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Democratic messenger. (Snow Hill, Md.) 1869-1973, April 23, 1921, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026758/1921-04-23/ed-1/seq-12/

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PAGE TWELVE
1 The Educational Service Supporting Local Interests j
'incMßtcE* ~~ _■: ;:
LESS LATIN AND MORE OF THIS
CHE above lesson is one of which every man, woman and child in thecommun- 31
ity should be interested. It is a lesson of co-operation between the home <3
merchant, manufacturer and consumer an appeal to our community spirit ;;
a piea for us to 4 ‘get together. ” 13
A little less Latin and more civic pride should be taught our children. They 3;
receive their education through taxation of the home merchant and citizen. So they 13
are never too young to be shown the folly of sending money away from their home ♦
town. Teach your children to respect the hand that feeds them and to honor the ;;
town that contributes to their welfare. Teach them that buying away from their 33
home town is a menace to the growth of the community in which they live. 3!
MORAL:-A lesson learned early in life is never lost. j;
Trade with These Merchants and support our home industries. j;
Mutual patronage brings mutual Prosperity <3
I). H. BRADFORD & SON
Farm Machinery
Titan Tractors. The I. H. C. Line of Machinery
CHERRIXS HARDWARE STORE
Everything in Hardware
Majestic Ranges, Hoosier Cabinets, Good Cutlery
'■ THE CORDDRY COMPANY
All Kinds of Huildinu Materials
Vnd Coal
T. H. COLLINS & SON
Shoes For Everybody
Men’s Furnishings of all kinds. Suits to order
R. H. CLI FF
Ours is a First-class Grocery Store
Itest Cuts of Meats
I*. I). LOTTING HAM & CO.
DRCGGISTS
Everything to be found in a First-class Drugstore
G. M. DRYDEN
Choice Groceries
And I try Goods anil Notions of All Kinds
THE DEMOCRATIC MESSENGER
Job Printing
l.et Fs Print Your Stationery
THE COMMERCIAL NATIONAL BANK
OF SNOW 1111.1.
Geo. S. Payne. President C. T. Richardson, Cashier
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF SNOW HILL
Oldest Bank in Worcester County
WILLIAM GOODMAN
Men’s. Boy’s, and Women’s Clothing, Shoes.
F'urnishings. Ready Trimmed Hats
P. A. HOLLOWAY & BRO.
Liberty and Maxwell Cars
Auto Supplies, Autos Repaired, Best Tires
M. T. HARGIS & CO. ,
Dry Goods,
furniture. Floor Coverings, Grot . etc!
PURNELL )
-* ■hW
E. M. JONES
Meat Store
Leading Snow Hill General Store and Grocery
DR. PALL JONES
ORCGGIST
The Best Patent and Proprietory Medicines
J. CLIFTON NOCK
INSIRANCE
Fire, Life, \ccident, and Automobile Insurance
.1. H. PERDI’E
Ford Cars and Tractors
Ml Kinds of Auto Supplies and Tires in Stock
W ALTER W. PRICE
Confectioner
Breyer’s Ice Cream Supplee’s Ice Cream
LELANI) RICHARDSON
Crane’s Ice Cream
Cigars Soft Brinks
SNOW HILL BAKEIH
Makers ol Bread. Rolls, Cakes, Pies, etc.
Fresh Every Hay
SNOW HILL HARDW ARE CO.
GI.ENMORE S. WILLIAMS
Hardware, Tinware, anil Farm Machinery
W . T. STANFORD
Sausage Manufacturer
Pure Country Lard, Cured Meats, etc.
SNOW HILL ECONOMY STORE
Clothing and Shoes for Men. Women and Children
S, SHAGER. Proprietor
( H AS. B. TIMMONS & SON
Dry Goods, Notions. Furniture, Men and
Women’s Shoes, Floor Coverings, etc.
J. W. VINCENT
Jeweler
Grafanolas, Records, Stieff and Shaw Pianos
O. W. WILSON SALES CO.
Genro Lighting Plants
“Buick and “Chevrolet" Automobiles
WALTF** wit LIAMS
THE DEMOCRATIC MESSENGER. SNOW HILL. MARYLAND.
M
\ A Scarlet Woman
l j By MARTHA M. WILLIAMS
t 1.4). IS. 1. by McClure Newtpuper Si'nUlcair )
►! "Y'ou’re not going a sti*|>. With your
I jaw swelled till you look like that
I lieu tin'll idol the Cliiliaiiii'ti all worship,
1 everybody would laugh at you and
* wonder why in creation 1 lot you
1 i'oiiio," Mrs. .\<u| said, hot' ton*’ loss
[ unkind than hoi words.
1 Sho was not fond of Auiuht'l. hor
stcpdiiughtcr. hut conscientious in duty
> toward Iho girl. Aiuahol was so liko
J hor niothor, who had oarrioil off tho
1 only man hor successor had ovor fail
( oiod. It was hard not to luito h i
> still tho two kept torms dooontly.
Mainly, ho it said, through Amabel's
’ yielding* to authority, sho had never
thought of mhnllinn until Austin Ware
[ provod to hor that hor foot and hor
> s-pirit woro oipially inado to dnnoo.
, Tho proving 1 nine to pass in a visit
> Aniahel had paid to a kinswoman at
, tho other sido of tho county. Hor
> neighborhood was cay, full of young
, folk, given to dancing and dining, with
1 tho approval and oxamplo of their
, elders, ••Them T’iscopalians.”
| Mrs. Neal iianiod thorn scornfully—
-1 herself and hor environment were
[ evangelically hard-hoiled. Kvon more
than her hushand, she loved her church
| and her dominance in it. Tonight she
> would f|Uoon it at the annual supper.
! a full-fed occasion whore gorging
> could he reokonod piety, since every
, edilde was at a round price.
* “Your pa is so deaf lie wouldn't go
, anyway," she said to Amahel as she
* set her bonnet in place. "So nobody
, can say a word about your staying
’ away a jaw like that is excuse
> enough for anything. Go to bed early
’ —l'll likely he home late, so 111 take
. the key nobody’ll have to wait Up
’ for tne. 11l fetch you some little
> cheesecakes if any happen to he loft."
’ "Don't trouble,” Amabel mumbled:
> "I can't eat — g-good night. Maybe I
| can sleep— lnti —l don't feel like It —
> now."
| That much ut least wns truth. Be
> hind a locked door site llung off sober
| garments, freed her cheek of a huge
> wail of chewing gum, nodded to it
! saucily.
> Stealthily, noiselessly, she slipped
! into a giddy, airy scarlet frock, self
> proclaimed a dancing frock by 'lie big
' mb / j? I ut
"Ours Is a Respectable House.”
black posy at the belt. It showed
beautifully sheer silk stockings match
ing Its - hue, red satin slippers with
i brilliant, paste buckles. She had left
the outer door unlocked —as she heard
It carefully opened she slid down the
stairs, her long black wrap huddled
over her arm, her carriage boots
swinging In her hand, to meet Aus
tin, who after a suppressed whistle
tiling the wrap about her, snyiug In
' her ear:
"Mine. Mephisto—l shan't dare let
you out of my sight— not tonight—'
nor ever," the last words under
breath.
It was Idtter cold, the rood hard
frozen yet beaten smooth as glass.
The motor purred over it at lightning
speed. Amahel had no sense of time
or distance. It seemed to her hardly
a minute before she found herself In
a warm, brilliantly lighted room, part
of a gay, surging crowd simply dance
mad. The music was of the wildest.
Something In the air set spirits on
edge. She was rapt away from ev
erything. Apprehension, reasonable
rare, home and its drabness fell from
her. She was ready—reckless enough
to brave anything.
So it was Austin who at last hur
ried her away, saying, "One o’clock,
Cinderella, hut you shall have more
dances."
| “Oli, oh, stepmnninm will get home
ahead of us. I ought to hare thought.
; But tonight I tun —a little hit mad.”
j Amahel began.
Austin's linnds closed on her. “It
1 la catching." he said. “I'm about
ready for anything except running out
I of gas halfway home."
’ calamity befell. Instead,
stealthily up to the
‘•"de a nearer j
eat in |
smiled, lie drew her hand within his '
arm and half carried her up the slip
pery brick pavement that rati the
length of the lawn. He even lifted
her onto the tiny porch and there
pulled nwaj her wrap. "I want to re
member you always just as you look
now," he said, standing hack a pace or
so to see more clearly. His headlights
Illumined the space with u soft, suf
fused radiance. It etherenllzed Ama
hel. lie tried to (ling his arms about
her, hut the door opened wide and
Mrs. Neal, candle in hand, stood
trained in it, her face a cross between
steel and ice.
"Tins must he a mistake." she said
with a hard breadth. "Ours is a tv
l> ctaide house —it does not harbor
scarlet wi.nidi. I should hate to dis
tin i. iiij sleeping hushand —so please
g** away- at once," turning ut the
lasi word to shut and lock the door.
She was beside herself with rage -
sonic stirrings of compunction ha I
brought her home early. A null T*
room, untidy, unteiianted, told her lnw
she had been fooled. Tills added fuel
to tin* (lame of Iter anger—to think
in compassion sin* had abjured her
rightful throne added insult to her
sense of injury. A hurtling sense, it
grew and mounted throughout two
hours of waiting, hardening her into
a desperate resolve.
A shut door was tin* only proper an
swer to such trickery—she would open
it after a while —when Amahel. re
duced to abject fear, should make
proper stipplicutiou. She would have
to do it theft* was nowhere she could
hope to tint! safe harborage—besides,
if slit* stayed from home till night her
reputation would he gone. Mrs. Neal
believed herself a devout Christian —
yet the thought of that dread con
tingency woke in Iter an unholy joy.
I'p in her own room she waited
tensely for tln* knocking that would
tell her she bail won. It did not come.
Instead, she heard the motor moving
rapidly away. A feint, she decided
meant to shake her resolution. After
a lit lit* it would come hack —even tluu
wicked Austin Ware would hardly dc
sort a girl at this hour of night in
such hitter cold. She wondered that.
In* had not spoken tip to her —that
both of them had stood silent before
her. They hail less fare than she had
thought—hut something must lie done'
—she would go down and listen closely
—maybe Amabel was outside the door,,
trembling with cold, afraid to knock.
She opened tne door. Nothing, no
body. Heedless of her bare head she
ran to the gate, then begun a hurried
search of the thick shrubbery, the
summer house, even the makeshift gu-,
rage at the further side. Once she
ventured into the main road and stood
for a minute peering up and down,
trying to call Amabel's name aloud,
hut finding herself voiceless.
Shaking like a leaf, she crept hack
within, tried to rouse her hushand, hut
vainly; he was one of the seven sleep
ers. “Better let him he; he will have
to know soon enough," she said to'
herself, brokenly. Then she thought
of the minister, lie was always a
safe counselor, but as she rang the
phone her voice was so strained she
had to repeat the call thrice to get
it sent on.
“That you Sister Neal?" came a
hearty answer at last. "You’re Just:
in time to he too Into. I married
your runaways hard and fast ten min
utes ago, and I'm hound to say they
look the happiest pair I have ever
helped into double harness. 1 wanted
to call you up before the ceremony.'
but Austin wouldn't hear to it. Ama
hel begged me to go and tell her dad
dy first thing In the morning.”
The good man stopped suddenly.'
Over tile wire he heard unmistakable
sobbing, then faintly: “Oh, thank the
Lord for this crowning mercy. Bui
for It I might lie a murderess."
The minister never asked explana
tions, hut he gave out to the world
that Sister Neal Imd a mighty soft
heart, and was, in spin* of appear-,
ances, wrapped up in her stepchild.
HOW UNCLE SAM ’HELPS OUT’
Business Man, Late With His Mail,
Need Not Despair of Having the
Message Delivered.
When the business man rushes into
any United States postotiire late in the
evening with his special delivery let
ter. hoping to catch the last mail for
Chicago, the mail in the eases is often
tied up. The clerk cannot stop to
untie the package of Chicago mail and
put the letter on the face of the bun
dle where It must ride, as he would
have done had the letter been in on
time. So he puts a date xlip on the
hack of your lone letter, attaches a
yard of twine which hangs free and
throws the letter loose in the pouch.
When the railway-mall clerk empties
Ills pouch he carefully looks for a
piece of twine, for he knows on the
end of It he will timi your important
message.
But should your letter he addressed j
to Montreal Instead of Chicago, re
member to substitute a Canadian spe
cial delivery stamp for service in
Montreal.—Christian Science Monitor.
Favored by Fate.
i’ersona bom between Feb. IP and
March "1, the Pisces sign, have e
<|Ulet, loving disiMisition and make
loyal friends. Honesty and purity are
theirs and a lack of self-esteem which
causes them to lie easily deceived by
others. They should guard against
habits of carelessness, restlessness, ,
and inattention and the luililt of scold
-1 big.
1 _____________
Women Own London Nowspapar.
Tim * Tide Is the name of a
j Londo '**r, which is owned
VEL-.IE i
o < >
o o
;; A quality Six at the price of a Four—with \ l
; | cord tires all around. F. O. B. $ 1485 ii
II < .
r i ►
I JL V <1
| An ideal 4-cylinder business car. They keep |
| going regardless of bad roads. Least expen* ♦
| sive car to run and keep FIT. 1
♦ LET US DEMONSTRATE ♦
I Motor Car Co. \
| SNOW HILL. MD. |
Light-Six
You can now have prompt delivery
of this New Studebaker-Built Sedan
SOLVING the transportation The Nf.w Li<;iit-Six Sedan was
problems of the world for over designed by .Studebaker ami is built
68 years has given to Stude- complete in Studebaker factories,
baker an experience that eminently Studehakcr's manufacturing experi
qualifies them to produce enclosed ence ami inherent knowledge of
cars that are not only beautiful and coach building is your assurance
comfortable, but highly practical that this Sedan is built to withstand
as well. jolts aud strains of long road service.
The New Licht-Six Sedan is a , In , iu <!*>?“ , of
L..Sl<Lp*g freedom from vibration, this New
m <p i > .inn looint of LloitT-SIX Sedan sets new standards
?"• T'f rVrlm .dm! i" comfort. Di-tracting
aU . V• ' ’ i '•' it noises aud discomforting body vi
ments. but more Itecause it reflects . . , , 7
that inbuilt quality of stability brat,ous have been ehm.nated.
gained only by those many years We are ready now to demonstrate
of experience. and make prompt deliveries.
Farmers & Merchants
Purchasing Coporation
Pocomoke City, Md.
$ 2,5 °
l®‘ 8 B f. o. b. South Bend
ll.’'' iBWwwJBWti B// J ■§
9 SB
ii •
24-Hour-a-day Electric Service
I >elco-Light is made for long, dc
’ >. pendable ami efficient service. The
r—> e\ best mechanics are employedin the
Lfflß factory where Dclce-Light : *de.
[fflffil Only the beat of materials a. 1
\ f^wail^ 1 and each plant is repeatedly t
before being shipped.
Write ftv 'og.
J. RALPH r
POGOMOKS
There's a Satir
■ ■ ■ -*
APRIL 23. 1921.

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