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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, October 29, 1922, SUNDAY MORNING, Image 13

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JAPAN,FEARING
WouW Convlnoe Ancient Enemy
of Advantagaa In Oriental
Alliance.
SEEKS TO AVERT CLASH
China** Laadars Ara Not Do
ceived by Tardy Profeasiona
of Good Will. v
ARTICLE FOUR.
By CORNELIUS VANDERBILT, Jr.
Copyright. 111*. -T C-V
Japan dreads an awakened
China!
The sleeping giant o? Asia is
rubbing the slumber-du?t from it?
?yea; h will shortly stitch ita
arms and yawn a bit. With an al
most vicious suddenness. China
taay be expected to leap from her
couch of the ages as one stung by
Jthe biting flames of oppressive
aggression and demand, at the
point of the bayonet, the return
of stolen properties and compen
aation for the outrages committed
upon her.
It will be a hard day for the
little 'Imperial Island Empire of
Japan wnan a vouag, ?Jrong and
revenge-driven China finds her
aelf ready to, call upon Japan for
an accounting of the Nipponese
Stewardship of the Orient.
Japan Shifts Policy.
Too well does Japan realise the
possibilities of a strong and united
China. But the Imperial Govern
ment of Japan Is pondering If the
hour Is not now too late. To soft
en the age-old bitterness of the
Chnese, to do what she can riowto
avert the seemingly Inevitable clash
of arms. Jspan has suddenly, and
With the eagerness of an all too
penitent youth, altered her outward
policy toward China. Hungrily
searching for some common ground
between the Asiatic nations. Japan
has cunningly conceived the Idea
that China must be convinced that
there is need of an alliance of Ori
ental races against posalble west
ern invaslo.i and occldentsl sup
pression. -
A more constructive policy or
tardy good will Is seen in Japan s
expressed intentlonsto be excep
tionally generous with the
government In the matter of af
fording easy payments to China in
the latter s efforts to recover the
Province of Shantung. whjch Japan
tore from the breast of Cathay.
There Is also an tncllnaUonupon
the part of some of the .Japanese
leaders to yield several Points to
China In the matter of railway
sua i ds In Manchuria.
And It comes very late. Even as
It-comes, Chinese leaders do not fall
to perceive the astuteness of the
Japanese in every move, ^e appar
ent deception that lies at the bottom
of tvery chalice of good will tendered
the Chinese government. China s
attitude in receiving what Justly be
longs to hr is not quite as concilia
tory and co-operatively good-naJT6!!
?a the Tokyo foreign office had
hoped might be the case In tact,
the Peking officials have donned the
robes of arrogance. New leaders ap
pear In China whom It may be well
to consider before giving closer study
to the new program Japan proposes
to pursue In her determination, as
strong as ever, to annex the rich
Chinese province of Msnchurla and
the Siberian province of Sakhalin, In
cluding the northern half of Sakhalin
Island ^ Chinese Leaders.
First In the new order of rtmark
able Chinese leaders Is Dr. Welling
ton Koo, well known to A -.net-leans.
Dr Koo waa Chinees ambassador to
Oreat Britain and was one of the
three Chinese delegates to the Wash
ington Arms Conference. Dr. Koo
recently returned to hi* native land
and assumed She portfolio of foreign
minister In the new Peking cabinet.
One of Dr. Koo's first acts was to
announce that China would seek the
return of the Kwatung peninsula
next year. That Is to say China
proposed again to secure to her,le'J
the rich Llaotung peninsula with
Port Arthur and Dalny, formerly the
nroperty of Russia and now of Japan.
Ably abetting the new Chinese for
eign minister Is Dr. Sao-Ke Alfred
Bse the Chinese Minister to the
United States, who Is still at hlapost
In Washington. Dr. Sxe, who Is con
aldered the most highly trained
diplomat of the Chinese diplomatic
corps, Is counted upon to swing the
United States Into line to support Dr.
Koo's claims when they are pre
sented. The United States will
probably refuse to take sides al
though public opinion in America
May force this Government to openly
declare Itself.
Irrespective of China's ability to
realize success In Dr. Koo's promise
to demand the return of Chinas
etolen tsrrltory ?r Llao-Tung. the
statement of the wtJv Koo is taken
as a fair Indication of what may be
expected of China In the future. Too
creat an amount of arrogance on
China's part Just now, however, may
Mult in the rendering of the Shan
tung withdrawal and payment terms
far more difficult by Japan. Off
setting Dr. Koo's rashness, howsver
aartlotlc, is the cool Judgment of
Chung-Hul Wang, the new Premier
of China who waa the third member
of the Chinese delegstlon at Wssh
ington. Dr. Wang was formerly
dhlef Justice of the Chinese Supreme
Court. _
Japan's Nightmare.
The lurking dread of a unified
China la Indeed keeping Japan
statesmen awake nights. They are
between the devil and the deep blue
?ea They know not whether to con
tinue the old militaristic policy to
Insure economic expansion or
whether to change entirely snd seek
commercial growth by liberal mutual
trade agreements.
Japan nurses the fear that the
first method would meet Its Waterloo
via America, and that the second
method may prove fruitless of result
because of the long pent-up hatu<l
for Japan, which marks the attitude
of all loyal Chinese, Koreans and
8'li|rlpasslng, let os make a brief
?Mtital note: Oreat Rrtta'n. though
ired te return to China the
itlvely lenmnMisfslW port
FIGHTS FOR RICHES
of Wei-Hal-Wel, at the western ex
tremity of the Shantung Peninsula,
?till retain* control of and ht* re
fused to rellaquish Hone Kong. the
greatest naval base In the Orient,
next to the Japanese naval bases of
Kobe and Kure. Let us remember,
too, that the Anglo-Japanese alliance
la stIU operative. Let us also Keep
in mind that France has a secret
understanding with Japan and (hat
the Four-power Treaty shows little
promise of ever being finally ratified
by France, an action necessary for
the abrogation of the Anglo-Japanese
alliance.
Let us not forget (he Japanese
army which still holds northern
Saghailen In subjection (Russian ter
ritory) and the fact that simultaneous
with the withdrawal of Japanese
troops from .Siberia, arms and am
munition are being supplied by the
j Japanese to the anti-Soviet forces in
Siberia under Oeneral Dletertchs at
Vladivostok. Let us look at the
dismal prospect of China, in whose
dissembling and dismembering rests
Japan's hope of realization of her
dream of empire by peaceful means,
that is to say by trick diplomacy.
Wu Prepares for Fight.
Oeneral Wu Pel Fu, the Oeorge
Washington of the New China, and
staunch supporter of the present
?' Peking Central Government, finds
that he cannot permit his loyal
armies to demobilize although they
recently decisively defeated the Man
churlan war lord, the Tuchan Chang
Tso-Lln. General Wu's armies are,
on the contrary, preparing for the
most bitter contest In China's mod
ern history.
Chang-Tso-Lin has established
three defense lines. The first Is at
the Great Wall, one mile from 8han
haikwan; the second at Wanchitun,
and the third at Sulching. Fortresses
are being built In and around Chi
umekow. The war lord is also re
ported negotiating alliances with cer
tain southern forces in the Yangste
Klnng valley, with the oblsct of re
storing to power Tuan Chijul, the
former leader of the pro-Japanese
Anfu party. Chang-Tso-I^ln eventu
ally hopes to combine forces with
Dr. Sun Yat Sen, the Canton or south
ern Chinese leader, who was ousted
from the presidency several years
ago.
Chang-Tso-Lin. it is said, is being
supplied with arms and ammunition,
with gnides and instructors, with
food and finances, by agents of the
Japanese government.
Banditry In Manchuria.
After China promised at the Wash
ington arms conference to do its
best to keep order in her provinces,
and thus guarantee protection to the
Japanese nationals and Japanese en
terprises, Japan agreed to withdraw
all troops and all police guards from
China. Thereupon, Japan kept its
word and withdrew the most of her
guards and troops in Manchuria. No
sooner had she done so than Chang
Tso-Lin's bandits started the messy
affair which ended, for the time be
ing, when General Wu led his armies
against Chang-Tso-Lin. A specially
selected set of bandits, however,
swooped down upon the town of Two
Tao-kow, In the Chien-tao district of
Manchuria, close to the Korean bor
der. ,'
The Japanese consulate was
burned to the ground, two Japanene
were killed, one Korean and three
Chinese met death. The Chinese
government immediately received a
vigorous note from the Tokyo For
eign Office announcing that the raid
ADVKRTISKMENT.
? ???.* i
Efl
YT~"irftvGG.^Aiin^^. ?}
Mrs. Graphic Grace 8afrig, beau
tiful half-blooded Indian girl, of
Berkeley, C'al., is fighting in
Seattle courts for the $404),04)0 for
tune left by George Washington
Carmark, discoverer of the Klon
dike. She declares she Is the daugh
ter of Carmack's first marriage.
For Pain
Use Pyramid
Pyramid Pile S*ppoal?ortea Have
Breaght Kellef te Thousands
Wh? Had Mattered Severely
Kor Yean.
You will quickly realise that
Pyramid Pile Suppositories are
simply wonderful to ease pain, re
lieve Itching, allay that aggravate
ing sense of pressure and enable y<> i
to rest and sleep with comfort.
The fact that almost every drug
gist In the V. 8. and Canada carries
Pyramid in stock it <0 cer.ts a bo*
shows how highly theae Snppnal
tories are regarded. Take n? sub
stitute. You can try them free by
sending your name and address tc
Pyramid Drue Co., (11 Pyramid
Bide.. Marshall Mick.
HUBBY PROMISED
TO WASH DISHES
His Love Cooiad in Flva Days
and Wifs It Suing
For Divoroa.
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., Oct. SS?
Promises of eternal devotion coupled
with equally fervent pledges to waah
all the dinner dlshaa ana help with
the housework. If only she would
"be his," Mrs. Beatrice F. Stockwell.
alleges were broken simultaneously
by Roland W. Stockwell, son of Mrs.
J. H. Stockwell. within five days
after their wedding, on August 6,
1922.
Pending final settlement of her
action of divorce, she appeared In
Superior Court and was granted $65
a month M temporary alimony.
All the perfume of the orange
blossom* which had bedecked Grace
Cathedral for the wedding and the
romance had been dissipated for the
girl wife, she admitted.
It was Just five days after the
ceremony, Mrs. Stockwell says, when
her husband told her that he didn't
care for her and was sorry that they
had married. "We aren t tempera
mentally fitted," he la said to have
explained.
was the third since 1930. and that
in spite of China's promise at
Washington to keep order in t\er
country the Peking government was
taking no steps to prevent bloody
riots In her territories. The reader
might ask how It would be possible
for China to keep peace In a prov
ince where disorder apparently Is
fomented by the Japanese.
The Japanese government followed
up this vigorous note with another
which had all the earmarks of an
ultimatum. All' this was explained
in great and confusing detail in the
Japanese statement Issued by their
embassy In Washington.
The fact Is "police" have already
been dispatched to the scene and in
all probability ffl many such
"scenes" throughout Manchuria.
Japan's Broken Pledges.
Thus has Japan violated her
pledges made at the Washington
arms conference. Thus la China
still the prey of the foreign aggres
sor. Is it to bo wondered then that
some factions In China lend an ear
to talk of a complete revision of
Oriental policies through an alliance
of Asiatics against the white man?
The Giant Stirring.
Five hundred million strong, the
Chinese giant has stirred In his
slumber'. Five hundred million
strong, the Chinese giant may de
signedly view an unwise and haughty
Japan with its comparatively in
consequential host of but seventy
eight millions.
Arthur Brisbane recently wisely
stated that America should join
heartily in moral support of the Brit
ish in their efforts to hold ba<-k the
Astatic hordes at Constantinople.
England, In defying Kemal, the
Turkish Nationalist leader, fights
the cause of civilization and It Is
i not for Americans to permit the
j angel of discord to visit Itself upon
the white races, which visitation Is
| the hotie and prayer of all Islam?
: a prayer that every son of Muham
mad breathes at the sacred attar of
his mosque every evening at sun
down.
Likewise, as England will have to
hold hark the lowly Asiatic horde*
in the Near East, the United States,
with Its emancipated people and
emancipated thought, must watch
with surpassing watchfulness the
developments as they are unfold.*!
by the Japanese In their work of
making real their dream of empire.
Victory for the Japanese means the
"Monroe Doctrine of Asia" and the
? end of the white man's commercial
growth.
nm man
WD J REPORT
Engineer at the Homeo
pathic Hospital Tells How
New Herbal Remedy
Dreco Brought Relief.
Is Now Free of Constipa
tion and* Stomach
Trouble.
Sine* the Introduction of Dreco In
Washington nevpr a day puiHi but
that someone cornea in and speaka in
the highest terms about It. Only a (aw
daya ago the following algned state
mant for publication waa given the
Dreco Expert at headquarters at O'Don
nell'a Drug Htore. where local people
are calling to have tha merits of this
vreat remedy explained.
J. H H ii iim;
"After I had flnlahed but one bottle
of Dreco I could aee that I had been
largely benefited and that at Iset I
had found the medicine I needed." de
clared Mr. J. B. Miilone. realillng at
701 l*th St N. K. Washington. Mr
Malone Is a member of McKendree
Methodiat Church, of Flreman'e Union
No. (3 and la popular among a large
Circle of frlenda In this olty.
"I have auffered from conatlpatlon
for years. If I forgot to take a pill
at .night I'd auffer the next day. Aa
. long aa I kept thla up 1 waa all right
but there seemed to be no end to It.
1 I often had gaa In my stomach and no
, matter bow carefully t ate eeemed
everything dlssgresd and dlagested
I pearly.
, "I became nervous so thst my sleep
waa broken and I'd get up moralnga
tired out Instead of refreshed.
I "I am ao much better In evsry way
alace taking Dreoo that I'd like for the
people to know about this (rest
remedy. The constipation Is completely
relieved, my digestion Is good. I sleep
sound and get up feeling refreshed and
full ef energy. Dreco surely haa helped
me and I believe will do the eame for
ether people If they will give it a fair
" Itreea Is Mm special*
ay Ike 0'D??-eir> rvrag Mare. Ie4 Ptfc
| ?<. X. W.
F -
Girts From States Taking Las
sons in Spaniah Gat
0. K. of Connoiaaaura .
%
MEXICO CITY. Out. It.?The tims
honored conception of the typical
schoolma'am?ibarp feature?, spec
tarlee. hair tightly colled In a knot
at the .top of the head?baa baen
pleasingly corrected here during the
paat few weeks by the more than
11,000 young women school teacher*
from the United States who have
been taking special courses In Span
ish at the national university.
Almost "flappereeque," but not too
much so, they cluttered up the down
town streets every afternoon when
classes were over to do their window
shopping.
What with swagger sticks and
sport clothes and startling coiffure
they presented a charming array of
American womanhood that give the
"flfls," those self-appointed Judges
of all feminine beauty in Mexico
City, aome hectic moments.
The young women came from all
parts of the Unltsd States. Prom
Maine and down the coast to Florida,
and from Washington to Lof An
geles, and from in* Middle West,
they flocked here at the cloae of
so (fool terms In the States to gain
an Intimate knowledge of the Span
ish languags by studying It In its
native haunts.
The Mexican government provided
a number of courses In Spanish and'
supplementary studies, and also fur
nished free transportation from the
border to Mexico City and return.
There ware a few men teachers
[ along, but their number* were
negligible.
Claims Hardest Head
In State of Arkansas
POPLAR BLUFF. Mo.. Oct. M.
?Leo Reeves, of Walnut Ridfee,
Ark., claims to hsve the hardest
hesd of anyone In Arkansas and
then some.
Reeves Is known as "hard head"
because of the resistance and resil
ience of his cranium. He thinks
nothing of ramming his head
through a door, breaking fifteen
bottle* on his head without a be
fuddling effect, or'striking it with
a hammer so long ?s it seeitis to
amuse his spectators.
Boy Hurt in Auto Crash
Sues for His Lost Smile
BUFFALO. Oct. St.?Joe Bevllac
qua. nine, asks a jury for a flO.OOO
award because he never again can
smile.
In an automobile colllaion a year
ago the boy's face was cut by glass
and he permanently lost control of
the muscles that reflect a glad heart.
Joe Is suing the owners of both
cars Involved.
nini.11
Whistle Saves
Cripple Locked
Inside Iced Car
VjUILKES-BAUKE, Oct 28.
" ?Cold, hungry and
thirsty, Johnny Pago, six
teen ypars old, a cripple, of
Hoploin, N. J.f mi found
her* locked in a refrigerator
ear in which he had been
prisoner three days. He
owas his life to the fact that
he-can whistle. Yelling and
pounding brought him ne
help so he decided to whis
tle. Trainmen were attract
ed and rescued him.
The boy asserted that two
Spaniards kidnaped him,
tossed him into an automo
bile, took him to the rail
road yards and locked him
in the. car.
DIETZ
The Real Tailor
247 11th Street N. E.
Sunshine Cleaning and
Steam Pressing.
Dyeing?All Colon of the
Rainbow
Just
Give
Me
a
Trial
Rvery run turn
er leave* my
place with a
?mile on
hin fa?v.
II
Don't ait In the corner and twiddle your thumbs?
be the moet popular person at the party instead.
It's easy to learn to alar the Dixon way. Five easy
, lessons; no dry-as-dust scales to ' play, and you
can play jassy ragtime (violin takes 10 lessons).
We guarantee to teach you-or return your money.
And with your first lesson you get
? .
Nothing cheap about the instrument we give you?
a genuine "bruno" is what you get. Come in a*d
examine the instrument you wish to play?let us ex
plain the original Dixon Method as written and
taught by Ifr. Crause. Take advantage of the cou
pon, it's worth $6.00. If you can't come in today
mail it and make an appointment.
INSTRUMENT FREE
Banjo
free
Collar
free
free
Violin
free
Uknl.l.
free
Baajo
MaVdolia
free
Taaor
Baajo
free
Baajoriae
free
Steel
Guitar
free
Saxophone
(So Instru
ment with
Coo rue)
Don't Be a Wallflower
Learn Ragtime in S Lessons
DIXON STUDIOS
612 13th STREET
. p,~ co?
Colored Studios j? - V
700 T Street
NORTHWEST ^
This Coupon / <
I? Worth $5 /<?
Ltnnont is cued
RUDEST OF CITIES
Speed of Modern Life React*
in Bad Manner*, Say'
Psychologists.
LiONDON, Oct. M.?"Hat London
become the rudeat ctty In the
wortdT" la the lateat subject ot news
paper discussion hare.
"If our ancestors could visit tha
city of London any day," vrrttea one
correspondent, "thay would be horri
fied by the modern curtneaa which
la fast pa suing into a cult. Many
people today think It to ?mart to b*
rod*.
"Where la the lelautyly good tem
per of a feneration sgo? Sna.pplsb
neaa, hate and even bad temper are
revealed In those little mlachancea
of every day which years uo would
have passed off with a ?mite, a bow
and a lifting of the hat."
But the psychologists agree In say
ing that Kood manners are a product
of leisurely times. "In this mechani
cal age." they ?t*t?, "life has been
speeded up, to the detriment of good
manners.
"The carrying of swords la the
old days had a marvelous effect on
politeness. Mea knew that rudeaem
meant the risk of a duel to the
d?ath.
"You will find that periods of his
tory when all men carried arms and
life was continually In osrti were
periods of elaborate politeness.
Virginia'
Beach
Dir*ctly mm AUmlc
Has no equal w an?
ALL-YEAR RESORT
Juat caol ?noasl) la hat tMlktt
HOTcuTS conrlcEfl
NEW YORK*EOSTQH ly sea
^easfiae
NORFOLK * WASHINGTON
STEAMBOAT CO.
They are
Happy
*** Well
You Should Be the Same
A LARGE number of women's ailments are not surgical
ones. Serious displacements or radical changes have not
yet taken place.
A tiny part in a fine clock may bccome loose and cause the
clock to gain or lose. If not attended to in time, the part may
fall from its place and cause serious trouble. So it is with
women's ailments, they start from simple causes; but if allowed
to continue, produce serious conditions.
When the warning symptoms are first noted, take Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound to relieve the present trouble
some ailment, arid to prevent the development of serious trouble.
Baltimore, Md.?'Tor several
months I suffered with severe
Portland, Ind.?"I was troubled
with irregularity and constipation
and would often hate to lie down
because of pains. One Sunday my
aunt was visiting us and she said her
iris took Lydia E. Pinkham's Vege
jd got
mother said she guessed she would
Si
,ble Compound and got well, so
It js doing me good
it highly.
lis Te
let me try it
and I praise it highly. You are
welcome to use this Tetter as a testi
monial."?Stella Newton, R. R
ifcfo. 8, Portland, Ind.
backache and general weakness. I
could not sleep comfortably at night
for pains in my back. I found your
book at home and after reading it
began at once to take Lydia E. Pink
ham's Vegetable Compound. I have
had very pood results and some of my
girl friends are taking it now. You
mav use -this letter to help other.
girls as the letters in your book
helped me."?Ross Waidx**, 3018
Rose-land Place, Baltimore, Md.
Many such Utters prove the virtue of
Lydia E. Pinkham's
\fedetable Compound
LYDIA C.PINKHAM MEDICINE CO. LYNN, MASS. /d
Are You Properly Equipped For the
Heavy Cooking Season?
FALL! With Thanksgiving in the offing and winter
coming the housewife turns her thoughts to heavier
'' ipeals and more hot dishes. '
It's a time to carefully consider the efficiency of your
cooking equipment. Whoever does the cooking in your
household needs the best, and she will appreciate the
time-saving, work-shortening features of the carefully
selected Ranges we offer.
A few minutes in our display room is sufficient for deciding
the type and sise of range best suited to your needs?the rest you
can confidently leave to our experts. Could you spend several
minutes to better advantage?this week?
***Small Cash Payment?Very Easy Terms'
WASHINGTON GAS LIGHT CO. '
Salsa Department 419 Tenth Street N. W.

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