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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, January 07, 1920, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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THE WEATHER:
Rain tonight and tomorrow; wanner
tonight. Temperature lightly abore
tmilag tonight. Temperature at 8
a. 32 degrees
fhtUashttififon times
NUMBER 11.403.
WASHINGTON. WEDNESDAY EVENING. JANUARY 7. 1920.
FINAL
? EDITION
PRICE TWO CENTS.
Federal Agents Here Hunt Ludwig Martens "Soviet Ambassador" to Put Him Under Arrest
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THREE AMERICANS SLAIN IN MEXICO IN LAST FEW OATS
? .?
Sir George Paish Tells Bankers That $10,000,000,000 Is Needed to Finance Bankrupt Europe
Senate Marks Time Pending
Result of Jaokson Day Pow
wow of Democrat*.
WILSON AND BRYAN DIFFER
Executive Expected to Urge
Pact as Campaign Issue If
Not Ratified as He Desires;
Senator Underwood In tfce
Senate* today served notice on
thou working (or a Treaty com
promise that If they do not speed*
lly reach an agreement, he will
call uf his resolution (or a con
ciliation committee.
By J. BART CAMPBELL.
, International News Service Staff
Correspondent
The treaty situation remained dead
locked today while the Senate con
tinued to mark time pending the out
come of the Jackson Day pknquet
of Democratic leaders tomorrow
night '
Interest was divided between the
"Important message1' President Wil
son would send to the dinner and
the address William Jennings Bryan
would deliver there.
Two Leaders iHffer.
Republican and Democratic Sena
tors appeared to take It for granted
the President would not only deal
with the treaty In his message, but
would urge the Democratic party
unite in making It a campaign issue
unless the Senate agreed to ratify
It without reservations which he con
sidered would "nullify" It.
Bryan was expected to assume a
different attitude. He was reported
to favor Immediate ratification with
the Ixjdge reservations If the so
called "preamble" providing for w-It
ten assent to the reservations by
thraa of the four powers the United
States was associated with in the
world war be modified.
Bryaa See* Disi?r la Isaac.
Bryan via said to have taken the
position the Democratic minority had
ao constitutional, or other, right to
dictate to tha Republic majority of
the Senate as to the form ratifica
tion should take. Senators of both
parties who said they shared Bry
an's reported view quoted his declarn
tlon that the "party, which by insist
ing upon unreasonable demands
makes the treaty h vital Issue In the
campaign, will Invite the wrath of
the voters.''
Bryan w as given credit for "a Bet
of new reservations emanating from
tha Democratic side, to which the Ra
(Continued on fjage 3, Column 3.)
ADMIRAL BAKH1MEFF
EXECUTED BY SOVIET
P.uasian Offlcer Charged With
Plotting Overthrow of
Government.
UKRLIN. Jan. 7.?The Ruisian
newspaper Prlsyne, a copy of which
haa been received here, contains a re
port of the execution of Admiral
Bakhlmeff, who fought brilliantly
against the German fleet in 101T. The
admiral, says the newspaper, fcas ac
cused of plotting against the soviet
government.
Admiral Bakhlmeff commanded the
Russian fleet In October, 1917, when
the Germans achieved a victory ^'Hh
preponderating tonnage In the vicin
ity of Riga against what were de
scribed as old type vessels, forcing
the Russlsns to retire ?Into the in
terior of Moon sound and then to
withdraw from the fighting. Admiral
Bakhlmeff had holated his flag over
the cruiser Bayan, which It was as
acrted. was unsuccessfully attacked
by submarines.
APPORTION ACCUSED
GERMANS FOR TRIALS
PARI?. Jan. 7.? The Interallied
aemmlsslon. charged with fixing
methods of procedure in the (rials of
Oarfnans guilty of war crimes, was In
gaaslon today to assign lists of the
IMtixil Germans to each country for
trial r ull lists have been completed. I
Democrats To Offer
Resolution Indorsing
President's Activities
Full and antlra approval of Preal
daat wiiaon'a Administration. from
th? t.lme he antarad the White House
until the present. Including h(s trip
to Europe and hla effort# at the Paris
peace conference, will be made the
subject of a resolution tomorrow,
when the Democratic National Com
mittee meets here to make prepara
tions for Its coming campaign.
Cnsuslii|a Makaa AsaeaaMSMSt.
"We are behind the President!"
Cahlrman Cummings repeated with
emphasis when the question was put
to him as to wether the Democratic
national committee would take any
action with regard to the peace
treaty.
"The President Is reported to be
strongly opposed to accepting any
reservatlona whatever to the pact," It
was remarked. "Will the committee
express its approval of that standT"
"We will undoubtedly support the
President in alt he has done to bring
permanent peace to the world," Chair
man Cummings replied. "His position
ought to be well known, for after he
returned from the conference he
made a tour of the United States and
spoke very plainly. Still, I am
amased 'at the misinterpretation of
the President's speo^hes.
Aaaaacd At Slss4rr.
"I am amased, too. ^it the corapaign
of alander which haa baan going oa
against him. It la one of the moat
shameful Incldeuts hi the history of
American politics. If we live a dec
ade. wa shall see the day when we
will all be prouad of what he has
dpne."
Chairman Cummings said the Demo
crats were going to win this cam
paign, which, in his gplnion,' would
be one of. vital importance to the
country. He said that during the
contest between the Democrats and
Republicans the country would find
out whether It wanted the kind of
leadership which tha Senate had de
veloped of late or whether It pre
ferred to follow the bigger and finer
Americanism of President Wilson.
The Democratic chairman was ask
ed If the nationsl committee, whan it
meats here tomorrow, would appoint
a subcommittee to take up the ques
tion of a platform.
Smiling, he replied:
"The Democratic party does not
consider it necessary to appoint a
POLICEMAN HELD UP BY
MAN HE PUT IN JAIL
Worker Breaks Out Soon After
Being Locked Up In
Colorado.
CANON CITY, Colo. Jan. 7.?Night
Marshal Hiram Pillmore was held up
by a man he had arrested and put in
jail a few hours before.
Marshal Pillmore arrested Jack
Carey, an employe of the Ohio Zinc
Company, early in the evening. Carey
was drunk and was thrown in jail to
sober up. As he is an expert Iron
worker he soon smashed a cuspidor
and used the pieces to force the door
of his call.
Pillmore was trying the door of a
firaRf when Carey camo upon lilm
the second time and threatened the
marshal s life. Carey, who was still
intoxicated, was talked out of the
deed by Marshal Pillmore and was
akairi arrested.
SMOOT GOES GUNNING
FOR SERVICE OFFICERS
Senator Smoot of Utah Is going
after the Scalps of army and naval
officers who have been holding office
Joba In Washington during the war.
He procured the adoption of a reso
lution in the Senate today, directing
the Secretary of War and the Secre
tary of the Navy to report to the Sen
ate the number of commissioned of
ficers who are not performing line
duty, along with their pay and their
allowance* for living expenses In
Washington.
MINE WORKERS APPROVE
COAL STRIKE COMPACT
COLUMBU8. Ohio. Jan. 7.?United
Mine Workers of America, meeting
here today, ratified the plan under
which the recent coal strike was end
ed by a vote of 1.(39 to 221.
The vote came at the end of a
stormy session. In which the radical
element of the union sought fo hloek
approval of the project. Cnder terms
of Ihe settlement. President Wilson's
commission of three men will fix a
basis of wages for bituminous min
ers
MRS. PKTKU OLEBBN,
Only womnn wjio will address
dual Jackson pay dinner
? ^ A& ?. r. .
committee to dJacoWr a platform. I
understand that *uch a committer
has been appointed by another na
tional committee, but then that party
han need for such action.
I understand It haa offered a $10,
000 prize for the best platform sub
mitted to It, by young members of
the party, preferably under the age
of twenty-five. My personal opin
ion is that the sum Is far too little.
It is totally Inadequate for the task
and only extreme youth would under
take It."
At the "Jaekxon Day" twin ban
quets, to be held tomorrow night at
the hotels. New Willard and Wash
ington. there will be no "keynote"
speeches, Chairman Cummlnga re
marked. "Key-note," he said, was a
misnomer. The speakers would ray
what they, as individuals, had to say,
and would not pretend to bind any
one other than themselves, "and,' he
added with a smile, "maybe not them
selves."
MEXICAN EARTHQUAKE
CLAIMS 1,000 VICTIMS
Hear? Toll In Lire* and Immense
Property Damage In
Vera Cruz.
MEXICO CITY, Jan. 7.?Gen. Fran
cisco Urqulse, secretary of war, an
nounced today he had received official
advices that at least 1,000 persons
were killed at Cosautlan, in the state
of Vera Crui, in Saturday night's
earthquake.
Dispatches indicated that with
clearing away of the wreckaae, the
toll of the earthquake all through
the state was much heavier than at
first believed.
The war department advices indi
cated about 300 were dead at Bar
ranca Grande and Chlcothle. In
many villages In the Jalapa district
of Vera Cru*?all houses and property
were destroyed according to the ad
vices to the war department.
Government officials expressed hope
that because of poor communication
and consequent possibility of exag
gerated reports It would be found
when the final check-up is made that
the death toll may not be as large
as Ihe present advices Indicated.
They admitted, however., there can be
little doubt the devastation Is wide
spread. Floods and fires addeu io the
suffering In many districts. Thou
sands of persons arc known to be
homeless and many threatened with
starvation.
The crippling of railroads and the
flooded roads have made difficult the
work of sending relief. Pandits, It
was reported In many districts, have
taken advantage of the situation to
plunder and rob the homeless people
of their few remaining possessions.
DIPL0MATS"0F ITALY
CONFER WITH BRITISH
Nitti and AftBOflatea In Parley With
Lloyd George In Downing
Street.
I./ONDON. Jan. 7.- The conference
hetwsen Premier NittI, foreign min
ister Hclaolla and Marquis Impsrlall
of Italy and Premier Uoyd Oeorge
and other British officials was re*
sumed In Downing Street today
I.loyd OeoVge and Andrew Ponar
l,aw. the government leader In the
House of Commons, will leave for
Paris Thureday
PAISH PLEADS
FOR 10 BILLION
Loan Necessary to Save Europe
From Anarchy, Says
British Expert ,
WHEELS MUST BE SET GOING
Equilibrium of Exports and Im
ports Weapon Against World
* Bolshevism.
' PHILADELPHIA. Jul 7.?Europe
mugt have a Joan of at least $10.
000,000,000, to be saved from anarchy,
Sir George Palsh, Brltleh Onanciai
?Xpert, told the Pennsylvania Bank
era' Association here last night.
"Europe must be really re-started
And restocked," Paish said. "When
his has been done, Europe- will b4
able to export commodities as well
w> to import them. Thus the equil
ibrium, necessary to gave the world
from Bolshevism, will be restored*
Members or Congresa todar^were
atemptlng to reconcile statement! by
Secretary of the Treasury Glaaa and
| Herbert Hoover, In regard to the
financial needs of Europe
Haever AJmlmat Lne
Secretary Glass haj submitted to
the Ways and Means Comimttee of
* pecon,?"*n<latlon that the
n<?.kt? ;Sut?" d,? ,nt<> Ita financial
S. further loans to rehablll
tat? hurope.
LJ1^HOOW -Aaida from
secondary mratuNa by our Govern
ment, the European problem la merely
one of ratification of peace and or
dlnary bualneaa process.*'
h*" be'n *ccepted gen
rally as authoritative In hla statement
as to conditions in Europe. As food
director of th? allied forcea during
Lhie,KWar.h" fan>* ,nto dtrec' contact
with not only the problem of food
?upply, but with the financial altua
lion.
Baalneaa CrrllU tafMfal.
Considering Europe aa a whole, Mr.
Hoover asserts that the 70.000.000 peo
Pie of natlona which have not auftsred
heavily In the war should aid Europe,
but adds: "if we contribute a bread
supply on Government credit to starv
ing cities, plu* business credits, we
will be doing our share of world re
sponsibility."
He alao pointa out that Great
Britain practically haa admitted offi
cially that she needs nothing but com
I mercial credits, while he saya Kng
i land has ample unpledged foreign as
sets to cover her need*. This condi
tion also applies to France.
Glaaa Has Ckragc of Heart.
The Secretary of Treaaury. in a
recent letter to Chairman Kordney,
of the Ways and Means Committee,
points out that he hss charged his
view point on the question of assist
ing in Europe finances. In his an
nual report to Congress, the Hecrc
tary urged that European loans be
discontinued. In his letter to Mr.
r ordney, he says he is convinced that
the necessary financing cannot be
<lone tnrough ordinary private chan
nels.
Secretary Glass has asked permis
sion to appear before the Ways and
Moans Committee to lay before It In
formation concerning the financial
status of Europe and to urge legisla
tion for further extension of credit.
Text ?( Glaaa* Letter.
The Secretary's letter follows in
part;
"I have the honor to request that
your committee afford me the oppor
tunity of laying before It any infor
mation which It may desire and which
I am able to furnish, Ifi order that
appropriate legislation may be con
sidered at once.
"The emergency Is of such mag
nitude; the dictates of humanity are
so pressing; the possible effect Af
the present situation upon the so
cial, economic and financial relm
I Mutation of Europe and. consequently
I upon the trade njtd prosperity of the
world. In which the United states
Mas so great a stake, may be of suoh
consequence that I do hesitate frem
the standpoint of humanity and pub.
He policy to aasume the responsibility
of appealing to the humane and prac
tleal sentiments of the Congress to
take Immediate steps to furnish from
our surplus the food necesaary to
h?v* the situation.
"We cannot and must not fall to
supply some food on credit to save
human lives and safeguard civilisa
tion. for which rr? have already ex
pended so many 1* ss snd billions of
ilellata,"
* WU.-4KI nr.fork mrals sad
I III,* good 4lgMtlua nates jog feel
X
Communist Organ in New York
Suppressed by Federal
Agents.
58 MORE AT ELLIS ISLAND
Force Urged by Radicals in
Detroit to Advance
Soviet Aims.
A warraat far the depertatiea
?f L. C. A. X. Intnl. Mil*
itfM wrfet uak*m4?r to the
United States, has ben Issued,
Department af Justice officials ,
said today.
Officers of the repartmeat Bali
they woald aarre the warraat aa
soon as they eoald flad Marteas.
S. Knarteva, aae af Martoaa'
aidea, told a reporter that Mar
toaa waa at the Lafayette Hotel, \
?air a fetr iaan (na the 4a
NBW YORK. Jan. 7.?FlftyHBlfht
ptreons were added to the group of
alleged alien radlcala at Ellis I aland
daring the laat twenty-fonr honra,
bringing the total held there for de
portation up to 499.
Department of Juatiee agonta con
tinued their ralda yesterday. Top
ping the day's activities waa a sud
den descant upon the Nory Mir. or
gan of communism, at one time ed
ited by Leon Trotsky.
Fourteen Are Arrested.
Fourteen men and one woman and
a large quantity of literature were
celled. Dr. Victor Pachacksky, alia*
Dr. Paige, an aaeociate of Trotsky,
was anionic those arrested.
Pachackaky w?? connected with the
revolutionary movement in Russia in
1107. and was exiled to Kiberta. He
escaped and made his way to Ger
many and South America. He cami
here with Trotsky in 1911. after
working with Lenlne In Swltserland.
He Is known as a lecturer on radical
subjects.
Hundreds of "Red" organisations
were reported to be fleeing from this
city today to escape arrest by Fed
eral agents. Some were said to be
headed toward the Canadian border.
A fund is being raised for the de
fense of the prisoners. Elisabeth
Curley Flynn. who has charge of It,
?aid today that enough money is on
(Continued on Page 2, Column 7.)
DETROIT MAYOR URGES
MOTOR STREET CARS
People Will Br Aaked By Couiena
To Vote On $15,000,000
Proposal.
_________ i
DETROIT, Jan. 7.?Mayor James
Cousens aaked the Common Council
to place before the votera at the elec.
Ition on April 0 a propoaal for a $13,
000,000 bond laaue for the conatruc
tlon of a munlelpally owned and op
erated atreet railway ayatem. Mayor
Couiena la hopeful, If the bqnd laaue
la voted, of using the Ford gaaollne
street ear.
In discussing the plan the Mayor
aald the 100.75 mllea of new track
could be completed In two years and
that construction would start the day
after election if the plan was sanc
tioned by the voters.
"I hav# been watching the develop
ment of the gaaollne atreet car and
recently had a conference with Mr.
Ford, when he ahowed me several
engines snd plana for his ear. I was
assured by his engineers that the gas
street car could be built for a mini
mum of $5,000 a car. which would re
duce the cost of equipment 50 per
cent?In other words, cut the cost
down to about %2,000,000."
SENATE TO HUNT REDS
IN U. S. TRADE BOARD
Appointment of a subcommltte of
the Renate Interstate Commerce Com
mittee to Investigate the Federal
Trade Commission was authorised at
a special meeting of the committee
today.
The Investigation will go Into al
leged activity of extremists in the
enmmiwslon's offlne. A resolution In
troduced by Senator Watson, Repub
lican. of Indiana, and paeeed by the
fenaie ordered Jhs Investigation.
Wealthy Draft Dodger
Caught By Detectives
After Two Years' Chase
PHILADELPHIA, Jan. 7.?One of the wealthy Berg
doll brothers, who have been sought for nearly two years
on charges of evading the army draft, was arrested here to
day, when detectives raided their home.
Detectives surrounded the Bergdoll residence early in
the morning and broke in from the front and rear simul
taneously.
Say She Threatened Detectives.
Mrs. Brrfdoll )? tlle(?4 to ktv*
threatened the detectives with a re
volver, but the weapon wu wrested
from her hands. la the meantime the
house was being searched and a man
wrapped in a blanket was fotmd
hiding In a closet.
The policeman reoofn'**' him as
Brwin Hergdoll, but the prisoner
claimed that he was the other brother,
Orover. They look much alike.
The Bergdolls are very wealthy.
The draft dodging case gained na
tional notorleO' when the brothers
disappeared. Search failed to reveal
tliem. They were reported to have
gone to Mexico, but all trace of them
wfts lost Upon previous occasions the
Bergdoll residence hhs been. raided,
biit without revutt. \
The raid was mada following per
sistent report* fM' lMn
and G rarer CJe* eland IteVgdoH, mm
of the wealthy brewer's widow, were
hack In the city after having given
I the authorities thai dip repeatedly.
J?MT>h MeDOTltt. Of the Department
of Justice, heading ? party of htm
agents, waa met at the front door
of the Berfdoll home by Mrs. Berg
doll. who thraataned him with a pla
toL McDotIU grow impatient with
her, deelarln*: Thla woman la bru
only defying the law, and we will ret
In If we have to burn down the houaa.
If ahe 'la ao fooltah aa to ahoot oneof
our men aha will have to take the
consequences."
The offtoera, despft* the threatening
attitude of Mra Bergdoll. then broke
Into the houses and arreated her aon.
Bergdotl la tho aon of a wealthy
brewer. He formerly waa an automo
bile ty.ee driver.
The Department of Justice today
announced that Cleveland Bergdoll,
known aa tho "mlllloiaire draft
??r'lT
The itopartnMnt announced that
kn. Bcrfdoll, mother of the man. had
ahot at 'the agent who made tho ar
rest, but i?Imi< hint.
Oriental Shrewdness
Of Wan Is Displayed
In Cross-Examihation
With true Oriental shrewdness. his
?very word uttered with deliberate
ness, Zlang Sung Wan. Chinese stu
dent on trial for his life before Jus
tice Gould and a Jury in Criminal
Division No. 1, District Supreme Court
today baffled United States District
Attorney John E. Ijiskey In tlie lat
ter'* attempt to wring from him in
criminating admissions of ont only
killing Ben Sen Wu, but Dr. Theodore
T. Wong and C. H. Hsie, members of
the Chinese Educational Mission, who
were found slain lant January.
Admitting that he had told the
police he shot and killed Wu after the
latter had slain Dr. Wong and Hsie,
Wan declared, while under the
searching Cross-exarnii.atlon, that any
such admissions he had made had
been extorted from him through force
and suggestion.
Admit> Ordering KimnI,
In an attempt to contradict Win's
statement that he was deprived of
food. District Attorney I.askey pro
duced checks he had signed for eat
ables while a "guest" of the Poliee
Department at the Dewey Hotal.
"Did you order this food?"
"Yes, but 1 was so sick that I could
not eat |t."
"Did you not tell the deteetivea
that you returned to New York on
January 27, and when confronted I y
Kang \ja, repudiate that, and say
you left on January 20?
"No, not that I remember. When
the polioe came to my room thoy
pointed pistol at me and my brother.
I was ao excited I might have said
that, but 1 don't remember-"
Wanted to <iri Bid mt Palter.
Did you not tell Detective Burlln
game you and Van went to the
Itlggs Bank to get the check caofced
-that you waited outside In the taxi
cab?"
"Yes, 1 told them that, but It was
not true."
"Then why did you say It?'1
"Jiecause they had told mc about
tho taxlcab. and I said so to get rid
of the detectives."
"Did you not say that after Van eeme
out of the bank that he said they
would not cash the check?II was no
good?that he would have to he Iden
tified. you put the check In your
pocket gnd destroyed It on the train
while you and your brother were
going to New York?"
"If 1 aaid that I was forced to."
J?d*e Questions lllm.
Justice Gould took Wan In hand
after District Attorney l-*skey had
asked him about the telegram Wan
?ent to hia brother Van in New York.
Wan said: "If I had Intended to kill
these men I would not have sent a
telegram to my brother. I wanted
him to eome because I was elek,
"Why didn't you get a nurse heret
"I didn't want to be bothered about
nurses here."
At this time Justice Gould leaning
toward Wan asked him to explain
why he made Incriminating state
ments against himself, when he knew
that if true they would mean the ulti
mate penalty of the law.
TkM|kt T**th WmII 0*t.
Wan explained in * halting manner
that he thought by making the state
ment and signing it he would get rid
of the police, who were constantly
worrying and asking him questions.
MI signed," said the prisoner, "be
cause they wanted m? to sign. They
say 'sign.' and I sign. They say 'don't
sign,' and I don't sign.
Justice Gould then asked whether
he knew that if his confession was
true and that If he signed It it meant
his death warrant.
"I thought the truth would come
out in the Investigation whether I
signed or not," he replied. "Let them
investigate and find out the truth.
Uefore adjourning for the noonday
recess. Justice Gould asked the ste
nographer to strike out from the rec
ord his question regarding Wan's
"signing of bis death warrant" and
the prisoner's answer thereto.
While the prosecution dereloped
that Wan had mad<> many conflicting
statements and admissions, it failed
(Continued on I'age 2, Column 4.)
MAY DEPORT BAMTONE
FOR DECEIVING SOPRANO
Baklanorr, Accused By Girl, At
tribute* His Romantic Trou
ble* To Jralouay.
CHICACSO, Jan. 7.?George Bakla
nofT. famous Russian barlton* of the
Chicago Grand Opera Company, who
was arrested on a deportation war
rant Alleging misconduct with Mile.
Klvlra Atnaxer, the soprano, at
tributed his trouble today to jealousy.
"That woman," hs said, "so Jeal
ous Is she of me, you wouldn't believe
It. .She gets jealous at everything?
chairs, walls, bureaus, everything.
You wouldn't believe It how Jealous
that woman Is. Hhe loves ma. She
has proposed to me."
Mile, Amaiar charged that Kakla
noff toured the country posing as an
unmarried man, when he has a wife
In Russia.
The baritone admitted he would
like to marry Mils. Amiier.
"Rut how can If he asked. "I write
to Russia, but no answer do I get. t
don't know whether I'm married or
not. I dirt not bring Mile Ainaaar to
Chicago. I come to sing for the Bos
ton Grand Opera Company alone,
when thai got bust up 1 eomo to
Chicago."
MaklanofT Is at liberty undar $1,000
ball.
I , -V
Consul Directed to Investigate
Slaying of Oil Man
By Officer.
TO DEMAND REPARATIOt
Department Awaits Official Iih
formation of Earlier Kill
ings by Robbers.
Qabrlol Porter, an American cttf
??n In employ of the Penn-Mez. Co-,
w shot and killed by a Mexican
federal army officer at Tuxpaa*
December 31, the State Department
was advised today by the American
oonaal at Tamplco.
"Tbe conaul has been directed by
telegraph," the State Department an
nounced, "to report further inform**
tion, and if warranted by the circuitt"
iitaneM to urge the local authorltiag
Tlmpico district to arrest and
ptfaUlh the rrflty pemotL"
Br|n New CYfcfs. i .
The Mate Department so far hafl
not received a complete report on thd
detail* of the murder of two Amert*
can employes of tho International Pm
troleum Company at Port L/obos.
Tbe killing's reported yesterday and
that of Porter, reported today, may
bring1 a new crlsts in Mexican relap '
tlons If It Is shown that Carranza sol
dlers are responsible, it vu believed
here.
While the State Department await
ed a complete report on the slayinB
near Port Ix>bos of two American
employes of the International Petrol
eum Company, it wan believed today
that should it develop that Carranga.
soldiers were reaponsible for the kill
ing. the relations between the United
Statea and Mexico would again ap
proach the breaking point.
Slayers KM IdralilH.
The State Department so far hat
not been advised who killed tbe
Americans, P. J. Rolle and Kaile
Eowles, but the American consul at
Tamplco has been Instructed to make
a report on the details of the crime.
The American embassy at Mexico City
also haw been directed to make urgent
representations to the Mexican gov
ernment for the punishment of tbe
murderers.
It was believed here today that, the
Americans were killed either by stray
bandits or by Carranza soldiers. The
belief was expressed that tho consul
at Tamplco certainly would not have
notified the State Department so
quickly of the murders had they been
the result of a fracas among em
ployes of the oil company, or had
they been committed by native Mexi
cans under circumstances which tend
ed to show that the Americans were
In the wrong.
It was pointed out here that the
Carransa troops are In complete con
trol of the Tamplco oil district, in /
which the Americans were killed, and
that, therefore. It was not likely that
there was any organized body of ban
dits operating there.
The only revolutionist leader about
the oil district is (General Manual
Pelaeis, and h? and hie forces arc to
the south. In addition, Palaes i*
friendly towards foreigners, accord*
Ing to representatives hero of AmerU
can oil interests in Mexico.
Had Pay Fiait.
According to the Stato Depart
ment's advices, the Americans weM
believed to have had pny funds of
the company in their possession at
the time of their murder.
With receipt of Information <hat
Harry V. Leonard and Harry O. Mar
tin, two American sailor*, were to be
released from jail in Mazatl.in on
January 12. the State Department
hoped that Incident would be closed.
The two sailors were sentenced t?
two months' Imprisonment for al
leged as.suit upon s Mexlcar.. Inas
much as the State Department had
been advised that the men were prop
erly arrested. It was believed here
that the sentence handed down In
their case was proper
MEXICO CITY, Jan. T.?Comment*
Ing upon similar action by the Unite*
States the foreign afflee announced
today Mexican consuls throughout the
United States had been Instructed to
oomplle list of Mexicans killed, rob
bed or otherwise mistreated in Amer
ica.
Ttn list will be designed to show
Mexico has as much cause for rem ?
plaint of treatment of her citizens In
the United States as that Oevern
menl has over treatment of Its citi
zens la Mexico. It was mM.

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