced in the
Senate today by Sefiator King or Utah,
'. "T i ' ' ' ' ' '
ffiino
BE BAQK Al
SISH ON
N E X T M G N D
ByjdBtf EDWlKfegN. J ft
Kernatlonal NewsTServic; . . w '
rEN.JlOUTE TQ T0BESHtFE3D-
s?patks with pp'P,.s'mp.Niv,'anTi.
rr f- ( fit
SON .0 BOARDS THRr S,
GEORGE WASHINGTON, June -30;
-(By Wireless to New Yprk) Pres
idnt Wilson, who sailed fr4Bres
yesterday, afternoon, is veryjared af
a rerolt of his lonfe and arauonk
with the results of his work-in Paris,
He plans to" devote the greafcr poi&
tioTi of the hbmeward va8fe',to'rest-c
irig. He will be backV'at lis desK
next Monda J ' v V ".
SL T?- . t l .."
. xne ixesiant is prewariijg'o ad
dress' Congress- reviewing. "At ha
oVM T-1 - it. j. '
taken place since the jeace .discus--
I
m
sions opened Almost ittHiediately ejr beenset upon our fellowship
his arrival jn ashigton; r I &. jh 8eal o0 -
jPreWast' thtif morning. He devJww
cuosiuafiia usie xq answering ine
cordial ielicltAtionsvfr(i?Jh rulers
3Df . varioOBufjibeaaVcbunrTlea aa.
.z ". - r r t. r ." - '
'6th
fS3l3Ei.FilIi?
godspeed.
, It fS TTVrfr! 4fcn.t tti PrmtX
v ..: ." v. - -""-
wiu reacn new xorK narbor next
Monday, making the voyage from
Brest in eight days. According to
present plans he will land at Hobo
ken and immediately board & special
train for Washington. He will ad
dress a joint session of Congress
upon his arrival there.
The copy of the treaty which Pres
ident Wilson is taking with him con
tains nothing especial. Printed upon
ordinary book paper are the final
terms, along with them the original
terms so that they can be compared
and In order that the correctness
can not be questioned.
Stand Pat on Dalmatia.
American peace commissioners re
maining behind will not recede from
the position taken upon the Dal
matian question.
(The Dalmatian question involves
territory upon the Adriatic claimed
by both the Italians and the Jugo
slavs). Secretary Lansing has been directed
to handle the American side of the
negotiations and he will keep the
President posted upon all develop
ments. It is generally expected that
a way out of the difficulty flnally
(Continued on Page 2, Column C.)
NEW YORK, June 30. The first
American troops who served in north
ern Russia to return came home today
aboard the transport Von Steuben by
way of Brest, which brought 2,028 vet
erans, including forty-six officers and
1,405 men of the 339th infantry.
The troops were under command of
Maj. Joseph Brooks Nichols, of De
troit, Mich., who wore the British dis
tinguished service cross, the French
war cross and the French Legion of
Honor decoration. Among them was
Company I, which was named by Gen
eral March as the unit which refused
to return to the front in the Archangel
sector.
R.R. DEFiCIENCY BILL
President Wilson, aboard the
steamship George Washington, today
signed the railroad deficiency bill
and the Indian appropriation bill, ac
cording to advices received by Secre
tary Tumulty. It was stated that
these bills were dispatched aboard
the steamer Great Northern, which
was ordered to meet the George
Washington.
The two vessels met at sea at 8 a
m., Greenwich time today. The bills
were taken aboard the George Wash
ington and received the President's
signature, the wireless advices said.
TAKE BEIX-ANS BEFORE HEALS and
see how one good digestion makes you feeL
Advt.
T TROOPS BNX
FROM
ARCHANGEL
PRESIDENT SGNS
PEACE GREETINGS
SENT TO
BY
CROWNED RULERS
,OF 6EEAT BEITAIN,,
SPAIN, AND JAPAN
tf & jg
, PARIS June 30. The following
congratulatory messages on the sign
ing: of peace, exchanged between
-t-RresIdent Wilson and the Kings ,'of
Great Britain anospam ana the jsm
Bior of Japans were made, public
IJhfrre tOdy ?M t
'Front Kng-qeorge to Prearfdetit
iwilson::. .,
I.- In thU. gloriou Hour, whethe
f SSlhSSm ""
. aV a time wheSortune. seem-
ed to Jrown and the issues nf the
I5gSpS.SSSt Z
hand, of fellowship to those who,
I ?n &'$ ot th& ocean, were
rtshter li our Hearts; -and a- new
SETSL. UB!LZ? JS
. sdoniess of -deed robiv done.
t MrV'PresIdent.. on: th6 day one
' or- onx. nappies tnongnrs is tnat
1 -the Aperlcart un& British peoples,
- brothers In arms; will continue
$ 5?r.e.r DO en fn peace.
i Unlt before by language and,
p tinnMik mmi. ,? -
ex;
hfch have been ettalned-b the
.-present acenna the new tlee
SS?SrSS,l-SS?.Sf! ''
- " -..- .w..ww .4 WW.
"We are on the eve of realising
more than we could realize at the
time the real objects of the great
war. The free peoples of the
world, united to defeat the ene-y
mies of liberty and justice, now
through their representatives,
have wrought out a plan by which
they remain united in a free part
nership of intimate council to pro
mote the cause of justice and of
freedom through the beneficent
processes of peace and liberal
policy.
"It is within the choice at
thoughtful men of every nation to
enrich the peace by their council.
I am happy to echo your greetings
at this momentous time of re
newed vision and confident hope.
"WOODROW WILSON."
From Japanese Rnler.
Emperor of Japan to the President:
"It gives me heartfelt pleasure
to congratulate you and the great
friendly people whose First Mag
istrate you are on the 'definite
termination of the war in which
you and they did so much to
achieve victory. Accept my warm
est felicitations on this magnifi
cent triumph, which I firmly be
lieve is the forerunner of a great
new era of the world's history,
eclipsing all that has gone before
in the general diffusion of hap
piness and security.
"YOSHIHITO."
The -President's reply:
"Your majesty's message of
felicitations is received with the
greatest gratification. It has
been a pleasure to co-operate
with the very able representa
tives of Japan in deyeloping the
terms of peace which inevitably
involved the interests of the
whole world.
"I believe with your majesty
(Continued on Page 2, Column 3.)
A record of all railroad passes,
whether for transportation or for
sleeping or dining car service, was
asked of the Railroad Administration
today in a resolution introduced by
Senator Newberry. Michigan, Newber
ry's resolution asked that the names
of all pass holders be given, and a
reason assigned for each pass.
YAISINFIGHTAT
T
BREST, June 30. As the result of
a brawl between American and French
(marines, in which several Frenchmen
were wounaeu, me streets ot jsreoi
were placed under military control
today.
French civilians joined In the tlht
and stoned and hit many Americans.
Hotels inhabited by Americans were
besieged.
Military police fired their revolvers
Into the air as a means of clearing
up tho streets.
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MAY PROBE PASSES
GIVEN BYR.R. BOARD
WITH POILUS WEATHER BLOCKS
R
FLORENCE I
MED By 15
SHOCKS, OL
CITY IN RUIN.
.- LONDON, JaoMfft, Oseta
ared and $f f jpersaB rece
killed at reaee aad Bsa,,
Italy, intsseeessisB ef. eth
quakes. last night, aeeerduqf te
an Exchange Telegraph Cm
paay dispatch frombse Mfary.
At Yecchja. Italy. 199 BeHMs
were killed, the dispatch wSi.
It added .that several
were is JHres" in the three eitke;
' Shocks continaed throtiglmrt tlW
night.
(By Exelasive Gable to the J. jf, bV3)(sb
B Seeelsv 3BSmaS 1&
FLORENCE, jjpfo? JtefA
severe earthqaakT roekcd?1emee
and the aarroundisf: JwatrVryess
day. , ..
- FifteSdistdsd:' shocks' wan ieft,
llastin.rcTO 5 o'cokk in the mofa-
etown has beea redcad
to
are reported dead- STftl
weredexaolishevRe'taT
iatketavaged-' a- district exeatof
i.wuiJL:iuAcuv.c tu AMuy&iMkr t
Trains are bringing assistance aad
PIies " Bologna, Era-
. J . ., .
iia, iuiu surruunuing ciues.
The earthquake carried, en its
work of destruction throughout Tus
cany. At Rergo San Lorenzo, fif
teen miles' from here, a church col
lapsed and went tumbling dowa the
side of a mountain.
The railway station at Rufina and
a number of houses were destroyed
The whole region of Mugello has
been shaken by the earthquake, but
telegraphic communication has been
interrupted, and it is impossible to
obtain any accurate information re
garding loss of life or property.
Population of 200,000.
About one-quarter of the city of
Florence, which has a population of
more than 200,000. lives in' he old
quarter of the town on the west bank
of the River Arno, which is reported
to have been leveled by the earth
quake. The building, including mary
of the historic edifices of Europe,
were built in the Middle Ages- The
streets of the old quarter radlata
from central squares. They are
mostly narrow and winding and lined
with rickety buildings centuries Old,
which have continued to serve as
dwelling places for the poorer classes.
The most famous structure In the
old quarter is the Palazzo PlttL n
imposing palace built In 1440 and oc
cupied by the Kin? of Italy on his
visits to Florence. It contains many
wonderful art treasures. The Santa
Maria del Carmine Church, a Car
melite monastery, rebuilt in 1782 aft r
a disastrous fire; the Museum' of
Natural Science, and St. Mark's
Church are all located In the old
quarter.
WORST EARTHQUAKE IN
NORTH ITALY SINCE 1895;
SHOCK EXTENDS MILES
ROME, June 30. The earthquake
that rocked northern Italy Sunday
has resulted in the worst disaster
since 1895.
Details aro lacking. Communi
cation between Rome and the
stricken districts has been inter
rupted, but victims are reported in
Dicomino (eighteen miles of Flor
ence) and Dargosanlorendo.
The shocks were felt at Pisa.
Venice, and elsewhere throughout
northern Italy.
The first dispatch telling of tJKe
earthquake disaster came direct
from Florence, where apparently
there has been the greatest Idas of
life. The dispatches were trans
mitted through Milan.
NEW OCEAN FLIGHT
ST. JOHNS. N. F.. June 30. Fog
and high winds, which were prevail
ing this morning, made it practically
certain that the Handley-Page air
plane could not start on a trans-Atlantic
flight this evening. If condi
tions improve the machine may
away tomorrow from Harbor Grac

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