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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, December 31, 1923, Image 8

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8
‘THANKYOL'AT
NATIONAL IS
GENUINE
John Golden presented at the
National Theater last night
“Thank-U,” a comedy by Win
chell Smith and Tom Cushing.
Here is an advocate for the un
< <> er pa id preacher quite as effec
' * live as any broadside from a pul
pit "Big Bertha’’ and both funda
mentalists and modernists will
reach a common ground in the
conclusion it is downright good
entertainment.
"Thank-U” derives its title from
the attitude which hundreds of
pastors of the less prosperous
flocks are compelled to assume
through accepting various gratu
ities to compensate for an inade
quate salary. Playwrights Wincfeu
Emith and Tom Cushing frequent
ly lay on their comedy strokes in
broad resounding smacks for the
•o-called professional Christians
and the smug hypocrisy some
times illy concealed under the
cloak of a vestryman.
The Rev. David Lee, pastor of
a small New England church is
the agency used to impress the
lesson. Rector Lee is eking out
an uncertain existence on an 1800
salary and such contributions as
the more generous of his
parishioners dole from time to
time. When his very attractive
niece arrives from Paris to be
come a member of his household
•he endeavors to impress upon
him that the relation between the
congregation and its underpaid
•nd humble spiritual director is
not such as to generate dignity or
respect. Her logic is that one
continually looked down upon and
pitied in week days can hardly
radiate the divine spark on the
Sabbath. The campaign to win
more material reward progresses
satisfactorily until the breath of
scandal touches the rectory and
incidentally brings in an appeal
ing romance. When it appears
that every plan has gone amiss
and failure is inevitable a wealthy
business man arrives on the
Scene and by the application of
some practical Christianity solves
the problem of the pastor and
the love-affair of his becoming
niece. It's a consistently told
little story and has the added
blessing of never becoming
preachy.
Martha Hedman fits in mosi
congenial!’- in this well-cast com
pany. She is Diane—the charm
ing niece of the rector—and still i
the blonde beautiful of the stage, j
Her role calls for no exacting mo- '
ments. but the touches of emo
tion with which she is entrusted
•re made effective by skilled re
pression and fin’sh. Harry Dav
enport. whose forte once was
musical comedv and juvenile
roles, seems fashioned to fit ner
fectly into h»s spiritual surround
fng. He makes the Rev. Lee a
most srmpathetio Pn d life-like
character. Frank Monroe was
truly fine as a hard-shelled busi
ness man with his rare voice still
... his great asset. The laughs in
Hiis play are well handled bv Phil
Bishon. Win Chatterton. Freder
ick Malcolm. Allen Peel. George
A. Schiller and the irrepressible
George Spelvin, Helen Judson,
Eleanor Post. Phyllis Rankin, and
Nancy Lee. fill incidental roles ac
ceptably.
“Thank—TT” 1 8 effectfvelv
•taged by Producer John Golden
•nd can be safely recommended
to the New Year playgoer who
is looking for clean, laughable en
tertainment.—A. R. K.
CENTRAL—
“Bright Lights.”
Bright Lights of Broadway'”
fe the featured photoplay at
Crandall’s Central Theater for the
first four days of this week.
The story centers around the dra
matic rise of a girl, through
managerial influence, to theatri
cal stardom. The climax, reached
by a succession of events familiar
to the life of Broadway, is ordi
nary, but carries a suspense that
•Imost lifts one from his seat.
A smalltown girl, whose dreams
of success and love, awakes to
find herself compelled to choose
between the two. Stardom she
chooses, and on the night of her
great success, becomes the wife
Os her manager. The same night,
the country boy comes in search
of his sweetheart, and in the aris
ing complications, is falsely ac
cused of murder and sentenced to
be electrocuted. Through the !
perseverence and skill of the girl j
his life is saved, and all ends j
happily. Os course, as in all !
such stories, the villian receives I
his reward at the hands of Provi
dence.
The cast is exceptional. Doris
Kenyon, Harrison Ford and Lowell
Sherman do some very splendid
acting as the “Eternal Three.”
and small parts are played by
Edmund Breese. Tyrone Power,
Effie Shannon and Charlie Mur
ray.
E. L. P.
CRANDALL’S—
“The Mailman.”
Johnny Walker and Ralph
Lewis have been given unusually
generous opportunities to exert
a deep appeal to the heart in
Emory Johnson’s production of
“The Mailman,” at Crandall’s
Theater, where overflow audi
ences greeted it enthusiastically
yesterday. The story is of a
mail carrier who has served
Uncle Sam faithfully for many
years, providing a comfortable
living for his family and devot
ing much time and money to the
partial care of a little invalid
living next door. Tn time his son
becomes a railway mail clerk
and in recognition of valuable
service is put in charge of a
large money shipment going by
sea to a distant port. The rene
gade father of the little Invalid
girl plans to rob the mails of
the money and make it appear •
that the mail clerk is the guilty
one. The manner in which this
scheme is thwarted comprises
♦he most exciting sequence of
events in the picture and brings
the movement of the drama to
Its highest point.
Ralph Lewis, remembered as
the carpetbagger in Griffith's
“The Birth of a Nation,” and
Johnny Walker, who has many
fine portrayals to his credit, is
Cast as his son.
Harry' Pollard is the star of
the comedy, “It's a Boy,” which
ought to be self-explanatory!
| In “Thank You”
■ I
■lllite ? I
ji
IIF
y-.
.1
Ipf wE
k W 1
gw w I
fib f
Hb-
I
W
MARTHA HEDMAN,
One of the alluringly lovely lights in John Golden’s comedy of
character, now at the National.
MAE MURRAY IN j ALL LAUGHTER
A SURPRISE ON MET’S
EFFORT BILL
“Fashion Row,” on view at the
Columbia this week, is by far the
most ambitious and the most suc
cessful of the Mae Murray pic
tures.
Considering some of her past
hits, this is rather a strong state
ment: but backed by a concrete
wall of evidence, it can be said
without fear of contradition. And
the evidence may be seen several
times daily on the Columbia silver
sheet.
Mae Murray’s efforts are in *
class apart; her following is about
as large and as partisan as
Gloria Swanson’s. Like the Para
mount star, a great deal of this
popularity is due to her bizarre
taste in clothes, and an ability
to set them off to fullest ad
vantage. It must be admitted
that some of Mae Murray’s past
performances have had little to
recommend them save the styles
the star introduced. With this in
the average mind, the title of her
latest film, “Fashion Row,” is
apt to be entirely misleading and
misrepresenting. For at last we
have a new and more powerful
Mae Murray, with a better and
sincerer sort of story to tell.
There is no doubt about the
ability of Robert Z. Leonard as
a director, after “Fashion Row.”
neither can there be any doubt
as to the histrionic ability of Mae
Murray. But it now becomes evi
dent that the full force of this
combination has been smothered
too often beneath manuscripts
that have been so much tripe.
All is now changed. The play’s
the thing. And with a cast like
this one it can’t go wrong.
A dandy Sennett comedy. Inter
national News and orchestral over
ture round out the entertainment.
R. L. B.
J AN ALL-FUN BILL
Miss Ray Dooleys
Mr.FlorenzAmes
In "A Terpxlchorean Dilemma”
By Joe ('awthorne
The Eunnient Skit Ever
EVA PUCK * SAM WHITE
“Opera v» Jaxz”
"HARMONIA” WITH
IN A HAYWOOD, DORA
MAIGHN A MISHA’S BOYS
T hw<. Babette
DCGAN A RAYMOND
“An Ace In the Hole”
Tflo lewis
•‘From Burnheart to Heart- T
burn" •
Sli Other Sterling Feature*
Show* Dally. 2:15 & H:ls
Extra—Midnight Show Tonight
Beginning 11:15
a Buy Early _
THE WASHINGTON TIMES • • The National Daily • • MONDAY, DECEMBER 31, 1923.
I Unfortunately, since we are not |
statisticians, we failed to record
the number of laughs per minute i
which we suffered at the Metro- i
politan yesterday, where "Her !
Temporary Husband” will run for '
j the week. However, we know it !
was a most unheard-of number.
; Without a doubt, "Her Tempo- ;
i vary Husband” is about as an ab- '
I surd and as illogical a piece of
■ hokum as we have reviewed in
■ many a day. But herein lies the i
i secret. It is so absurd as to be
j side-splitting; it is so illogical as
■ to be amusing beyond words—the j
I maximum of comedy on the mini- ;
■ mum of probability. It is all i
| founded on the premise of possi- I
I bility. By the Old Year, it is •
hilariously improbable! No 1
■ amount of gag has been spared.
, Beginning with a situation that
; is stretched to the limit and end
i ing with a monstrosity, it rolls
! along in mountainous waves of
: mirth and is altogether an ingeni
; ous handiwork. Be the husband
| as temporary as possible, he de
j veloped the most exceptional stick
i ing qualities, to the deep chagrin
j of his enemies.
Owen Moore, Sylvia Breamer
j and Sydney Chaplin occupy the
| spotlight of mirth. But the laur- ,
j els of comedy must go to Chaplin. I
i He is the perfect valet, whose >
| gods are his master and old Dr. I
| Rum. Tully Marshall also con-
I tributes his bit in his character
j istic way.
To give you just, the last few
laughs of which you are capable,
a Christie comedy, featuring Jim
mie Adams, has been added. Dan- i
iel Breeskin, with his able assocj- !
ates, render a splendid musical ;
embellishment, and Bathe News
runs down the curtain.
W. S. P., Jr.
Capt. Ariel L. Vargos, Inter
national News Reel cameraman,
who had the distinction of'being
the first photographer to film ;
the devasted area in Japan, has ;
arrived in California. He is
here on a short vacation.
HAPPY NEW YEAR, EVERYBODY!
I a*.,.. RIALTO up
I FEATURE STARTS—II:4O, 1:40, 3:40, 5:40, 7:40, 9:40
I FOR THE FIRST TIME IN HISTORY!
G old try n Presents
A FRANK, FEARLESS AND THRILLING EXPOSE
OF AMERICA’S AMAZING DIVORCE TANGLE
IC lOL $9
I C.l ® (»
I’ RUPERT *
I ... HUGHES’
/I Liveliest Picture
Featuring
■ HELENE CHftDWICK-LEW CODY-CARMEL MYERS
I WILL ROGERS COMEDY-NEWS-ORCHESTRft
Gotham Guild Returns
for New Honors
"He Who Gets Slapped," the
Russian fantasy of Andreyev
which marked the opening last
night of the Theater Guild’s second
week of repertoire in Washington
this season, provide quite as in
teresting and entertaining a piece
as any' which have occupied the
Poli boards this year.
Though many who have already ’
looked upon this dramatic story I
of tanbark life have sought to
find something symbolic in the
tale, there remains the belief in
one who viewed it for the first
time last night that all the cards
are quite clearly on the top of
the table with little more than a
.ague hint of anything symbolic.
A gentleman seeking consola
tion from a more or less brutal
world, which has permitted an
other man to walk out with his
wife, finds some degree of happi
ness in the friendly embrace z of
the care-free life of a F clrcus.
Once he is one of the boys who
I must smile though the hekrt is
breaking, he finds that they have
about as much trouble as those
on the outside who take them-
‘CANYON CALL’
PLEASES AT
PALACE
Loew’s I*alace starts the New
Year with a bang by offering to
Washington a masterpiece in the
ptotoplay, "The Call of the
Canyon.” a. picturization of Zane
Grey's novel of that name.
Wonderful scenic effects and
faultless acting in combination
with a love story of great appeal
have produced a picture of merit.
Just who, or which part, of the
picture to praise most is the
problem that confronts us. Rich
ard Dlx and Lois Wilson, in the
stellar roles, could not have filled
them better than they did. Mar
jorie Daw’s acting was flawless,
| but —and this, we think, will be
the only adverse criticism —it
would seem after reading the
; book that this character as con
ceived by Zane Grey calls for
something bigger and stronger
than the pretty sweetness of
Majorie Daw. The beautiful
Western scenery has a great deaJ
to do with the success of the
picture. Through it all. however,
can be seen the fine hand of the
: director whose praise we are in
| dined to mitigate, nowever, con
' sidering the fine material he had
to work with.
"The Call of the Canyon”
throws into high relief the
marathon madness which has fol
lowed the war and gives to a
I world seemingly unable to judge
, itself a universal view, a much
needed basis of comparison.
Drowned in the babble of jazz, all
1 its senses submerged in the
riotous unrestraint of the day the
weary world dances on—now an
swering the mad call of the
piper and now standing aside to
i condemn.
Richard Dix takes the role of
Glen Kilbourne, who returns
home, long after the boom of the
last gun, a shattered man, expect
j ing tn find rest and quiet in his
i sweetheart’s arms, but the world
> has changed since Glenn Kil
bourne went away. Rest and
quiet are unknown words. He
finds his sweetheart, Carley
Burch, whose part is enacted by
Lois Wilson, shaking dice with
some "cowboys” and “flappers.'
Then the doctor sends him to
! Arizona, where he is nursed to
' health by a pretty girl and one
! of the cleanest products of the.
i West. Flo falls in love with
i Glenn, but he remains faithful to
Carley. After a time Carley fol
lows him, but to her the virile
rawness of the West is disgust
ing and she returns East only
to have love call her back just in
time to save a perfectly good
husband
Added attractions are a new
Ben Turpin comedy, "Ten Dollars
or Ten Days;” the Bathe News
views, Topics of the Day, and a
symphonic overture and musical
score by Mr. Gannon and his
orchestra. —M. A. K.
: AMBASSADOR—
“Her Temporary Husband.”
"Black and Blue,” the two-reel
Christie comedy, presented as
foremost supplementary feature
■ of the bill arranged for yesterday
! and today at Crandall’s Ambassa
dor Theater, is a clever farce of
situation that moves with un
abated speed throughout its
length and is based on a real idea.
The entire action hinges upon the
efforts of an irate father and a
resentful suitor to prevent the
i marriage of a beautiful young
t woman to a man deemed un
worthy of her hand. Jimmie
; Adams offers one of his best
pieces of work in the principal
role, and Vera Steadman is prop-
selves seriously but are quite as
clownish withal. He would re
turn to his life on the "outside”
through marrying the starring
young equestrienne, but again is
foiled when the girl’s father seeks
to sell her to a baron as wealthy
as he is fat. Robbed again of
his right to love he plays the
joker, poisons the girl and takes
his own life with a quaff of the
same potion. If that is anything
more than a study of morbid
psychology let the symbol search
ers search on.
“He Who Gets Slapped” is quite
different from the usual run. and
because of that alone is honestly
entertaining. Basil Sydney, in the
role of “He,” makes much of a
part overeasy to spoil. Zita
Johann has moments when she
does not convince, but is never
theless charming in a difficult
part. C. H. Crocker-King, Stan
ley G. Wood, Lloyd Neal, Rauff
Acklom and Florence Auer give
' good interpretations.
Tonight the Theater Guild will
I present Bernard Shaw's play, “The
I Devil’s Disciple.”—C. L. M.
FILM PLAYER
HEADLINES
STRAND
The Strand has an entertaining
bill as its first offering of 1924.
Walter Miller, the popular
screen star, who has lately ap
peared with Lionel Barrymore,
Mae Marsh and other artists of
like caliber, is headlined in a one
act comedy by James Horan,
“The Pick of the Family.” The
plot of the sketch is rather trivial
and does not offer Mr. Miller an
opportunity for any exceptional
display of artistic ability, the
brunt of the acting falling upon
the shoulders of William H.
Power and Estelle Mardo who ap
pear in support of the star. Mr.
Miller's appearance, however, is
very pleasing and his personality
is of the variety which meets
with favor on the silver screen.
The “Jewel Box Revue” features
Eileen Schofield and Bob Gore.
Miss Schofield is a supple and
graceful dancer and Mr. Gore
also does a few intricate steps.
Their “Bevy of Danelilg Beauties”
forms a background sufficiently
interesting to hold the attention
of any “tired business man.”
Morgan and Moran have some
new and rollicking interpretations
of tragedy a la Shakespeare in
“Legitimate Legits.” Their act is
unusually funny. Kara, the mar
; vel of manipulation, and "daddy
of them all” presents some ex
; ceedingly clever stunts in the art
of juggling. Billy Frisch and
Verna Sadler offer “The Song
Writer's Wedding Belle" and Mr.
Frisch sings a number of his own
popular compositions.
The photoplay attraction is
“South Sea Isles,” featuring Shir
j ley Mason. It is a colorful and
1 emotional bit of drama enacted in
the tropics. J. Frank Blendon
• and Francis McDonald appear in
i adequate support.
The orchestra under the leader
! ship of Arthur .1. Ma.nvell pre
’ sents several numbers.—E. M. R.
erly agitated when left waiting at
! the church. ’
i The new issue of the pictured
J world events embodies much that
is of interest, and the Ambassador
j Orchestra, conducted by Bailey F.
Alart. gives a fine rendition of
! selections from “The Only Girl,”
by Victor Herbert, as the concert
i overture.
The major feature of the bill to
, be repeated today with continuous
i performances from 2 to 11 p. m..
! is First National’s hilariously
i funny picturization of Edward A.
I Paulton’s stage success, "Her Tern
-1 porary Husband,” with Sydney
I Chaplin and a star cast.
SHUBERT-BELASC A
Reginning Tonight at 8:30 p. in. WW
William Harris, Jr.
Presents
The American Premier of
OUTWARD BOUND
With « Rtmarkablt Cast That Ineludea
rF.si.iK Howard, makgalo
GU.MORF, tl.Fßi'.n EI’NT
i BERYL MERCER. DUDLEY DIGGER, J. M.
KERRIGAN. EUGENE POWERS. LYON EL
WATTS and CHARLOTTE GRANVILLE.
NEXT MONDAY-SEATS THURSDAY
JANE COWL
AS
CLEOPATRA IN
ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA
Nights. R1 to S 3
Wed. and Sat. Mats.. 50c to 82.50
MAIL OHDERS NOW
F PRESIDENT
LEONARD WOOD. Jr., Presents
The Washington Theatre Guild
The Superb Comedy-Drama,
“UP THE
LADDER”
By OWEN DAVIS
Prives: Eves.. Orchen., g 1.50 and
gl ; Bid., 75«- and 50c; Boxen, 82,
Plus Tax. Matn., Orchen., 75c;
BuL. 50c and 35<>; Boxen, SI,
Plus Tax.
Week "Commencing Sunday Eve
ning. January fl
“SCANDAL”
By COSMO HAMILTON'.
DANCING
Saunders’ Orchestra every evening.
Famous chicken and steak dinners,
also a la carte nt nil hours. Catering
In all its branches, parties, dances,
bunquetn. Phone reservations.
Green Grove “T” House
Columbia 0075.
7301 Georgia Ave. N. W.
"Only Place of Its Kind in the City"
At Keith’s Tonight
■ <» ■ * k * ' ■
JB'
t
BL;
mUF
■ >
®L '
B
./-.J'JI,
»
n. •■ •
H
I
_EVA PUCK,
One of the bright entertainers on the-program at the big vaude
ville houses for New Year’s week.
DIVORCE IS
RIALTO
THEME
The alarming spread of the
divorce evil in America, as in no
other country of the world, has
made it one of the most im
portant themes of the twentieth
century. It is not strange, there
fore, that after much discussion
in the pulpit, the press, and
legislative bodies of States and
countries, it should find its way
to the screen through the in
strumentality of so well-known a
writer as Rupert Hughes.
“Reno,” the word which has
become a synonym for divorce, is
the title of this week’s offering
at Moore's Rialto. Written and
directed by Mr. Hughes, it is at
once a travesty on divorce and
am eloquent appeal for uniform
divorce laws.
The story, however, falls some
what below the Hughes standard.
It begins as serious drama, wan
ders into the field of comedy,
strays from the theme to touch
upon appalling conditions made
possible by the Virginia laws
which permit a girl of twelve to
marry, then returns to the theme
and drama.
The matrimonlac, Roy Tappan.
goes to Reno •where he divorces
his second wife and Immediately
takes another. The abandoned
young mother, finding herself
LOEW’S ■■l
I PalacE
F STREET AT l«th
I Continuous 10:30 a. m.—ll p. m.
TODAY AND ALE WEEK
I THE CALL OF
I THE CANYON
BY ZANE OBEY
|g|| A love story of jazz-mad Broad
way and the plains of the
Far West.
I WITH LOIS WILSON AND
I RICHARD DIX
BEN TURPIN COMEDY
News—Topics—Overture
■ A LOEW’S M
■ Columbia
F STREET AT 12th
<7'a Continuous, 10:30 a. m.—ll p. na.
NOW PLAYING
MAE
I MURRAY
Enacts a powerful dual role in
the most exquisite picture of
Af'- her splendid career!
“FASHION ROW”
WITH EARLE FOXE
MACK SENNETT COMEDY
News—Overture—Etc.
Tuesday, January 1 at 8:15
THE AUDITORIUM. 13th & N. Y. Ave.
HARVARD
GLEE CLUB
DR. ARCHIBALD T. DAVISON
Conductor
T. Arthur Smith. Inc.. 1306 G Street.
MARCEL DUPRE
WORLD’S GREATEST ORGANIST
Three Monday Evening Recitals
January 7, 26, and February 26.
Subscription 05.
MRS. GREENE’S CONCERT BUREAU.
1300 G St. at Droop’s. Tel. Main 6403.
For Limited Number Special Rate Stu
dent’s Tickets, Sal. Frank. WJ9.
penniless, has in the meantime
married Walter Heath, a former
lover, but finds she is not free to
live with him since she was not
represented by an attorney when
her husband divorced her in
Reno. A telephone call, supposed
ly from Heath’s secretary, takes
her to his office while Tappan
entices the children out for a
i ride and flees with them to the
I beautiful South Carolina estate
of his aunt. Being near the
home of his first wife, whom .he
has quite forgotten, an amusing
scene follows the arrival of the
second Mrs. Tappan in company
with Mrs. Tappan the first. No
divorce being recognized in South
Carolina, the father has no right
to his children so the mother
regains possession. From here
on the story grows in interest.
Mr. Hughes has gathered an
excellent cast for his production,
i being especially fortunate in his
■ selection of diminutive Robert
! Vilbliss and Virginia Loomis to
play the junior roles.
| Additional features include Fox
News. Sportlight, and an* amus
ing Hal Roach comedy, “Uncen
sored Movies.” which presents
i Will Rogers in a clever take-off
on William S. Hart. Tom Mix,
; and Valentino. M. M.
f rMETROPOUTAN I
— F AT 10th
TODAY—II A. M. TO 11:25 P. M.
First National Presents
= SYDNEY
I CHAPLIN
I “■“
SSS Owen Moore. Sylvia Breamer.
XZ Tully Marshall and a Special
= and Ensemble in a Comedy Riot,
= Her
1 TEMPORARY
HUSBAND
JIMMIE ADAMS In
"BLACK AND BLUE"
Exceptional Music
= 1-aat Complete Show—9:2o
to 11:25 P. M.
S 5 —CRANDALL’S
1 [JU BASSADOR
I - 18TH AND COL. RD.
TODAY—2 TO 11 P. M.
| STAR CAST
. ~~ In First National's Comedy Howl.
HER
= TEMPORARY
HUSBAND
Distinctive Added Hits
liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 1 ’
MAI IIA TONIGHT, 8:20
POLI S Holiday Mat.
■ Vfci V TOMORROW. 3 P. M.
Jos. M. Gaites Presents
BASIL SYDNEY
And a Wonderful Company of 40
TAVISUT 0 Tuesday Matinee
lUNIuHI « Tues. & Frid. Eve.
“THE DEVIL’S DISCIPLE’’
Bernard Shaw's Great Comedy-Drama
Wed. Eve. and Sat. Mat. and Eve
iiDECD fiVHT” ,l »« nl s Spectacular
rttn Ulnl Romance With Musie
Thursday Matinee and Evening
“HE WHO GETS SLAPPED’’
| n7y.~~TH EATER GUILD PRODUCTIONB <
RATIONAL THEATRE
ABSOLUTELY ■ FIREPROOF
: TONIGHT Matinee Tomorrow NIGHTS
1 AT 8:20 and Sat. 50c to $2 50c to $2.5#
; John Golden. | Presents Another of
Producer of , H1 » Comedy Hite.
, .XTv.., THANK-U
and By Winchell Smith
I ‘ 7th Heaven" And Tom pushing
I urvT aaoai Mats. Wed. & Sat., SEATS
NEXT MUN. SI.OO to $2.50 THURS.
sth Annual Production
GEORGE WHITE’S
SCANDALS |«»i
Edition de Luxe
MAIL Nights: SIOO. $2.00, $2.50, $3.00. $3.5#
ORDERS Mats.: SI.OO. $1.50. $2.00. $2.50
NOW Plux 10% Tax
No Advance for Saturday Night
PRESIDENT IN
AUSPICIOUS
START
Leonard Wood, jr., —presents
the Washington Theater Guild,
Inc., in “Up the by
Owen Davis, at the President
Theater this week. The cast:
Henry Smith Howard Sydney
Mary, hie wife ..Mine Ann Warrington
Jane, Daugther. . . .Miao Peggy Coudray
Jerry. Son Robert Harrigan
Lucy. Daughter ....Mias June Weboter
Mrs. Muller Henrietta Vader*
John Allen Wilfred Lytell
Rosalind Henley ...Miss Jessica Paige
Joe Henley J. H. Doyle
Dick WilmersNelan H. Jaap
Eva Wilmer* .Miss Grace Goodall
Stanley Grant Bernard Pate
Ellen Mias Norma Lee
Dr. Raymond Edward Cobb
It one were to judg* from
quality of production and volume
of attendance, basing the decision
upon Sunday evaning’s presenta
■ tion, the stars augur well for the
latest fling at fortune of the
avenue playhouse; the customers
were literally “hanging to the
paint” and the play was as en
joyable as the audience was
large. The Theater Guild, Inc.,
Is to be congratulated upon a
most auspicious start.
Owen Davis’ "Up the Ladder”
is a typical comedy-drama of
today, with not too much drama
and not too little comedy. It
is cut from the same cloth as
a hundred other so-called suc
cess plays—the rise of the yuong
man to a position of importance
in the business world, his wife’s
endeavors to keep up with him
socially while secretly longing
for the little vine-covered cottage'
of the ea'rlier days before
prosperity came in such heaping
abundance, the young man's fight
against unethical dealings, and
his final triumph over the at
tempt on the part of certain men
to unseat him from his place in
the sun. A subject just a little
predisposed toward triteness,
saved by the showmanship of
Owen Davis, who has interpolated
enough human interest into the
four acts to send away the multi
tudes with a feeling of satisfac
tion at having had its money’s
worth and more.
The cast is of particularly fine
quality. Wilfred Lytell (and
from now on let’s make a New
Year’s resolution to refrain from
identifying him as “The brother
of Bert Lytell”—for he’s talented
enough to stand on his own
thespian feet) heads the cast,
with Peggy Coudray, already
known to Washingtonians, oppo
site. Howard Sydney in character.
Ann Warrington ditto, Robert
Harrigan in juvenile, Jessica
Paige as the ingenue and J. H.
Doyle as the elderly heavy, form
a splendid nucleus about which
the rest are clustered.
A good word for the mounting,
too. As fresh as a daisy and as
easy ot look at, it’s a credit ta
the’ company.—R. L. B.
| “Happy New Year” I
Greetings from the
Refined and selected acts
exclusively from the
B. F. KEITH
ZZJHZB3HE
| EXCHANGE I
I CHOICE—HIGH-CLASS |
Comedies and Short Subjects
Matinee, 22c and 38c, Till 6
First Night Vaudeville 6:30
Last Feature Showing 8
Last Vaudeville Starts 9:15
A SHUBERTu
GarricK
NEW YEAR’S EVE—MAT. TOMOR.
Brock Pemberton Presents
“MISTER PITT”
A New American Play by
ZONA GALE, Author ot "Lulu Botl”
S Cost of Noto with Woltor Huston
IHBHBBI WH ■ FfiMirnip
Marty Collins and Sonny Pillard
WITH THE
HOLLYWOOD FOLLIES
NEXT WEEK—"STEP ON IT.”
Dancing
ARCADE
Get in the Big Photo at 11 P. M.
AT THE
HUM DINGIN’
HORN TOOTIN’
HIGH STEPPIN’
NEW YEAR’S EVE
BALL
TONIGHT
I,ADIES 25c. MEN 60c.
NEW YEAR’S TWIN EVENTS
—TOMORROW-
MATINEE DANCE 3 TO 6
1924 DANCE 8:30 TO 12.
Billiard* and Bowline
Open at 10 A. M.
Bowling: 15c a Game. 10 to 8.
GLOVER'S, SIS 22d. Priv. lessons. 7 So.
Course. 4 pri., 3 class. leg.. S 4. W. Ill#
OPEN
DANCING EVERY NIGHT
ROCK SPRING INN
ON CONDUIT ROAD
THIS SIDE GLEN ECHO
JOE CAIN
OWNER * MANAGER.

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