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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, July 22, 1919, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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FINAL1
EDITION
THE WEATHER:
Showers probably tonight and tomorrow,
followed by doady weather.
Temperature at 8 a. m., 72 degrees.
Normal temperature for Jury 22 for the
last thirty years, 77 degrees.
... -,- Published erery erenlnr (Including Sunday)
WASHINGTON, TUESDAY EVENING, JULY 22, 1919.
dosing Wall Street Prices PRICE TWO CENTS.
TVTTTM !' K I I 'Af? Bntra as cona-ciai rwnr. mo
.JJ. UilXOJUA" --"
pftgtofA.ee at Washington. P. C
, CLOSED
TREET
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ARE
TO CHECK RIOTING
PEACE TREATY
S RATIFIED BY
BRITISHHOUSE
OF HON
T '
LONDON, July 22. Great
t Britain has placed its approval on
i the treaty with Germany.
The bill recommending its ratifi
cation was passed last night by the
House of Commons on its third
leading by a vote of 163 to 4.
An attempt to defeat the treaty
on the basis of the Irish question,
injected by Joseph Devlin, Na
tionalist irom Belfast, was Voted
down by the house. Devlin proposed
cfhe treaty be rejected because of
Premier Lloyd George's Irish
policy.
Premier Despairs.
Replying to Devlin's demand for a
plebiscite In 'Ireland, the premier de
clared he had .despaired of any settle
ment .of the Irish Question Am ti 1 the
Irish people agreed among themselves.
He said' the government had tried al
ready to supply the principle of self
determination by means of the Irish
convention, out that the Nationalists
were divided. The premier declared
that Ulster, moreover, did not want
self-determination.
rjoyd George pointed out that Ire
land was not one nation in race, re
ligion, temperament, or anything con
stituting the essentials of a nation.
Sir Donald MacLean. opening the
treaty debate, urged the trial of the
ex-Kaiser in a neutral country.
PRESIDENT, BETTER,
RESUMES G. 0. P.
CONFERENCES
President Wilson today re
sumed his conferences with Re
publican Senators, postponed yes
terday when he was confined to
his bed with an attack of intestine
trouble.
The President may, however,
cancel appointments scheduled
for this afternoon and rest
"The President is getting along
as well as can be expected," said
Dr. Qary T. Grayson, his physi
cian, "He is still weak, however.
Weather conditions are against
him, but he is responding to his
treatment.
"The President will fill his ear
lier engagements, but may decide
to rest this afternoon if they tire
him."
Senator Edge of New Jersey.,
Republican, was the first caller
today. The President discussed
the treaty and league covenant
with him.
N
EN1ED ENVOY
NNHMIY
The Senate Foreign Relations Com
mittee today refused President Wil
son's request for approval of his ap
pointment of a provisional American
member of the allied reparations com
mission. The committee stood eight
to seven.
By that vote it substituted a reso
"What right have we to assume that ! luUon br Senator Knox for one pre
any neutral country desires to be the
scene of such a trial?" the premier
asked.
The allies had confidence, he said,
that whoever was put on trial in Great
Britain "he would receive a trial equal
to the highest traditions of the Brit
ish nation."
The ratification of the Anglo
French treaty also was up for con
sideration. The treaty was read the
third time without objection.
ASTIC DRY
LL PASSED
BY THE HOUSE
The House today gave final ap
proval to the national prohibition act,
providing for enforcement of both
war-time and constitutional prohibi
tion. The final rote came after a motion
to recommit the bill and substitute a
much more liberal one. offered by
Congressman Igoe, Missouri, was de
feated by a vote of 136 to 253.
The final vote on the prohibition
bill was 287 for, 101 against, and 3
present.
ENTHUSIASTIC WELCOMES
GREET PESSOA ON RETURN
sented yesterday by Senator Williams,
granting the approval asked by
President Wilson.
The Knox substitute not only with
held approval of the appointment,
but in effect denied President Wil
son's right to make the appointment
until the treaty has been ratified.
Knox's resolution stated that "It
Is the judgment of the committee
that until the proposed treaty is rati
fied in accordance with its terms, no
power exists to execute any of Its
provisions, either provisionally or
otherwise
fcenators Lodge. Brandegee. Fall.
Knox. Harding. Johnson of California,
New, and Moses, all Republicans, voted
for the Knox substitute, and Senators
.Mccumber. Republican, and Hitch
cock. Williams, Swanson. Pomerene,
Smith of Arizona, and Pittman vntH
I against it.
i
BULGARIAN TREATY
RIO JANEI . Juij . Rio gave
fexpression to all 'U Kfctta enthusiasm
when the Art battleship Idaho,
carrying PrMt-et Pessoa an
chored in the nwor We shortly be
fore midnight.
Pessoa's inawruriHie probably will
take place Jl J6.
.
President's Calltrs Today
10 a. ra. Seiater Walter E. Edge
of New Jertrjv
12 m. Tfcemas Nln Page, United
States ambassador to Italy.
2 p. m, eral Haldeman.
2:16 p. -i -aatr William M. Cal
der of New xk.
3 p. m. Sel ter A. B. Cummins of
Iowa. !
4 p. rj Cfngrsman William A.
Ayres of Ka. .
OP TO PRESIDENT
PARIS, July 2. Henry White, of
the American peace delegation, it was
learned today, has cabled President
Wilson, asking specific instruction as
to whether America should sign the
peace treaty with Bulgaria.
German experts on merchant ship
ping, chemicals and dyes and repre
sentatives of other industries are
expected at Versailles this week for
discussion of the export problem.
Austrian newspapers protPst vig
orously against the reparation and
financial terms of the peace treaty.
Keeping Up With
The Times
A'FACT A DAY
Mr. Longcope, Manager
Classified Advertising, re
ports 412 competitors in
response to the offer of a
modest prize for the best
limerick description of the
merits of The Times clas
sified advertising columns.
Who will be the first mer
chant to give the Wash
ington poets a chance to
make his store the subject
of their interest?
Map Showing the Zones Where Last Night's Rioting Occurred
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MA
M LAW ffi
LOIN OFFERS
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7
Six spot, m the city where rioting was hottest last night Al
though there were other smaller disturbances in other parts of the
city, the largest crowds and the bloodiest fights occurred at these
locations. The six zones are: No. 1, in the vicinity of Seventh and
T streets northwest; No. 2, Eleventh and U streets northwest; No.
3, Fourth street between M and N streets northwest; No. 4, Four
teenth and Florida avenue; No. 5, Vermont avenue and L streets,
and No. 6. the immediate vicinity of 220 G street northwest. At
the last spot Detective Sergeant Wilson met his death.
(M ASKS PROB
J
E
OF DISTRICT POLICE
A sweeping Investigation of the
"police and hieher officials" of the
District to place the blame for the re
cent wave of crime and disorders that
have followed is provided in the reso
lutlon introduced in the House today
py Congressman Frank Clark of
Florida.
Mr. Clark will urge that the House
Rules Committee take speedy action
on the resolution and that an imme
diate investigation be started.
110,000 JUST TSYTSSTZD IN SPECTAI
hirt and collar jujpmnt by Star Lud
4ry to Inpir yoa satUiacUoa-nAdrt.
Commissioners Appeal to AH
With the police arrangements to be made tonight,
if the authorities can have the co-operation and assist
ance of law-abiding citizens, the situation will be kept
in hand.
At no time last night was the city at the mercy
of the mob. The violence which occurred was sporadic
in character and most of the shootings and other out
rages took place where small crowds or no crowds at
all were gathered. The large crowds, and what might
properly be termed mobs, were dispersed by the police
(Continued on Page Eleven, Column Seven,) .
iee
r-A4Tt.
Latest developments in the race riot situation are:
The Commissioners decide' against asking Presi
dent Wilson to institute martial law in the city:
Congressman Emerson of Ohio introduces reso
lution asking the President to declare martial law.
Congressman Vale of Colorado also introduced a
resolution calling on the President to declare martial
law to "preserve the dignity of the Government of
the Onited States."
The Police Department will increase patrols of
soldiers and marines, add to the reserves, in each pre
cinct, and close the streets to vehicle traffic in troubled
zones.' - - ,
..There wfll be'nomartfal liwitonlght ' r;t
Washington' turns grimly to1rer own resources iir
the task of stamping out the race conflict The slender
police forces of the Capital are to be re-enforced by ad
ditional soldiery, and the Commissioners, after a. con
ference with Major Pullman and army officials, are con
fident they can control the situation.
President Wilson alone can declare martial law, and
no appeal has been made to him to do so. He will not
act without representations from the War Department
and the District Commissioners.
The city, awakening with blood-shot eyes to review
its night of terror, and wondering whether it has Rus
sianized its reputation, wants the sternest measures, but
citizens generally express confidence m the CommlsSloners,
action.
Whites and Blacks Warned.
If tonight turns red and rioting flares up again, ten
it is recognized that Washington has no recourse but fq
turn itself over to the military authorities and endure a
taste of real war. Both whites and blacks are warned of
the consequences that will ensue if the streets are crowded
tonight and another blood orgy is staged.
After the most weird and wicked night in its history,
the Nation's Capital has been brought to realize that drastic
steps must be taken if its vaunted boast of being "the
best governed city in the world" is not to become a by
word.
War Department officials will see to it that bands of
marines do not organize to avenge the shooting of three,
of their "buddies" last night, and all mobs will be dispersed
by the police, who have been given instruction to take
whatever action their best judgment dictates in enforcing
their authority.
Curiosity Seekers Are Barred.
Persons parading the downtenvn streets tonight 'with
out apparent destinations are likely to find their activities
considerably curtailed by the police, and mere cariosity
seekers "will not be tolerated.
District affairs are to be given a thorough airing in
Congress as the result of the tragedy, and it is certain that
responsibility for the present inadequate condition of the,
police force will be traced to its source.
So far as rioting was concerned, the morning and early
afternoon passed without incident, and there were no addV
tions to the death roll, although the list of the mindr
wounded increased considerably. fc
Sorrow over the murder of Detective Harry Wilson
was general throughout the city today, and at the District
Buildine his loss will be keenly felt, for he was one of the.
most efficient detectives in the city.
Major Pullman sent a request to the police of all neigh
boring towns and cities that they bar the sale of firearms
and ammunition for a time, in view of the Washington
situation.
Another outrage by a negro on a young woman was
reported from Capitol Heights, Prince George's .county,
Md., where Mrs. H. Nightingale, while returning from the
"movies" shortly after 9 o'clock last night, was attacked
how aa Booddiauon makes you fei.jw a black TpftTi and fought hi off after a hard struggle,
OFEERS BILL FOR
D. CI CROW LAW
A Jim Crow car law for the Dis
trict of Columbia is provided in a
bill introduced in the Senate today
by Senator Harrison of Mississippi.
It Is similar to a bill Introduced by
Mr. Harrison in the House in the Sixty-second
Congress. The bill was re
ferred to the District Committee.
TAKE nEIX-ANS BEVOBE MBAES and
P1

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