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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, September 11, 1919, FINAL EDITION, Image 11

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026749/1919-09-11/ed-1/seq-11/

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THE" VABHlKCaPON ' T13VEES, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER "11. 1019.'
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1
goers and Film Fans
MRS. WIGGS
15 YEARS AGO
When the Garrick Players revived
PUTS. Wigffa of the Cabbage Patch"
fe.t the Shubert-Garrlck Theater last
Sunday evening, the management lit
jtla dreamed that in the audience
Vould be a veteran theatergoer who
v "was a first-nighter when the play
Vaa originally produced in New York
pome fifteen years ago. So enthused
dfd this gentleman, now a resident of
Washington, become over the inter
pretation of the various roles that he
took the trouble to write the manage
ment a letter, in which he compared
the three principal roles as -enacted
by the Garrick Players with the same
roles as played in the original pro
duction. His letter follows, in part:
Manager. Shubert-Garrick Theater,
Washington, D. C.
Dear sir: I want to take this op
portunity of thanking you for an
evening of exceptional entertainment
In your revival of "Mrs. Wiggs of the
Cabbage Patch." I attended the pre
mier, performance in New York some
t fifteen years ago, and although for
some years past I have not been a
regular theater patron, . I could not
miss the opportunity of going to your
cozy playhouse Sunday evening, to
once more witness what I deem one
of the classics of the stage.
Right here I want to compliment
you upon the remarkably fine char
acterizations which Mr. Foxe. Mrs.
Martin, and Miss Huntingon gave. In
the role of Stubbins I believe Mr.
Foxe gets a great deal more out of
the part than did William Hodge.
Mrs. Martin, as the sympathetic
and philosophical Mrs. Wiggs, is, to
my notion, vastly ahead of Madge
Carr Cook, while Miss Huntington
(who, by the way, is an unusually
good character woman) to my notion
is fully the equal of Helen Lowell,
who originally played the part of
Miss Hazy.
Perhaps it is because of the time
that haB elapsed ' since I saw the
play, and perhaps my ideas of philo
sophy have broadened, nevertheless
I found many sweet truths in the al
most poetical lines of Mrs. Wiggs, and
I want to say that, if such a thing be
possible, I can honestly say that your
presentation of the play has taken
five -years of worry and care off my
age-laden shoulders.
AN OLD TIMER.
AMUSEMENTS
I
AMUSEMENTS
gniuiniiiniTiirniiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiirTiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiity
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TALL STAR HAS
HIS JROUBLES
LOEWS
11 1
PALACE COLUMBIA
ls
-THEATERS;
LAST 3 DAYS
OF THE SMASHING, SPECTACULAR HIT
DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS
IN
'HIS MAJESTY, THE AMERICAN'
JEXTSA. JLDDED VEA.TVKB
Ftrrt Timet at TersMng Xonectmimf &
2Tew TerJt deception.
U
infn'fmiiFnmiinrTininirmTjfiJFiTTinunfiNfifnffffinrFffnnfnfiifr
COMING LOEW ATTRACTIONS
LOEWS
PALACE
THEATER
-BEGTETSmG SU2TDAY-ALL 2fEXT WEEK-
ELSIE
IK JL POWKHKUL. -ADAPTATION OP THE
FAMOUS STAGE SUCCESS,
"THE WITNESS FOR
THE DEFENSE"
I w.
KX'l'KM -ajjirtaJ ATTRACTION
UNCLE TOM WITHOUT THE CABIN"
. A -Zfocfc Seasett Jjaugh, Siot Featuring
XEHT VVHiflH A2ED CHARLIE COKKXET
IX3EWS
THEATER
COLUMBIA
BEQEUKIEG-SU2TDAYF0UB DATS
THE 13 CHAIR"
By BAYARD VEILLER
' KEATDRING
CBB6HT0M HflLE YVOME DELVA
WITH
Bare KeDermett-rIsrle Sbotwell Chrlxtlne Mayo
ft
STRIKINGLY SUPPLEMENTED
With a big array of Musical and Cinema
Foatuves of the first rank. Comedy Heirs
Futures Mocdhez.
J
Everybody in Town KNOWS
Greater Penn Gardens
Penna Ave. at 21st,
D-A-N-C-l-N-G
On Marble and Glass Over Electric Lights to 2 of .
Thomas' Jardin Jazz Bands
in the
World's Most Beautiful Gardens
WEEK NIGHTS 8:30 TO 12
One admission to all. No extras.
My preconceived notions about pic
tures and picture people are always
receiving a jolt. I had, for ins'tance.
always believed tjbat if a man were
tall he had all the best of it in the
film world. Isn't it the athletic six
footers like Douglas Fairbanks. Wil
liam Russell, and Wallace Reid, whom
all the girls admire so?
And don't they always enfold the
beautiful leading lady into their man
ly arms at the final fade-out and
live happily ever afterward? Now
comes Thomas, Melghan, hero of the
wonderful new. Paramount-Artcraft
super production, "The Miracle Man,"
which is being shown at Moore's Gar
den Theater this week, and asserts
that height is not always without its
disadvantages. Mr. Melghan is six
foot one and knows whereof he
speaks.
Perhaps Handsome Tom Is preju
diced. .
He has played with practicallv ev
ery little star of prominence In the
.motion picture world, including Mar-
sueruc L,mrK, jvorma Talmage, Billle
.ourKe, jiary i-Jckford, and Wanda
nawiey. Shortly he is to appear with
Gloria Swanson, who is just In the
five-foot class.
- "But what are these disadvantages
you speak of, Mr. Melghan T' I asked,
determined to be shown.
"Look up at me."
"Now do you see?" he asked.
I see you, yes."
,"?' ? mein do "0VL 8 the
idea? Now don't think that v -
celted, or want to push myself Into.
wiu camera as mucn as possible or
any of those unkind things. But the
only -way an. actor can do his best is
to have the camera register every
change of expression on his face,
every flicker of the eye. And don't
you see that If we were photographed
In this position, the- camera -would
register your eyes, perfectly the most
important thing in pictures to my
mind while, my lids being lowered,
the eyes are lost-"
PALACE GETS
FILM SCOOP
For Dancers
GREATER PENN GARDENS.
Greater Penn Gardens are attract
ing throngs of dancers nightly. With
the finest of floors and music to be
found, high standards always en
forced and every convenience sup
plied, the management has secured a
patronage that Includes only the very
best element.
SAYS BOLSHEVISTS
IE AFTER MEXICO
'1
AMUSEMENTS
Next Week
R MOORE'S 4
ialtv
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When, America at large was going
mad last Monday over the home-coming
and reception to Gen. John J
Pershing, commander-in-chief of the
American expeditionary forces, a
small group of film distribution ex
perts of the Pathe forces were utiliz
ing every speed device known to cam
era science to give Washington a
glimpse of the Pershing home-coming
before Washington could read the de
tailed stories in Its newspapers on
Tuesday morning.
All' the world knows now that Gen
eral Pershing stepped ashore from
the Leviathan at New York at 9:20
o'clock, on Monday morning last, and
as he stepped ashore, a battery of mo
tion picture cameras were clicking oft
on celluloid the event that has now
passed into history. All during the
morning hours the camera men fol
lowed Pershing, and by noon the
strictly news features of the event
had been fully "covered."
So rapidly had the Pathe forces
worked that the, program at Loew's
Palace Theater, to which one reel was
consigned, had not been arranged to
care for It. Word had been received
from the local-Pathe neadqiiarters
late in the evening that the film was
coming and a "hole" was Immediately
made in the program.
That is the reason why Washing
ton photoplay enthusiasts witnessed
at Loew's Palace Theater on Monday
night twelve hours after Pershing's
arrival the only news pictures of
the record-achieving event that 'were
shown in Washington on that same
evening.
end man is
now a s;fr
PLAYS AT THE CAPITAL
THEATERS NEXT WEEK
"EVANGELINE,"
LONGFELLOW'S
DRAMA-POEM
A ' Superproduction -Extraordinary
115,801
WASHINGTONIANS
TO MATE HAVE SEEN
MARY PICKFORD'S
f.RKATEST
SWEETEST
LAST 3 DAYS
SKE IT TODAY
OK PERHAPS NEVER
POLI'S
5 Shows Dallj I, 3, 5, 730 fc 0:30
chvy chase lake
D-A-N-C-I-N-G
Two Large Pavilions
Orchestra Jazz Band
(Continued from Preceding Page.)
who made the shimmy a classic, sur
rounded by a fine company. Valerie
Bergere and company will present
''Moths," a comedy drama. Berk and
Valda in a recherche novelty are next
in order. Others include Williams
and Wolfus. in "Hark, Hark, Hark;"
Alice Hamilton In characterizations
comic; Duval and Symqnds; Rinaldo
Brothers; the Four Meyakos and the
kinograms.
RELASCO.
With a splendid ensemble of prlnci
pals, chorus and concert orchestra,'
the Gallo English Opera Company,
wllfopen limited engagement of one
week only at the Belasco Theater
Monday evening next, coming direct
from a successful engagement at the
Sbubert Theater, New York.
The Gallo English Opera Company's
list of principals includes such well
known names as Jefferson de Angelis.
William Danforth, Warren Proctor,
Albert Parr. . Arthur Cunningham.
Louis Cassavant, J. Parker Coombs,
Rosamond Whiteside. Greta Risely,
Ethel Mae Bagnal, Gertrude Shannon
and Hana Shimozumi. the only Japan
ese light opera prima donna in th3
world. Max Bendix will conduct.
For the opening opera hero William
S. Gilbert and Sir Arthur Sullivan's
immortal masterpiece. "The Mikado,"
has been selected, with De Angelis as
Ko-Ko and Hana Shimozumi as ""yum
Yum. Later In the week-"The Chimes
of Normandy" -will be offered.
NATIONAL.
For the week of September 14 the
management of the National Theater
announces An attraction of more than
usual interest On that date Sam
Shannon will present what he de
scribes as "A Musical Gallop In Three
Heats." entitled "What's the Odds."
This play, written by Edgar Allan
Woolf, is absed on a famous racing
story. A strong company Includes
William E. Meehan. George MacKay,
and Mablc Withee. The music em
anates from the tuneful pen of Albert
Von Tilzer, and the lyrics arc written
by Neville Fleeson.
GAYETV.
The Sporting Widows company.
With Al K. Hall, the noted eccentric
comedian at its head, is" the coming
week's attraction at the Gayety Thea
ter. A musical frivolity In two acts
and eight scenes, entitled "There Was
a Fool." 'will serve to Introduce the
manifold talents of th large cast.
The supporting players include
Charles Mack. Flossie Kverette, Jun
Lc Vcay. Phil Smith. George Wlest,
Billy McCarthy. Eddie Akcn. Jennie
Larkin. Ethel Norton, and Irene Mc
Carthy, and a large chorus of attrac
tive young women. Numerous special
ties by capable vaudeville artistes will
bo introduced at intervals.
LYCEUM.
"The Record Breakers Company,"
said to be one of the liveliest shows
on the wheel, is booked as the attrac
tion for the Lyceum Theater, starting
with the matinees Sunday, September
14.
AMUSFMEiNTS
From being a student at Phillips
Andovcr to the endman of tho "Who,
What and When" minstrels at "J 6
per week and cakes," marked the
hejira of Andrew Toombes from the
halls of learning to the questionable
delights of life on the stage.
It has been a long hard struggle
with poverty, infrequent salary days
and privations which test and tem
per a man's soul, before "Andy"
Toombes won his hard earned suc
cess. The successive steps of Nils
progress carried him through
minstrelsy, Shakespearian repertoire,
stock, burlesque, vaudeville and mu
sical comedy.
Two seasons ago when "Flo Flo"
was presented; In New York it was
the work of Toombes that saved the
piece from utter failure on the -opening
night. It was his firs' t chance to
score on Broadway in rf sical com
edy and he awoke iL& following
morning to find . himself listed
among the elect.
His old friend and boyhood chum,
C. B. Maddock, commissioned Frank.
Stammers to wrlto the book and,)
lyrics oi a musical comedy in which:
"Andy" was to star this season, tha
result being that very smart three
act pjece, "Nothing but Love," which
comes to Poll's on Sunday night for
a week's tay.
NAZIMOVA IS
HINDUS' IDOL
... I.U
""M
East Indian motion plctnra audi
ences are shewing by box office at
tendance recoil 3 that Nazimova Is
by far tho most popular star of the
silent drama, in that quarter of the
globe. All through India, Coy .on, and
Burmah the demand for Nazlmova's
super-features is increasing
each successive production.
Odd as it may seem, all screen stars
are not suddenly discovered, pounced
upon by an admiring manager and im
mediately besought to sign a life
contract at a fabulous salary. Nazi
mova, now starring in "The Brat,"
receives a salary that would make
many a bank president envious. But
according to her own statement, she
began her great stage career by ac
cepting an engagement for a season
at a salary of $50 a month.
C. N. Douetil, who is the managing
director of the Bijou Limited, having
main offices in Calcutta, recently
passed through Hollywood, Cal., ac
companied by A. C. Daybeny, one of
the stockholders of the company.
While in Hallywood Messrs. Douetil
and Daybeny visited the studios where
the new Nazimova production, "The
Brat," to be seen, beginning Sunday,
exclusively .at Crandall's Metropoli
tan and Knickerbocker Theaters, was
made, and in the course of his visit
Mr. Douetil, who is himself an ardent
admirer of Nazimova's screen por
trayals, explained briefly the motion
picture situation in his territory.
TRIBUTE OF A
GOLD-STRIPER
There arc some things which little
Ada Mao Weeks, the fascinating in
genue of "Listen Lester," John
Cort's musical comedy at the National
this week, considers too sacred to
even speak of, and we print this story
at the awful risk of her anger.
It was after one of tho perform
ances of "Listen Lester" that a tired,
wan-faced doughboy with his arm In
a sling and two stripes of glory on
his right sleeve, asked permission to
sec Miss Weeks. The loyal, 'tender
hearted little actress is the last one
lif the world to refuse such a request
from one who had served his country
so valiantly.
"Miss," said the youthful veteran
bluntly. "I didn't come here to flirt
with j ou, as you might think. I've
come to get something off my heart."
He hesitated a moment, a blush of
embarrassment coming to his face.
You know, I saw you act yester
day, and, by gosh," with a boyish
enthusiasm, "it is wonderful won
derful to se a regular, sure-enough
American girl act and to hear her
talk and sing. Somehow or other you
represented to mc the real spirit of
the American girl gay, spicy,
healthy and pure. This is so differ
ent from what I have known for the
past year that 1-1 just wanted to
be a darn fool and come in here and
tell you about it. I want to thank
you for bringing before me and those
other boys just back from France -so
vividly, those wonderful qualities
uhirh make the American girl the
most wonderful In the whole world."
POLI'S
Shubert Attractions
AH Next Week
Mats.Thurs.&Sat.
t OSniKNC IMi NBT SLIVDAY MCiHT AT Si20
C. B. MADDOCK & MAX HART
Offer
A Smart Musical Comedy in Three A ts
iSJumL2M3
Book and Lncs by Frank Stammers. Score by Harold Orlob.
Afctonishing Gowns 10 Haunting Melodies- IJ captivating Dances
LOVELY, LOVING'QIRLS
And This Kemarij.aoitJ cat:
ANDREW TOOMBES
Donald Meek
Betty Pierce
John Roche
Jack McScrlcy
RUBY NORTON &
SAMMY LEE
Stanley H. Fordo
Arline Fredericks
Philip Bishop
Millicent Gleeman
Clarence Nordstrom
Florence Enright
Robert Woolscy
Easton Yonge
Hannah Hayes
BURLESQUER
TO RAISE FISH
Bolshevism is making a bid for
Moxico, Edward L. Doheny, million
aire Los Angeles oil man told tha
Senate Mexican investigating com
mittee today. i
Doheny said - that Bolshevist
propaganda In Mexicoc ocmes from
American sources, the same, he said, t
which spread the red doctrines in
Russia.
Much of the disorder in Mexico, he
declared, js attributable to the spread
Conditions of-peons in Mexico under
Diaz were never so bad as painted
Doheny said.
He likened accounts of their exploi
tation to "Uncle Tom's Cabin."
Doheny said the heart of Dlas was
always close to the workers of tho
country of wljlch he was dictator.
He told how he and his asociates de
veloped the oil fields of Tamplco.
They paid cash for lands on which
wells were put down ho said, and al
ways told the Mexicans of their pur
pose in acquiring the land.
Tamplco A Happy City.
Since -1000 the population of Tam
plco has jumped from 8,000 to from
60,000 to 60.000, and Is today "one
of the happiest and most prosperous
jcommunities in the world," Boheny
said. .
, He told how one oil camp of hifl
company was once besieged for four
months by -14.000 Vlllistas, being
subjected to artillery and rifle fire.
Considerable property damage was
done and 800,000 barrels of oil were
destroyed, but Yankee grit wunsiooa
repeated attempts at capture by the
Mexican outlaws.
Doheny emphastically denied that
American oil interests has been, re
sponsible for disorders In Mexico, or
had taken aides with any Mexican
faction. He cited Tampico as an ex
ample of the benefits Mexicans had
derived from the development of -the
Mexican oil fields by American in
terests like those-he, Is prominently
Identified with. The streets of the
city had been well paved and modern
sanitary facilities provided. Busi
ness blocks on the American plan had
been constructed, and everything done
by American oil interests to Improve
the conditions of the Mexican people.
Not a Bonanza,
Doheny said that American oil oper
ators who had crone into Mexico had
not found a bonanza, but anly by
dine of hard work and foresight had
developed the natural oil resources
of the country. I
One oil well owned by his interests '
has been developed Into the greatest I
in the world, having a capacity oi
1G1.00O barrels a day.
TOoobwarb & Xotbtop
New York WASHINGTON Pri$ ,j,
Friday Remnant. Day
The Values face Exceptional 1
The items are not numerous tomorrov as the stocks
are extremely new and complete and it is difficult to secure
special items of desirable quality at price concessions.
However, there are some extremely good values below.
No Remnant Merchandise sent C O. D., or ob
REPORT MEXICANS
HOLD 3 AMERICANS
Tho American embassy at Mexico
City is Investigating an unconfirmed
report that- three Americans of Tain-1
pico were captured by bandits, who
blew up a railroad train between San
Luis PotosI and Tamplco, the State
Department announced today.
Information of the supposed attack
reached the State Department from
San Luis Potosl.
Two of the men supposed to have
been captured were named- Jones and
Ferguson.
approval; no local mail or phone orders .accepted.
Friday Special, Marquisette Curtains,
$3.75 Pair
About 50 pair Soft Marquisette Curtains, some trfsasMd
with cluny- lace edge and some with both edge and iBsertw.
Very unusual values. Those desiring them should select ""early.
2-yard length. $3.75 pair.
Hemstitched Voile Curtains,
Special, $1.75 Pair
150 pairs Soft Sheer Voile Curtains, with: two-inch heniatitchr
r ed. borders; soft sheer quality; 2 yards long;
LACE CURTAIN REMNANTS:
10 pairs Ftae Handmade Lacet Arabian Curtain, isottate e
a heavy quality of Bobbinette. S&34 pairs were 12.S9. - -
5 pairs White Lacet Arabian Curtains. pM ta!rj. wer . $. -,
12 pairs White. Lacet Arabian Curtains. ! Hrjc were $M
5 pairs .White Lacet Arabian Curtains. TJ4"IrMWve JflLW.
3 pairs Handsome Imported Renaissance Curtafasv 9&34 -
were $12.50. '-- ,
5 pairs Voile Curtains with beautiful lace decoration. f&34
palrt were $12.59.
5 pairs Fine VoUe Curtains, handsomely lace trimmed. .EltkM
pairs were $15.00.
7 Fine Lace Window Panels, mounted on veile. . eaeai
were $13.50.
5 Soft Net Panels with beautiful lace trimmings. S12.ee eaeat
were J1S.00. -
Also a large collection -of remnant lengths in Cretonnes and
similar' goods: also Voiles. Marquisettes. Curtain Nets and tier
Drapery and Upholstery fabrics, desirable for batjs, curtains, faney
work and upholstery purposes. 1-4 to 1-3 leas than regular prleea.
Curtain Section. Fourth floor. ,
HONDURAN CHIEF
FLEEING TO U. S.
President Bertrand and Brother-in-law
Leave Country
Following General Revolt.
Nazarii Seriano has loft teh Hon
duras capital with President Bertrand",
who abdicated, leaving his powers in
vested in a council of ministers, the
State Department learned today.
The revolt which forced Bertrand
to flee followed his alleged attempt to
elect Soriano, his brother-in-law. to
the Presidency without giving other
candidates consideration.
Both Bertrand and Soriano arc re
ported to have arrived at San Ltf
renzo and left for Anapella, from
where. It is said, they will sail for
this country.
It is thought hre. however, that
they may stop in Mexico, since Bert
rand and Carranza arc reported close j
friends. I
The gunboat Wheeling, due to sail
from Key West to Honduras, was dis
abled during the tornado that hit
southern Florida, the NavyDepart
ment announced today.
To operate a fish farm on his coun
try reservation In New Hampshire Is
thf after-the-stage ambition of
Frank Harcourt. featured star of the
"Bowery Burlosquers, this weck'aJ
stellar attraction at the Gayety Thea
ter. Harcourt has been a fisherman
since the memory of hi oldest friends
runs not to the contrary, and when
h- doffs the paint, the powder, the
wig and the other necessary comple
ments of life behind tho footlights,
h wants to start Into a brand new
venture that of raising fish.
Harcourt says the rish-farm idea
has been successfully tried out near
his homo by thoughtful producers
who have their own original plans to
reduce the high cost of food. Fish
are easily raised in the farms and
a minimum of capital Is all that is
necessary to start the adventure, ac
cording to the Gayety star.
AUU.MJ52VTED OHCllKSTltA OK TWENTY MUKICIA.VS
The first of the Eminent Authors'
Company productions soon to be re
leased by Uoldwyn is Rex Beach'
The Girl from Outside," an unusual
story of Alaska, the land with which
Mr. Beach-is so familiar.
NO COAL STRIKE,
SAYS UNION CHIEF
CLEVELAND. Sept. 11. There will,
be no strike of miners on November
1 with its consequent coal famine be
cause a satisfactory -.vage and work-!
lug agreement will be negotiated by
the United Mine Workers of America'
with the mine operator, is the belief
of John It. Lewis, acting president, of
tho organization.
II S. 10 DISPOSE
a
I14D0IIT0IS!
The United States Housing Corpo-!
ration has decided to sell the four
teen buildings at Potomac avenue and
E street southeast, opposite Congres
sional Cemetery, to the highest bid- ,
der. There are 4UU aparimenis m uie
structures.
It was first the intention to trans
fer these buildings to the Navy De
partment for use as dormitories for
mhanics in the navy yard. This
plan was abandoned when naval ati-1
thorities found that legislation and
appropriations by Congress would be
necessary for tho operating txpen- I
ses. . '
"
Tro Friday Specials In Petticoats
-
Satin-Striped Silk Taffeta Petticoats, navy or purple
predominating in the backgrounds, and "artistic reds,
greens, gold arid other tones in the several width
stripes; plain flounces with hemstitched borders.
Speciadly Priced, $5.00.
Printed Sateen Petticoats, figured and flowered pat
terns in beautiful blendings of gold, greens, grays, reds
and other shades on black, gray- or green grounds;
tailored flounces finished with diagonal tucks.
Specify Priced, $2.00.
Petticoat Section. Third floor.
-Mens Wear
-27 pairs Men's Hijabed Cotton Drawers, knee length, rein
forced seat; sizes 38 and 40." 3 pairs for 58c; were 50c pair.
33 Checked Nainsook Union Suits, sleeveless knee. length
style; full cut; sizes 36 and 42. $1.00 eachr were SL50.
54 Foulard and Silk Crejte Bow Ties, fancy figurfcd patterns in
medium colorings. 50c each; were 75c'
35 Khaki Colored Cotton Shirts, suitable for outing and sports
wear; sizes 14', 15, 1514, and 17, with or without collars at
tached. $2.15 each; were $3.50.
60 pairs. Men's Seamless Silk Socks, double heels and toes;
light and dark gray and tan; sizes 9, 10, 11, and 11. 58c pair;
were 75c
48 pairs Men's Silk Plated Socks, black, white and tan; doable
soles, heels and toes; sizes 9'A, 10, 11, and 11. 35c fair; 3
pairs for $1.00; were 60c.
39 pairs Fancy Silk Crepe and Four-in-Hand Ties, figured
patterns; bright and medium colorings. 50c each; were $1.60
and $1.50.
Men's Wear, First floor.
Final Clearance on Men's
' ' White Oxfords
Oxfords of this quality will be mudi higher priced
next season, so that we urge every man that can be fitted
to buy now; sizes are limited, but excellent values,.
19 pairs White Caivras Oxfords, leather soles; sizes 7. 73. '8 d
11A: CV-. 7. 7riB: C. 7 and IOC. Reduced to $3.75 pair.
20 pairs Men's White Canvas Ked Oxfords; sizes 0, 9, 0. 10, 10
and 11C: G, G. 0. 10 and 1D. Reduced to aso pair.
Men's White Canvas Ked Oxfords with rubber soles 10 pairs;
sizes !. 61-: 7. 7 and 8. Reduced to 82.25 pair.
Also a'few pairs of Men's Tan Oxfords In large sizes; 10 and lOfeA;
G'.i. 10. lO'.i and 11B; 10 li and 11C; 10. 10& and 1ID. Reduced to
Z5?-5 pair.
. Men's Shoes. First floor.
Friday Special In
English Nainsook
A very prominent manufacturer of English Nain
sook decided 'recently that he would discontinue making
his finer qualities in the 45-inch width. He made us
a very liberal proposition to dispose of the stock, he
then had on hand, and we bought it at a most attrac
tive price, which results in the following very special
offering:
100 Pieces 45-Inch Width (note the width)
ENGLISH NAINSOOK
12 Yards to the Piece $6.00 Piece. 9
There is not a woman to whom this onerirK;
should not appeal.
White Goods. Second floor.
Women?s Blouses
13 Georgette Blouses, white, flesh, French blue and turquoise;
from-regular stock; two size 36; two 40, two 42, throe 44, two 46.
S5.00 each; were $7.50 and SS-cO.
2 Habutai White Silk Shirts, tucked bosoms, tailored cuffs;
size 44. $5.00 each; were $6.00.
White Radium Silk Blouses, tailored; slightly soiled from
handling; Mzes w ana 44. so.uu eacn; were o.o.
9 White Urepe oe inine ciouses, wine pjeaiea rumc arounn
neck, trimmed in either rose or Nile; takon from regular stock;
size 34, one uo, one on, two 4U, one z.. two is- m.w, worm
'two
onr. Cf. :;
i- nr-nnn rln P.hi?r Tl!fmcr. v.hitr flfh nnr? Mark? trtrf3
tailored styles with flat or convertible collars; two Mlze 34, eight
36 six 3S, four 40, one 42, three 44, one 46. $3.03 each; were
55-To and $o..o. .
no linrmrio Rlnncf; inrlnrlmfr wln'fp vnil3. lAce-lrrmid; arni
batiste with rose or green iinene collars and cuffs; tailored models,
and some cuiurcu iiiKiuii uiuuscs, wji. j-j yr a , uum
r.S. sixteen 40, twentyfivc 42, sixteen 44, nineteen 46. $1.95 each:
were $2.25, $2.50 and $2.95.
Biouse Section. Third floor.
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