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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, July 02, 1923, Image 1

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Bm GOURARD.THE ONE-ARMED UON
OF THE ARGONNE, ARRIVES IN
NEW YORK FOR VISIT
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■ GeMral Gourard, “the Men of the Argonne/*' arrived yesterday
Mb the eteatiship France at New York. He was met by Maj. Gen.
Sobert Lae Bullam ' - < W ;^: ' ? ‘
[RESIDENT
fIDUH
land Mrs. Harding Refresh-
I After Two Days’ Rest in
■ Nation’s Wonderland.
E'«r GBOKCE B. HOLMES,
■ laitematioaal News Service.
1 ENROUTE WITH PRESIDENT
k|piNG TO SPOKANE, Wash.,
■ 2.—Refreshed by his rest in
■wstone Park—the only real
■he has had since leaving
■ngton— President Harding
Bf today on the kst lap of
Jsurely journey across the
|Four More Speeches.
[■jtottxl more speeches will be made
■Are Ithe President sets sail for
MdcaJl and he is looking forward
Ether* with zest. He went into
M m<*»ntainß of the Yellowstone
■® Tw om ten days incessant
and crowds, but he
today wholly rested. The
TOO days of quiet in the mountains
|<Bto trim the time needed’ for re-
Eat Vnd recreation.
■te President is highly pleased
■*b ;the results of his trip thus
BbT Bp told friends today. He has
Kteched the gospel of contentment
■Bjt ‘iniddle-of-the-road-conseryatism
■ toe people of the west for ten
.Kps , npw. and he personally be
■to* “*• utterances have been not
■moyt. effect in allaying some of
unrest that he has
Krdso much of in Washington
Ee last November.
Ki some respects the President
been surprised and gratified.
B’lmA heard in the White House
Kmany tales of the “West seeth
■r with unrest” that he was fully
■pared tor some heckling when
Fleft Washington. But he has
| been bothered in this respect.
i audiences, for the moat part,
listened to bis prepared
with marked attention
■T interest.
■pt. President’s speeches were
■pared with an eye to combatting
Fsame unrest and each of them
I contained an appeal, either
4 ■jfely or Indirectly, for the public
Kilsregard the extremists
j of the big problems,
lis in his world court
Harding scored both
ers and the irreconcil
.ppealed for a middle
court, v •
r/ Pleads' for Conservatism.
I- to ‘ hie • agricultural speech at
nMehlnson, he asks the farmers to
■regard the radicals who are urg
ing revolt in the rural sections. He
5 told them of bettering conditions and
ESmted to the vast array of
Stadial legislation already enacted
Ki/proof that Washington is alive to
Presidential special is due to
thrive *t Spokane this afternoon
Sh Cr> the President will make a
MMech tonight dealing with re-
Station policies. The people of
to northwest are vitally concerned
Ess reclamation and the President
Sms to handle the subject in con-
BSlrohle detaiL A -
- i
COL. LOGANWILL BE U. S.
OBSERVER DEBT PARLEYS
The resignation of Roland W.
as Observer
Os the on .the allied
reparations commission will cause
no change In the policy of this
Government tq&ard that body, it
was stated officially at the State
Department today.
When Botoen retires on August
Was one of the American. economic
experts at the Versailles pea&oesP
ference. •
z .... . z
SIXTH DEATH REPORTED
IN BLAST ON DESTROYER
NEWPORT, it 1., July J —With
the death of Anthony Rock/a fire
man, the casualties from Saturday’s
engine room explosion aboard the
V. 8. destroyer Williamson, mount
ed today to six.
■ The navy board pt.inquiry an
nounced the blast was due to the
slipping of a ventilator pin. This
Siused the ventilator cover in the
reroom to fall aud close. The
blower, without air, exploded, the
board reported.
BANDITS ESCAPE AFTER
SHOOTING POLICEMAN
CHICAGO, July 2.—Three hold-up
men who seem to have a penchant
for picking on the Royal Blue
Stores, Inc., today shot and danger
ously wounded Policeman Edward
Mashek who had been detailed to
guard one of the stores which had
not been robbed in the last few
weeks.
The bandits, evidently believing
they had killed him, fled empty,
handed and escaped in an automo
bile.
FISKE SEES fflß LOOM OVEB
DRY ENFORCEMENT
By International News Service.
NEW YORK, July 2.—New war clouds are gathering over
“dry America.” Prohibition—the international enforcement
of the Volstead Act—-is the breeze fanning the flame. Rear
Admiral Bradley A. Fiske, U. S. N., retired, two-fisted fighting
man, visiting New York, holds this belief.
“I was berated soundly for predicting a world war in 1914,”
Admiral Fiske said today. “I was right then.
“America’s international affairs-* — —«
have assumed a most undesirable
state. The four greatest countries
in the world have taken sides on
an issue—the prohibition issue.
One—America —is on one side, an
nouncing its “stand-pat ’ policy;
England, France and Italy are on
the other. They, too, are ‘stand
patters.’
“It would not be correct to say
war is sure to follow. But it is
■ correct to declare that wars often
1 have followed just such situations.
“The war with Spain—there we
had a long, drawn-out dispute fol
lowed by the blowing up of the
; Maine.
“The world war—trivial matters,
, growing greater in dispute, a-nd
i then the killing of an obscure arch
, duke.
: “We gre today drifting toward
war and we will have to change
our course in some way to dodge
it."
* Admiral Fiske believes he I.«
found the way.
- “I suggest the calling of a pro
' hibitlon conference.” he said. “Get
I together 100 of America’s first citl
, I zens. Let them study prohibition
land its enforcement tor six months.
’ (Continued on Page 2, Column 6.)
Soldiers With Machine Guns Rout 4,000
Masked Strikers After 3 Hours Battle
i M ... J* ! ?'
WASHINGWNTIMES
t-|r
NO. 12,654.
IFRENCH SEIZE KRUPP WORKS
I ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ’Ar ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ’Ar
\Author Oi Poison Case Tip Found
STRIKERS
CURBED BY
GUNS
Troops Called in Industrial-Dis
order Among 4,000 at ,
Nova Scotia. j
SYDNEY, Nova Seotia, July 2.
—Machine guns, manned by 400
soldiers, early today succeeded in '
ttttjiing back a d? > 4,000 ■
tottgked strikers, mo ih .« three- ,
hour battle, stoped police sta
tioned about tha plant of the
British Empire Steel Company
- csam T&r additional troops
sent out. It»was announced cavAtry ,
was on its way here ffdm Quebec,
Toronto and Montreal.
The rioting followed similar out- j
breaks *«f Friday and Wturday
nights. , <’ i-
A KILLED, 9 HURT WHEN
NIAGARA TRAIN WRECKS
TONAWANDA, N. T., July 2.
Nine persons were Injured, tour
seriously, when an International
Railway Company two-car train on
the Niagara Falls high speed line
jumped the track today, plunged
into a field and one of the cars
overturned.
The injured were rushed to the
Degraf Memorial Hospital here.
The train is reported to have hit
an open switch while going at a
high rate of speed.
PICKLE FACTORY BURNS
WHILE OWNER IS IN JAIL
NORFOLK, Va„ July 2.—Fire
early today destroyed Joseph
Voight’s pickle factory here while
the owner was locked up in the city
jail serving a term for using hl's
plant tor the illegal manufacture of
liquor.
The loss was estimated at $60,000.
SEEKING THE
OPPORTUNITY
—Remember, if you have some
thing of value you are in a
position to offer or else is
wanting to offer you an op
portunity that you now need.
—Remember, if you have some
thing of value to sell—if you
want to market the work of
your hands or of your brains,
tell all the people what you
have to offer through The
Morning Herald and The
Evening Times Want Ad
columns.
—When you have a Want of
any kind you should call upon
The Morning Herald and The
Evening Times Want Ads to
assist you.
Telephone Your Ads
Into
The Times-Herald
Phone Main 5260
• ; 4 —.
KRUPP’S 15
SEIZED BY
FRENCH
Troops Also Marching on Oth«
Towns to Cut Off Frankfort.
One More Occupied.
? By Urteroatfoml Mews Ssrvfos '
LONDON, July 2.—The KruPP
works at Essen have been occupied
by the French, according to a ©Mi
tral News dispatch today from
Berlin.
French troops also occupied.
Schwerte, the Westphalian iron
town, and ' aro
Hagen with the intention ofCtttttto
off Frankfort, according to adwKwl
Central NwsMJHOpatchs
Hagen IK twenty-aix mflea Wt
of Arnsberg and only tourj. nipos
from Schwert.
Reports to Berilß .-'.'V
BERLIN, July 2.—French troepo
in the Ruhr were reported id be
extending their line in the edbtern|
end of the Ruhr today. < ,
Forces of cavalry and infantry
are said to be moving in direc
tion of Westphalian towna of
Hagen, Westhofen and HChworte.
By DAVID M. CHURCH
By InternatSoMd News Serwtee.
LONDON, July 2.—A report was
persistently circulated today that
Premier Stanley Baldwin is anxious
to open direct negotiations with
Germany on the reparations issue.
The premier was represented as
feeling this necessity was forced
upon England by France’s apparent
intention to adhere to its policy of
taking no steps towards a -settle
ment of the Ruhr problem until
London, tacitly at least, recognizes
its right to occupy the Ruhr., -
At the foreign office it was
stated that reports of Independent
action by England on the repara
tions were premature.
If, however, France’s answer to
the British questionnaire on the
French Ruhr policy does not "show
a solution, then the cabinet will
consider Independent action,” 'it
was said..
Denial was made at the foreign
office that England and the United
States are considering a plan to
force action from France through
co-operative demand for payment of
France’s war debt.
Instead of sending a written
reply to the questionnaire, Premier
Poincare apparently has determined
upon a verbal answer.
Count De Saint Aulaire, French
ambassador, will hold a conference
I on the subject and the exchange of
views is regarded here as of the
utmost importance.
Sbme members of Baldwin’s cabi
net are understood to be opposed to
separate negotiations with Ger
many, but their position undoubtedly
will be weakened if the outcome of
the conversations today is not fav
orable.
Belief here is that Premier Poin
care is most anxious to hold the
British Government, but is not
willing to recede from his announc
ed policy of taking no step in the
settlement of the reparations until
passive resistance has ceased.
One of the items in the British
questionnaires formulated by Lord
Curzon inquires what was the
French interpretation of “passive
resistance.”
Doubts Separate Negotiations
PARIS, July 2.—The foreign
office today discounted press re
ports that Britain was considering
entering generate negotiations with
Germany on the Ruhr and repara
tions problems with France.
The reports “do not correspond
with information available in diplo
matic channels,” it was stated.
THE WEATHER.
Partly cloudy tonight and
Tuesday; mild temperature;
light variable winds.
WASHINGTON, MONDAY, JULY 2, 1923.
HMMSKAtt-
■ 11
A lew of th. I.OOT It.U.n im- ffl
mlgrnnifi on bonrd tl-p ste-u-r- hip ■■*
Guillo Cesare, from Naples, which S ’ | .K y
early yesterday moved up New ■ ’ %’kW X I *’'
Cork harbor. The great question ' -J
in all their minds was whether ‘ -V'
they would land or he returned to ‘
their native land and be forced . ■ |
to wait until the next quota | 1 ■ < ' ■ ,
period. ’
iimsTm'toK
IH BOCKS OFF
BILIFIB /TH W
Vessel Grounds in Dense Fog. / f
Radio Brings Tugs to Res-
cue Passengers. ‘
By International NeWa Service.
HALIFAX, N. S. July 2.—During
a dense fog today the Inter-Colonial
Navigation Company’s steamer Ad
vance, from Boston, with nearly Ww J '
100 passengers and a large crew
went on the rocks off Shutin Is- I'- *
land, sis tee nmiles east of Halifax. 9 s
The first known of the stranding
of the steamer was when the Cap
tain sent a radio to Halifax for as
sfstance to take off the nassencrers.
A of <be I.WO leitan ta
migrants on bdMm the steamship
tiuUfo Cesare, from Naples, which
early yesterday movedup New
York harbor. The great question
In gll their mind* was whether
they would land or be returned te
their native hind and be forced
to wait until the next quota
penoa. ••c.j
MBSM
UN HICKS OFF
«
Vessel Grounds in Dense Fog.
Radio Brings Tugs to Res
cue Passengers.
Hr International Metro Service.
HALIFAX, N. S. July 2.—During
a dense fog today the Inter-Colonial
Navigation Company’s steamer Ad
vance, from Boston, with nearly
100 passengers and a large crew
went on the rocks off Shutin Is
land, fiftee nmiles east of Halifax.
The first known of the stranding
of the steamer was when the Cap
tain sent a radio to Halifax for as
sistance to take off the passengers.
Tugs were immediately dispatched.
The Advance was bound for Hali
fax and was to have arrived here
before noon today.
The weather is' calm and it is
believed all the passengers will be
taken off safely.
HELD FOR GRAND JURY
IN THEFT OF $350 RING
Admitting the theft of a 1350 dia
mond ring, Lloyd Sloan, colored, was,
held on SSOO bail to await the action
of a criminal grand jury by Judge
! McMahon today in Police Court.
Sloan told the court that he had
hidden the ring tn the basement of
a house at 188 Maryland avenue
northeast, where it was recovered.
The ring belonged to Mrs. John
Seay, 5416 Thirty-third street north-
J west. u
; DYNAMITE WRECKS/hOME
OF OHIO PROHIBITION AIDE
[ STEUBENVILLE, Ohio, July 3
, a dynamite wrecked the
front of the home ox John C. Mc-
Coy, prohibition enforcement officer.
Sixteen other sticks of dynamite
were found under the rear of the
house, having faded to explode
when the fuse attached burned out.
Bloodhounds were/ placed on the
trail of the bombJrs.
Wee :-daye
Tony and Angelo enjoy Italian “pie" on the steamship Guilio
Cesare, from Naples, one of the many ships that raced into New
York harbor yesterday with their cargoes of immigrants.
420 OF 1WM»B
ALREADY MED BACK
By JACK CARBERRY,
International News Service.
NEW YORK, July 2.—Tears, mingled with laughter—
comedy with tragedy on Ellis Island today.
. On the 12,448 liberty-seeking immigrants who yesterday
arrived aboard twelve liners, choking the sieve of the
nation’s “melting pot,” 420 have already been rejected.
AU are Greeks or natives of
“other Asia”—-the tiny dots on the
Asiatic maps. The Grecian quota
of 638 admissible aliens was ex
hausted before the Polonia, which
reached quarantine at 12:02 o’clock
Sunday morning, had discharged
THREE CENTS ~|
two-thirds of its human cargo into
the crucible of nations.
By nightfall the admissions will
total 4,000.
This will leave 0,500 of the first
arrivals still to be examined. To
(Continued on Page >. Column
■»»_
HOMJ
EDITION
-_- „, , ~ I , ■■—.—■■■.
POLICE TO
QUIZ HIM
Ibehj
r AY
4 I llllnl
1 ' I UUlli
i®» '.'■■■< st": Cs-” •<?>£- ; r
’ rS«
Who JuO*
-W ;fc
ptepson will bo
g£gg»<SS
w Headquarters Dattctnres Jtelljp
and Scrivener.
4 ThnWnthor fa a wvlli odvcatpd
is making no
P? *,
MUjW Fayton UGxilon> uniwu
death on June 23 was nirt the ft
suit of natural causes “in the in
■'-' -j. W ft -fciaMßh jl Aißtton w
vcresva qk &xreu<ißiiipf
,-d jurtk*.» ■ ' W
* ?-3~/ ‘ ;-* ,v v
“SrrSsSS
Airing, 28, and Vlncenta A. Navarro,
avenue, were revealed by officials
toHay
The police atm declare that every
thing 1* contingent upon whether
analyses of the viscera and ab
dominal organs of Abing, whose body
was disinterred from Mt. Olivet
Cdfhetery Saturday and reinterred
after autopsical show he
was the victim of poison. 3 ' -
Three tests are stlH under way:
One by Dr. T. M. Price, District
chemist, who seeks alkaloid poisons,
perhaps Oriental in character; a
second by a pathologist resorted to
by Dr. Price, who is seeking to de
velop active tuberculosis bacilli from
tissue, and a third by a pathologist
similarly engaged by Dr. Herbert T.
Martyn, deputy District coroner.
Dr. Brice declared today his teats
would all be completed this after
noon, the results to be communi
cated at once to the police. 'He re
fused to hazard the outcome of the
exhaustive analysis to which he has
been subjecting the specimens
through Saturday, Sunday and to
day. '
The jury sworn by Coroner Nevltt
over Abing*s body before it was re
buried, and which would sit in case
findings warranted an inquest, con
sista of W. J. Armstrong, If. W.
Kelly, C. A. Forrest, F. W. Seebode,
C. L. Tschiffely and Mason Taylor.
Couple Still Detained.
Mrs. Abing is Mill at the Hous?
of Detention, where she preserves
an unperturbed demeanor. Navarro
has been moved to the Tenth pre
cinct station where he is lodged tn
the commodious witness room. He
is said to be cheerful.
It developed today that, accord
ing to the statement of the police,
Mrs; Abing and Navarro have ample
protection of-counsel in two young
lawyers... Inspector. Grant. declared
that the pair had at no time been
held Incommunicado, that the attor
neys ■ had had several conferences
with their clients and that they had
agreed to bring no habeas corpus
procedeings prior to the chemists'
and pathologists’ announcements.
A visitor at headquarters this
morning was Commander Mayo. He
went first to the office of Major
Daniel Sullivan, chief of police, who
took him to Inspector Grant**
rooms. After a consultation behind
closed doors and tran»o»»g*- he
J came out the side way. Approached
1 mobile, that he “didn’t wish to
. appear rude, but had absolutely
nothing to say.”
He threw no light upon the case,
according to the detective

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