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Democratic messenger. (Snow Hill, Md.) 1869-1973, July 09, 1921, Image 10

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026758/1921-07-09/ed-1/seq-10/

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PAGE TEN
The Educational Service Supporting Local Interests
#
a
COMMON SENSE
/ f O SEE. to hear, to taste, to touch and to smell are the five human senses, and
we who have the pood fortune of j ossessing them should develop a sixth,
COMMON SENSE, and thereby, support our local interests. This does not
apply to the wage earner alone, but it also applies to the merchants engaged in one
line of business, who go out of our home town to do their Inning in other lines.
MORAL: The man of sense will circulate his money for the betterment of
local interests.
Trade with These Merchants and support our home industries.
Mutual patronage brings mutual Prosperity
I). H. HRADFORD & SON
I arm Machinery
Titan Tractor-, The 1. 11. C. Line of Machine!.'
< HERRIN S II \RI)W ARE STORE
Every thing in Hardware
Majestic Ranges, Hoosier Cabinets, Good Cutler)
THE CORDDRY COMPANY
All Kinds of Building Material-
And C oal
T. H. COM. INS \ MIN
.shoes Tor Ever) bod)
Men's Furnishings of all kinds. Suit> to ord* - r
R. H. ( LUFF
Our> I- a First-class (irocer) Store
Hi st Cuts of Meats
I\ I). ( <m INCH AM & CO.
OKI 'HOISTS
Everything to he found in a First-class Drugstore
(~ M. DRY DEN
Choice (iroceries
\nd |)r\ (ioods and Notions ot All Kind-
THE DEMOCRAT!! MESSENGER
Job Printing
Let l s Print Your Stationer)
THE COMMERCIAL NATIONAL HANK
OF SNOW HILL
Geo. S. Payne, President C. T. Richardson, Cashier
THE FIRST NATIONAL HANK
OF SNOW HILL
Oldest Hank in Worcester Count)
WILLIAM GOODMAN
Men’s, Boy’s, and Women's Clothing, Shoes.
Furnishings, Head) Trimmed Hats
P. A. HOLLOWAY & HRO.
Liberty and Maxwell Cars
Auto Supplies, Autos Repaired. Best Tires
M. T. HARGIS & CO.
Dry floods.
Shoes. Furniture, Floor Coverings, Groceries, etc.
HOTEL PURNELL
C. PARKER SMITH, Proprietor
OUR MOTTO: —“Service” We strive to please
E. M. JONES
Meat store
I caking Sno Hdl (ieinral store and Grocer)
DR. PAUL JONES
OKI GGlvr
1 iii lies! Patent and Proprietor) Medicines
.!. CLIFTON NOCK
i.ns! kam e
l ire. Life. Vcidcni. and Automobile’lnsurance
J. H. PERDUE
l ord Cars and Tractors
\l! Kinds ot Auto Supplies and Tires in Stock
W ALTER W. PRICE
Confectioner •
Hrcver's Ice Cream Supplee's Ice Cream
I.EL \ND RICHARDSON
( rane's Ice Cream
< igar- Soft Drinks
SNOW HILL BAKERY
JOHN S. HOLLAND, Prop.
Makers of Bread. Rolls, t akes. Pies, etc.
SNOW HILL HARDW ARE CO.
GLEN MORE S. W ILLI AMS
Hardware. Tinware, and Farm Machinery
W. T. STANFORD
>attsage Manufacturer
Part Country Lard. Cured Meats, etc.
SNOW HILL ECONOMY STORE
t iothing and Shoes tor Men, Women and Children
S. SH \GER, Proprietor
( H AS. H. TIMMONS & SON
Dry Goods, Notions, Furniture, Men and
Women's Shoes, Floor Coverings, etc.
J. W. VINCENT
Jeweler
Grafanda*. Records. StieiT and Shaw Pianos
0. W. WILSON SALES CO.
Genco Lighting Plants
"Buick and "Chevrolet" Automobiles
WALTER WILLIAMS
Auto Keparing
Agents for Hupntohile, Batteries Recharged
THE DEMOCRAT*.; MESSENGER. SNOW HILL. MARYLAND.
f: X Grub Worm and
j: Butterflies
| By A. MARIA CRAWFORD.
* (4). I Mi. by McClure Newspaper Syndicate )
.lime liikl nut wanted to go to the
lila 11 ui>■>• party given by her beautiful
mu! rh h young cousin at Chestnut
I.odgc, a luxuriously furnished place
In l||e t'hilhowee mountains. .lane
knew well enough that she would lit
Into the erowil Alma would Invite
almu t a' siieeessfully as a square pete
in a round hole, for while Alma had
I finishing her edueation at a sc
leet sellout for fasliloliahle young
girl- lane had been earning a liveli
hood for herself and her widowed
niothe- h\ ihe inirouiantie route of
si cnog fa phy.
She did not give herself any airs
and egjl herself Mr. Mathews' private
seereti.ry, although her duties em
liraeed everything from oftii'e hoy to
genera manager of the hit; marble
quarry of which Mr. Mathews was
prcsitli nt. The war had liit the mar
ble industry a pretty hard blow and
lane had generously given her youth
ful strength, energy and enthusiasm
to keeping down expenses until the
quarry began to pay again. I.alior
was high
A mi n operating a derrick demand
ed S7.rs> per day, and even the water
boy, a half-witted lad of thirteen,
drew "iO. Machinery, long idle, had
rusted and had to lie replaced. But
tile market hud suddenly opened with
u bang and .lane dreamed wonderful
dreams of helping poor old Mr. Math
ew. get back on his feet in the linau
rial w o-Id. It was a sort of debt of
rratltll'.'e.
Mrs. Mathews had been the very
first pi.rson lo go to their aid when
Jane's father had died suddenly,
eitsing ids widow and daughter only a
nodest tittle home and no means with
which Hi keep it. It had been Mrs.
Mathew j who stlgge>ted business col
,ege and a place later in her husbands
idlice.
When the invitation to visit her
pretty, frivolous cousin in the tnoun
iains had come. Mrs. Mathews had
joined v ith .lane's mother in urging
the girl to go.
She had not been in the house more
than six hours before she realized
with a real pang of heart hunger that
do* was an outsider and that all the
-ousinly tact in the world could not
make her enjoy herself. A grub worm
has nothing in common with a hut
terlly. The small talk of the girls
■ insisted of clothes, boredom and
gossip The men frankly made love
to all the girls and were too free,
Jane thought, with their carefully
manicured hands.
i .(ane never knew how she manage I
to get through those first trying days.
She was perfectly miserable and she
j tried 'o hide it. Alma insisted on
lending her exquisite dresses and Jew
els. too, but .lane demurred at the
Idea of borrowed finery. So she wore
the simple, inexpensive things and re
garded herself as a drab colored
grub worm among brilliantly lined
liutterfl
Saturday morning mine and the en
tire party motored down to tie- sta
tion to meet several men who had
been lured from business by the hunt
ing Alma's game preserve offered
When the train pulled in everybody
shrieked over everybody else. Jane
almie remained an outsider. And
then a big Jolly fellow, whose brown
hair was already streaked becoming
ly with gray, came up to her, cap in
hand.
"They are too busy to not ice that
we do not know each other." he said
smilingly. “I am I'liil Mar-den."
lie managed to sit beside her on
I the way to the lodge and for tlie first
time since her arrival, Jane felt her
self one of the party. "Alma told me
all about you," In- said, "and 1 have
I keen ever since then to know
you. I do admire a girl who can
hold her own against all odds."
Jane felt real relief at that, lie
knew then that she did not belong to
that crowd. She was not sailing un
b-r filse colors. She laughed s,, heart
ily at one of Ids stories later that
|toll Sanders raised his eyebrows and
inquired In his drawling fashion, "Oh.
t say. Miss Jane, you're positively
lovely when you laugh. Why haven't
ton done it beforeV’
I'hil asked her to walk around the
nkc before luncheon and It was with
t last heating heart that Jane pre
■ared Hi dress for her first real en
gagement there. She had laid out a
Itt It* blue ser.-e so skillfully embroil!
-red by her own t liable fingers ttmt
t looked as If it might be anybody’s
•xponsive model. She wits Just get
lug Into it with rather trembling
lands when tin- bright sun of her
nippiness was promptly obscured h.v
(ie remark of the sophisticated little
tiitix who was rooming with tier.
"I knew Hint I'hil would he idee to
von. lie's engaged to Alloa you
know, and of course he wants to
mike a good Impression on Ids new
•otislM-to-lie."
Jane hurried downstairs and
fairly Invited Tony ilnines to go
walking with Iter. Then she asked
Alma to tell I'hil that she had al
-endy gone.
When she mine hack, glowing front
her lirlsk walk and also from the
.now ledge that site found herself able
to gain the iniere-d of the inimitable
Tony l" sueli an extent that lie laid
straight way made an engagement
with her for the afternoon, she set
t herself the pleasant, womanly task of
showing Iter hlaek-linlred little room- |
mate that she did not need I’liil Mars
tl ell's kindness, li was as If a witch '
had given Iter a charm to ensnare
men. She had Mattered Tony. It had
worked marvelously. Site proceeded
to try the .same method on the others
—all hut I'liil. By nightfall the girls
began to regard her curiously. Then
they grew ex Ilngly friendly. When
they were dressing for dinner Alma
outlie Into Jane's room Htid again of
feted Iter a beautiful evening dress,
litis time u reseda green one with
Iridescent spangles like star dust.
Jane accepted It eagerly. For the
first time in her wholesome young
lift! she longed for a look of admi
ration—in one man's eyes, whether
she had a right to it or not. Site had
always known Hint it would happen
to Iter like that, that when love came
it would come blindingly. When
I'hil Marstlen smiled at Iter site felt
her thudding heart drawn right up
to mirror L'self In Iter happy eyes.
She made a striking picture as she
went slowly down the long, curving
stairway. Three or four men were
in the hall below. I'hil among them,
ns she hoped he would be.
"You know, you are the loveliest
girl I have ever seen," lie told her
when lie had slipped Iter hand
through his arm and led Iter off to
a low, deep-cushioned window seat.
"Why did you run away and leave
me today?"
Just then Jane caught sight of
Alma, regal in white satin and lus
trous pearls. She thought, resentful
Iv at lit'st. that Alma had always Imd
everything. If she could steal a little
happiness with this mail, who was there
to know ? Then Jane's quick sense of
the right ami wrong of everything
rillin' to her rescue and site put Satan
behind her with a matter of fad re
joinder. Thereafter she avoided per
sonalities carefully. She talked of her
business, of the beautiful pink mar
ble in llie Mathews' quarry, of the
price it was bringing on the market,
of the price it would soon be bring
ing if the presidential election year
carried no money panic in it- wake.
Within thirty minutes I'hil Marstlen
laid given her the largest order for
marble that the Mathews Marble com
pany bad ever received. Business as
serted itself once more. Jane could
think of nothing else all during dinner.
She slipped away as soon as possible
anil called Mr. Mathews on long dis
tance. She was in Alma's little den
upstairs, and knowing that everybody
else was downstairs, she talked freely
about everything to Iter beloved old ,
employer.
"I'll be home in a few days ear
lier than I planned," she told him.
“We must get Ibis marble right out.
I will take all the office worries off
of your mind so that you can speed
up product ion in the quarry. Yes, he
Is a sjdcndld man. I'hil Marstlen is
his name, lie is tlie Junior member
of Mar-den fit Son, nreltileeia. The
very nicest man I ever knew!” There
was a little singing note in her voice.
Then quietly, the lilt gone out of it.
site added, "lie is engaged to my
cousin, Alma."
Stic hung up the receiver and sat
there, staring blankly at the walls,
dim tn the mellow glow from many
shaded lights.
"Who i- engaged to Alma?" asked
I'hil Mar-den so abruptly that she
Jumped.
"You.” said Jane In a small, quak
ing voice.
Then I'hil Marstlen did an unex
pected thing, lie put Ids arms around
her and jttughed. "I'm not engaged to
anybody, Jane dear, but I want to be,
to you. All of my life I have known
that the right girl would come just as
you have, and that 1 would recognize
her Instantly. As a- I hopped
off the train this morning I did not
S*‘|* <1 soul on the platform but you. |
I toes all ibis sound foolish to you,
dour, or do you. too. believe in fate?"
It was several minutes later that
Jane, remembering, looked up to say
happily, “Think what our tirm can
do for old Mr. Mathews' marble quar
ry! Why. you can just advise every
body to use marble, can't you. I'liil?"
Feast of Purim.
Jews, the world liver, tejoii-e greatly
in the celebration of the festival of
Purim, continuing for two days. Pur
lin is observed on the 1 -Ith and loth
of the month of Adnr, which is the
last month of the Jewish calendar, it
i> celebrated ill-recognition of the de
iiverntice of the Jews resident in Per
sia from tile destructive designs of
Hainan, the grand vizier of King
Ahasiierus. Itio Ido It. who itad
planned it general mas-acre of the
jews for the IHtli of Adar. Through
tile Intervention of K-ther, a Jewess
whose beauty had led Iter to the king's
harem, where sin- rose to be queen,
the plan was frustrated. Human and
Ids -on.- were condemned to (lie gul
lows, and Montreal, uncle of l-'.sther,
was raised to the position of second
in Hie kingdom. Instead of being
slaughtered, the Jews were permitted
to slaughter those who attacked them
on the day set for the massacre.
East Indian Superstition.
In certain parts of India tigers' uttd
lizards’ skins take the place of the
Bible of I'bristiaii countries, mid the
penalty of breaking the oath is that In
one ease the wiine-s will bets Hue the
prey of a tiger, and ill the other, that
his hotly will he covered with scales
like a lizard.
Willing.
He—l gHe you fair warning. I am
going to kiss you! ,
Site Kir! Your head must ha
turned.
He—Sure. I'll turn It.—Judge.
Miller Tires
Wear Better
Ride Better
than most any tire you can buy any*
where. We sell them. Buy them
once and you will always buy them.
Buy a HUP none better
great car for the money
Williams’ Garage
Next to Electric Light Plant
Snow Hill, Md.
—-
Light-Six
You can now have prompt delivery
of this New Studebaker-Built Sedan
SOLVING tin* transportation Th* Ni w’ I.h.ilT->!\ S; :>w
problems of flu* world t r over designed hv Studeh.iker ai'l i- Imiit
Gtt yearn has given to Stude- romplete in Mmiriiaki rfa :<*rir*.
Laker art experience that eminently ni.iiiufa*turiii>i \-eri
qualities them to produce enclosed rnrr and inherent knowledge of
ram that are not only beautiful and eoaelt building - your a-urane •
rom fori able, hut highly practical that this Sedan i* hull to withstand .
** well. jolts and alraiitn of long road •••nice.
TV New I.imit-SixSi i.-.n i< a ~ n of ,-H. r J„,l
maota-rpMrr of the r..a. 1.-l.uiM.-r’. [ r * ° ,1,,m fr, .' m ' .brat.-.,,, t.n- IShW
an. not only from the -land,mini of IJin->'X >kdan s.-t, new .tandard*
beauty of line, and r.eh appnint. >" .* 10-e.l ear .omlort. D.-traetm*
menls. but more berau-e it reflect, “'V 1 '■- bl -‘> v “
that inbuilt quality of .lability brat.on. hare been el.iumateJ.
gained only by tho,c many years We are ready now to demonstrate
of experience. and make prompt deliveries.
Farmers & Merchants
Purchasing Coporation
Pocomoke City, .Md. 4
l f. 0. b. South fUnd
tt a
The Hoosier the Finest
Kitchen Cabinet Made
If there were a Kitchen Cabinet superior to the Hoosier,
it stands to reason that there would he more of that Cabinet
in use than there are Hoosiers. Butl there are as many
Hoosiers in use as all other Kitchen Cabinets combined.
Two million women, by their choice, have approved the
Hoosier as the finest Kitchen Cabinet ever made.
There is a Hoosier to fit every home and every purse. See
our display of Hoosiers.
Cherrix’s Hdw. Store
SNOW HILL, MD.
Try a “Want" Ad. in The Messenp
JULY 9. 1921.

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