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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, February 24, 1923, Image 13

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THIS PART OF THE TIME£ NO T COMPLETE WITHO UT_ FIRST SECTION. DO NO T BUY THIS SECTION WITHO UT THEOTHER
ARI Hit W IIP WITH
THE TIMES?
BONDS PROPOSED FOR AGENTS IN DRY CASES
To Repair Knickerbocker For New Theater
PERMIT IS
TAKEN
OUT
All-Steel Skeleton to Support
Roof of Ambassador—Cost
Placed at SIOO,OOO.
The permit- for the new Am
bassador Theater, Eighteenth
street and Columbia road north
west, provides for the repairing
of the old Knickerbocker Theater
Structure, the roof of which col
lapsed more than a year ago, kill
ing ninety-eight persons and in
juring 150 more.
To Cost SIOO,MO.
Thomas W. Lamb, architect, who
signed the application for the per
mit, estimates the improvement to
the property to cost >IOO,OOO. The
new theater, it is said, will be dif
ferent from the Knickerbocker, both
in architecture and construction.
“Although the permit calls for
repairing the theater, the building
Will be reconstructed and rebuilt,”
John P. Healy, inspector of. build
ings, declared today. .- *Tt-4vlli. be
steel throughout. _ |
“Plans for the theater aflwnow 1
in our possession and we are,-bare
fully scrutinizing them." i
Retain One Wall.
According to the permit the
Eighteenth street wall of the old
building will be retained The Co
lumbia rood wall will be rebuilt,
the permit provides, “to the satis
faction of the building department.” .
A new steel and gypsum roof is
planned.
"This roof will rest on steel col
umns on all sides of the building.“
Inspector Healy said. “All of the
weight of the roof will rest on
them. Tha walls Will only act as
a sort of curtain for the theater
and will not bear any of the weight
of the roof. The columns will be
carried to the soil."
In the old theater the roof rested
on the walls.
All-Steel Skeleton.
“The entire skeleton of the struc
ture Will be of steel,” said Inspector
Healy. “It will be practically a
rebuilt job. When the theater is
completed it will not have even a
semblance of the old Knicker
bocker.”
It is also planned, the permit
says, to erect a new ceiling. A
new balcony in the rear, construct
ed of steel, is provided in the per- j
mit.
The entire job, the permit says,
is subject to the approval of the
District Commissioners.
Inspector Healy said that the I
plgns fer the new theater will be;
submitted to the Commissioners'
advisory committee of architects,
which committee inspects plans of
all larger buildings.
THREE AUTO OWNERS
REPORT CARS STOLEN
Frank S. Appleman, 1735 New
Hampshire avenue northwest, re
ported to the police that his Willys-
Knight roadster, D. C. 22.898,
Stolen last night from in front of 305 i
Eleventh street southwest.
Charles C. Rowzell. 506 Second
Street southeast, reported that his
Ford touring car, Md. 212,930. was
Stolen from in front of 321 E street
southeast.
Frak D. Stone. 619 E street '
northwest, complained that his Hud- I
son sedan. D. C. 2.591, was taken i
from in front of his home last night. !
CITY’S TASTE FOR HOOTCH
FADING. POLICE CHIEF FINDS
The k wept number of intoxication
eases >n many months was given in
• report today by Major Daniel Sul
livan. chief of police, to Commission
er James F. Oyster. The daily re
port shows an average of twenty
eases Today only five were men
tioned ~ Th® report shows that six
Were charged with illegal possession
and sell ng.
In •• ories of whiskey raids
throughout the city fourteen gal
lons and one pint of liquor were
seized last night.
BTEALS 2 TONS OF COAL,
2 HORSES AND WAGON
The cold snap gnd coal shortage
•video'ly tempted a thief today.
Two horses, a wagop. end two
tons of coal owned by William T.
Brecht, 302 Twelfth street south
rt. ware taken from It front of
I southsast. Total value
wgs estimated at IBM.
S>BX bill PRICE* 1 —
BEFORE HENRY’S DAY.
When I see countless fllwlri
Scurrying over our eity avenues.
I get to thinking of the Garden of Eve
In those days of newspaperless news.
They say Eve wore a few fig leaves —
Scant attire that made her shiver —
How would she have felt In February
If she'd gone riding in a flivver?
THE OFFICE GOAT. I
Newspaper proofreaders are
beginning to part King Tut-
Ank-Hamen*s name in three
ways. The emphasis should
really be on the Ham, which
he was Tutank - ham - en,
thereby giving us the first
part of “ham and —”
PETE.
ALL TOO TRUE *
He was a small, skinny chap
walking F street* between two
large, fine-looking girls.
Two newsboys looked them over
and one said to the other: “There
ain’t much ham in the sand
wich, is there, Bill?”
GEORGETTE.
“Italy buys Senate site,"
we read, but in this country
we buy Senate seats.
FRED VETTER.
iMMMMMHMMaHMMaesHNMaiMBHWMMMaaMasMassw
A PERSONAL AFFAIR
I* every word In our language
In which we use the letter Q,
A fact we eee which comes to stay.
That letter is very clo»e^to^C^(^ou).

CRAZY COOT'S TROUBLES.
Him pouhd«]lM kl
1 I J ’ ! H /I
my >GOSH! IKHOWCjfcJp Mg
(ANOTHER) THAT'S W
Tr n scale/ much j!
ixl
® Ii? \
I WN ANOTHERj
I ' i scale/ jmf —c r
IM!. ( IVE ALWAYS LIKED TO WEIGH MySELp||
Smrpmc f 5 “"MOW RUSTED—/
jkkfH L wk i have pound nsEir
..>) THAT PENNY SCALES cr-j
NEVER CAN BE
j' fIM [ CORRECT!
cOBLjL IL IF I
“Hunts doctor after drink
ing three quarts” we read.
Most fellows have to hunt
six doctors before drinking
such an amount-one doctor
per pint, you know.
FRED VETTER.
DISCOVERED.
’Twas at a ball I met him;
He asked me for a dance;
I knew he was a sailor
By the cut of his pants.
MILDRED M. , I
TELLING YOUR GIRL
YOU LOVE HER |
Dear Bill \ I read the other i
day that a Kansas beau told his I
sweetie he had rather hear her I
chew gum than hear Geraldine I
Farrar sing. Which reminds me !
of the extravagant expressions i
of love so many fellows pass to |
their girls. I just wonder how 1
many fellows, long since married,
can remember the mushy things
they did say th their wives be
fore marriage? It would be in
teresting if some contrib would
give us something on this sub
ject. B. E. W.
Slander Suit Demurrer.
A demurrer filed by James A.
Burns to the suit for >IO.OOO dam
age filed against him by Henry M.
Ijanford, for alleged slander, was
yesterday overruled by Justice Hitz
in the District Supreme Court.
Burns claimed that the remarks
complained of by Lanford and
ascribed to him were of a privileged
nature. Lanford declared that
Burns went out of his way to slan
der him.
Bronze Bust Given U. S.
Mrs. Grace Whitney Hoff, acting
as donor for Mm». Beth Gh:s:-det,
ihe French sculptress. .v»s-<iduy
formally presented a bronze bust of
Jeanne d’Arc to the American peo
ple, through the Smithsonian Instl
t tution as custodian.
Almost any pedestrian, in
these days of automobile reck
lessness, is liable to get that
“run-down condition.*?
WINDING UP THE CHICKENS.
Five-year-old Mary strayed Into
• the rear yard of her home, where
a servant was killing some
chickens by wringing their necks.
She watched the proceedings with
great interest and th6p, in a glow
of excitement, ran to her mother.
“Mama,” she cried “run here
a-nd see the fun. Mandy la wind
ing the chickens up.”
• SNOOKUM.
A FOWL RHYME
A dealer in fancy fowls sang
the praises of his favorite breed
in this unique rhyme:
If yea Want some feathered st 1
That will not your wishes mo 1 /xrur
When at neete you daily kn J OCK
Buy some eggs or get a fl • )
or the famous Plymouth R f
J. A. TUCKER.
TEACHING BOOTLEGGING.
A Portland, Ore., chap started
a night school to teach “the art
.of bootlegging in easy lessons,
guaranteeing huge profits.*' A
revenue Shylock enrolled as a
student and found out how to
make synthetic booze Out of wood
alcohol and money out of simps.
The instructor, before the Gov
ernment got through with him,
learned that Uncle Sam is
powerful.
TONY TO JOE HOLMAN
I wants ta saya ta J. H. Holaman
He’s gotta mos* brains in da Heard
•eena elan.
He write da poetrs, he niaka me sigh
For ma sweet Angela—sure. I go gem,
bye bye.
He wrila < a J oka. dn points he hide.
But I finds and laffa till 1 busts ma
, side.
I Now the Fable he write. O mya da
good.
I I»a Morals da trutha, not drawn from
a wood.
I Joe write da one ’bout da beega
profiteer,
I Who Charga too mucha on da maca
roni and near-beer.
I When da profia-teera read it. he
gnasha da teeth,
I He’ll say, “I’ma roolned, by a phoney
N'ewsa Brief.”
| Don’t thlnka he won’ta see it. Joe,
they alia park Hearda-Reert,
I ’Cause I watcha da beega guys, they
know its rieha as cream.
I Mucha proud of youa, Joe, you gotta
sense lika man.
| Now 1 known all next summer I sella
more cheana banan
f.l I.U M. S< HUI.TZ.
A TIP TO MOTHERS.
Our friend Coue preached
I nothing which would cause an
American boy or girl to swallow
castor oil without desperate re
sistance, but if every mother who
wants to give this useful medi
cine will beat up the white of an
egg in it the oil becomes quite
tasteless. If orange juice is add—
-1 ed it becomes all the better.
PRESIDENT WILL NAME
NEW RENT COMMISSION
Rent Commission appointments will
be made within the next week,
Senator L. Heisler Ball, chairman of
the Senate District Committee, said
today. «
The Senator has received a letter
from President Harding in which the
chief executive stated the appoint
ments are now under consideration.
Jobs for Teachers.
it was announced at Franklin 1
School toda. .ha applications for
District tea< ht_.H or school officials
for positions as principals of junior
high schools must be in the office
of the superintendent of schools i
not later than March 1. I
WASHINGS TIMFS
| SATURDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 24, 1923. SECOND SECTION, |
WILL PUSH
TRAFFIC
BILL
Commissioners Hope Congress
Will Sanction Demand for
Jail Sentences.
The District Commissioners will
bend every effort to have Con
gress take action on the measure
sent up yesterday giving them
power to establish heavy fines and
jail sentences for violators of
traffic regulations.
Hope For Prompt Action. *
Commissioner James F. Oyster and
Cuno H. Rudolph today declared
they were hopeful that some action
would be taken in the next few
days in order that the courts may
begin the imposition of the fines
and sentences sometime next .nonth.
"We hope to have our bill at
tached to the one recently sent up,
whjch gives the Commissioners
power to revoke automobile license
permits,’’ Commissioner Rudolph
said.
Early next week, it was learned
today, the special traffic commit
tee appointed by the District Com
missioners will make their first
report, urging a regulation making
reckless driving of automobiles an
iffense In, itself.
Favors Jail Sentences.
The committee, it is said, endorses
the Commissioners bill for heavy
fines and jail sentences.
"With a reckless driving regula
tion tn this city. I feel sure that
the number of accidents would be
reduced materially,” one member of
the committee said today.
The committee feels that the
Commissioners have ample author
ity to promulgate such a regulation
without going to Congress for -spe
cial authority.
Pending the passage of the meas
ure sent up yesterday, the commit
tee probably will ask that heavy
fines be imposed for reckless driv
ing.
At yesterday’s meeting, repre
sentatives of the traffic committee
of the Board of Trade conferred
with the committee. It is said the
recommendations of the trade body
will not be approved by w the com
mittee.
Respect for law Needed.
W. Peace Rayner, head of the
District motor corps and chairman
of the subcommittee on traffic of
the Washington Board of Trade, to
day expressed the highest approval
of the measure sent to Congress.
"I don't see how anybody who is
interested in the welfare of the city
and the safety of its citizens can
object to this measure,” he said
this morning. “This bill, if passed,
will be the greatest step yet taken
toward creating a wholesome re
spect for the traffic laws. Under
the present penalties, traffic court
judges are powerless to impose
fines of more than >4O, even for
the most serious violations of the
traffic laws.”
He also expressed approval of
the reckless driving statute urged
by Stephens. This plan has already
been advocated by the Washington
Board of Trade’s public order com
mittee.
Would Set Thirty-Mlle Maximum.
Rayner and the public order com
mittee hnve asked enactment of a
variable speed limit law for the
District, under which drivers would
(Continued on Page 19.)
Noon-Day
Lenten Services
Be F< Keith's Theater
12:30 to I o’clock
Speaker Monday
Mr* E. Ce Mercer
Conducted By
Mn Byron Se Adams
Everyone Invited —No
Collection
Daily Traffic Calendar
Fine* and collateral forfeitures:
Totgl fer year >17,875
Total for yesterday.... 1,003
>18,94V
Yesterday's arrests and fine#:
William Harris >l6O
Jehn Roberts 100
Thomas Loving ......... 135
Alfred Keyes ..... 60
Theodore Kraft 80
Ignasius Dyson 50
Verale 3. DgAe 50
Solomon Jacksen 50
Arthur McCoy 40
Frank Williams 40
Charles H. Mecum....... 40
Harry T. Shelton 20
William A. Slater... 20
Frank Smith 20
Jessie Hardey 20
Edmund L. 80uden.;.... 20
Howard p. Lewis 20 .
John B. Capping......... 25
Louis Jackson 26
Morris J. Clark 25
Irving Seles 25
. Francis R. Hatt 15
Richard W. Lelbert «5
Howard Baker 5
Herman Resin 5
GUNNERS PLIN
THREE BIG
NIGHTS
Wrestling Match, Theater
Party, and Dance Are on
Alm&s’ Schedule.
Three big nights have been
planned for Almas temple.
The first of these will come next
Wednesday night, when the middle
weight wrestling championship
match will be held at Convention
Hall fop the benefit of the fund
to purchase new uniforms for the
patrol.
Joe Turner will meet Walno
Ketonen, present middle-weight
champion, for the title. As a pre
liminary, Pinky Gardner, the Shrine
middle-weight from Schenectady
temple, will take on Hughey Mc-
Donald. of Pittsburgh.
Party At Keith’s.
The second event will be an
Almas Temple theater party at
Keith’s Theater the night of March
5, when the theater will be turned
over to the .local Shrlners. A num
ber of surprises are being planned.
The third will be a record-break
ing patrol dance at the New Will
ard Hotel, March 21.
All expectations of the Almas
Temple 1923 Shrine Committee for
the Imperial Council session are
being broken as the various temples
complete their registrations with
Ellwood P. Morey, chairman of the
hotel and housing committee. The
estimate of 300,000 Shrlners will
probably be far too low. it is indi
cated. Many of the temples, which
have previously registered for a
certain number of visitors are re
questing that these provisions be
extended to take care of, In some
cases, nearly double the original
number.
Increase Quotas.
One pt these temples, registered
early during the season, has indi
cated that it would' practically
double its original delegation. This
Is Mohammed Temple, of Peoria.
111. Morey today was informed that
this temple will send fifty cars to
Washington in June.
i*v presen tat ives of Antioch
emple, Dayton. Ohio, in Washing
ton today, have submitted figures
which far exceed the original expec
atiops and have requeated that
xtra housing facilities be given
hem'.
Contributions to the >BOO,OOO en
tertainment and decoration fund,
now nearly two-thirds complete,
are sttil coming in heavily. Last
night Hope Lodge. No. 20, F. A.
A. M., voted >2OO toward the fund.
It Is expected that the >300,000
mark will be reached before the
end of Mgrch.
LENTEN LECTURE SERIES
UNDER KILMER CIRCLE
The flrM of a series of Lenten
lectures to be given each Sunday
afternoon under the auspices of the
K Imer circle, a local literary group
named in honor of Joyce Kilmer the
hero poet who died serving in
France, will be held tomorrow aft
ernoon at the National Service
School for Women, beginning at
3:30.
Ths Rev. F. K. Doyle, George
town University professor, will be
the lecturer, and will discuss some
of Wilmer’s poems. Just 4 ce Wen
’ 'll Stafford and Miss Katherine
r Fughes. will be antonvr those who i
follow Father Doyle.
The musical program will he given I
bv Miss Mercedes Phelan and Miss !
Margaret Callahan. The service
schools for women is at 2400 Nine-1
teen th street. I
WOMEN GO
TO WHITE
HOUSE
Mothers Thank President for
His Interest in D. C.
Teachers’ BUI.
A delegation of women, repror
Renting mothers of 70,000 school
children in the District, called to
see President Harding at * the
White House today to thank him
for his expression yesterday in be
half of the teachers salary bill.
Will See Him Monday.
Because of previous engage
ments, they did not get an inter
view with the President, but an
engagement was made for them
to see him Monday when they will
solicit his support in behalf of
District of Columbia legislation..
The delegation was headed by
Mrs. Joseph Goldberger, president
of the Cleveland Park Mothers’ Club.
The expression of appreciation. for
the President’s voiced appeal yester
day for fair play for District legis
lation, was left with Secretary Chrls
tion, who made tfce arrangements
for the District mothers’ represen
tatives to see the President on Mon
day.
Will Storm Capitol.
Following the conference with the
President on Monday, the mothers’
clubs of the District will then call
on the Commissioners at the District
building and then go to the Capitol
to see what has become of the “vest
pocket’’ rule which has been granted
by the Rules Committee, and which
it is charged is now ip the waist
coat of Congressman Campbell,
chairman of the Rules Committee.
Fallowing the call at thd Wnite
House this morning, Mrs. Goldberger
declared that the mothers of the Dis
trict, encouraged by the President’s
expression of approval of the teach
ers’ salary bill, would work until the
last day of the session in an effort
to “wake up” Congress to the injus
tice done the District, both in the
inadequate teachers’ compensation
and other legislation which bids fair
to die for inattention.
Hope to Place Blame.
“We at least hope to place the
responsibility of the teachers’ salary
bill where it belongs if the measure
is not passed,” Mrs. Goldberger de
clared today. “This is not a threat,
but the* people of Washington are
entitled to know who the ’buck
passers’ are, and they should be
forced into the open,” she declared.
POLIGE7TO N E
SERVICEPOOR,
0 VOTER SAYS
Commissioner Threatens Some
Dismissals and Shifts of
Operators.
A shake-up among telephone
operators in the Police Department
has been ordered by Commissioner
James F. Oyster.
"I am dissatisfied with the serv
ice these operators are rendering
and I am going to insist on im
provement,” the Commissioner said
today.
There ip a possibility that one
or two operators may be dropped
from the service and others shifted.
“The public must get better at
tention,” the Commissioner *sald,
“the telephone operator has'a grave
responsibility. All calls should be
answered most promptly. Opera
tors should assume that every call
is an appeal tor help.”
Commissioner Oyster also said
that he plans to see that only re
sponsible persons at headquarters
receive Important messages from'
the public and the precincts. He
said he had reports that messages
have been taken by chauffeurs.
The Commissioner himself has ex
perienced difficulty in reaching
headquarters. Several nights ago
he said he spent 10 minutes trying
to get in touch with the detective
bureau.
“I will not tolerate such service,”
the Commissioner said, "The public I
is entitled to prompt attention and I
1 am going to see that it gets it.” I
ALL WASHINGTON
HOME TOWN PAGE
Sixth Precinct Chief
Long In Service
7 Os Police
CAFT. ROBERT E. DOYLE,
Veteran commander of the Sixth
police precinct, fifty-two years
old today. He has been thirty-two
yean ip the service of the local
police force, sixteen years as a
- captain,
islum
CHECK,CLERK
ADMITS
Studying Law, and Needed
Funds, M. Glicksman Says.
Gets 3 Years, Paroled.
Admitting that it is a serious
offense to raise a check, and also
informing the court that he is
studying law and expects seme day
to be admitted to practice. Maurice
Glicksman, twenty-six years old,
who had’ been employed in the
Coast Guard service as a clerk, to
day pleaded guilty before Justice
Stafford in Criminal Court, No. 1,
to raising, in August, 1919, a com
pensation check of >24 to >74.
“I don’t think you are the type
of man that ought to be admitted
to the bar,” Justice Stafford said
to the self-confessed criminal
“There are enough of your kind
practicing law now, but we got rid
of some of them.”
A penitentiary sentence of three
years was imposed and Glicksman
was placed on probation.
Glicksman cashed the raised
check at the Federal National Bank
and he gave as reason for altering
it that his salary was small and
that he hkd Incurred some debts.
He has since made up the amount.
Glicksman is from New York, but
his been in this city since 1918.
and has been employed all that
time in one Government department
or another.
At present he is employed in the
Postoffice Department and has been
attending law school, where he is
now in his third year.
KILLS WOMAN BY AUTO;
GETS 7-YEAR TERM
Samuel A. King, colored, convicted
last Wednesday of manslaughter ini
connection with the death of Mrs. j
Emily J. Keith by running her down
with an automobile, was sentenced
today by Justice Stafford in Criminal
Court No. 1 to seven years in the
penitentiary.
Mrs. Keith was crossing the Inter
section at Thirteenth and B streets
northeast January 27 last when the ,
car struck and dragged her several;
feet. She was dead by -the time the i
hospital was reached.
“FATHER TOM” GRIFFIN
TO CELEBRATE BIRTHDAY
"Father Tom" Griffin, veteran em
ploye of the State Department, will !
celebrate tha seventy-fifth anniver
sary of his birth this evening at his
home, 336 Bryant street northwest.
Seventy-five guests have been in
vited to the birthday party, includ
ing many employes of the State
Department.
DRUG sf6RE~sfbRAGE
SHED BURNS IN FIRE
Fire of undetermined origin
damaged a sped in the rear of Lig
gett’s drug store, 1715 Pennsylvania
avenue, shortly before noon today.
Firemen extinguished the blaze
with chemicals. Several cases of
soft drinks and druggists’ acces
sories were destroyed. The damage
has not been estimated.
SOME ARE
SCARED
AWAT
NOW
“Crooks” Could Be Eliminated,
Is Lawyer’s Belief, If Court
Could Hold Them.
Bonding of police agents—per
sons on whose affidavits war
rants for the arrest of alleged
rum-sellers are given—is being
advocated by officials connected
with the suppression of the boot
leg trade in Washington.
Would EMndnate Crooks.
According to one of . the District
attorneys in charge of prosecution
of liquor cases, any legislation- to
that effect would single out any
“crooked” agents, who. every now
and then, creep into the ranks of
that branch of the police depart
ment.
Another feature of the bonding
system, the prosecutor declared,
would eliminate One of the things
that has been troubling his office
for* some time. In many cases,
he asserted, bootleggers scare away
the police agent, upon whom the
case is based, and cause trouble
and pecuniary loss for the Gov
ernment.
By bonding the. agents,. It was
pointed out, they couM .be kept
within the jurisdiction of the court
until the case in which they are
involved is disposed of.
One other thought which is oc
cupying the minds of many of the
officials is the payment of periodical
salaries to police agents, to avoid
the embarrassing situations which
daily arise in Police Court and in
many instances cause a disagree
ment among the jurymen. *
At the present time, police agents
are paid about 95 for every case
that is made by them. When testi
fying before a jury, the counsel for
the defendant takes advantage of
the point in attempting to bias the
opinion of the jury by discrediting
the testimony, inasmuch as he is
paid by the case.
Read Favors Plan.
Discussing the subject, Major
Daniel Sullivan declared that he
I did not care to have his opinion
promulgated, but Intimated that he
would be in favor of any legislation
that would efface the prejudice
from the minds of the jurymen.
Edgare C. Read, head of the
Revenue Department, asserted that
•he would back anything that was
offered by the Police Department,
ias that department had control over
police agents.
SEEITESWE
OFCHARITY
NEEDS
Committee Gathers Data on
Community Chest
Proposal.
Investigations looking toward
establishment of a community chest
! in Washington are being made to
! day by members of the special com
i mittee appointed last week at a
conference of representative of local
charities and commercial and civic
organizations held under the auspices
of the Merchants’ and Manufactur
ers’ Association.
While the work of the committee
has not yet been outlined and ns
subcommittees have been appointed,
each member has been asked to
acquaint himself with the com
munity chest system and its ap
plication to Washington.
The preliminary Investigations are
especially directed toward securing
estimates regarding. *the approxi
mate amount which will be needed,
annually to maintain local charities.
Members of the committee wif!
report their findings at a meeting
to be held March 2 in the assembly
hall of the Merchants’ and Manu
facturers’ Association
K DANCING
& Every Evening
9:30—12:30
■pTIW 11th at Penna. Ave.
GARREN’S ORCHESTRA
i

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