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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, January 27, 1922, HOME FINAL EDITION, Image 2

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EARLY ACTION IS DEMANDED ON BILL AIMED AT ^DIVORCE RING"'
VOLUNTARY
CLEAN-UP
UNLIKELY
i
(Continued from First Page.)
the public Interest" la affected by and
? Involved In every suit for divorce or
the annulment of the marriage ties,
?nd
"Whereas It Is further considered
? that the people of the Commonwealth,
< In every such uncontested suit or
: whenever the court or Judge thereof
?hall deem It for the probable good,
should proceed through a duly ap
pointed representative and defend or
contest the same."
? Backed by Woman.
Under the provisions of the bill,
? whenever any suit for divorce or the
' annulment of a marriage hereafter
Instituted shall have been matured by
the due execution of the process
therein, and the respondent shall fall
' to defend or contest the same, or
whenever the court or the Judge
thereof In vacation shall be of the
opinion at any time during the prog
? ress of the suit that the respondent
is not defending same in gOod faith,
or that the public Interest require it,
the co)irt shall appoint some discreet
and competent attorney a guardian ad
litem, who shall defend the suit in the
name and on behalf of the Common
wealth of Virginia.
The bill further provides that the
guardian shall not be related to or
connected with the parties, nor have
any Interest In the matter In the con
troversy.
In case the respondent falls to enter
his appearance in any suit the clerk
: of the court must appoint a guardian
to represent the interest of the absent
' defendant.
One of the backers of the measure
is Dr. Kate Waller Barrett, for many
years active in reform work, and a
resident of Alexandria, now in Rich
mond working for the support of the
measure.
"The provisions of this bill should
put a stop to the wholesale divorce
t business which has caused a blight on
the name of our grand old State, and
disgrace to the city of Alexandria,"
she declared.
$1,000 FOR CAR, TRACTOR,
AND TRUCK, FORD'S AIM
DETROIT, Mich., Jan. 27.?Henry
Ford today was near the goal of prices
he set out to attain several years ago
when he announced he would sell "a
car, a tractor, and a truck for $1,000."
In a statement Mr. Ford announced
a cut of $230 in the pricn of the Ford
? tractor, bringing the selling price of
the farm machine down to $3!?i.
With the new cut In effect, the Ford
touring car, a truck, and a tractor'can
now be purchased for 31,137.
"I believe it will do the country
some good Just at this time, especially
when spring is approaching, to make
?. It easier for the farmer to get his
work done at lower cost and thus help
. bring down the price of food and
everything else," says the announce
? ment.
all-metal monoplane
PERFECTED BY GERMAN
BERLIN, Jan. 27.?Prof. Hugo
Junkers, noted German scientist, has
Just completed the design for an all
metal monoplane, which will be 260
\ feet from tip to tip of the wings.
? There will be four engines of 1,000
f horse power each.
The airplane cannot be built until
the allies relinquish their control
*! over German aeronautics.
NIGHTGOWN AND
3200 WILL GET
DIVORCE IN VI,
(Continued from First Page.)
Immediately came in quest of grist for
the mill.
Thomas' emmUnary slipped out of
a sldedoor, walked a few paces up
South Fairfax street, crossed to the
oppoelte side and returned to where
the reporter stood In front of the
other lawyer's office.
"Howdy, stranger." the emmlssary
stated by way of approach. "Oot a
match?"
The reporter had and. in exchange
accepted the proffered cigarette.
Knew Good Lawyer.
"Looking for aomebodyT" the
stranger asked.
The reporter was, tout did not volun
teer the Information as to who he was'
looking for.
"Don't guess you are looking for a
good lawyer, are you?" was the
stranger's 6autton question.
"Yep, I am," the reporter confess
ed. "Am In a little trouble. Waiting
here to see Mr. (?).
"Was It about a divorce, mister?"
the stranger boldly asked.
"Well, to &e franc, It Is," the re
porter replied, loosening up a bit.
"I'm over here to get a divorce; was
referred to Mr. ( ). Am waiting
for him now."
"Well, I know a mighty fine divorce
lawyer," the stranger volunteered.
"Ills office Is right across the street.
Want to go over and see him?"
"No," the reporter replied. "I was
referred to Mr. Blank and will wait
a few moments for him."
The stranger departed, going around
the block. Approaching from the op
posite direction he again entered
Thomas' office and soon returned with
Thomas, the counselor and attorney.
An Introduction followed, with the
added impressive bit fit information
that Mr. Thomas waa a director. In the
Peoples Permanent Building and Loan
Association of Virginia, Incorporated
for $260,000, with offices in Alexandria,
Del Hay, etc., with permanent offices
at Aurora Hills, Va., which Is Mr.
Thomas' home.
Sympathetic and eager to be of any
little assistance, Mr. Thomas won
dered if he could assist in any way.
When told that the visitor was wait
ing to see another lawyer, Mr. Thomas
volunteered the information that the
other lawyer was probably out of town
and would not be back.
Wanted Quick Decree.
"Come on over to my office and
maybe I can help you out," Mr.
Thomas urged.
The reporter was reluctant, but
after some persuasion he agreed to
go over.
In Thomas' office the reporter In
troduced himself and stated the cas-?
According' to the story told to
Thomas, the reporter had a friend,
a very wealthy and prominent so
ciety woman, residing in Washing
ton.
She desired a divorce, but due to
her social prominence, it must be
gotten quietly and quickly, if gotten
at all. Without saying so, the re
porter intimated that the woman
who nought a divorce waa the wife
of a Congressman.
"The main thing," the reporter
stated, "Is that If this divorce Is to
be gotten at all It must be gotten
without any chance of publicity, for
to have publicity, in this case
would ruin the divorce seeker social
ly, and, furthermore, the reporter
stated, "she has no grounds for
divorce and if the suit should be
come known to her husband It would
be Impossible for her to get It.
"The plan," the reporter continued,
"is for this woman to get a dlvorco
and slip away from Washington at
once.
"She desires to meet .another man
in San Francisco. This man that she
will meet Is an official of the
SAMMY AND HIS PALS
Copjnrlfht, lttt, by lUr Company
CUT IT OUT?
I CAN'T
BEAR IT'
^VE.R 6AW. WE'RE.
, GOiMCr "To TAKE THEM
'uwassirs^s?1
lUCApO
VKUnw/Mw?
Arms Conference To Make China
Safe?For International Crooks
By POLITICLY.
Whatever else the arms confer
ence may achieve. It seems certain
that It will make China sate for all
the plunderers.
The latest achievement in this
humane endeavor Is Its attempt to
forbid the exportation of arms to
China. Against this ban, the Jap
anese delegation suggested a res
ervation that the prohibition must
not interfere with the shipment of
arms to the Japanese troops in
Standard Oil Company. He sails for
the Orient In three weeks. What we
want Is a divorce, gotten in three
weeks, if it can be, and without
knowledge of the suit to anybody
except the lawyer, the Judge and the
prominent Washington woman. Can
it be arranged?"
Assured of Secrecy.
"The whole thing can be arranged
to the entire satisfaction of your
friend," Thomas declared.
"Well, how about the publicity?"
the reporter asked.
"There won't be any publicity, and
her hnnband will know nothing about
it until It's too late," Thomas assured
the reporter.
"As the matter is so urgent
wouldn't it be a good idea for you
and your friend to meet me at my
home tonight," Thomas asked. "You
know It is pretty risky business get
ting a divorce quick like this, and
it would really be better for you to
China. They were promptly In
formed that the prohibition, of
course, would not affect this Jap
anese privilege. But the shipment
of arms to the Chinese government
for its own troops is to be strictly
forbidden. That Is the conference
idea of "disarmament."
Called Restoring Peace.
The whole thing was undertaken
under the benevolent notion of "re
storing" peace in China. Its chief
effect will be to leave China, at the
come to the house tonight than to
be seen in the office here."
Accordingly, arrangements were
made with Thomas, one of Little
Reno's "counselors and attorney*
with practice in Virginia and the
courts of the District," to secure a
quick divorce, details for which
would be explained that night in
Thomas's home.
"Will she have to live over here at
all?" the reporter asked, about to de
part.
"All you need to get a divorce in
Alexandria is ? night gown and $200.
You ran hang your night gown up
over here in somebody's house, which
establishes you a residence, and give
me the $100. I'll do the rest.
"It will be easy, dead easy, boy, and
you won't have any trouble, publicity,
nor worry.
"Bring your friend out to my house
tonight and we'll settle the whole
thing," Thomas declared, bowing the
1 divorce seeker out of hla office.
Try It with Hot Milk
Get a good start for the day. You need a hot dish that not only
warms the stomach, but puts pep and punch into the body. Try
Shredded Wheat
With HOT Milk
Heat the Shredded Wheat Biscuits in the oven to restore crispness; pour hot
milk over them, adding a little cream and salt, or sweeten to suit the taste.
Nothing so nourishing, strengthening or satisfying.
Shredded Wheat contains more real, strength-giving nu
triment than eggs or potatoes and costs but a few cents.
Better than ordinary porridges because it contains all the
nourishment of the whole wheat in
digestible form. Being ready-cooked
and ready-to-eat it saves fuel and
saves time. M r
The Happy Way to Health
TIUSCUTTi* tWShrxMWWW
toad ? mmd ic
mercy of 1U benefactor. Py|lcu
larly of the Japanese. Just as they
have done in Siberia, the
have fomented revolutlona in China
and have armed the enemies of the
Chinese government. This noble un
dertaking ao far has been some
what hampered by the fact that
troopa loyal to China have alao been
able to get arma. If * way_ oouVd
be found to disarm the Chinese
troops, the bandits who get their
arma and ammunition from Jap
unese sources, or whose
have been bribed by the
would have an eaaier time of ine
final subjugation of the greai
Chinese repubUc.
The plan fits in remarkably well
with the whole tenor of the arma
conference. Inatead of r?*t?^llJ?
the integrity or the sovereignty or
either China or of Russia, 'the <con
ference leadorn have sought to in
sure the helplessness of those coun
tries. lest they resist the future en
croachmenta of Japan or of Great
Britain.
Simple Way to Peace.
It is a simple way to make peace.
If China and Russia can be dis
armed and paralyzed, if the im
perialist free-booting of Japan ana
Great Britain has nothing to fear
from Chinese or Russian resistance,
the peace of the Orient should be
Secure#
Against this program, the Ameri
can delegation has not raised its
voice. Instead it haa stood ready
to assent at every turn.
From time to time we have heard
noble sentiments from Mr. Hughes
and from his colleagues concern
ing the friendly Interest which the ,
United States has in China as well
as Russia. From time to time, Mr.
Hughes has emphasized the "moral
trusteeship," which he feels the
conference should hold for these
less-favored countries. To
In tlie street, this meant that the
United States was prepared to de
fend the rights of Russia or at
China. In his Innocent credulity,
he could picture Mr. Hughes pro
claiming the sanctity of treaties
against all violators; proclaiming
the Independence of China and of
Russia against all threats;
the determination of the United
States to see that Justice should be
done to the weakest.
Instead, for two months now, wo
have heard the voice of the Unltea
States raise'i only In defense of
the strong, we have heard It* dele
gates assent to every step that
would fetter these nations; we have
watched them bind the United
States to the chariot wheels of an
alien Imperialism.
Leave China Helpless.
If the conference were to end to
morrow, it would leave China more
helpless than ever and Russia more
completely at the mercy of the
Japanese invaders, than it was
when the conference began.
Worse, It would leave the United
States bound, by the treaty of the
ouadruple alliance, to protect Japan
against a possible retaliation by
China or of Russia, should either
of those nations ever become strong
enough to strike back at its
despoilers.
But the conference for the dis
armament of China will at ieast
have been a success. This is lim
itation of armaments with a ven- v
geance.
tofarmers,
FARM BLOCKERS, AND
FELLOWS WHO
FARM THE FARMERS?
If you care to read a book that is
full of facts, punch, snd logic, and
that will figure effectively In the
coming campaign, rea^
?THE CRIME OF '20"
By George W Armstrong <>f Kort
Worth. Texss. '? fam Hie press
and for suit- m. . ????'
stands in Waoh.ngton
NELLIE BLV DIES
OF PNEUMONIA
IN N.T. HOSPITAL
Widely Known Writer Remem
bered for Record-Breaking
Trip Around the World.
NEW TORK. Jan J7.?Nellie Blv. In
private life Mr*. Robert L. Seaman,
one of the apeclal writers on the ataff
of the Evening Journal, died today of
pneumonia In St. Mark's Hospital.
She became 111 two weeks ago and
shortly afterward was taken to the
hospital from her room In the Hotel
McAlpln. She sank steadily and yes
terday no further hope was held out
for her recovery.
Nellie Bly occupied a unique place
In the world's journalism for nearly
two-score years, and the reputation
she made In the eighties by her record
breaking trip around the world for a
New York newspaper remains undlm
med today.
Men and women in all corners of the
United States knew her as a great
ministering angel to humanity. Her
dally mall contained many grateful
letters from persons who had been
helped by her words of advice. Inspira
tion, and wisdom.
Nellie Bly knew life as few news
papers writers of the day. The back
ground of her knowledge of human
fralllties, sacrifices, joys, was the ex
traordinary newspaper life she had
led since she began writing in Pitta
burgh about forty years ago. She had
always been a feature writer and
had appeared on the public platform
ttiany times In behalf of good move
ments to which she decldefl to give
her energetic support.
She waged a sensational fight
against gambling and more recently
wielded her powerful pen In an agita
tion against capital punishment. She
heard the cry of homeless boys, the
blind, and the destitute; and her force
ful articles in their behalf brought
about many much-needed rsforms.
Nellie Bly covered political conven
tions for many years and her articles
were tremendously popular. She knew
the political game as few women
writers of today.
Nellie Bly was fifty-six years old
and had led a tremendously active
life. 8he was a newspaper writer,
from her early youth, managed two
large corporations for a time, and In
her after life returned to newspaper
work with as great an avidity as she
had shown In her younger days.
The thing that made her famous
was her trip around the globe In 1889!
In seventy-two days, six hours and
eleven mlnutea.
8he undertook the trip to prove that
Jules Verne's famous romance.
"Around the World In Eighty Days.",
could be matched In reality.
MEAT WORKERS VOTE
TO CONTINUE STRIKE
CHICAGO. Jan. 17;?More than 90
per cent of the striking packing house
workers voted today to continue the
strike, which has been in effect since
December 6, according to figures an
nounced today by officials of the
Amalgamated Meat Cutters and
Butcher Workmen of North America.
These figure* are based on the votes
cast In East St. Louis, St. Joseph,
Mo., Oklahoma City, Kansas City,
Omaha. Sioux City, Denver, Albert
Minn., and a part of the Chi
cago vote.
Dennis Lane, secretary of the Meat
Cutters' Union, said there was no
doubt that the strikers had voted
overwhelmingly to continue the
strike.
Some people think "Jan" Is mod
ern, but In The Washington Times
Sunday morning you will learn that
the ladies and gents who lived 5,000
years ago knew hew to shake a mean
shoulder-blade.
I .
57
Ready to heat
and eat
No wonder it tastes so
good! Heinz makes
the dry Spaghetti?and
cooks it after the recipe
of a celebrated Italian
chef. The tomato sauce
for which Heins is fa
mous, is used?and a
special cheese with
just the right flavor.
HEINZ
SPAGHETTI
i
Noted Woman Writer
Dies After Illness
of Two Weeks
. * j
MRS. ROBERT L. SEAMON
(Nellie Bly.)
LACK CONFIRMATION OF
EGYPTIAN RIOT VICTIMS
LONDON. Jan. 27.?Official con
firmation of the report that 190 per
sona had been killed and 1,000
wounded in disorders at Cairo, Egypt,
was still lacking this afternoon.
Field Marshal Allenby, British high
commissioner in Egypt, has made no
mention of the casualties nor of any
serious new disorders, in his latest
dispatches.
The cabinet discussed the report of
heavy casualties In fresh Egyptian
disorders, but no public statement
has besa made.
CHILD SCALDED TO DEATH
IN POT OF BOILING SOAP
CHIPL.ET, FTa., Jan. 27.?Falling
into a pot of boiling soap, the four
year-old son of Henry Wachob, resid
ing near here, was scalded to death
today. The child, with others, were
playing around the pot, where its
parents were working.
500 GAL. STILL
IS CAPTURED IN
Seven Arrests Are Made Fol
lowing Swoop on
Farm.
Raiding the farm house of Igna
tius Wat hen at Morganza. abo'lt forty-fg
five mites from Leonardtown, 8t.
Marys county. Md., Washington and
Baltimore prohibition agents this)
morning made seven arrests and con
fiacated a 500-gallon still they claim
was found in operation and nearly
400 gallons of distilled spirits.
Those arrested were Wathen, who
was charged with operating the still,
and E. W. Williams, T. W. Thomp
son. David Alexander and William
Miller, charged with aiding Wathen
in making whiskey, and Charles
Young and Burt Cliffon, who were
charged with having in an automo
bile a 175-galion still which they
were attempting to drive away with
when the officers swooped down on
Wathen's place.
With the qapture of the still, the
Federal officers claim they have put
out of commission one of the sources
of whiskey supply for Baltimore an<i
Washington. The officers who made
the arrests Included J. H. Albntten,
E. Linholn, William Slichen and
J. IX. Bratton.
CANADA MAY ANNUL
INDIAN TRIAL MARRIAGES*
WINNIPEG, Manitoba. Jan. 27.?
The special Canadian com:nittee on
Indian affairs today recommended
that legit? In t ion allowing trial mir*
rlagos uming the Indians be an
nulled
Free and easy marriage and di
vorce have resulted in grave im
morality among the Indians, the
committee said.
For Colds, Grip or Influenza.
and *? * Prrl?ntlT?. take T.aiitlTe RROMO
QUININE Tablata. The teanlnr brara tha de
nature of K. W. Gro*a. IB? aura wu (el
BHOMO ) 30c?Adv.
On Sale Tomorrow
$35 and $37.50
HAND-TAILORED
Suits for Men
i
At The Lowest Price That Really Fine
Suits Have Been Offered in Four Years,
Namely,
*25
Embracing 437 All-Wool, Hand-Tail
ored Suits, in fabrics of blue serge, pin
stripes,- herringbones (tan and grey),
plaids, checks, oxford greys, and plain
shades of brown, green, black and grey.
Models for men and young men; sizes for
every figure.
We advise you. to look into it!
The Avenue at Ninth

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