OCR Interpretation


Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, February 15, 1868, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026820/1868-02-15/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Effect |}ortnj.
dicts
seem
upon
ation
catch
tated
food
the
they
they
Our
ens.'
TWILIGHT MV8IR08.
When the day is slowly fading,
Ere the night has yet begun,
When the little stars arc brightening
In the heavens
Comes an hour of peaceful quiet,
When I love alone to sit,
Mnsi ng over memory's pictures
As they past my fancy flit ;
by one,
Thinking of old friends and playmate«,
Faces bright with happy smiles ;
Planning for the distant future,
• With its many doubts and trials,
Full of joy and holy calmness
Is to me this twilight hour,
forth the soul's best treasures
a strong yet tender power.
Call
the
been
and
ring
the
for
a
is
(Dur ©lia.
Tlse Kmpre.s Bugrnlr.
A correspondent furnishes the following
description of the French Empress :
Eugenie is the must beautiful as she is
the most popular woman in Paris. Her
style is so marked, her taste so decided,
her form and manners so unlike tho French,
that she stands alone in tho gay capital the
observed of- all observers. Unlike the
French women—who are short and dam
py, especially in middle life—the Empress
queenly in form, tnl', slim, and stately,
alike the French women whose complex
ions are dark sallow and even dingy, the
Empress's face is as white as alabaster.
Her eye is clear but piercing; her smile
captivating ; her brow gracious. Arrayed
in her regal robes she is simply magnifi
cent. Everything about her is iu keeping.
Her taste is unequalled. Everything is in
proportion, and one part is suited to the
other. She knows what will agree with
her complexion to the exact shade of rib
. You can suggest no alteration in
her dress. On state occasions when she
greet« the public eye she wears everything
regal and stately that becomes her station.
On oridnary occasions her dress is very
plain, very simple, yet very taking. Her
hat Beems to be the central point of her
dress. If it is brown or blue, green or
crimson, her gloves, scarf, ornaments and
her apparel correspond. Her spirits are
exuberant, her disposition joyous, und she
seems disposed to enjoy her position. On
her last visit to England, she was the
guest of the Queen. A review wus held
in St. James' Park in her honor, which
she beheld from the balcony of Bucking
ham Palaoe, in company with Victoria and
leon. She was joyous as a school
She clasped her hands and shouted
in her French style like-a little girl at the
grand display. Her buoyancy and gloc
fuluess of mailer, not to say frivolity,
shocked the digiufied and sober Queen of
Englaud, and more than once Victoria
laid her hand on the shoulder of her fair
visitor and reminded her that while such
outbursts of feeling were perfectly natural,
they were not regal !
1 saw the Empress attended by the Im
perial cortege as she went with her hus
band to open the Great Exposition. Noth
ing oould exceed the pluinness of her
dress. Amid the gorgeous array of the
Royal ladies of France, the brilliant cos
tume of foreign ministers and dignitaries,
the glitter and gold of the military of
France and of Europe, she stood alouo in
her simple elegance, the only woman
among the thousands who was more elegant
for her plaiuness.
She understands the French people per
fectly. The pageantry that they like so
well she spread before their eye. She is
all grace and dignity as she daily drives
out with the Imperial carriages, attended
by her husband or son. The Empe
ror sinks away in the corner of his car
riage, aa if indifferent to publie attention,
wearied with cares of State, or annoyed
by public attention. He kicks at one, and
seldom returns u salutation, with a frown
on his bee, and a " I-wish-you-would-let
me-alone " sort of look on his countenance.
The Empress sits upright in her carriage,
catches ev6ry eye, returns gracefully and
with a peculiar smile every salutation from
th« humblest to the mightiest. All Paris
feel that they have au interest in her,
The street-sweepers, rag-piokers and beg
gars take off their hats as she passes. Like
tho wife of Nubal, by benignity she seeks
to hide the churlishness of her husband.
Very devout in her religion, her humanity
aud benificence to the poor huvu*becoine a
proverb. She is the patron of sick hos
pitals and neglected children. During the
cholera, when the panic dyovc nurses from
the pallets of sufferers, the Empress, in a
plain dress, summoned her ladies of hon
our, drove io the hospitals where the chol
era was raging, and in spite of all remon
strance, commenced nursing the siek.
Her heroic conduct recalled tho frightened
attendants, restored general confidence,
and saved the lives of large numbers of
the sick. The .flowers that she bore with
her she distributed to the sufferers, and
some who died begged that those flowers
might be buried with them in their coffins.
ehe is a woman of unquestioned talent,
shrewdness aud strong common sense.
She has mote influence over her husband
• in national matters than any of his minis
ters. She attend« the Councils of State,
I participates in the deliberations,
absence of Napoleon, «he i* the Regent
of the Empire. She preside« at Councils
of State with great dignity and ability,
holds the members to tho exact questing
before them, and will not allow them to
discuss any question or pass any measures
that would be distasteful to the Emperor.
The long tranquility of France owes very
much to the taste, talent, tact aud benig
nity of the Empress.
U.i
boti
N
lapo
girl.
and
In
the
Tnz Goldkn Hulk.—T he Golden Rule
teaches us to do unto others as wc would
have others do unto us. At the same time
it teaches us not to expect from our neigh
bor* what wo would not be willing, '
similar circumstances to do for them.
with his mother
m
• Little George's coloquy
illustrate* the priuciple :
"Now, George, you must divide the
honorably with your brother Charles."
iVhat is honorable, mother ?"
"It means that you must give him the
largest piece. "
"Thun, mother, I'd rather Charley
should divide it."
©ako
Rare and Carious.
Mothfr Cary's Chickens. —Mariners
consider that the sight of the petrol pre
dicts a storm, and the reason for its ap
pearance is thus given : 4 4 Because petrels
seem to repose in a common brecse ; but
upon the approach, or during the continu
ation of a. gale, they surround a ship, and
catch up the small animals which the agi
tated ocean brings near the surfaoe, or any
food that may be dropped from the vessel.
Whisking like an arrow through the deep
valleys of the abyss, and darting away over
the foam crest of some mountain wave,
they attend the laboring bark in all her
perilous course. When the storm subsides
they retire to rest, aud are uq more seen.
Our sailors have, from very early times
called these birds . 4 Mother Cary's chick
ens.' "
1.
1
F irk From Ick.—M ake a hole in a
thick piece of ice, dry it oat with souie
cotton, place a bit of potassium in the hole ;
the mettle will immediately take fire, and
sometimes it will he discharged with great
violence, especially if the potassium has
been held some time between the fingers
and becomes warm. Caro must always be
taken not to lean over the icc or water du
ring experiment« with potassium ; and it
should be remembered that this metal very
nearly explodes whenever held long in the
hands, or otherwise warmed for use. ,
Moon Days. —An English tavu.rU ar
gues that 44 a day iu the moon" equals
fourteen of our days. It begins with u
Blow sunshine, followed, by a brilliant
Buushinc and heat (about 212 degrees
Fahr.) ; the sky is intensely black (there
bciug no atmosphere like ours, to which
blue Bky is due) ; the Btars arc visible and
the horizon is limited ; there is dead si
lence ; the cold iu the intensely black
shadow is very great ; and there is no serial
perspective. Thus the moon is no place
for a man, or any animals or vegetables
that we know of. The "night of the
moon" (fourteen of our days) begins with
a slow sunset, which is followed by intense
cold (about 384 degrees below zero.)
An Anoiknt Theatre. —The ancient
theatre of Ephesus has recently been ex^
amined and measured. Its diumetcr was
six hundred feet, und it would accommo
date seventy-five thousand spectators. It
is memorable for the uproar described in
Acts VI. when the Kphosians accursed
Paul and the Christians in this very build
ing. It was also the scene of Appolonius'
miracles.
Origin or Boots and Shoes. —Boots
are said to have been invented by Currans.
They were at first made uf leather, after
wards of brass and iron, arj were proof
against both cut and thrust. It was from
this that Horner called the Greeks brazen
fuoted. Formerly in France, a great foot
was much esteemed, and the length of the
shoe, in the fourteenth century, was a
mark of distinction. The shoes of a prince
were two feet nnd a half long ; those of a
baron, two*foet; those of u knight eigh
teen iuehes long.
of
in
so
is
a
the
a
of
and
to
2.
.
The Pope.
The Holy Father is now in his 75th
year. He is of the middle height, or
slightly above it. The air of Heine and
his sedentary habits have given him an
cmbonjwint, not, however, enough to in
convcnience him, and which disappears
under his ecclesiastical oostume. His
hair is white, though thick ; his forehead
large and prominent; the eyes deep set,
and flushing with strange light ; all the
features are stron
gly marked, but in har
mony with each other. There are no wrin
kles on the face ; the complexion ht slightly
colored, hut transparent. The month,
somewhat prominent, gives to his whole
physiognomy an expression of gentleness
and extr;.ordina* y b nevolenoe. ffad Pius
IX. Wen a prince, instead of holding the
highest place in the Catholic hierarchy, it
might he said that his visage was marked
by that good nature which Stcndliall de
clares he has never yet met with in Ital
ians. Everything about him shows ex
traordinary vigor, and the the longest cer
emonies do not exhaust him. He takes a
walk every day On
outside tho walls.
foot iu the Pincio dr
Good Ukrtii for a Correspondent.—
Dr. H. Kussell has accepted, says an ex
change, the most responsible and influen
tial outside positiou connected with the
Loudon Timet, and is about to proceed to
Paris as its own regular correspondent.
In his new character Dr. R. will bo able
to influence the foreign policy of tho em
pire to some extent, for the British press
take its tone on many questions from the
selected extracts, as well as the remarks
on continental affairs which have, as a
general rule, characterized the Thunderer.
The Time*' proprietors conduct their Paris
oflico upon a scale of great magnificence.
The salary is twenty thousand dollar* in
gold, besides a splendidly furnished house,
carriages, wiues, servants and secretaries.
In its saloons the most celebrated states
men snd wits of France and Kurope
semble and are entertained, and tho cor
respondent thus gleans front original sour
ces the current news of the day. Dr.
O'Meara, an Irishman of culture and lite
rary attainments, has, for a number of
years, filled this position, and is now suc
ceeded by Dr. Russell, another Irishman,
thus again illustrating the fact that some
of tho leading positions on tho London
press are occupied by persons of that
country.
In
D*bt.—T ho following paragraph will
boar rending often. It in from an article
% Horace Grcoly:
Hunger, cold, rags, hard work, con
tempt, suspicion, unjust reproach, are dis
agreeable ; but Dbbt is iufinitoly worse
than them all. And if. it plAae God to
either or all of uiy declining years,
the lesson which I should have most
'
81
earn
cstly sought in impressing on thorn is :
"Never run into debt! Avoid pecuniary
obligation as you would pestilence and
famine. If you have but fifty cents, and
ean get no more for a week, buy a peck of
corn, parch it and live on it rather than
owe any man a dollar." *
There arc many graceless preachers
grace—many uncharitable one* on charity.
Yon cannot preserve happy domestic
pairs in family jars.
m
the
the
on
C-
BOOKS FOR WINTER READING.
Note. —Any of the books named below will be
forwarded by mail, postage paid, ou rocieptof the
price attached to each.
her
PUBLISHED BY
IH R» & HOUGHTON,
459 BROOME STREET, NEW YORK.
TWO THOUSAND MILKS ON HORSEBACK.
Santa Fe and back. A Summer T
1.
'hrrruwi I
Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, and New Mexico,
the Year 1860. By Colouel Jas. F. Moline,
vol. crown 8vo, price $2.
"He is a good traveller, and combining the
disciplined mind of a student with the training
"an army officer, is well qualified to give an
opiniou upon whut he observes. His mode of
travelling lias furnished him *ith excellent op
portunities for careful observation and with great
variety of adventure in the prairie."— Standard,
New Bedford , Mass.
44 it is a lively, descriptive history of the coun
try passed through, imparting much valuable
information, aud makes a capital companion to
the Across the Contiuet, nnd other books of in
tcr-contincntal travel of the past few years."_
Commonwealth , Boston.
1
a
a
2. FOUR YEARS AMONG TIIE SPAN18H
AMERICANS.
By Hon. E. Hnssaurek, late U. S. Minister Resi
dent to tlie Republic of Ecuador. 1 vol. c
8vo, price $2.
" Tlie subject is full of interest, and
uiend the volume to our readers
of tlie year for .information."— 1'
Conneeficut.
** The result is a work
rn
we coni
out* of the teat
, Harford,
rhich for its wealth of
information, for its broad spirit of philosophy, is
seldom equalled. In style it is graphic and ner
vous. The description of the nseeut of Chimbu
razo is a fine »{»ccimcn of vivacious narrative,
while the portruilure of Bnanish-American char
acter and life, as displayed in the cities and the
country, i9 minute, aud evidently faithful."—
Express , Albany.
3. ITALIAN JOURNEYS.
By W flliaxh D. Howells, Author of Ycnctiau
Life. 1 vol. crown 8vo., price $2.
. "Since tho days of Montaigne and Lord Her
bert of Cherbury ( not to mention James HowcB
traveller in Italy baa written mote en
tertaining accounts of his journey than our coun
tryman, Mr. Howells, whose Veuetian Life we
noticed some mouths ago."— Commonwealth, Bos -
again )
torn.
" There is in all Mr. Howells writes a freshness
nnd sincerity, a quiet and perfect renunciation of
pretence^ a subtle and strong humor, a liveliness
of description, combined with a grave und self
possessed calmness, which uiake the expression of
opinion, the narration of fact, the utterance of
emotion, or the IjubLling out of an irrepressible
sense of the ludicrous alike charming. There is
no writer of travels in our day so simple, siucere,
enjoyable, und profitable ."—Brooklyn Union.
4. VENETIAN LIFE.
By William D. Howells. 1vol. crown 8vo.
piree $2.
"Seldom a writer makes so broad nnd fine a
mark with his first pen-stroke us Mr. Howells,
our late accomplished Consul at Venice, made
with his Venetian Life. The critics found so
much to praise in this book that for once they
forgot their avocation and paused to admire and
enjoy instead of hastening to point out
arid faults ."—Liberal Christian.
the defects
5. THE TURK AND THE GREEK;
Ur, Greeds, Races, Society, aud Scenery in
Turkey and Greece, und the Isles of Greece. By
S. G. W. Benjamin. 1. vol. l6mo, price $1.75.
"If anybody wishes a small volume of facile,
graceful, mobile prose, we commend him to these
rather miscellaneous, yet entertaiuiug pages."—
New Yorjf Indtpcruh nt.
44 The style of this book is that of an easy
rative, the sympathies are those of a right
minded American, and the predictions are shared
In common with intelligent observers
.''—Brooklyn Union.
" The author s account of Greece is not flatter
ing, but no doubt it is true.''— Baltimore Episco
pal Methodist.
0. THE DIARY OF A MILLINER.
By Belle Otis. 1 vol. lUmo, price $1. 25.
"The diary is apparently truthfully written ;
it indicates some very queer tacts lor the reformer
and economist, some phases of familiar experience,
of which a popular novelist might well avail him
self, and is a memoir of a kind of life about which
many people kuow little."— Transcript , Boston.
" A smart milliner could tell many a line story.
A smart milliner is 44 Belle (His," aud that is just
what she does. Her narrative has ail the viva
city and piquancy which belongs to woman.
Now it sends a keen shaft, and then follows a
sally of exquisite humor ."—Albany Express.
every
W
or
an
in
the
the
it
de
ex
cer
a
7. THE OPEN POLAR SEA.
A Narrative of a Voyuge of Discovery toward
the North Pole, iu the sriinoner United States,
By Dr. Isaac I. Huy es, Commander of the Ex
pedition. Embellished with six lull-page illus
trations, drawn bv Durley, White, aud others,
from Dr. Hayes' Sketches, three full-page ( hurts,
twenty-eight vignettes, aud a tiue portrait of the
author, engraved on steel. 1 vol. 8vo., price,
cloth, $3.75; half calf, $6.
"He has culled the most significant facts, the
most picturesque sceueB the most dramatic and
pathetic incidents from this diurnal record and
woven them into a consecutive, pleasing, and im
pressive history ."—Boston Transcript.
dr
8. OLD ENGLAND:
Its Scenery, Art, and People. By James M.
Hoppin, Protessor in Yale College. 1 vol. ltimo.
price, $2.
" it pleasantly revives our choicest memories
of England, and suggests motives and means for
a more enjoyable and instructive sojourn than
our rapid eountrvmeu usually devote to tlie land
of their fathers."— Tranecript, Ho,Ion.
9. HOMESPUN; OR, FIVE - AND - TWENTY
YEARS AGO.
By Thomas Lackland. 1 vdl. Hi mo. price, in
cloth, $1. 75.
" The description of tlie landscape on a rainv
day, the country Sabbath, the babbling brook a't
even-tide, the rich glories of Summer, aud the
mellow, softening beauties of autumn,
wrought with exquisite skill."— Journal, Albany.
10. POEMS OF FAITH, HOPE, AND LOVE.
By Phoebe Cary. 1 vol. 16mo. price, $1.'50.
" We do not often meet with a more satisfait
tory and comforting little collection of ;,ocms
than the unpretending volume juBt published by
Hurd a Houghton of the Phoebe Cary's Poems of
Faith, Hope, and Love. They arc utterances of
a truly chastened spirit, submissive but not sud,
full of hope ds well as acquiescence, of patience
rather^ than passivencss."— Republican, Spring
field.
ex
the
to
able
em
the
a
in
cor
Dr.
lite
of
suc
some
that
arc
For sale by all Booksellers.
January 25.
LEND ME YOUK COUNTENANCE,
I F you want a good likeness of yourself
family call at
HORNING'S MAMMOTH CAR,
-Middletown, Del.,
where you will get pictures from the beautiful
little Peurl Ferrotype to the life-size Photograph.
All who wish u correct likcuce* of* them selves
or friends should embrace this opportunity and
call at once.
Particular attention paid to copying daguerro
typcß or auibrotyjieg of deceased persons into card
or large size Photographs.
A profile will be shown before the picture* are
finished.
A good assortment of Rustic and other Frames
hand.
It will afford us
examine Specimens.
January 4—tf
or
will
con
dis
to
jilcniiurc to have you call and
J. M. HORNING.
is :
and
and
of
than
First Cla88 Boarding House.
NO. 76 STTARP STREET,
, BALTIMORE.
IjOCateJ one nynarr/mm tbe R. anS 0. ft. ft. Depot,
and three tquare, front the Bittern Short
Steamboat Wharf,
M RS. GURT AVUS WRIGHT, late of Chester
town, Kent cooutv, Maryland, inform- her
friend« and the public generally that she will ao
commoduto, on reasonable terms, Transient, Per
maueul and Table boarder-.
on
Jun. 4.—y.
LouiBa Muhlbach'g Historical Novels.
k
of
by
at
of
D. APPLETON & CO..
443 ÂnIT 446 BROADWAY, NEW YORK*
H AVE just published, The Empress Josephine.
An Historical Sketch of the Days of Najto
leon. 1 vol. 8vo. Paper covers, $1 50; Cloth, $2.
Napoleon awl the\Qwcn of Prussia. 1 vol. ä vu.
per covers, $1 50; «loth, $2.
The Daughter if i
lustra tod. Paper
Marie Antoinette awl Her Son. 1 vol.Bvo. Paper
covers, $1 50; cloth, $2.
Joseph //. awl His H urt. Translated from the
German by Adelaide de V. Chaudron. 1 vol. 8vo.
Cloth, $2.
Frederick the Great and lbs Court. Translated
from the German by Mis. Chapman Colemun and
her daughters. 1 vol. 12mo. 434pp. Cloth, $2.
Brrlin and Sane- Souri ; or Frederick the Great
and His Friends. 1 vol. 12ino. Cloth, $2.
The Merehard if Berlin. Translated from the
German by Amory Coffin, M. D.
Cloth, $2.
Frederick the Great and Hi* Family. 1 vol. 8vo.
Illustrated. Cloth, 82.
Louisa of Prussia and Her Time*. 1 vol. 8vo.
Illustrated. Paper covers, 81 50; cloth, 82.
Henry VIII. and Catherine Parr. An H
Novel. By L. Muhtbaeh. 1 vol. 12iuo. Cl
in Empress. 1 vol. 8vo. li
vers, $1 50; doth $2.
1 voi. 12mo.
istoricu)
loth, $2.
PROMINENT CHARACTERISTICS.
I.—Thky
_ Instructive.
"As purely literary works, these historical ro
munoos possess a high degree of merit. They read
—nuine histories."— Catholic World.
are correct descriptions
copie described.' — Ihn
like gent;
"They
and the i»eoplc
uf the countries
dd.
II. —Thky ark Entkktaimjno.
4 *Wc regard these hooks as
among the t»cst nnd
most entertaining novels of the day."— Snrina
Jieid Republican.
"The reader is at once fascinated and held spell
bound until the volume is completed ."—Free
Press.
' There Is no dull chapter in It.— Utica Herald.
H1.~Tuey are Mirrors of thk Times.
"No one can peruse them without conceding
the author's great skill in gripping and delinea
ting tho characters which figure conspicuously in
them.
"The study which enables tlie author to deline
ate so uceuratoly the emotions and incentives to
aetion which moved men and women of a jtast
age must be close und untiring, and Louisa Mühl
bach shgws in all of her works a perfection which
carries the reader into the very presence of the
characters represented ."—Syracuse Journal.
"Louisa Mulbach must have carefully nnd dill
gently studied the secrect histories of' the times
and countries of which she writes, and her bisk
is done well and effectively."-— Worcester Sou.
"No Historical Novelist has labored so faith
and 8, ' t '«'»sf» , lly to reproduce a complete
piCture ot P ,wt '"»d events."— Utica Herald.
IV.— They auk HiatonicALLY Correct.
"Historically correct, and as cut -rtnining ns
many of the volumes of Sir Walter Scott."— Prov

Herald,
V.—They ark Original.
"It has agreeably surprised readers to find a
new writer with such c
struct!ve genius nnd
knowledge of character pg Louisa Muhtbaeh pos
sesses . ' ' — Public. Ledger.
* Each succeeding novel adds to Mks. Mundt's
reputation as a writer of historic fiction.— X. J'.
Times.
VT.— They are toll of Imagination.
"She is not only tho skillful joiner, but a neat
handed urtixun ."—Christian Witness.
"There is seldom any straining after effect, but
it is really wonderful how Madame Mundt mana
ges to sustain and increase the interest to tho
end ."—City Item.
"The word-painting of tho authoress is much
more effective than the best efforts of the engrav
er."— Illinois State Register.
VII. —They Contain Anecdotes of Courts.
44 Scottish history offered no fresher and more
romantic material to the magic working hand of
Sir Walter Scott than she finds in the aunals of
the German courts ."—Evening Gazette:
" There are not he found anywhere inhuman
annals, unused, such magnificent, such supera
bundant materials for romance, as clog the chroni
cles of the Prussian and; Austrian courts of the
18th century. By their dress, their manners, their
modes of thought, their language, they are al
most m much separated from us as if they hod
lived one thousaud years ago."— Observer.
VIII. —They tkll a dolt Emeerobs. Kino«,
Qu KENS.
"We learn from her not only how Frederick
William and Frederick the Great, Joseph the Sec
ond, Voltaire, Rousseau, Baron Trench, the Em
press Catherine, w alked and talked in their grand
roles, bqt how they powdered their hair, tlirted
and took tea."— Register.
44 The choice of her subjects exhibit« her :
nius. She takes the time of Frederick the Great.
Joseph the Second, for example, and upon the
background of the facts which the chronicles oi
the periods afford, she embroiders the bright and
sombre colors, the light and shade of her fiction,
with theskillof a consuinateartist.'
a
AMD
The E gle
IX. —Tiuc Stylb is Ijcmcrestino.
"The style of this writer for purity, perspi
cuity, and elegance, is somethiug greatly to lie
commended. It is free from imitations, manner
isms, and tricks of every kind. '— The Aryus.
4 ' The translations do justice to the vivid pi
quant style of the original: and the storv is' full
of movement and crowded with instructive aud
entertaining incident ." —The ChicayoPost.
"The interest of the book does not dej>end
*its character nor its incidents,
miiig style, but in its general harmony of
positiou ."—Hay Book,
X. —Everybody is Rkad^i
"Our people see
French
plained of ns dull,
plies the public want.
" The novels of Clara Mundt are being read bv
every one.' '—7'o/aj.
"Mahlbach'stauvel's have a world-wide repu
tation, and are read wilh avidity, its fast as is
sued from the |iress."— S/rinji/iilil UtouUinm.
"They are winning a wide and deserved poi>
ularity in this-couolry ."—Stale Journal.
in
a't
by
of
of
upon
yet on itsehnr
eom
TIIRM.
to have stopped reading
els, and English works are coin
Miss. Mühlbach precisely sup
Either of the Novels scut free by mail to
adprese on receipt of price.
January 18—lin.
iny
m;vi a> ii\ f. may,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
No. 79 South Street, opposite the Corn Exchange
BALTIMORE, MD.
T HE subscriber, huving been at the head of the
Stete Grain Office, in the city of Baltimore,
for the List five years, thereby lmviug acquired
considerable experience in the Grain Trade, und
now engaged in a General Commission Business,
would respectfully solicit a share of patronage
from Agriculturists and Forwarders of Grain and
Produce to the city. Such consignment* will at
all times be attended to with promptness and
accnracy, nnd returns of the highest prices made.
or
AUTHORISED REFERENCES :
Ex-Governor Bradford, of Maryland,
Col. E. H. Webster, Collector of Baltimore.
Geu, Edward Shriver, Postmaster, of Baltimore.
Hon. John M. Frazier, Baltimore,
lion. Hiram McCullough, M. C., of Cecil county.
Hon« Alexttndcr Evans, of 44 •*'
Hon. George Vicekers, of Kent
Col, Edwin- Wilkins, of 44
Col. James Wallace, of Dorchester
Dr. Francis P. Phelps, of 44
Col. Wm. II. Purnell, of Worcester
Hon. Alfred Spates, of Allegany
John V. L. Kind lav, Esq., ofWashington "
Messrs. Clabaugh k Harris, of Carroll "
Hon. G. Fred. Maddox, of St. Mary's "
Hon. Richard Muckall, of Calvert
H* Yauderford, Esq., Middletown, Delaware.
January 4, 1808—-6m
It
MIDDLETOWN ACADEMY.
r I 'HE exercises of this Institution will bo
X sum««) January 6, 1868.
TERMS!
Senior Department, per ye
Primary 44 " "
January 4—tf
$50 00
30 00
J. E. NEWMAN,
Principal.
1868. THE WORLD. 1868.
A T the. opening of the year ldl$, The Worm»
challenges, more confidently than ever, the
symputliy and support of all patriotic citizens.
k glorious work has been gloriously begun.—
Deep already answers to deep. Th« long fidelity
of this journal to the cause of Liberty protected
by Law stands nobly vindicated in a splendor
victory shining from Maine to California. Con
necticut, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New
York, have thundered forth their verdict upon
the misrule and the madness of the Past. But
(mich more still remuins to be done. Never was
peril of the country greater. The Radical
party still decrees the death of representative self
government in ten sovereign States. Armed with
Negro Suffrage, it desperately grasps at a perma
nent lease of power, in defiance of public opinion,
at the cost of enormous taxes and of crippled in
dustries, at th« cost of Union and Peace.
To the great battle still to be fbaght The World
will give all its efforts, all its energies. It asks
of its friends in their turn as much; its asks of
them more readers and a wider influence. It
asks this with confidence in its claims as a news
paper and as an organ-of opinion.
of a newspaper is to give its
of
XI ie chief
.-u (lets
ALL THE NEWS.
For this the facilities of Thz World are unaur
pnssed by nuy journal in the United States. It
scekH to excel by un accuracy and candor, a spirit
und freshness in itx news columns which shall
commend it to the readers of whatever party,
'sect, creed, or plaee.
As an organ of opinion, The World is the
Hindling champion of
A LIBERAL, PROGRESSIVE DEMOCRACY,
whereof the corner-stone is freedom restrained by
Justicirf Freedom pure and simple, in the largest
collective measure; the office of Justice being to
protect Freedom from encroarhments ; Freedom
of the individual citizen in his rights of thought,
sjieoch, religion and locomotion ; in his Right to
choose his own food uud drink, in çpitc of med
dlesome temperance laws ; in his Right to moke
any money bargains he thinks proper, in spite of
foolish usury Ihw.h; in his Right to buy and sell
in all markets, domestic and foreign, in spite of
unjust protective tariffs; in his Right to repre
sentation in the legislative bodies which tax him,
in spite of unconstitutional exclusion* ; Freedom
of collective citizens to assemble for discussion of
grievances ; Freedom of all local communities to
manuge their local affairs without central inter
ference ; Freedom in every section of the country
from the arrogant and unconstitutional domina
tion of other sectious. This large and compre
hensive idea of Freedom sums up the politics of
Thk Would, which will never be founo wanting
to this capital interests of the country And of the
human race.
A paper published, in the metropolis is nntur
ally looked to for careful Market Reports, au
thentic information, and intelligent discussions
relating to
. TRADE, COMMERCE, AND FINANCE.
In these features Tlie World invites comparison
with uny other journal.
EDITIONS.
The WeeklY World, a large quarto sheet,
same size ns Daily, is now printetl whooly in larye
type, nnd (since it* union with the Kew York
Aryus ) has the hirgest circulation of any weekly
journal published, save one, Published Wed
nesday.
1. Its market Reports embrace the New-Yoik
Albany, Brighton, and Cambridge Live Sto<k
Markets ; the New-York Country Produce and
Gcnoral Produce Markets ; special and valuable
Hop Intelligence: a new and enlarg5d depart
ment of Agricultural Reading, which will include
a valuable series of papers on the Science and
Practice of American Agriculture; altogether
comprising an unrivalled handbook of current
information for the Farmer, Live Stock or Pro
duce Dealer, Country Merchant, ect.
2. A page or more will be reserved for Enter
taining Fireside Reading for the Family Circle,
embracing the freshest and best Stories,* Poetry,
Religious Reading, ect., und a page for tho Dis
cussion of all Prominent Topics of public interest.
2. All the good Books of the Year will be de
scribed with careful criticisnw
4. All the Ncws^rill be given in a condensed
and brief, but full and accurate flummery.
The Hhmi-Wkbkly World is a large quarto
sheet, same size as Daily, which, by omitting the
great muss of city advertisements from the Daily,
contains everything else that appears in the Daily
aid Weekly editions. Published Tuesday and
Friday.
Thk Daily World affords a complete compen
dium und discussion of the news of every day.
In every post-office district there should
found some active, public-spirited Democrat who
will confer a benefit upon
the cause, by counselling
friends and making a determined effort to form
a* large a club as possible for Tut Skmi-Wkckly
World.
of
of
oi
us, his neighbors and
with his Uom«>cmtic
TERMS :
WEEKLY WORLD.
1 copy, one year,
4 copies,
$2 00
year, separately addressed
10 copies, one year, separately addressed
20 copies, one year, to one address
20 copies, ona year, separately addressed
50 copies, one year, to one address
50 copies, one year, separately addressed
7 00
15 00
25 00
■27 00
50 00
lie
bv
is
iS 00
SEMI-WEEKLY WORLD.
I copy, one year
4 copies,
10 eopiea,
10 copies, one year, separately addressed
DAILY WORLD.
§4 00
10 00
20 00
22 00
year, separately addressed
j year, to one address
1 copy, one year
SHl 00
CLUB LRIZKS.
Club of 10, to one address, one Weekly, 1 year
" 20, 44 44 44 " "
" 30,
44 100,
DIRECTIONS.
Additions to clubs mav Ij« made at
the year at the ubove club rates.
Change* in club lists made only on request of
persons receiving club packages, stating edition,
post office and State to which it has previously
been sent, and enclosing twenty-five cent* to pay
for trouble of tlie change to separate address.
Terms, cash in advance. Send, if possible,
Post Office Money Order or Bank Draft. Bills
sent bv mail will be at the risk of the sender.
We have no traveling agents. Specimen copies,
posters, Ac., sent free of charge whenever und
w herever desired. Address all orders uud letters
THE WORLD,
37 Park Row, New York.
one «Semi-Wk'y 44
oue Daily, "
any time
iny
Jan 18—tf
the
und
and
at
and
THE BALTIMORE SUN.
P UBLISHED Daily, (except Sunday ) Ajour
nai National, Independent and Conservative.
Unsurpassed in Editorial Ability. New* Enter
prise, th* Versatility and Spirit oflt« Contents, and
Devotion ta the Interests of the Whole Country.
Disseminated from a most important geograph
ical centre, the growing Commercial Hty of Bal
timore, it cannot fail to appreciate the relations
of the position, especially to the gnat Southern
and Western sections of the country.
As a safe and wboleaome instructor on all tb*
topics of the day and the varied intereats at so
ciety ta«- Su» hue a well-established reputation
which is zealously, carefully and conscientiously
maintained.
Its columns embody every thing of general,
political, commercial and monetary information
up to the latest hour before going to press, aud
by its compact and conveniet preparation of
ter affords a larger and more varied amount of
information thaa can be obtained through euv
similar medium.
•ails itself ftiHy of the wide-spread tele
graphic agencies of the day, and stereotyping its
every edition so multiplies its printing power as
to secure any desired speed of production. It is
the cheapest and most serviceable Daily Newspa
;>er extant.
TIKHB OF Subscription.—B y mall, $6 for twelve
months; J3 for six months;.$l 50 for three
months. A. 8. ABLE s OO.
Sun Iron Building, Baltimore, Md.
January-18.
It
J. Thomas Budd,
M ANUFACTURER and Dealer in Agricultmal
Machinery, Steam Eugiaet, Belting, Oils,
rircular Saws and Tools of every description, at
city price*. j aa 4
00
00
Delaware Rail Road Line.
Winter Arnnigemrnt.
and after MONlTTŸ, November 25, 1867,
V/ Passenger Trains will rnn as follows, until
further notice ;

NORÎJL
Leave Crisfield,
" Marion,
" Kingston,
41 Westover,
44 PrincoM Anna, 9 35
a Eden 9 55
Fork town
Salisbury
Del mar
Laurel
Seaford
Bridge ville
Ureeuwood
Farmington
Hanlngton 7 00 1 2 30 P. M.
Felton
Canterbury 7 20 12 50
Wll. Grove 7 25 )2 56
Camden
8 00 A. M.
6 00 P.11.
8 20
8 40
9 no
6 4»
10 05
10 30
10 45
11 06
11 25
11 45
11 56 A. M.
12 05 P. M.
7 20
8 05
9 00
1 15 12 45
7 35 1 05
7 55 1 25
" Moorton 8 05 1 36
44 Breuford 8 15 1 45
" Smyrna 8 10 1 40
" Clayton 8 25 1 55
" Sassafras R 8 30 2 0Q
" Blackbird 8 40 2 lo
41 Townsend 8 00 2 20
" Middleto'n 9 05 2 35
" MtPleasant9 15 2 45
" St George* 8 30 3 00
" Bear 9 40 3 10
" Kcw Castle 10 00 3 30
10 25 3 50
11 55 5 25 I'. M.
Dover
9 40
9 50
10 05
10 40
II 25
11 45
1 20 A. M.
8 15 À.M.
Arrive Wjlm.
44 Phllad'a
44 Baltimore 1 r&ru 8 00 P. M.
SOUTH.
U OOP.«. 8 30 A. N. 4 30 P. u.
Leave Philad'a
44 Baltimore 9 00
44 Wilm
|| Newcastle 12 50
44 öl George*
44 Mt Pleasant
44 Mid die to'n 1 40
44 Townsend
44 Blackbird
44 Sassafras
44 Clayton
Arrive .Smyrna
Leave Bren tord
44 Moor ton
44 Dover
44 Caindcn
44 Wil. Grove
44 Canterbury
44 Felton
44 Harrington 3 20
44 Farmington
44 Greenwood
44 Bridge ville
44 Seaford
44 Laurel
44 Del mar
44 Salisbury
44 Fork to wu
44 Eden
44 Princes* AnneB 35
14 Westover
44 Kingston
14 Marion
7 25
12 30 a.m. 10 15
10 40
10 55
n 15.
11 25
11 45
11 55
12 00
12 10
12 15
12 25
12 20
12 30
2 30 12 50
1 AO
6 00
6 20
6 40
(! ft»
7 05
7 20
7 30
7 35
7 45
2 05
7 55
8 05
8 oo
8 05
8 80
8 40
I
8 45
1 10
8 50
1 20
9 00
1 45
9 20
1 55
2 05
4 10
2 35
3 10
5 00
3 40
4 00
4 35
4 55
5 10
-5 25
6 20 a.m. 5 45
New Castle Trains.—L eave New
Wilmington and Philadelphia atA
Leave Philadelphia 6 00 P. M. ana
7.40 P. M. for New Castle.
Hmvbna Branch Trains.— Additional to those
above leave Smyrna for Clayton 12 00 noon, and
7 40 P. M. Clayton for Smyrnu, 8 40 A. M. and
2 00 and 10 05 P. M., to make connection with
trains to and from Dover, and Stations South,
Trains leaving Crisficld at 6 00 P. M. f
Wilmington going Sooth at 12 30 A. M. will
in close connection with Steamboats to Norfolk
and Portsmouth and Express Trains to and from
Baltimore, Philadelphia and >iew York. They
will stop on the Delaware Railroad Line only u
nnneipal stations at which their time is suited.
Except that Steamboat Train South will let off
passengers from Baltimore at any station to which
they have tickets.
Passengers from Delaw
Arrive Crisficld'
v Castle for
30 A. M —
Wilmington
and
run
fl l4 . . „ Railroad Line to
Baltimore, and from Baltimore to Delaware Rail
road. change cars at S. C. Junction in morning,
at Wilmington in afternoon and night, unies*
trains are
E. Q. SEWALL,
Superintendent Delaware R. R.
Jan 4
COMPLETE MANURE,
HAROFACTORED BY
UKNIl Y HOHER, Phiiudelpkl»,
MA DB FROM
Super-Phosphate of Lime, Ad -
luonia and Potash,
W ARRANTED free from adulteration. Park
ed in bags of 200 !bn. euch. Has raised
good crops of Wheat, Corn, Oats, Potatoes Col
ton, Grass, Tobacco nnd Vegetables of all kinds
fanners would do well to inquire of their near
est dealer in fertilizers as ta the results obtained
from the use or Complete Manure. The growing
crops of Wheat, at this time, freely attest its
virtues.
Rccwuroeudcd by Booth A Garrett, Chemist.,
Phtlndelphia. IV llliauis k Moss, Chemists, Phil
adelphia. V. Elton Burk, Chemist, New York
And by all who have used it up to this timu.
We huve numerous testimonials to the effect
that it it an invaluable Fertilizer, and we
tuend it highly
Grass.
ecom
a top dressing for Wheat and
of
DIXON, «SHARPLESS A CO.,
«Sole Agents, 39 S. Water Si. A 40 «S. Whnrves,
Philadelphia.
For sal« by
WM. RKYNOLD.S,
79 South Street, Baltimore, Md.
JOHN A. REYNOLD.S * «SONS,
Middletow'n, Del.
Also, by
Jan 4—ly
Marble Hall, the Great Popular Clo
thing House.
B OYS' JACKETS, GOATS and RANTS, Min's
kino Cloth Coat«, Mtn's Sack Coals Men's
English Walking Coata, Men's French Sack Coat*
Men's Block Fanta, Men'* Fancy l'ants. We have
the best and finest sto ce of
Men's & Boy's Clothing in the City
together with a «uperior stock of
Piece Ciood* ftor Custom Work,
at lots than gold rates.
Persons visiting the city, who may be in want
anything in Ihn Clothing line, should not fall
toviait
of
its
as
is
SMITH, BRO'S. & CO..
1jfS2£*Marhk Halt Clothing House,
Bstainou, Mn.
Jan 4—ly
f
MAN8I0N HOUSE HOTEL,
North IV«*f Corner Fayette de St. Faul St*,
BALTIMORE.
ilherfta«Proprietor.
^»-This is one of the moat pleasant and
tral locations in the city.
January 4, 1868—ly.
It
cen
-
For Me.
P RIME OAK, HICKORY and PINE WOOD hv
tbe cord, and delivered at the shortest notice.
Also, a fine lot of White Oak Posts.
CHAULES DERRICKSOjf. /
Middletown.
Jan 4 —-tf
at
TUST received a fresh supply of 2005 lb*, of
O Buckwheat Flops. Also, a Urge stock of
Dried Fruit, consisting of Raisins, Citron, Cor
rants, 4c.
JOHN A. REYNOLDS 4 «SONS.
January U
;i PROSPECTUS.
1868. "THE AGE." 1868.
»tic Dully «ltd Weekly Journal In
PHiladalplila.
▲ Dei
HR attention of the Itemocrntls end Conserv
atives of the country is called to the Daily
and Weekly issues of this widelyciixtalated journal.
The dissemination of sound political doctrines
should oommend the earnest attention of every
true friend of the Union and the Constitution.
The «venta of the past political year* are full of
signifie* ace. The uprising of the People in op
position to the destructive policy ef Radicalism,
clearly shows that the marnes are determined to
restore again to power the great Democratic partv, j
every page of whose history is filled witn tfie
|lory and prosperity of our comnfon country.
No more effectual method for presenting the Truth
can be devised, than in circulating Democratic
journals. It is the intention of the Proprietors of
The Age to make it, in every way. worthy of the
support und confidence that huve heretofore been
extended to it. Improvements are contemplated
in every department, and no pains or expense
will be spared to keep it iu the front rank of
American journnlism.
The Daily Aon contains the latest intelligence
from all purls of ibe world, with articles on Gov
ernment, Politics, Trade, Finance, aud all the
current questions of the day ; Local Intelligence»
Market Reports, Prices Current, ätock Quotations,
Marine and Commercial Intelligince, Reports or
Public Gatherings, Foreign and Domestic Corres»
poudenee, Legal Reports, Book Notices, Theatrical
Criticisms, Reviews of Literature, Art and Mnsic,
Agricultural Mutters, and discussions of whatever
subjects are of general interest and importance.
Besides Speciul Tdcgmms, it has all tho dispatches
of the Associated Piets from every part of the
United States, and also the Alsociated Prèss dis
patches rccived by the Atlantic Cable; And the
news from all parts of Kurope brought by
steamers, is instantly telcgVuphcd from whatever
point the steamers first touch. ,
The Weekly Age will be a complete compen
dium of the news of the week, and besides the
Icadiug editorials from the Daily, will contain a
large amount of interesting matter prepured
pressl v for the weekly issue. It will be in all
respects a first-class family journul, particularly
adapted to the Politician, the Former, the Mer
chant, the Media nie, the Family Circle, and the
General Reader, having, in fact, every character
istic of a live newspaper. At an early day will
be begun an intensely interesting serial, by
of the most popular and fascinating authors, and
it is also the intention to publish, from week to
week, in the course of tlie year, throe or four of
the best aud latest novels.
T
ex
oue
Terms of the Daily.— One copy, one year, $9 ;
six months, $4 50 ; three months, *52 50 ; for any
less period, ul the rate of $1 per month. Pay
ment required invariably iu advance. Postage
on the Daily, 30 cents per quarter, or $1 20 per
annum, to be prepaid at the ofliec of delivery.
Terms of tiik Weekly. —One copy, one year,
$2 ; five copies, one year, $9 ; ten copies, one
year, $17 5U» twenty copies, one year, $33. To
clubs, where the papers are sent to one address,
the following reduction will be made: — Five
copies, one year, $8 50 ; ten copies,
year, $30.
one year,
... . . A cqpy
will be furnished gratis for each club of ten, or
more, to oue address, for one year. Payment re
quired invariably in advance. Postage
Weekly, five cents per quarter, or twenty cents
per unuum, to be prepaid at the office of delivery.
$16 50; twenty copies,
The above terms will be rigidly adhered
to. Drafts on Philadelphia, or Postoflice -Orders,
payable to the order of the Publishers, being
safer, are preferable to any other mode of jgttifc» :
tance. All who send money by Express^ must
pre-puy Express charges. Specimen copies of th«
Daily and Weekly scut gratis, on application at
this office. Advertisements inserted at moderate
rates. Address
WELSH * ROBB,
480 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.
January 4, 1868—tf
PROSPECTUS
or TUK
(Piddlflmun Cranstripf.
r I^IIE TRANSCRIPT is published every
X urday morning, at TWO DOLLARS per
nuro, payable in advance. Single copies Five
Cents.
The growing importance of Middletown, situa
ted as it is in the midst of a wealthy and psps
lous region of country, and the centre of an ac
tive and steadily increasing trade, requires the
aid of a local press to Wevclop still further its
abundant resources, and to bring more fully into
view the Agricultural, Horticultural, and Borno
logical advantages of New Castle county, and
the adjacent purts of Delaware and Marylsmdw
It will l>e the aim of the Transcript to advance
these great leading interests, and to encourage
manufactures und the mechanie arts. It will al
so present an abstract of the corrent news, and
un accurate rejHjrt of the local and city markets.
It will aim to take a broad, liberal aud com
prehensive view of public affairs; upholding the
Constitution ns the bond of union between the
States, nnd steadily maintaining tho principles
of a sound Democratic Conservatism. Its col
umns will be open, however, to a proper discus
sion of all topics of general interest, its editors
holding the sentiment, with Mr. Jefferson, that
" error of opiniou may safely he tolerated wheve
reason is leu free to combat it."
H is unnecessary to say more within the nar
row limits of a prospectus. The pnper will speak
for itself. The friends of the enterprise will ob
lige us by canvassing energetically for subscrib
ers, writing the numes legibly. •
Æ-W'All letters should
Sat
#1
nes leg
should
TRANSCRIPT, Middletown, Del.
HENRY VANDERFOUD.
WM. H. VANDERFORi'.
be addressed to the
Jan. 4th, 1866.
southern society,
A Weekly Journal of Literature, Society and Art.
OEL1EVING that the people of the South are
•M »t length convinced of the duty and impor
tance of supporting their own literature, we com
menced, on the first of October, 1867, iu the <ta
CIETY ^ 1110 pub . lic " tlou SOUTHERN SC
Soutiikbk Society is the literary, social a**
artistic exponent of the «South. The most distim
guishod poets, novelists, critics, essayists, arth^
of the «south are contributors to Southebm Sw
ety. It is absolutely nccessurv for the precsi.
existence and future welfare of the South tha
site should have a literature of her own. We in
tend to do our part in this noble cause, and eat
neatly apiHjal to all wbo love the South to aid «
now in establishing a worthy representative of it
refinement, taste und culture.
SUHSClHFTiON
SOUTHERN SOCIETY
subscribers on
will be supplied io
tbe following terms : ■>"
One year, $4.00; Six mouths $2.60 ; to dub*
oftenormore, one year, $3.50; six months $2.
Jttf- Addrrns all communications to
SOUTHERN SOCIETY,
No. 220 West Baltimore Stree,
Jtsirmous.
Jan. 4.
GOLD MEDAL PIANOS
AND PARLOR ORGANS.
STIFF'S PIANOS,—THE BEST NOW MADR*
OLD MEDAL for tbe beat Pianos raanvfbc
ß lured has been awarded for the tmt i««?
■ t °'FS A ¥ J P STIEFF, examined and pronoun
BEsV" pTA^,' ,rUf r >r ' ,0 - B"«***' •»!" Ote
BEM1 FI A NOS, mid worn in compeiition with
llaltimora, Philadelphia ind NswXrk P|»wl
Sites s Piano* contain Improvement* that are
not to be m other instruments, *«id ore all ««s«
at his extensivè Factory and out of the best t—
soned materW, and warranted for «r*y«w*
Call and examine for yourselves Thcv ara
""X °' hCT bouse. 7
SECOND HAND PIANOS from $50 to Sana
AI«o, PARLOR ORGANS for sale cheap at
STIEnrS,
PATAmc° GUANO ÖOMPANY'8 Amraoni
2° ,ub,e Phosphate, for Cotton, Tobacoo
Grain, Grasses and Root Crop*. •""«vo
NEALE, HARRIS k CO. G.aen.1 Agent.
Jan. 4, 26 Commerce St. Baltimore. *
f
hv
/
tfi,
of
of

xml | txt