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The Washington times. [volume] (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, February 05, 1932, Image 1

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Police On Guard For New Sniping Tonight
THE WEATHER
Fair tonight, minimum temperature about 30
degrees; Saturday increasing cloudiness and
warmer; moderate west and southwest winds.
Temperature Yesterday—Highest, 50; lowest,
37. (1931 —Highest, 51; lowest, 31.)
Humidity Yesterday—Highest, 95; lowest, 44.
Full Weather Report on Page 9
The Washington Times is the only afternoon paper In
this elty publishing the news dispatches of International
Newt Service and Universal Service.
JAPS DESTROY CHAPEI AREA
GIBBONS SEES 11. S. TROOPS REACH SHANGHAI
POLICE DREAD
MORE WILD
SHOOTINGS
Entire Northwest Section
Patrolled Tonight by
Radio Cruisers
Fearful that the desperados
Or maniacs who last night shot
three persons and attempted
to shoot another will begin
anew their reign, of terror at
nightfall, Inspector F. S.
Burke, chief of the Detective
Bureau, announced today that
detectives in three radio
equipped cruisers will patrol
all of the Northwest section.
While the shootings last night
were staged in the areas of the
Tenth and Thirteenth precincts,
Inspector Burke said the in
creased patrol would take in the
Fourteenth and Twelfth precinct
areas. At least 12 detectives from
headquarters will be in this de
tail.
At the same time police were
making an effort to ascertain
whether any psycopathic patients
at Walter Reed Hospital have
escaped.
Bullets Identified
Decision to reinforce the police
guard in the Northwest was
reached after Lieut. John Fowler,
ballistics expert, indicated to In
spector Burke that two bullets
brought to him today had been
fired from the same gun.
One of the bullets was taken
from Miss Helen Andrews, 18, of
5811 Sixth St. N. W., and the
other from Gordon T. Backus, 51,
a Department of Agriculture em
ploye.
Miss Andrews and Doris Beall,
16, of 1411 G St. S. E., were walk
ing on Fifth Street Northwest
hear Aspin Street, when fired upon
from a black coach which drove
alongside them. Helen was struck
twice in the left arm while Doris
was struck in the right leg.
Gordon T. Backus, of 3433 Mt.
Pleasant St. N. W., was bred
upon in front of his home. His
condition is termed serious at
Emergency Hospital, where he is
being treated for a wound in the
back.
Backus Unconscious
The two girls had been to a
public library branch and were
on their way home when the
shooting occurred. Witnesses
secured several numbers of the
automobile license tag.
Backus was discovered slumped
on the sidewalk near his house
by Mrs. D. E. Brundage, of 1733
Newton St. N. W., who witnessed
the shooting from a front window
of her home. Backus, who is
married and has four children,
soon lapsed into unconsciousness
and was taken to the hospital.
Another is Menaced
Meanwhile, police are working
on the theory that the attackers
are a pair of maniacs or rum
crazed men. Earlier, they had
embraced a theory that the
crimes might have been com
mitted by a former friend of one
of the girl-victims, but investiga
tion revealed he was at his home
at the time of the shootings.
Police were spurred further in
their search for the culprits by
the report of an attempted shoot
ing made by Arthur H. Clethane,
of 2032 Belmont Rd. N. W., who
said that early today, while stop
ping at a- stop sign at Lanier
Place and Ontario Road North
west, a white man had run up to
his car, pointed a pistol at him I
and pulled the trigger. The gun
did not go off, and the man ran
down Lanier Place.
Read “Embers of Love,” the Soul-Stirring Novel of Youthful Romance, Starting Monday
SHANGHAI STREET SCENE OF SNIPING
p
■ -■ ’’ ilfWiiOr
MT
..
I * —lnternational Photo
’CHINESE SOLDIERS IN SHANGHAI
EQUIPPED WITH THE latest type firearms, Chinese soldiers are shown “snip
ing” in the streets of Shanghai. This photo was taken during the civil war sev
eral months ago, but similar scenes are being enacted today as Chinese troops
battle the Japanese.
state CLOSES
ALLENCASE
NORRISTOWN, Pa., Feb. 5
(1.N.5.). —The State’s case against
Edward H. B. Allen, 23-year-old
society man charged with the
murder of his sister’s sweetheart,
was complete today.
The Commonwealth rested after
three full days of taking testi
mony to show that the hollow
eyed youth fired a shotgun blast
into the heart of Francis A. Don
aldson, 3d, the man-about-town
with whom 18 year-old Rose Allen
was in love.
District Attorney Nase closed
his case without calling several of
his witnesses and William T.
Connor, defense counsel, at once
began the case for the boy. He
said:
“It is the right of any indi
vidual in the defense of his
life and t<> save himself from
bodily- hartn.to take whatever
measures he deems necessary.
“The defense will show you
that Young Eddie Allen was
actuated by a deep regard for
his aged father and his sister.”
CONDITION OF TREASURY
Treasury balance as of February
3, $636,935,121.24; expenditures,
$11,327,941.46; customs receipts,
$2,491,5510.56.
$125
FURNISHED
APARTMENT
For Rent
If you are a newcomer to
Washington and want "a
Home away from home,’’
vhspect the completely fur
.■nished two • room, foyer,
and bath apart
j ment, located on Massa
i chusetts Avenue near Du
pont Circle, and adver
■ Used today in the Rental
| Columns of The
\ •
/
I WASHINSIONTIMES
Want Ad Pages
WASHIWONTIMES
Entered a» Second Claaa Matter
At Poatofflea of Washington. D. C.
NO. 15,767
LATEST WAR BULLETINS
TAYLOR REPORTS CHAPEIIN RUINS
,The entire Chapei sector of Shanghai is a wreck, due to
gunfire, aerial bombing, and conflagration, Admiral M. M.
Taylor notified the Navy today in a dispatch filed at 2:30,
Eastern Standard Time. J’>
JAP BOMBS PERIL AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
SHANGHAI, Feb. 5 (1.N.5.). —Japanese aerial bombs fell
today within a few hundred yards of St. John’s University,
an American institution lying within the British defense
lines. The bombs apparently were intended for the Shang
hai-Hangchow railway tracks. * •
NEW FOUR-POWERNOTE SENT TO JAPAN
LONDON, Feb. 5 (I.N.S.).—A new note will be sent to
Japan by Great Britain and the other three powers associated
in presenting the five-point proposal designed to end the Sino-
Japanese conflict, it was announced by the foreign office
today. Great Britain is expected again to follow the United
States in lodging a new protest with Japan over use of the
International Settlement as a base for military action.
CHINESE LEFT WING BEING SURROUNDED
LONDON, Feb. 5 (1.N.5.).—N0 building was left standing
for an area of two miles around the North Station in Shang
hai tonight as a result of an all-day Japanese bombardment,
Central News dispatches stated. Japanese, reinforced by six
heavy field guns, were gradually surrounding the Chinese
left wing.
RUSSIA MASSES 70,000 MEN AT BORDER
TOKYO, Feb. 5 (I.N.S.).—Seventy thousand Russian troops
are massed in Vladivostok, Siberia, near the Manchurian bor
der, presumably in view of the Japanese occupation of Har
bin. This was revealed by the passengers of the S. S. Ama
kusa Maru, which arrived at Tsoruga today.
TOKYO REPLY UNACCEPTABLE TO CHINA
NANKING, Feb. 5 (I.N.S.).—The Japanese reply to the
powers’ peace proposals, delivered last night, is not accept
able to the Chinese government, foreign office officials an
nounced today. China, it was stated, will insist that any
solution of the Shanghai situation must also embrace a
settlement of the Manchurian controversy.
FIRE THREATENS FOREIGN SETTLEMENT
LONDON, Feb. 5 (I.N.S.).—A Central News dispatch from
Shanghai this afternoon said fires caused by the Chinese and
Japanese bombardment in the native city of Shanghai were
creeping toward the International Settlement.
NANKING REFUGEES AT SHANGHAI
SHANGHAI, Feb. 5 (I.N.S.).—One hundred and three for
eign refugees, women and children, arrived here today from
Nanking aboard the steamer Tuckwo.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1932
JAPAN SENDS
NODE MEN
TO CHINA
Troops Are Landed Without
Difficulty; Chinese Still
Holding Chapei Area
By DIXON HOSTE
SHANGHAI, Feb. 5 (1.N.5.).
Between 3,000 and 4,000 Japa
nese troops were landed at
daybreak today on the Yangtze
River bank between Liu-Ho
and Pao-Shan, northwest of
Woosung, to reinforce Japa
nese marines and bluejackets
in a grand offensive against
the Chinese at Shanghai.
The reinforcements disembarked
from two transports, whose
arrival off Woosung was ex
clusively reported by Interna
tional News Service yesterday.
Another troopship, believed to
be crowded, arrived at Shanghai
tonight. A strong cordon of
Japanese marines was thrown
about the wharf and no one was
permitted to approach. Ap
parently these men are to go
ashore during the night to join
at once in the attack of Chapei.
Confirmation of the secret
landing of the expeditionary force
16 miles from Shanghai proper
was received early this evening
from the same source that first
reported the Japanese transports’
arrival.
Sending Full Division
Long strings of boats, towed by
pinnaces, were used to disembark
the troops, vanguard of a full
division the Tokyo government is
dispatching to Shanghai.
The landing is believed to have
been without incident, though
(Continued on Page 2, Col. 2) ,
MELLON FOBCED
OUT,REPORT
PITTSBURGH, Feb. 5 (1.N.5.).
Secretary of the Treasury Andrew
W. Mellon accepted appointment
as Ambassador to Great Britain
as an alternative to a complete
severance of participation in pub
lic life, the Pittsburgh Sun-Tele
graph said in a copyrighted story
published today. The story as
serted:
"President Hoover not only
was willing but at least mildly
suggestive that Mellon should
resign the Treasury. However,
he was fearful of the political
consequences in some financial
circles should the Pittsburgher
abruptly leave the administra
tion in advance of the coming
election. The President urged
Mellon to accept the British
post in an endea.vor to cover
what appears to have been a
real break in relations which
were never warm.”
Under the signature of Mark
Shields, political editor of the
Sun-Telegraph, it was declared the
ambassadorship was “open
through the providential —for
Hoover —resignation of Charles G.
Dawes.” x
(Other Mellon News on Page 3)
SIO,OOO Fire Ejects
4 Families in Snow
FALL RIVER, Mass., Feb. 5
(1.N.5.). —Four families were
driven to the street in a howling
snowstorm today when flames
caused SIO,OOO damage in a two
story wooden factory building
near their home.
THREE CENTS
War News
Tersely
Told
Japanese completely raze
Chapei district of Shanghai
with shells and bombs.
Japanese land 500 more
marines in International Settle
ment, preparing for new offen
sive at dawn.
U. S. S. Chaumont arrives
at Shanghai in midst of battle
with 1,000 regular army troops,
who will disembark in morning.
’ Japanese land between 3,000
and 4.000 troops between Pao
shan and Liu ho, about 16
miles from Shanghai.
Additional Japanese troops
reported on way to Shanghai.
Terrific land, sea and air bat
tle rages over 100 square miles
arounC Shanghai with Japanese
determined to drive Chinese
completely out of territory but
with Chinese stubbornly resist
ing.
Japanese plane destroyed in
fighting.
Fire rages in Chapei district,
threatening to spread to Inter
tional Settlement. '
One hundred thousand Chi
nese refugees crowd streets of
Shanghai, on way to safety.
Many American women and
children sail from Shanghai.
American tourists aboard
liner President McKinley due
at Shanghai today in midst of
battle.
Csie hundred and three Amer
ican and British refugees from
Nanking reach Shanghai.
Japanese troops occupy Har
bin, in Soviet sphere of influ
ence in Manchuria.
Chinese anti-aircraft missiles
and Japanese shells fall into
International Settlement.
GAR WODSETS
SPEED RECORD
DETROIT, Feb. 5 (1.N.5.).—
Gar Wood today at Miami Beach,
Fla., regained the world’s speed
boat record for the United States,
according to W.• D. Edenbum,
chairman of the racing committee
of the Yachtmens Association of
America.
MIAMI BEACH, Fla., Feb. 5
(1.N.5.). —Gar Wood, white-haired
American speed king, established
a new world’s water speed record
here today by driving his Miss
America IX over the Indian Creek
course at the speed of 111.712
miles an hour.
Wood on his first two runs to
day broke Kaye Don’s official
world mark of 110.223 miles an
hour and his own unofficial
record of 110.785, established last
week.
The Miss America made the
measured nautical mile at 112.434
miles an hour, or an elapsed time
for the mile of 36.87 seconds. It
was the fastest time Wood has
ever made on the water.
Turning the Miss America,
Wood roared back over the meas
ured mile in a northerly direction
at 110.989 miles an hour, negoti
ated in 37.35 seconds. The two
speeds were averaged for the aver
age mark of 111.712.
Bingham Beer Bill
Hearings Near End
Senate hearings on the Bing
ham bill to legalize 4 per cent
beer will be concluded next
week. Senator Metcalf (R.) of
Rhode Island, announced today.
Gustate Hafer, of the Farmers
Feed Company, New York, will
be one of the final witnesses
heard Tuesday.
auxiliarytomeet
The regular meeting of the
Silver Spring unit of the Ameri
can Legion Auxiliary will be held
at the home of Mrs. H. H. How
lett next Tuesday evening.
AMERICAN FORCES HELD
ON SHIP TO NIP PERIL
DE CLASH IN NIGHT
By FLOYD GIBBONS
(Noted War Correspondent and Radio Broadcaster)
(Copyright, 1932, by International News Service)
SHANGHAI, Feb. 6 (Saturday, 12:10 A. M.) (1.N.5.).
Japanese military commanders shuffled their troops on
the Shanghai chessboard early this morning, prepara-
/ Il
FLOYD GIBBONS
Shanghai’s Worst Hours
Japanese heavy artillery, aided by the well-placed bombs of
Japanese fighting seaplanes, virtually completed the destruc
tion of Chapei, and when the armies called off their argument
for th* evening the place was a total wreck.
The last 24 hours were the worst Shanghai had seen since the
opposing armies of the Orient chose to make this great inter
national city the scene of combat.
- ——♦
Chinese Seize
Hunter, I.N.S.
Reporter
NEW YORK, Feb. 5 (1.N.5.).
Edward Hunter, International
News Service correspondent in
Manchuria, has been arrested by
Chinese troops between Chang
chung and Harbin, according to
dispatches received here today
from Tokyo.
One dispatch said that Hunter
had been seized by the Chinese
and was “missing.”
General Araki, Japanese minis
ter of war, has wirelessed Gen.
Shigeru Honjo, Japanese com
mander in Manchuria, to try to
effect Hunter’s release.
Secretary of State Stimson to
day cabled instructions to Consul
General George C. Hanson, at
Harbin, and Consul General M. S.
Myers, at Mukden, to do their
utmost * effect the release of
Edward b. Hunter correspondent
for the Internationa! News Ser
vice, reported held captive by re
treating Chinese forces in Man
churia.
LONDON, Feb. 5 (1.N.5.) .—Be
lief that Edward Hunter, had been
arrested by Japanese instead of
Chinese troops was expressed
here today by the charge d’af- j
faires at the Chinese ministry.
£—
Sister of Gibbons
Devours Dispatches
BOSTON, Feb. 5 (1.N.5.).;
The dispatches of Floyd Gibbons
from Shanghai have mere than
a single meaning to Mrs. Theo
dore Mayer, of Newton. Mrs.
i Mayer is Gibbon’s sister and
I daily she reads every word of
the news from Shanghai by her
brother. Often the great news
paper correspondent speaks tn
Mrs. Mayer in his radio broad
I casts and refers to her as “Sis- (
ter Zelda.” 1
FINAL
EDITION
tory to a new offensive in the Cliapei
area at daybreak.
I They landed 500 more marines in
I the International Settlement shortly
before midnight and sent them up
North Szechuan Road to reinforce
the troops regularly stationed there
in preparation for the new push.
A daylong artillery and machine
gun battle, which ended only when
complete darkness blotted out gun-
I sights and targets alike, reduced the
entire Chapei area to shambles but
apparently resulted in no decisive
gain for either side.
Many shells fell throughout
the day in the international
sector, damaging buildings in
the French concession. One
aerial missile sent two Chinese
to their ancestors, but Ameri
cans and other foreigners
escaped unscathed.
From early morning until
dusk* Japanese planes swept
over the International Settle
ment to Chapei, dropped their
bombs, and then zoomed back
to their bases.
Jap Plane Shot Down
Chinese anti-aircraft gun
ners or'a machine-gun crew
punctured one craft in a vital
spot and it spiraled to earth,
hopelessly crippled, less than
800 yards from the line in
the International Settlement
guarded by American Ma
rines.
The Leathernecks saw it fall,
and also saw Chinese infantry
men wriggle on their bellies out
to the spot and send the Japanese
crew of the craft on their way
to eternity with bayonet thrusts.
If the Japanese made any gains
in today’s terrific onslaught, they
were in the Kiangwan sector
where their lines appeared to
have been advanced about half
a mile.
The Chinese were still holding
out in their principal entrench
ments, however, despite the fact
(Continued on Page 6, Column I)
In The Times Today
Page
Comics 24,25
Death Notices 28
Dramatics 12,13
Fashion News 14, 20,25
Financial News 26,27
Magazine Page 14
Radio 10
Seldes “True to Type” Local
Society 20,21
Sports 22,23
What’s Doing 18

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