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Democratic messenger. (Snow Hill, Md.) 1869-1973, September 23, 1922, Image 4

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PAGE FOUR
THE DEMOCRATIC MESSENGER
Entered at the Postofßce at Snow Hill, Md., as second-class matter.
Published every Saturday.
C. 1.. VINCENT & C. V. WHITE. Editors.
Subscription $1.50 a Year in Worcester Co. $2.00 outside of the County.
The Leading Newspaper of Worcester County.
THE REWARDS (H S( HOIARSHII\
Some of the young people now beginning 1 their year of school
vork are principally ambition- to w in places on the athletic teams.
Others are looking forward to new ! rit-ml-i.ip' and ocia! triumphs.
How many am earnestly seeking to make better records in their
lessons, and learn the share of tin woi id’s wisdom ollered by the
school courses of Worcester County?
The complaint is often made that -choiarship honors are not
appreciated, that the crowd- go wild over the successful athletes
who are showered with social attention - while the good students
live quiet lives and are not much noticed.
When the business na n come minimi to find promising young
people to enter their establishments, they ant some one who has
taken, a first das- position in the work of the school. It is not
so much that they believe young people of that type know more,
as that they prize the faithfulness to duty that they have shown.
They believe that young people who have manifested ambition
m their school work, will show the same quality when they are
asked to take up the tasks of the world of business and industry.
These studies offered the young people are prescribed because
as the result of centuries of experience, educators believe that
ihey develop brains and help people solve their problems.
Pupils who have made good records in scholarship have usually
learned to do some thinking, and to put their thoughts into con
vincing language. That should enable them, when they come up
against practical affairs to find solutions for difficulties and to over
come obstacles. The leaders of the community are largely those
who have gained this ability to think and express themselves.
Those who despise scholarship throw away most of their chances
for success.
THE ItOA SCOUT MOVEMENT.
.Many people will he astonished to learn that there are now
f>26,1>00 Boy Scouts in this country. This feature was reported
m connection with the recent convention of Boy Scouts and scout
masters held at Blue Ridge. North Carolina. That an elfort of
this kind, which calls for so much hard work on the part of men
leaders, and so much enthusiasm and cooperation on the part of
the boys, could have attained such a success in the 12 years since
the scout organization was formed, would have seemed incredible
a few years ago.
A movement of this kind runs up against many difficulties, as
the men who try to influence boy* frequently do not understand
how to deal with the peculiar kinks of boys nature.
The scout idea has seemed to hit the hoys .just right. It gives
them the touch of wild life which they long for. U takes them
out of the formal and conventional conditions of their home-,
which are contrary to hoy nature, and gives them a chance to
kick up their heels in the open. It provides a system of competi
tion for passage from one grade of scoutcraft to another, so that
they have an incentive of rivalry and emulation which leads them
to do some real work on useful subjects. It gives them certain
ideals of manliness and helpfulness which must he a permanent
influence in many of these youngsters’ lives.
The biggest problem in handling this tremendous movement,
must he to secure good scout leaders. In the hurrying race of
the business world, too few young men are w illing to give the time
and enthusiasm necessary to win the hoy heart. But such effort
has splendid rewards. It helps keep a fellow young, and must as
sist him in initiative and in ability to control others. No young
man goes into such work without getting a lot out of it himself.
Vi.AS. THE \NGLK WORM.
And now we have a device by which the angle worm is hunted
in his lair, brought to the surface to be devoured for the susten
ance of the great American hen. Peter J. O’Keefe, of Greenwich.
Connecticut, is the inventor.
The device i- an electrical one and literally shocks the worms
out of the ground. It consists of two brass rods that are pushed
into the earth several feet apart. A wire is attached to each red
and each wire connects w ith an ordinary telephone magneto.
By twisting the handle of the magneto the angle worm feels ii
is time to take the air. Rapidly he moves to escape, hut. alas! the
chicken is waiting, and as soon as the worm imagines he is safe
from danger his troubles come to an end.
Thus does the world move on. If the mentality of the angle
worm were properly developed, lie would sense the greater danger
cf leaving his natural environment.
A- time goes on and the standard of angle worm intelligence
advances, things may improve for him; but in the meantime, he
will have to look for temporary protection to the American Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Angle Worms, an organization
w hich undoubtedly w ill come into being as soon as the cruelty of
the O'Keefe device is conceived.
Surely such an opportunity for a new protective and paternalis
tic society cannot bo missed.
THE CLEAN TOWN
You can to some extent judge of a person's progress and
achievement, by the extent to which he keepsdean. If he is
indifferent to soap and water, if he rarely -haves, he gives tin
impression of l>eing unsuccessful. Men who perform rough work
must dress according to their job. but if they have self respect
they usually clean up for their hour of leisure.
It is much the same in the case of a town. Public sentiment
has advanced much in this matter during the past ten \v,
Formerly in many towns there was little disposition to do
frequent street cleaning. Municipal employes would go Wei
public places once in a while blit in a few days disorderly and
careless people bad thrown away vaste paper and other rtibbi-h.
and the whole places looked frowsy again.
Today it is more generally realized that the stmt a plan
must he kept constantly clean if that community is to look like a
five one. It may cost some money, hut dirt and disorder are so
THE DEMOCRATIC MESSENGER, SNOW HILL, MARYLAND.
fatal to the appearance of a town that it is costly policy to let
such a state continue.
Moreover, the prevalence of dirt expresses the morale of the
community. There is no encouragement for a man to keep his
place looking nicely, if the street in front is littered with waste
paper.
The expense of such cleaning is greatly increased, when people
throw trash into the streets, as so many do. The people of
Know Hill should trv to keep the town clean.
i
MANY AUTOISTS
LOSE THEIR LIVES
l lin'li Mitili l Hi Railroad Ollicial'
I CrmoingH
Inspectors of tin- Penn- yb ania rail-,
' Oll,l •7:>' i <' ! “! auotho,
ptn aulomohiii iri\at -o!rtoci
highwav cio mu- in I Viui.-ylvaiiin.
\. Yo Pel a arc. Maryland and
viitrinia to dit*'iiiiiu tin- • \tint and
iT.aracti rof can < n< - di.-played in
driving motoi ca • ■" iu railroad
track* I'la fart.- m Sdl >|>oritii
••.-.m o' uto negligence have Im-i h
rompilid and analyzed.
The following form.' of e;.i ■ le ■ in - -
:!i tlriv ing were not- d:
tailing to look in either direction
for trains.
Pii.reKard.ng t. . -top signal of
i ro.-sing watchmen.
~
I •riving under cr. -mg gate- in.
iron! of tra:.t. vvhiT gate- wore in-
ing lowered.
Running or. no -ing 1..-te.- top-
ping, not having cat unit i gpitrol.
Stalling on the Hack.-.
Stopping ear.- on crossing and
turning around on liie track-.
Paving no attention to tin leeomo-
the warning whistles.
Racing automobile.' aero,-.- tin
track- to heat train-.
, 1 .
1 . hours. ear.-, hearing license tags
from five different tales, averaged
27 miles pei hour when running
across the railroad tracks and in two
instances thev were making almost a
"".A, ano'the'r ero ing P. and in-
experienced dlivi rs were observed. 15
tried to ‘'heat" other automoliih
across the railroad track.- and on*
ear was driven '25 mill - pel hour in
' I • dark vv ill .. :t light .
PI Mil PAN.
He I- SO Stupid he think- a powder
magazine is a woman'.- fashion pulili-
'‘'i'. n ' , , , ~ . .
Have you got a Pumli Pan . Send
it in, and we will pnnt it. 1
j REDUCTION SALE "j
: OF FARM IMPLEMENTS 1
Thomas Change-speed Mowing Machines
J Thomas Wheat Drills best by test {
| Grow more wheat per acre |
X Horse Rakes self-dumping X
X Thomas Hay Tedders
♦ Oliver Manure Spreaders J
X Oliver Riding Plows X
♦ In order to make room for our new’ Spring ♦
♦ goods, we are going to sell you some J
i REAL BARGAINS \
X Come let us show you ♦
X Sole Agents for Cole’s Hot Blast Stoves and ♦
♦ Ranges. Big shipment just in. See them. ♦
: i
: Snow Hill Hardware Co. \
| SNOW HILL. MARYLAND |
FroyH
| A Special Representative of f
♦ The Forester Tailoring Co. |
♦ Baltimore, Maryland J
| IS NOW HERE j
♦ ♦
Have your measure taken
• ♦
for vour fall and winter ♦
X $
X Suit and Overcoat :
♦ ♦
i T. H. COLLINS & SON!
| SNOW HILL. MARYLAND. |
MADDIC
ItUKKiJ
m m m
M I
I AX I
|u . |V jn S p, endid assortment.
.. .
Ihe be>t confect ions we can hurt
for OUr candy tabic. We have
other good candies and we have
been careful to select the tasty
i i
s
If you want a nice I mix of
candy for her. just remember
lOILET
ARTICLES
V(( sl „ | t , ninsu ] H
. . ,
carries a better stork of toilet
.
COods til.ill I . I). ( ottillgiiam
Co., and our prices are lower
than most of them,
~, ,m V .,
*' l>mN< ’
TACKLE
.... . . . . .
lu ’ 11 -ha le lilting line now
big trout in the buy. We can
fix you up with all kinds of tack
](. so vou w ill get vour share
of the specked beauties if you

ha\ e the I'lgllt pun.
' OMr, HI
_ _
P. D. Cottillghain
-v ~,
Ak I r|
SNOW fill I Ml)
'
( HRISTIAN C’lD RCH
|>jt>ic School at 111 A. M. and Corn
lm.nj,,tl ;it j) \ \|
R. P. Ilrowell will preach at T.Mh
.
' ' '
I FI R SCARFS MAILORDERS
| EARLY FALL “ %%& PROMPTLY AND
I ARE NOW TWO 810 STORES ( A ?^ LY
! I POCOMOKE EP ::
♦ ONE OF THE FINEST COLLECTIONS OF i!
READY-TO-WEAR
Z * ’
♦ Ever Assembled Under One Roof

♦ We Invite You to View This Magnificent Display j;
| ()ur building is small but our stock this season is bigger and finer than ever. ;;
1 <’
! COATS AND WRAPS ij
| Gracefully draped wraps with loose, full lines, clever sleeves, fashioned of
{ lovely soft fabrics, $15.00 up I!
♦ Splendid Model of Wool Bolivia with large collar of
♦ wolf, full silk lined, $29.50 \\
\ SUITS of UNUSUAL CHARM Jpf
| Cut on smart straight lines, in the season’s new mbi j;
| shades of malay, beaver, marten, cocoa, caramel, </! V ;;
kit fox, black, navy. Sorrento and radio; s2O up
\ THE NEW FALL DRESSES Vii J|i:
\ ARE WONDERFUL ' |j§| jj
| It would be impossible to find a prettier or more varied | p-/g I !1
♦ selection than we are showing. I J!
X Charming draped effects in Crepe Romaine, ft Pefel R
X Satin Canton. Crepe Renee, Canton and Me- | Bgjj
X telasse in all the alluring Autum tints. II R
| Smart coat effects and combinations in poiret II fftj ;;
♦ twill, eponge, jerseys and silk velvets. Yi/ )!
♦ $15.00 and up / qf - W
J Prices On All Are Remarkably Low A \ J!
Z See our line of Chudley Dresses for the school H 5 * !!
X girl and college miss. j;
If You Knit
Postal Brings
200
Samples Free
Direct From Mill
121 c an ounce
OLD ( OLON\ MILLS
Mannyunk. Pa.
BE INDEPENDENT OF STRIKES
Build up Your Business
SHIP BY TRUCK
To the Eastern Shore
|
Via the Only Heal Ferry Boats
Crossing the Bay
I:i etTei • .r am! after Sept. i::. I'.'SJ
I.K.WK IU) SHOKK
i Baltimore)
A. M. 5.00 A. M.
I.K \VK HIM K II M l.
(Kii.-tern Shore)
7.:1(i A. M. a. (Mi I*. M.
: Daily- Weatl.* i ami Tide Permitting
“VOI KPN RIGHT ON ANI) VOP
HI N RIGHT OFF” In Ninety
Minutes.
Th< Perfect Fa-tern Shore Road-
Start Right At Out Pier
TRUCKS [loaded to capacity j |
2 TONS (ill I.KSS (It II.) #2.5(1.
.1 tons OK I.KSS (li It.) S.l.Oti
TONS OK I KSS (It It.) #l.OOl
l.e - Without Knud
('mini. Aalion Kate- Fieri l.uw
BALTD. & KASTKRN SHOKK
FERRY LINK. Inc.
; st. Paui St. Baltimore, Md.
Si. Paul (Wiist
notkt: to tkkspasskks.
Ail |.< >.-> ii- are hereby notified not
t.. in -i a; - mi my land with dog m
gun .mder penalty of the law. Ail
\ ioiatoi.- will he dealt with in tint
nrcordunre with the law.
KOIIKRI li. SHOCKI.KY, ,
Ko.it* 1 1, Snow Hill, Md.
RACES
AT
Franklin Park
Berlin
WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY
October 4th & sth
Everybody knows that Berlin Races are good, and this
vear they are going to be better that ever.
OTHER ATTRACTIONS
Automobile Races, Motorcycle Races, and Side Shows
with acrobatic performers.
The Berlin Track is now a member of the National
Trotting association, which assures the protection of
horses from being outlawed and guarantees good races to
the pulbic.
$400.00 IN PURSES
and classes will be awarded to suit the entries.
COLLINS & COMPANY, Mgrs.
Eastern Stockmen Trying Beef Herds
1 .Lsirrn .01! bri‘.<ln li 1 •!> 1.. td that thin tiill.idc
fi.i.u-' and litnber lands art' ideal for l>< * f herd development and as a
result are this week staging a national b< - rf breed show at Wilmington,
lie la ware.
SEPTEMBER 23, 1922,

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