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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, February 15, 1924, Image 17

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I THETIMESVj
UTILITIES BODY MOVES TO CUT RATES AND FARES
Bill Exempts Autos From Personal Tax
SLIP HIDE
FRAMING
ICT •
«
Meer Found and House Hans
to Recall Measure Sent
to Senate.
Through a legislative slip in the
House the District gasoline tax
bill which was passed by the
House Monday contains no pro*
vision for a personal property tax
upon automobiles, it was learned
today.
Bill Exempts Autos.
The proposal to include automo
biles in the personal property tax
collection laws was the subject of
a four-hour debate in the House.
The bill as originally framed ex
cluded automobiles from the tax.
The most heated opposition to
this exemption developed in the
House and it was voted to include |
autoidobiles in the list of personal 1
property for taxation purposes.
Despite all this opposition, the
bill as passed by the House not
only failed to make automobiles
subject to personal property tax,
but specifically provides that they
shall be exempt from such a tax.
This is the opinion expressed today
by leading parliamentarians and
legal experts of the House.
Accident to Be Corrected.
“The bill, as it is framed, cer
tainly exempts automobiles from
taxation as personal property,”
declares Congressman William A.
Oldfield of Arkansas, Democratic
whip. “It is clearly the result of
a legislative accident, and will
have to be changed.”
Congressman John Q. Tilson of
Connecticut, a member of the
Ways and Means Committee, and
one of the leading parliamentarians
in the House, stated that in his
opinion the personal property tax
upon automobiles is clearly not
Included.
The bill as originally drawn pro
vided that the gasoline tax of 2
cents a gallon was to be collected
“in lieu of a personal property
tex "
Joker Is Left In.
The House in its effort to impose
the personal property tax struck
out this phrase, but neglected to
change other phraseology in the
bill.
The bill, as it was sent to the
Senate provides "that on and after
the passage of this act, a registra
tion fee of 15 cents per horsepower
tor all motor vehicles registered, and i
a tax of 2 cents per gallon on all
motor vehicle fuel sold within the
District of Columbia shall be levied
and collected in the manner herein
after provided.”
The bill provides that "on and
after the passage of this act, no tax
of any character or description, ex
cept as in this act provided, shall be
levied or assessed on any motor
vehicle in the District of Columbia.”
Plan To RecaU Bill.
There is no mention in the bill of
• personal property tax, which
under this phraseology is therefore
specifically exempted.
The bill further provides "That
all laws inconsistent with the pro
visions of this act be, and the same
are hereby, repealed.”
Efforts will be made to have the
bill returned to the House so that
changes edn be made.
It is known, however, that there
la strong opposition in the Senate
to the imposition of a personal
property tax upon automobiles in
the District and the Senate District
Committee, before which the bill is
now pending, is expected to put up
a stiff fight for the bill as it now
stands, with the legislative error
Included.
LITTLE CONGRESS PLANS
FOR GAY ANNUAL DINNER
The fifth annual banquet of the
Little Congress, composed of the sec
retaries to member of Congress,
will be held at the Willard Hotel,
Thursday night, March 6. The af
fair, which is the social high-light
of the season for the junior body
promise to eclipse all previous
records.
Congressman Frtiz G. Lanham,
of Texas, an honorary member, will
be master of the ceremonies, and
Congressman Connery of Masachu
setts, a former actor, will take part.
Congressman Sol. Bloom, of New
York, will provide a number of the
atrical features.
The committee in charge consists
of Kenneth Romney of Montana,
chairman William E. Murray, of
Illinois; John A. Thomas of North
Carolina; Robert Davis, of Tennes
see; and R. H. McGimfey, of Louisi
ana. An attendance of 250 is exr
ytedi
_£> B y bill PR ICE «
• FLORIDA.
Down where warmer summer zephyrs
Sweep across the arms and necks.
Where the hlfalutin heifers
Write to dad for weekly ehecks,
There a common person blundered.
And decided to remain.
Giving to the rich four hundred
Os society a pain.
There among the muchly scandaled.
There among the Mood of blue.
Stayed he while his roll was handled
By the hotel wrecking crew.
O'er the short week-end he lingered,
Then for home he took a ship,
Leaving flat the deftly fingered
Grabbers of the Transient's tip.
Home, his friends asked him about it.
Weather, water, warm and calm—
Loudly to the world he shouted:
“AU I noticed was the palm.'*
JACK HABLAK.
o<e
NOT MUCH LEFT.
Dear Bill: Talking about the
country going to the doge, at the
rate some men have been giving
it away lately there won’t be
any left for the dogs.
Oily to bed
And oily to rise
Makes some men wealthy,
Though not very wise.
IKE N. DODGEM.
e<e
HOW A BROADCASTING STATION,
BECOMES A RECEIVING STATION
~ / / ?7 5 n
GEOGRAPHICAL LIMERICKS.
(Learn one State a day.)
He wooed a girl In Nevada,
She had vim. vigor and ardor,
4 - When he gave her a squeeze
She said to him, “Please
Hug me harder and harder and harder**
TEACHEB.
o<e
THAT VALENTINE PUZZLE.
“JACK HARLAN’S” poetic
valentine puzzle evidently
stumped the majority of those
who read it. “BRIDGEPORT”
is tiie only one who got the cor
rect answer. “Heard and Seen”
is Harlan’s valentine. Various
answers came in from many
fans.
»♦»
PATCHES.
I used to be a stirring child,
I never washed my face, I loved
to haunt the weed-patch wild, and
come home in disgrace, with sec
tions torn out of my pants, where
I'd gone through a fence, and
Ma would make me howl and
dance as righteous recompense,
aad then I’d have to take 'em
off, and sit beside the stove, and
shiver there and sneeze and cough,
while mother worked and wove,
and put large purple patches on,
that fairly seemed to shout, "This
poor boy's self-respect is gone,
his duds are busted out.** I knew
the other kids would yell, and call
me funny names, and ask If I
was feeling well, and rouse my
ire to flames, and then Ma’d hand
'em back to me to wear away to
school, and I'd be full of misery
and feel an awful fool, and sure
enough, when I got there. I’d
hear a Jeering hail from Bill Mc-
Graw, who had red hair. “Say,
why's your pants so palef** And
I would climb on William’s chest
and paste him In the eye, and
Bill would also do his best to
make my feathers fly, and In the
middle of the fight the teacher
would butt In, and say, “Why,
boys, you are a sight, such actions
are a sin.'* And she would take a
husky switch and put Bill’s soul
in line, aad in her belt she'd
take a hitch aad then she'd give
me mine, but I would feel a great
content and satisfaction true, for
Bill, by some luck Heaven-sent,
had torn his trousers, too, and he
would have to take the gibes of
aj* the girls and boys, and bo the
big Joke of the tribes, and lose
his perky poise. A patch Is quite
a useful thing; It always does its
part to plant a sharp and painful
sting deep In some intent's heart,
and people never get so old but
what their breath they'll catch,
and fume and fret and scowl and
scold before they'll wear a patch.
GENE BLOSSOM.
Down in some of those ram
shackle war-built buildings still
used by the Government, some
of the clerks suggest that during
the cold days they would be far
better off with fewer “fire
drills” and more fire, or heat
B.
BILL ASKS REBUILDING OF
WASHINGTON MEMORIAL
Rebuilding of the Washington
monument on South Mountain,
Md., is provided in a bill introduced
in the House today *by Congress
man Frederick N. Zihlman of
Maryland. The monument was de
stroyed by a dynamite explosion
said to have been set off by an
enemy alien during the world war.
This was the first monument
erected to the memory of George
Washington. It was built in 1827
by soldiers who served under Wash
ington in the Revolutionary War.
An appropriation of >4,000 is pro
iMrf.
WASHISMTIMES
FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 15, M 24. ‘ ' SECOND SECTION I
' "-TT—r^—r~ -
HITS AND MISSES.
A '“permanent wave” has no
appeal for men. What they
would like is a “permanent
shave.”
“D. C. wants money for special
lawyers,” we note. What’s the
matter with the ordinary kind!
Aren’t they expensive enough!
Thoreau, the great naturalist,
returned an ax he had borrowed.
Honest man. But how about
that umbrella.
Wm. H. Anderson claims that
“John T. King’’ slapped him on
the shoulder when he handed
him that money. Most likely the
mysterious stranger tapped him
on the head. Anderson’s story
proves it. FRED VETTER.
JOSH JONES’ DIARY.
HICKORY HEMP, who wm given
up for lost since his accident with
his gM tank, came back to life the
other day and got home Just as the
Insurance man wm giving hie “sup
posed widder” n eheck for *4,000,
and when the man saw Hickory he
took the money back, and Hickory
might m wen nave stayed dead, for
the old. lady nearly killed him for
coming home at the wrong time.
SETH MOONEY, our only under
taker, says business is getting dull,
because people are getting like cats;
they go away from home and die,
and some other undertaker sets the
Job.
MOSES HENRY wm “cMght**
•elite’ likker the other day. but
Sheriff Looney let him go. ’cause
he wm the one he wm eellln* it to.
CHECKERS.
o+o
A news note says Americans
win ski contest at St. Moritz. In
the whiski contest here at home
nobody seems to know who is
winning unless it' is the home
brewers.
The Senate seems to be trying
to get rid of the oil scandal. It’s
supposed to be a dry Senate and
oil and water don’t mix.
HANK HAWKINS.
■■■ ■■
Dad—So. Marie, you are learning
the touch system at school?
Marie—Yeo. dad. Will you please
slip me MO. O’SVILLEABHAIN.
■■ ♦
SAYS SAMBO:
wfes AH COME IN LATE T'OTHER
NI&HT AH TELL DE OL* WOMAN
AH AINT &WINE SAY NUYHIH’
'CAUSE NIT MIGHT ’CRIMINATE
ME UH-UN ! BOY W’EN AH
SA’O OAT AH NOT ONLY GOT
MAHSEF 'CRIMINATED BUT
COME PuRTY NIG-H G-ITTIN’
ELEMINATED I!
mill/li
‘I fitral
►—
SNAPPYGRAPHS.
An aviator recently married a
prominent society beauty. He ‘‘feir’
for her at a flying exhibition.
A 220-pound Polish woman was
fined ISO in court for beating her
husband. Evidently he wasn't enough
of a diplomat to deal with a “for
eign"’ power.
Science has reduced the weight of
Sulnea pigs by keeping them In the
ark. But plenty of fat women have
been kept In the dark for years by
thsir husbands.
More electricity Is being used In the
world each year. But that isn't why
so many current events are shocking.
A man of 90, ill for the first time,
called a doctor. Otherwise he mlgat
have lived to be Ibo.
MIKE HEXHY
SIMON CALLED PETER PLAY
ROUSES MINISTERS TO ACT
Representatives of the Federation
, of Churches of this city will confer
tomorrow with the District Commis
• sloners to make protests against
’ permitting indecent shows to be put
on the stage In Washington.
i Police action in censoring “Simon
i Called Peter," playing at the Presi
dent Theater, has caused ministers
: of the city to ask for a conference
i with the Commissioners.
' Representatives of local theaters
. are expected to be present to reply
. to any attacks the clergy may make
, regarding the types of shows being
**** its UMNutoa,
UTILITIES
HEARING
LIVELY
Auditor Admits Findings of
Capital Traction Co.
Never Changed.
Persistent attempts to prove
that the , Capital Traction Com
pany over a period of years dom
inated the Public Utilities Com
mission made by Senator Mc-
Kellar, of Tennessee, featured to
day’s hearing on McKellar’s bill
providing a five-cent street car
fare in Washington.
Made No Changes.
E. B. Fisher, auditor for the Pub
lic Utilities Commission, was the
principal witness at today’s hearing
and admitted to Senator McKellar
that the' Public Utilities Commission
has never changed any of the rates
of depreciation or expense deter
mined by the Capital Traction Com
pany and reported to the Public Util
ities Commission.
“What is the need of a Public
Utilities Commission audit?" in
quired Senator McKellar of Auditor
Fisher, “if you never make any
change? Do you regard that method
of bookkeeping fair to the public?"
Mr. Fisher replied that no
changes had been made because it
has not been found necessary and
he regarded this a compliment to i
the company rather than an in- '
justice to the public. He later stated :
that a more vigorous checking upi
system had not been in vogue be-1
cause the commission “is (behind
in its work.” j
Scrap With Allen.
A lively colloquy ensued between'
Senator McKellar and Walter Allen, 1
secretary to the Public Utilities
Commission over the authorized
functions of the commission as j
dictated by Congress in 1912.
Senator McKellar brought out that
the Public Utilities Commission has
permitted the Capital Traction Com--
pany to buy new cars out of its de- .
preciation fund while the traction
company should not be able to doj
this unless specifically ordered by
the Commission. Mr. Allen admit
ted that the Commission had never
issued an order requiring the trac
tion company to buy new cars out
of their depreciation fund, but when
ever they had done this the Com
mission always approved their ac
tion.
Upbraids Commission.
Senator McKellar upbraided the
Public Utilities Commission for not
fixing specific depreciation rates
to be allowed the traction com
panies although they have had be
tween ten and eleven years to take
this step. Mr. Allen explained that
tentative depreciation rates were
fixed by the commission in 1919,
but later admitted to Senator Mc-
Kellar that the Capital Traction
Company had ignored these tenta
tive rates.
The life of a street car and the
life of public utility busses were
discussed at today’s meeting and
Chairman Copeland of New York
said that these facts would be vital
to the investigators. Vice President
Hanna, of the Capital Traction
Company, promised to give definite
data on this score when he is called
to testify.
Car Costs $13,000.
It was testified by Auditor Fisher
that a Capital Traction Company
street-car costs $13,000 and its life
has oeen estimated at twenty-five
years. Officials of the Capital
Traction Company testified that
while they were working on the
basis that their motor busses would
endure for four years they now
believe that they will have to be
scrapped in three years.
Senator Copeland presided at to
day’s hearing of the &-cent street
car fare committee in the absence
of Chairman Ball, whose brother is
critically ill In Wilmington.
While Auditor Fisher was the
only one put on the stand to testi
fy, his story was augmented from
time to time by elucidations from
Messrs. Hanna and Allen.
..® e ® re ’ e E. Hamilton, president of
the Capital Traction Compnay, re
quested that his company’s testi
mony, when it is continued, be
heard by both Copeland and Ball
inasmuch as they have heard most i
of the testimony thus far given.
With this in mind Senator Cope
land stated that the 5 cent street
car fare hearings would be con
tinued next Tuesday providing
Ball can be present.
Are you reading Helen Rowland's
witticisms on the magazine page?
Men Who Judged Ad
Contest and Made
S2OO Awards
PMBgX. 'I-
i I BIB* * ■ H
: IO
!k ibkx
Bl jB.
.JBL '
JAMES A. BELL.
Bl
DR. FRANK O’HARA.
a.- 1
R. R. HAND.
WANT JO TESTS
REVEAL GREAT
INTEREST
Winners to Get S2OO in
Prizes From Herald and
Times Competition.
Want ads. always are suggestive
of human interest. To bring this
out and reveal the many ways
in which they have come to play
a part In the lives of Washing
ton readers of The Washington
Times and The Washington Her
ald, an interesting competition has
been arranged.
The organization of the competi
tion is simple. Two hundred dollars
will be distributed among the
winners. It will be equally divided
between persons using the want ad
columns of The Washington Times
ahd The Washington Herald, and
readers of the want ads appearing
in the two newspapers. The contest
loses tomorrow. Story letters must
be in by February 23. The' letters
must be confined to experiences re
lated to wan tads appearing during
Want Ad Week .
Readers of the want ads, to
win one of the cash prizes which
WM* » M DtiM Mt MA a
ASKS RENT
RULE IN
CITIES
McLeod Would Have Model
Law Passed Here—Assails
Landlord Profiteers.
Congressman Clarence J. Mc-
Leod, of Detroit, declared today
that the time is near when every
important American city must
have as one of the safeguards for
the health and comfort of its
people, a rent commission to pro
tect the people against “gouging
landlords.”
Mr. McLeod as a member of the
House District Committee, is tak
' ing a conspicuous part in draft
jing new legislation, giving per
manency to Washington’s war
time rent commission. said
all large American cities present
a most alarming housing situa- 1
tion because of the “greed of the j
i average real estate shark.”
Wants Model Here.
“Every American city eventually,
must set up a commission to pro-1
tect the public against real estate
profiteers,” McLeod said. “The
model for such commissions should
be established here in the National
Capital. Shocking conditions are re
vealed here in Washington by our
investigation of high rente and
scarcity of living quarters.
“The average family has to pay
from one third to one-half their
earnings for house rent, or for
rental of apartments.
“Too many real estate owners
; have gone into the profiteer class
They are not satisfied with a sub
stantial net return on their invest
' ment, with allowances for deprecia
tion and other possible losses. Too
many of them want to grab all
they can.
“This practice only invites sterner
legislative measures to shield the
public.
“The rent commission should be
a permanent thing for all cities
where such conditions exist. Con
ditions we have found in the
capital of the nation are disgrace
ful. Overcrowding in small quart
ers has led to ill health and crime.
"The profiteer is largely to blame
because he has made it impossible
for the poor to get living quarters
at a fair price."
Supporters of the plan to extend
the District rent act, now the sub
ject of hearings before a special
subcommitttee of the House District
Committee, have received further
ammunition for their fight through
action taken in New York last
night.
Governor Smith, declaring that
the housing emergency still exists,
last night signed a bill providing
for extension of the New York
State emergency rent Uws for an
additional period of two years. The
i New York law was to have ex
pired today.
The New York law places upon
the landlord the burden of proof
that an increase in rent is justified
and grants to tenants .the right to
refuse payment of increased rentals
unless court Investigation . shows
that the increase is just. Land
lords are allowed an 8 per cent re
turn on investmentss.
It has been the practically unani
mous testimony of members of the
District Rent Commission and
Washington tenants who have so
far appeared before the House Com
mittee that a housing emergency
still exists in Washington.
The committee, headed by Con
gressman Florian Lampert of Wis
consin, has been offered proof of
proposed rental increases by land
lords if the act is permitted to ex
pire.
The bill now pending before the
committee probably will be reported
favorably to the full District com
mittee within the next two weeks.
The next hearing will be held at 8
o’clock tonight in the caucus room
of the House Office building.
second prize of 125 and ten prizes of
32.50 each, must submit in letters
their experiences resulting from fol
lowing up a want ad. These experi
ences must be Interestingly written
and must be told within SOO words.
Advertisers in the want ad col
umns of the two papers can partici
pate in the contest by writing a
800-word letter relating in turn
their experiences with persons re
plying to their ads.
The letters received will bo passed
upon by a corps of judges which
Includes the following: James A.
Bell, director of education, Y. M. C.
A. College And affiliated schools;
Dr. Frank O'Hara, dean of the
Knights of olumbus Evening
School, and R. R. Hand, service
manager of the Washington branch
* SR "HR
[ALL-WASHINGTON
[home town page
$25,000 Asked By
D. C. to Make Street
Traffic Safer
An appropriation of $25,000
to enable the District Govern
ment tp purchase traffic lights,
markers and signals will be
asked of Congress by the Dis
trict Commissioners.
The newly created traffic
board of the District urged
this appropriation. The money
is to be spent during the fiscal
year which begins next July.
JURY EXONERATES MAN
WHO SHOT WIFE’S FRIEND
Frank Newton, colored, charged
with first degree murder in con
nection with the death May 28,
1923, of Theodore Jackson, colored,
was acquitted last night by a jury
in Criminal Court No. 2, Justice
Hoehling presiding. The jury was
out two hours. Newton was rep
resented by Attorney J. H. Wilson.
Newton pleaded self defense,
claiming that Jackson harbored his
wfle, Ella Newton. There was a
quarrel and Newton says he was
attacked by Jackson, and acted in
self defense when he shot the lat
ter. The Government was repre
sented by Assistant District At
torney Emerson.
PKICED BIGHT NOT ONK DAY -CVBNT DAY J
I MEET YOUR MEAT I
* At my markets face to face. You will enjoy selecting fine S
£ roasts, tender steaks and juicy chops. You will appreciate, too, £
$ the cleanliness of my markets and the anxious desire of my Z
£ clerks to please you. '. •
| SMOKED If SMOKED 11:
| HAMS SHOULDERS ;
Extra fancy, 8 < 3 to 6-1 b. Al < [
* «. iMb. l hr H
£ pound pound A »
BACON
£ pound £OV < >
H TOMATOES 1[ POTATOES 1H
Red Ripe, Solid Pack Fancy white, Dry Mealy < [
£ No. 2 size, Cookers, J >
1 15 lbs. 28c i
f tMI “- J J I!
| Home-Dressed Pork Beef < ►
jyi Fresh Shoulders, 12%C Round Steak, 9A/» * *
* small, pound v pound £W < >
£ Loin Pork Chops, 23C Sirloin Steak, ] *
£ p0und........... pound Z&C o
£ „±S" PB ’ 15c porterhouse Steak, W J [
2 Fresh Spare Ribs, fir pound *
* pound..' Shoulder Clod Roast, OA n <*
£ Pure Lard, IQr pound *UC <►
£ pound ZY Three-cornered Roast, 0/1/. ] [
A Fresh Hams, lUf pound AW < >
£ pound PUte Beef ’ for b ® n i“S. lAa»
£ Pork Loins, whole, lyp pound XW w
£ pound... *2 Hamburg Steak, . IQJLp £
Pork Loins, half, IQr fresh ground, pound..,. XAzV
£ pound Chuck Roast, IE- 17* £
£ “T i pound xov and
Young Veal / *
£ Cutlets, 35c EGGS— mm m I J
2 po sK?ibte ii™i. 20c '”* h , fFo “ nlln I
$ rsu isc ->:
2 "Ste cii£ 20c . Fancy Lamb 5
£ pound •.•••' ' _ Legs, t, OKp £
£ Rib or Loin Chops, 25C P° und £
X. pound Rib and Loin Chops, IE- £
£ . pound £
2 • Fish Specials Shoulder Chops, OO„ £
£ Trout, Igr Pound X|OV £
£ pound Shoulder Roast, OQ» £
j Steak Cod, 20C P°und mOC £
| T&’ii*-; 25c
2 FHlet Haddock, QAr / \ £
O pound ZZ Frank Kidwell's 20 Stores Io- 5
]t. Oysters, fancy, 55C cated at ~~ £
3 quart ... No £, ,,^‘ B M “' ke *’ I,th “* H ?
J; ✓ "1 Rowlyn. Va.
| Poultry *"■ »■ ’• - $
< > Finest Quality Money Can •*’* nth^stV’t^W. 0 *—’*** w " > ‘ •
O Buy. SO3S 14th St. N. w. •
< 1 n...V. 1 A _ 7th and C Sts. 8. B. W
Ducks, 211 IP 2121 18th St. N. W. W
O pound !rtJ' l 2 U w K - w -
i 718 O St. Ji. Mr»
Fowl, •>£p 2007 14th St. N. W. Z
nound OeJv 2018 14th Bt. Ji. W. • Z
pouno .. • Sts p*. Ave. N. W. X
Chickens. /f (Ip 4% and C Ste. 8. w. £
nound -WV 710 7th st. 8. W. £
£ pounu IS , OI 4M| Ht N w w
*X— 7 2200 Pa. Ave. X. W.
< Prairie Rose Creamery Butter, k 1 sT'm"w’*" W ‘ W " W
< > high score, pound £Q C St. a„ N W.
; ■ carton. The E. T. Goodman Co., Ine M •
] [ Kidwell s Oleo, £1 (• Stores lately purchased by me W
o pound w® located at— £
] * Bread, one-pound Arcade Market, 104-114. £
> Sweet radar. >IW Mt - nea«mt St. X. W. £
» Bwee* viaer, 1(H0 colaaibfiHuad X. W. £
J Kraut, JQg «7 M la«rel Ave., Tahoma Paok. *
i I quart Mil 14th at. X. W. 5
FLORIDA ORANGES— QQp £
sweet, 150 she, doten JUMBO GRAPEFRUIT, Iftp £
FLORIDA ORANGES, OAp each lUV £
< i small. Juicy, 250 site, doi. ""L 3 f or 2&c w
HNG ON
EARNINGS
CULLED
Commission Proposes to Set
New Basis for Charges
to Public.
Definite steps toward bringing
about a general reduction in all
rates charged by utility corpora
tions in the District have been
taken by the Public Utilities Com
mission.
A hearing to consider an im
portant phase of the depreciation
(Continued on Page 26 )

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