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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, March 28, 1868, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Delaware Library, Newark, DE

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026820/1868-03-28/ed-1/seq-4/

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WHILE THE DAYS ARE GOING BY
Ctoft Arc lonely heartt to cherish *
I W hün the days are going by ;
Thera are weary souls who periffe. 4 y
While the days are going by ;
If-atswile we oan renew <»
As our journey we pursue,
*l)h! the good'we all may do
While the days are pawing by.
4 There's no time for idle scorning
While the days are goiug by ;
Letrour face be like the morning
, While the days are going by;
t Ou I the world is full of sighs,
Fufl of sad and weeping eyes—
► help your fallen brother rise
While the days are goiug by.
t . All the loving links that bind us
While the days are going by ;
One by ope we leave behind us
„ While the days are goiug by ;
"But the seeds of good we sow
Both in shade and shine will grow,
.. And will keep our hearts aglow
While the days are goiug by.
Mh
•JW .
T
Mlii and Ijumor.
A Wedding Might Shirt.
It was hardly the fair thing that the
boys did to Joe Thompson the night he
was married, but thS temptation was irre
aistible. They couldn't have helped it to
gavé their lives. I'll tell you how it was.
Joe was about the most fancifully dress
ed buck in the town—over nice and
pnr
tidhlitr—a regular Miss Nancy in man
ners, always putting on airs, and more
dainty and modest than a girl. Well,
when his wedding night came he was
dressed to kill, and his pants, especially,
fitted him as if they had boon molds and
his legs candles, and rim into them.
.Tight was no name for them. Their 8« t
was immense, and he was prouder than
half a doz«n peacocks.
.'^Aren't they nice, boys*?' he asked of
the two who were to be groomsmen aud
see that he threw himself away in the liifst
approved fashion.
"Stunning! gorgeous!" replied Tom
Bennett. " Never saw any thing equal to
j them. But, 1 say Joe, aren't they just
the least bit tight? lt strikes me that
you will have some difficulty in bending
—won't you?"
" Pshaw, no ! They are just as easy as
un old glove See !"
- ' To prove the matter he bent down so as
"ÄI touch his patent leathers, when crack!
crack ! followed like the twain reports of a
revolver.
"Thunder! exclaimed Joe, as he clap
~ÿctThîs hands behind, and found a rent in
the cas simere from stem to stern. " Hi un
der! the pauts have burst, and what shall
■i dor
"I should rather think they had;" pn-
swered Tom, getting purple in the face as
he endeavored to control his laughter. But
there is no time to get another pair. It
.tcnly want* half an hour of tbe standing up
tune, and we have got a mile to go, Cur-
/yiagc waiting too."
r vhiit shall I do ?—what shall I do ?"
-a .»«PU tell you what Joe, if mine would
fit yoti, you should have them, and wel
ef>me ; but they are a mile too big, would
.■et like a shirt on a beau pole. I see no
c, wny but to have them mended."
"Who can I get to do it, Tom?"
" Well, l am something of a tailor, and
jean fU them so they wont show. Hold
ofi it' minute, and i'll get a needle and
thread."
Y.Cun you? May God bless you!"
" Off with your coat !" commanded Tom,
as he come back.
"^Jow lay yourself over on the bed, and
T will fix you in short order."
The command was obeyed—the pants
meuded—the coat tails carefully pinned
over, so as to conceal the "distress for
*» rout," aud all went as merry as a marriage
bell, until Joe followed his blushiug br?de
to the nuptial couch.
There was only a dim light iii the room,
but it enabled Joe, as he glanced bashfully
■round, to sec the sweetest face in the world,
the rosy cheeks and ripe lips, the lovely
and loving eyes, and the golden curls just
peeping out from the snowy sheets ; and
he distinguished it altogether, and hasten
ed to disrobe himself. Off came coat,
vest, fancy necktie and collar, boots and
socks in a hurry, but somehow' the pants
stuck. The more he tried, the more they
wouldn't come, and he tugged vainly for
half an hour.
" Thunder!" muttered Joe.
" What is the matter dear?" came in the
' 'üofteçt of accents fropi the bed, where some
body'was wandering if he was ever going
Jpjhcr arms.
Tr was a moment of' desperation ; Joe
overcome by the situation, and for
getting his accustomed bash fulness, blur
» ted out :
< '"Molly, that cursed Tom Bennet Has
sewed my pants, drawers, shirt and under
shirt altogether !"
'' It is too bail. Wait a moment, dear."
A little stockingless foot peeped out
first, then a ruffled night dress, the lamp
was lighted, a pair of scissors found, and
Joe released.
tfVM steward" exclaimed a fellow in
une of our steamboats after having retired
■4t»bed, 4 'hallo steward."
*! Vi hat, massa ?"
tJA Bring me the way bill."
.What for massa?"
I want to see if those bugs put down
tlieïr names for this berth before I did. if
noVl,»mnt them turned out."
t>U
— Somebody says tbc first thing that turn
ed his atteition to matrimony
»•d skilful manner in which a pretty girl
handled a broom. Yes, he muy the
when the manner in which that broom
' will be handled will not afford him so much
aatisfaction.
the neat
j. 4,n nglÿ young lady js alwny» anxious
To itiarry aud young gentlemen are seldom
I anxious to marry her. This is a resultant
j-t»f two mechanical powers—the inclined
}>!ain und leave her.
A young woman'* fancy iu like the moon
whieh changes continually, but always has
a man in it
Spring, und Sen
that buds arc beginning to blossom,
I pleine, flowers to bloom in opeu
mo nable Reflections.
Now
poets to
•ir, Indies to put on nsw hats and spring
habits (to the joy and delight of fashiona
ble modiites), students to yawu and in
dulge spring fever, we suppose that we of
the editorial staff may indulge ourselves
■pnd out readers to such doles Jar nittUe
reveries as conic upou us, seeking expres
sion in the mild Spring-like maimer of the
Bettabl Vrh-.Hid.
It will hardly, wo faucy, be necessary
to 'inforui our readers that St. Patrick's
day has coino. Was duly eolebrated, and is
gone, that spriug-time is upon us, and the
grassy vales and the green woodlands, the
sunny slopes, the budding flowers, full
gardens, dusty roads (but delightful rides
and drives), will soon succeed the bleak
winds, blinding snows, and milk-white
cerements of winter. This, and more than
this, they have already gathered from the
alinan&dÿ/the daily papers, and the show
windows ; from the balmy air, the soft
winds, the light costumes and the daily
converse in the parlor and on the street ;
and though the changes of the seasons,
lik,e that of faces, habits and stories, af
fords a great relief to writer and compo
ser, and suggested« whole poem to Thomp
son (in whose nature was much of human
nature), it is uot simply for the spring as
a new season that we refer at present,—it
is to bring with it and produce such
thoughts and feelings ns arc suggested by
H
and
to
Our
and
it.
.There was much of wisdom and philos
ophy in the division of the months anc sea
sons by the Indians of this country, who
gave both, names significant of the chan
ges oceurriug at these periods in nature
herself and in her children. Our readers
will recall the language of Hiawatha and
the divisions of the year therein contained,
and sec how much of poetry possessed the
children of the forest.
What other equally important and sig
nificant influence this season exerts upon
the civilized aud christianized denizens of
the world, is a matter of interesting and
not altogether uninstruetive inquiry, and
it is specially to these we would at present
advert. *
Well and sweetly docs the Laureate sing :
la the Spring a fuller crimson comes upon the
robin'« breast:
In the Spring the wanton lapwing gets himself an
other crest ; •
In the Spring a lovelier iris changes on the bur
nisli d dove;
In the Spring u young m
\q thoughts of love.
tan's fancy lightly turns
but how it touches the maiden s heart and
influences its action, or that of the ,mid
throughout the many thousand ramifica
tions that feel iU silent influence equally
potent, a more steady and prosaic pen must
teach us.
In the lines quoted we have only the
poetic, sparkling temperament laid bare,
not the whole man, soul, passion and na
ture.
in
if
lu our estimate of Eden, we fuel sure
neither writer or reader has ever thought
of it in any light but that of a bright beau
tiful hiud^of spriug time and flowers ; and
the richest romance has alw ays colored the
happy laud as 11 land of eternal summer.
But the world (the stern, hard world),
unflttcd for everlasting, all enduring good,
required chauge, and that change has come
upon us in the dark and gloomy seasons
that so rapidly succeed the bright and
cheering ones. What lessons such changes
teach; what thoughts they suggest, were
a theme useful to preacher and worthy of
a text ; but what beauties they develop
may interest and amuse the less stern me.
alist
books in ruuuing brooks, sermons in
stoYies, and good in everything." To the
many we kuow it brings 110 thought, no
reflection, no philosophy but that of the
poor shepherd, who minds his flock and
sees the grass grow for no other purpose
but, tu feed Ins sheep. Do we not pity
♦liDWghi and mind that-soars not beyond
"Finds tuugues in trees
lio
such limit*, aud yet do we uot pass every
hour those whose thoughts rise not above
such philosophy and such reflection, and
who contemplate the changes of season only
as they affect complexions or toilets, the
last hat or the newest bonnet ?
But the season suggests harmony, hap
piness'and content, and we cease to mor
alize, to hope for better and happier re
sults throughout the country, with the
return of bright, beautiful spring-time.—
Southern Society.
Dogs more dangerous Hum Guns.
The value of the dog for watch purposes
wa* recently presented iu a new light.—
According to the lUchmond Dispatch, Jim
PajAcrsou, a venerable mulatto, in discus
sing Ute important question, "which is
most dangerous, guns or dogs?" before a
negro debating society at White Sulpher,
in Virginia, spoke as follows :
"Mr. President—Dose gentlemen what
has spokeu differs from me on dis subject.
I thinks dogs is much more dangerous dan
guns. Spos '11 you set loaded guns all
romid Dry Creek, dey ain't gwinc off sep'n
somebody pull de trigger; but dur s Masr
Ed. Caldwell's Cesar, he gwinc off wlieder
you pull him or no; and uo nigger ain't
gwine dar while he's dar. Dat, * iu my
uiind, settles de quçshun."
The .New York Times argues that the
modern wateh dog is no protection against
burgUra^rbut, as we prcSutne the Times
never practically tested the question,
must accept the declaration of Jim Patter
son as conclusive evidence on the point.—
He declares that the dog is more danger
ous than the gun, aud Jim talks like a
mau of experience ; therefore it naturally
follows that the modern watch dog is of
•ome account. Property owners should
make a note of this fact, and present it as
the reasons why the watch dog
be exempted from taxation.— Turf,
Field and Farm.
the
vpp fif
inontA
Bdnyan and the Quaked.— John Bun
von, while in Bedford jail, was called upon
hy a Quaker desirous of making
of him. "Friend John I havi
thee with a mcesage from the Lord, and
after having searched for thee in all the
prisons iu ftnriaad, I am glad that I have
foiii*d thee at last."
" K the Lord had sent yon," returned
Banyan, "yon need not have taken so
mueh pains to find me out ; for tho Lord
know 1 - I have liven here for twelve vears."
a convert
come to
has
NEW GOODS, NEW PRICES,
AND
N EW STYLES.
G
H AVING just returned from Philadelphia w1th
a stock of goods of great variety of styles
and qualities, being selected with an eye single
to the tuâtes and wishes of the people generally*.
Our stock of
Muslins being entirely New,
e can offer great baigains in
NEW YORK MILLS, WAMASUTTA
and all leading makes of Bleached Goods. Also,
standard Brown Muslins, 9-4 aud 10-4 Sheetings.
Jpfr' We are offering our FALL and WINTER
GOODS at Greatly REDUCED PRICES such as
Ladle». Dress Goods,
Shawls, Casslmeres,
II» I moral Skirts,
Uatlles' Y est s.
Gents* Knit Shirts.
I
A LARGE STOCK OF
Boots & Shoes, Selling Low,
all being purchased from manufacturers.
Ji£l~ ALL WE ASK IS TRIAL, AND SHOW
GOODS WITH GREAT PLEASURE.-^
NAI'DAII & RRO.
Middletown.
Jan 25—ly
:
LUMBER. LUMBER.
Uf'MlE subscribers offer to the citizens of Middle
X town and surrounding country their thanks
for the very liberal patronage they have received,
aud embrace this medium in announcing to all
builders and contractors and those in want of
Lumber, tlmt they are prepared to supply them
the most libcful terms. We have reduced
price, as the market has demanded, and we think
'that they will compare with th<*citv prices. Our
stock is very large, embracing a full assortment
of
SPRUCE,
HEMLOCK,
AND OAK FRAMING STUFF,
ALL SIZES.
WHITE PINE BOARDS,
HEMLOCK "
OAK PLANK,
WHITE PINE DO.
WHITE PINE SIDING.
YELLOW PINE FLOORING,
HEMLOCK
PLASTERING LATHES.
SPRUCE AND CYPRESS SHINGLES.
PLAIN AND FANCY PICKETING.
SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS.
Hulldlng Hardware,
S NAILS AND SPECIALITIES.^
BRICKS,
CALCINE PLASTER, LIME & HAIR.
of
in
no
the
HEWES' PHOSPHAT E.
PAINTS, OIL, TURPENTINE,
VARNISH, DRY JAPAN, GLASS.
J. B. FENIMORE k CO.,
On the Railroad, above the National Hotel.
January 25—tf
500 Tons Lehigh Coal,
FOR SALE BY
E. T. EVANS.
100 Tons Locust Mountain Coal
Foil SALE UY
E. T. EVANS.
100 Tons Shamokin Coal,
SALE BY
E. T. EVANS.
200 Bushels Prime Clover Seed
»
FOR SALE UY
the
re
the
E. T. EVANS.
50 Bus Prime Timothy Seed,
E. T. EVA.NS.
1000 Bus Wilmington Ground Plaster,
FOR SALE BY
FOE SALE BY
E. T. EVANS.
Jan 23-tf
DE. J. J. VANDERF0RD
is
a
dan
all
my
the
a
of
as
dog
Graduate of tlae Pennuyl'vanla College of
DE1ÏTAL SI'IIGEIIY,
AV1NG located in Middletown, Del.
respectfully announces to the public
that he is prepared to perform all operations per
tuiuin^ to the practice of
11
DENTISTRY.
ARTIFICIAL TEETH Mounted
Dental Vul
canite, a material superior to metals in it* adapt
ability and durability.
Persons having badly adjusted gold plates
have them exchanged for the Vulcanite.
Great
can
ill be given to Children's Teeth ;
irregularities corrected, and deoiduou* teeth pre
served until the pcrmaucul ones make their
appearance.
A superior Dentifrice constantly
Office seven doors east of the Bank/
January 4, 1868—Iv
liand .
ODESSA NURSERIES"
W F 1
now offering for sale, for Spring
Planting, 1868, No. 1 Plants of the
BLACKBERRY,
RASPBERRY,
STRAWBERRY,
GOOSEBERRY,
CURRANT and
GRAPE VINES,
by the dozen, hundred,
thousand, all of which
will be warranted genuine and true to ni
Also. Osage Orange Plants, Asparagus Roots,
und Early Goodrich Potatoes.
POLK k HYATT,
Odessa, Del.
January 25—3m
MANSION HOUSE HOTEL,
North Weft Corner Fayette A' St. Paul Sts.
OÊrofiJTE BARNl'M'S city hotel,
BALTIMORE.
Proprietor.
Bun
upon
and
the
have
so
Lord
to
Isaac Albcrston
^t&'This is
trat locations in the city.
January 4, 1868—ly
of the most pleasant and cçn
TO FARMERS.
*300,000
Apply to
r eh 1—if
OSAGE ORANGE QUICKS,
of Pri
ANDREW HUSHABECK,
Middletown. Del.
Quality, for sale.—
Louisa Muhlbach'g Historical NotoIb.
O
D. APPLETOS ét CO.,
443 AND 44ft BROADWAY, NEW YORK,
H AVE iust published, The Empreee Josephine.
An Historical Sketch of the Days of Napo
leon. lvol. 8vo. Paper covers, $1 5Ù; Cloth, $2.
Napoleon and the Qmen ofPrussia. 1 vul. 8\u.
Paper <;<fVers. $1 30; doth,
1 he DaughUr <J an Emprise. 1 vol. 8vo. Il
lustrated. Paper covers, $1 50; cloth $2.
Marie Antoinette and Ihr Son. 1 vol. bvo. Paper
covers, $1 60; cloth, $2.
Jostph II. and His Court.
G or man by Adelaide de V. Chaudron.
Cloth.. $2.
Frederick the Great and /lis Court. Translated
from the Gorman by Mrs. Chapman Coleman and
her daughters. l\o!.12mo. 434pp. Cloth. $2.
B rlin and Sans-Souri ; or Frederick the Great
and His Friends. 1 vol. 12mo. Cloth. $2.
The Merchant qf Berlin. Translated from the
German by Amorv Coffin, M. D.
Cloth, $2.
Frederick the Great and His Family. 1 vol. 8vo.
Illustrated. Cloth, $2.
Louisa of /Russia and I/,r Times. 1 vol. 8vo.
Illustrated. Paper cov
l/enry VTI1. and Catherine /*
Novel. By L. Muhlbach. 1 vol. 12mo. Cloth, $2.
Translated from the
1 vol. 8vo.
vol. 12mo.
$1 50; cloth, $2.
. An Historical
PROMINENT CHARACTERISTICS.
I.—They are Instructive.
"As purely literary works, these historical
rnances possess a high degree of merit. They read
I Ac genuine histories ."—Catholic World.
"They are correct descriptions of the countries
und the people described."— Herald.
II.—They ark Entert a mm«.
"We regard these books as
among the best and
>st entertaining novels of the day."— Spring
field Republican.
"The reader is at once fascinated and held spell
bound until the volume is completed."
"There is no dull chapter in it.— Ulica IIraid.
III.—— 1 They are Mmnoits of thk Times.
|m.tusc them without conceding
the author's great skill in grasping and delinea
ting the characters which figure conspicuously in
them.
—Fr
"N
"The study which enables the author to deline
ate so accurately the emotions aud incentives to
action which moved men
d women of a past
age must be close and untiring, and Louisa Muhl
lmefi shows in all of her works a perfection which
carries the rcuder into the very presence of the
characters represented ."— Syracuse Journal.
IV. —They auk Historically Correct.
"Historically correct, and as entertaining ns
y of the volumes of Sir Walter Scott.' Prov
idence Herald.
"Louisa Mulhnch must have carefully and dili
gently studied the secrect histories of the tinus
and countries of which she writes, and her task
is done well and effectively."— Worcester Spy.
"No Historical Novelist has labored so faith
fully and successfully to reproduce a complete
picture of past times and events."— Utica Herald.
V. —They are OkioinAl.
"lt lias agreeably surprised readers to find
new writer with such constructive gc. .
knowledge of character as Louisa Mühlbach
susses. "— Public Ledger.
"Each succeeding novel odds to Mts. Mnndt's
reputation as a writer of historic fiction.—JV. 1".
aud
pos
Ti
V I.—They ark full ok Imagination.
"She is not only the skillful joinir, but a ncat
lmnded urtiznn ."—Christian Witness.
"There is seldom any straining after effect, hut
ij is really wonderful how Madame Mundt
ges to sustain and increase the interest to the
end. —City Item.
"The
rnnna
8
. 'ord-pninting of the authoress is much
more effective than the best efforts of the
er.".— Illinois Suite Register.
8
engrav
^ lb—T hey Contain Anecdotes of C
"Scottish history offered
romantic material to the
'RTS.
fresher und more
... , ,, , ,l K>'* working hand of
Mr Walter bcott than she finds in the annals of
the German courts ."—Evening Gazette.
"There n re not be found anywhere inhuman
annals, unused, such
bundaut materials for
agnificcnt.
h suj»era
romance, as clog the chroni
cles of the Prussian and. Austrian courts of tin
18th century. By their dress, their manners, their
modes of thought, their language, they me al
as much separated from us as if they had
lived ono thousund years ago."— Observer.'
noil
VIII.— Thky till ABOl'T Kmpiuori, KlXUS,
(Jl'KKNS. -
" We learn from her not only how Frederick
" llllu "> and Frederick the (ircui, Joseph the Sec
ond, Voltaire, Iloussenii, Baron Trcnck, the Em
press Catherine, walked and talked in their nrand
role., but how they powdered their hair, flirted
and took tea."— Register.
''The choice of her subjects exhibitis iter ge
mus. She takes the time of Frederick the Greut
Joseph tiie Second, for example, and upon the
background ot the tacts which the chronicles of
the periods afford, she embroiders the bright and
sombre colors, the light and shade of her fiction,
with the skill of u eousumate artist ."—The Eigle.
IX*—The Styl* is Interesting.
"The style ot this writer for purity, perspi
cuity, and elegance, is something greatly to be
commended. It is free from imitations, manner
isms. and tricks of every kind ."—The Argus.
"The translations do justice to the vivid pi
quant style of the original ; and the story in
of movement and crowded with instructive
entertaining incident ."—The Chicago Post.
. j * ie interest of the book does not depend upon
its character nor its incidents, nor yet on its char
ming style, but in its general harmony of c
position."— D,ry Book.
AND
full
a
X. —Everybody is Rkaiuno
^ "Our people seem to have slopped reading
French novels, und English works are com
plained of as dull. Mi
plies the public want.
"The
THEM.
. Mühlbach precisely sup
of
els of Clura Mundt are being rend hy
every one."— Times.
* " Mühlbach'* novel's have a
tation, and
oriri-wide repu
read with avidity, as fast as is
sued from tiie press."— S/iring/iild K<oubHcun.
"They are winning u wide and deserved pop
ularity in this country ."— Stute Journal.
Either of the Novels sent free by mail to
nd press on receipt of price.
January 18—Ini,
any
can
Middletown Furniture Warerooms.
JOSEPiFÏi. ENOS
;
pre
K EEPS constantly on hand an assortment of
Fl KN1TURE suitable to the market, con
.
isting of
COTTAGE SUITS,
BEDSTEADS, CIJAIKS, WASIISTANDS,
Parlor aud Dlulng Room Furnitur«,
FCRNISHINQ UNDERTAKER.
COFFINS of all kinds and atvies ; Metalic Cas
kets j Potent Burial Cases to order . Jan ,4.tf.
Dr. J. E. EEG I8TER,
denTist,
^ ELKTON, MD.
O FFICE on North street, two doors above the
Odd Fellows' Hull.
February 8, 1868—tf
E. REYNOLDS,
Notary Public and Conveyancer,
MIDDLETOWN, DEL.
D EEDS, Mortgages, Bonds, Leases, Ac. care
fully and promptly prepared.
Feh 1—tf
Sts.
cçn
WRAPPING PAPER,
O LD NEWSPAPER8, fifty cents a
for sale nt this office.
February 1 tf.
hundred,
J UST received a new lot of Mackerel, Shad and
Herring, to he sold low.
NAUDAIN k RRO.
Feb 28
Delaware Rail Road Line.
Spring Arrangement.
O N and after MONDAY, March 16th, 1866.
Passenger Train* will run a« follow*, until
further notice :
NORTH.
11 20 A. M. • 6 43 A. M.
11 50
12 10 P. M.
12 35
Leave Clin field,
" Marion,
" Kingston,
*' Westover.
" Princess Aune,
" Eden
" Fork tow n
" Salisbury
" Delntar *
lt * Laurel
" Seaford
" liridgeville
" Greenwood
41 Farmington
" Harrington 7 00
" Felton
" Plymouth 7 20
" Canterbury 7 20
" W il. Grove 7 25
" Camden * 7 35
7 30
10
30
1 50
2 10
8 05
2 23
2 40
3 05
3 25
3 35
3 45
4 05
4 20
4 25
4 25
4 30
8 50
9 45
7 15
4 40
Dover
7
•1 5
10 25
" Moorton 8 05 5 10
" Brenford 8 15 5 15
" Sniy
" Clayton 8 25. 6 25
" Sassafras R 8 30 5 30
" Blackbird 8 40 5 40
" Townsend 8 50 5 45
" Middleto'n 9 05
" Mt Pleasant 9 15 b 15
" St Georges 9 30 0 30
9 40 6 40
" Newcastle 10 00 7 00
Arrive Wilni. 10 25 7 20
" Philad'a 11 55 a. M. 9 00 P. M.
" Baltimore 1 15i*. m 3 15 A. M.
8 10
5 10
10 30
10 45
6 05
11 20
I
12 00 M.
12 20 P. M.
1 30 "
3 45 • "
SOUTH.
3 30 F. M. 8 30 a.m. 5 00 p.m.
2 13
5 05 p.m. 10 15
10 40
10 55
Leave Philad'a
" Baltimore
" YVilm
" Newcastle 5 25
" Bear
" St Georges
" MtPIcusunt
" Middlcto'i
" Townsend
" Blackbird
" Sassafras
" Clayton
Arrive Smyrna
Leave Brenford
" Moorton
" Dover
" Camden
2 15
6 30
G SO
7 15
1 15
7 30
1
7 40
C 15
11 4
8 00
8 10
11 ;
12 00 U.
12 10 P.M. 8 25
8 15
C 40
6 50
12
8 30
8 40
8 35
8 45
9 05
9 15
9 20
9 30
9 30
ft 35
9 50
12
12 20
12 30
12 50
7 10
00
Wil. Grov
1 05
Canterbury
Plymouth
Felton
Harrington
Farmington
Greenwood
Bridgeville
Seaford
1 10
1 10
1 20
1 45
1
2 05
2 15
2 35
8 40
Laurel
Dclmur
Salisl
Forktowi
Eden
3 10
9 30
3 40
3 50
4 00
rrl
•css A
10 00 4 35
4 55
Westover
Kingston
5 10
Arrive Crisfield
10 45 P. M.
• 45 V. M.
e New Castle for
A. M.—
nd Wilmington
New CV.tlk Trains.—L
Wilmington und
Mi il ad cl pi lia at 7 1
7 00 1*. M.
Leave IMiiliulelphii
8 35 I». M. for New ('asile
Smyrna Bba.m
above leave Sniy
8 10 1*. M. Clayton for Smv
A. M. to make c<
iron» Dove
Truius
WilmingU
Trains. —Additional to those
for Clayton 12 on noon,
, 8 10 and 11 00
M-tion with trains to and
t, and .Stations South,
leaving Crisfield at 6 45 A. M.. and
m going South at 5 05 1*. M. will
■ctimi with Steamboats to Norfolk
and Portsmouth and Express Trai
Baltimore, Philadelphia
will stop on the Delaware Railroad Lim
principal stations at which their time i
Except that Steamboat Trai
passengers from Baltimore at
they have tickets.
Passengers fr
Baltimore, und f
road, change eu
at Wilmington i
trains
to and fr
1 New York.
They
oulv
stated.
South will let ofi
y station to which
1
Del« iv
Railroad Line to
? Rail
•tion in morning,
night, unless
E. Q. SEWALL,
Superintendent Delaware R. R.
Baltimore to Delaw
s at N. C. J
11 afternoon and
delayed.
Mateh 14.
OKIUI.V
I
And History of the Books of the Bihle,
B OTH the Cnnonical anil Apocryphal, showing
w hat the Ilihle is nut, what it is, and how
to use it. ( New Testament.) With Illustrations.
Hy l'rof. Calvin E. Slone. D. ft. for more than
thirty years Bibical Professor ut Andover, Cin
cinnati. and other Theological Seminaries, and
acknow ledged to be one of the l est informed Bible
students of the age. This work is one of patient
research, diligent study, ami ripe experience, be
ing in fact the life work of the author.
It will treat of 1. The common popular objec
tions to the Bible at the present day. Wlmt the
Bihle is not, what it is, and how to use it.
2. The evide
*8 upou which we receive the
Sacred Books, and description of the Ancient
Manuscripts of the New Testament
illustrations.
3. Brief Biographies of 100 Ancient Witnesses
to the New Testament, whose testimony is most
important, much of it cited in this great work.
4. The testimony for the Historical Books, and
a full examination, separately, of the four Gospels.
5. The Apocryphal Gospels, aud fragments of
Gospels supposed to be lost.
substitutes for the Gosi»cl History,
with ub examination of the works of Strauss,
Weisse, Gfroervr, Bruno Bauer, F. C. Buuer, Re
nan, und Schenckel, intending to meet the under
mining process with regard to the authority of
Seriplure, so prevalent at the present dav.
7. Acts of the Apostles, the Apocryphal Acts
and the fourteen Epistles of Paul. The Catholic
and the Apocryphal Epistles. Revelation of St.
John, and the Apocryphal Revolutions.
8. The Bible Prophet* und the Classical Oracles
contrasted.
9. The Apocryphal Books of the Old Testa
ment, End the reason fur their exclusion from the
Canon.
It is a work of real value, not sectarian at all,
not even Theological, but is just what it purports
to be, a Jlistory of the Books of the Bihle, suffi
ciently critical to meet the wants of the Professor,
the Clergyman and the Student, and yet
plified as to he the hook needed hy every Fumily
and every Sunday School T&icher as the Com
panion of the Bible.
ith fac-siniile
>. Mode
of
sim
This hook is new and fresh from the pen of the
author, who lias long been urged to its preparation
by Presidents of Colleges, and leading Ministers
«nd Scholars of the various Christian denomina
tions, and has given his best energies to its com
pletion.
It contains about 600 pages octavo, printed
from new and beuutiful clear type, selected
pressly for this work, illustrated with a fine steel
portrait of the author, fac-siiniics of the early
manuscripts on which tne Bible was written, v
curious and interesting, und other full page illus
trative engravings, all in the highest style of en
graving, by the best artists in tne country. It is
of the most popular hooks ever published. It
will he furnished to subscribers in neat und sub
stantial
Extra English Cloth Binding for the low
price of..
Fine Leather Library Binding
Fine English Half Culf Binding
Sold by subscription only.
the
$3 50
. 5 00
Those ordering
will uot he obliged to take the work unless it
corresponds with the descriptions in every partic
ular. Address
ZEIGLER, McCURDY k CO. Publishers,
Philadelphia, Pa. Cincinuat, O. k St. Louis, Mo.
February 22—4ra
LIVERY STABLE.
H ORSES and CARRIAGF.S for hire at the
Stables of L. R. Davis* Middletown Hotel.
The horses
provided when desired. Terms moderate. Ap
ply to THUS. MURRAY,
At the .Stables.
safe, and careful drivers will be
and
Jan. i.—y
E. T. EVANS,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
AND DKAALKR IN'
GRAIN,
LUMBER,
COAL,
in
1
BUILDING LIME,
«•t
BRICKS,
HAIR,
CEMENT,
AGRICULTURAL. IMPLEMENTS,
TIMOTHY SEED,
t
CLOVER SEED,
LAND and CALCINED PLASTER,
LAND LIME,
GUANOS,
8UPER-PHOSPATES, &c.
OFFICE AX!) WAREHOUSE
OPPOSITE
DELAWARE RAH. ROAD DEPOT,
MIDDLETOWN, DEL.
January 4, 1808—tf
PENINSULAR MACHINE WORKS.
J. THOMAS II II) D ,
makufacurer of
[fund and Poicer Corn S lullern, Felton 's
Triple Geared Hone Foirer» ,
McCorkle Ganr/ Flow, Cultivator and Corn
Planter,
Pennington's Improved Reaper, Buckeye
Steel Tooth Self-Deli eery I fuse Rake,
Montgomery's Celebrated Roc ku ira y Grain
i, Gale's Lever Cutting Boxes,
orgivgs and Castings of all kinds.
Iron Railings of a variety of new and
beautiful juitterns.
'Fo
Sole Owner of Nohlett's Patent
Iron Railing for Yards and
Cemetery Lots.
Verandah and Porch Railings of rant
Patterns.
Hitching Posts, Cellar Gratings, Gearing
and Mill Work.
Jiù" Jobbing promptly executed. Orders by
mail punctually filled.
January 4—tf
MIDDLETOWN STOVE HOUSE.
S. W. ROBCRTF,
1 AKES pleasure i
-L of Middletown and surrounding co
that the liberal pat run gc he has received has in
duced him to otter to the public the greatest va
riety, and best selected stock of Stoves, both
Cooking and Heating, ever offered in Middletown,
and at prices that cannot full to please. Among
the assortment are the following
•ing to his friends
try.
an
COOK STOVES.
NIAGARA, * NOBLE TOOK,
CORAL COOK, \VM. PENN,
and others made in the city.
PARLOR STOVES.
DENY DROP,
UNION AIR TIGHT.
OUR PARLOR.
Alsb, SEXTON'S PARLOR HEATERS.
Stoves of all kinds suitable for .Stores, Offices,
Bar-rooms, and School Houses.
Also, the Morning Glory and the Oriental, both
unsurpassed in beauty und efficiency. They can
he seen in operation at the store of tin* proprietor.
All sises of Bar-room Stovei
Stoves repaired at short notice.
Old Stoves taken in exchange.
/S'TIN WARE ut wholesale and retail.-Q.*.'
As 1 have practical workmen employed, I think
I win give satisfaction to all who favor me with
their work. Particular attention paid to Roof
ing und Spouting.
Middletown, January 4, 1868—ly
MONITOR.
LEHIGH,
BRILLIANT.
GAS BURNING BASE,
GEM, .
d Teu-plutc
S. W. ROBERTS.
Marble Hall, the Great Popular Clo
thing House.
B OYS' JACKETS, COATS and PANTS, Men's
Fine Cloth ('oats, Men's Sack Coats, Men's
English Walking Coats, Men's French Sack Conte,
Men's Black Pants, Men's Fancy Punts.
THE BEST AND FINEST STOCK OF
Men's & Boy's Clothing in the City
together with a superior stock of
Piece GoodM Tor Custom Work,
# at less than gold rates.
Persons visiting the city, who may be in wont
of anything in the Clothing line, should not fail
to visit
We have
SMITH, BRO'S. & CO.,
Tjc 3 S*Marble Hall Clothing House,
is
It
40 West Baltimore Street.
Baltimore, Mn.
Jan 4—1 y
WINE AND LIQUOR STORE,
MIDDLETOWN, DEL.
T IIE undersigned take this method of notify
ing the public that they Have opened a
WINE and LIQUOR STORE
In Middletown, Del. opposite Davis' Hotel,
where they have on hand
sortment of WINES AND LIQUORS, i
and casks, which they offer
terms to the purchaser, at wholesale
large and varied
bottles
advantageous
or retail.
u-fine assortment of choice TOBAC
CO AND CIGARS.
Jan. 4—Omo.
50
COCHRAN k DAVIS.
00
it
Middletown Carriage Works.
ESTABLISHED IN 1830.
J. M. COX k lino., Proprietor«.
W E keep constantly on hand and manufac
ture to order Carriages of the latest styles
and finished in the best manner, ns we employ
none but first-class workmen and use only the
best material.
Repairing executed with neatness and
despatch.
All worl^warrauled.
the
be
Jan 1—(f
BOOKS FOB WINTEB BEADING.
Note.*— Any of the hooks named below will he
forwarded by mail, pontage paid, on recicpt ol the
price attached to each.
rCKLIällKD BY
1^11> & HOUGHTON,
450 BROOME STREET, NEW YORK.
• TWO TUOrSAKl) MILES OX HORSEBACK,
oantn Fe mid back.
x . , A Hummer Tour through
Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado; and New Mexico,
in tiie Year 1866. By Colonel Jas. F. Mcliiu.
1 vol*. crow
* * He is I
8vo,. price $2.
good traveller, und combining the
disciplined mind of a student with the training
«•t aii army officer, is well qualified to give an
opinion upon what he observes. His mode of
travelling Inis furnished him with excellent oii
port uni ties for careful observation and with greut
variety of adventure in the prairie.' —Standard,
Neic Bedford , Mass.
" It i
lively, descriptive history of the_
try passed through, imparting much valuublo
information, und makes a capital companion to
the Across the Continct, and other books of in-r
t cr-conti non ta 1 travel of tlie past few years."—r
Commonwealth, Boston.
COUI1
2. FOUR YEARS AMONG TIIE SPANISH-'
AMERICANS.
By Hon. F. Ilassaurek, late U. S. Minister Resi
dent to the Republic of Ecuador.
8vo, price $2.
"The subject is full of interest, and Me conf-'
mend the volume to our reade
of the year for information."— Press, Harford
Connecticut.
"The result is a work which for its wealth of
inform, tion, for its broad spirit of philosophy, is
seldom equalled. In style it is graphic and ner
vous. The description of the ascent of (,'himba
razo is a fine sjiecimen of vivacious narrative,
while the portraiture of Spanish-American char
acter and life, as displayed in the cities and tiie
Country, is minute, and evidently faithful."-—
Express, Albany.
l vol. crown
of the best
3. ITALIAN JOURNEYS.
By Willi;
D. II
... 'ells, Author of Venetian
Life. 1 vol. crown 8vo., price $2.
"Since the days of Montaigne and Lord Her
bert of Cherbury ( not to mention James Howell
again) no traveller in Italy has written mote en
tertaining uccounts of his journey than our cotin
, Mr. Howells, whose Venetian Life we
noticed some months ago."— Commonwealth, Bos
ton.
try
There is in all Mr. Howells writes
and sincerity, a quiet
pretence,
freshness
d perfect renunciation of
subtle and strong humor, a liveliness
of description, combined with a grave und self
possessed calmness, which make the expression of
opinion, the narration of fact, the utterance of
emotion, or the bubbling out of an irrepressible
»use of the ludicrous alike charming. There is
no writer ol travels in our day so simple, sincere,
enjoyable, and profitable ."—Brooklyn Union.
4. VENETIAN LIFE.
By William D. HdAclls.
pi roe !?2.
"Seldom n
mark with hi
our late an
with his V
h to pr
forgot their avocation and paused to admire nod
enjo\ instead of hastening to point out the defects
and limits."— Liberal Christian.
vol. crown 8vo.
riter
akes so broad and fine a
first pen-stroke ub Mr. Howells,
pllslicd Consul at Venice, made
The critics found so
book that for once they
IJfc.
in ilii
ft. THE TURK AND THE GREEK;
Ur. Creeds, Races, Society, and SccncrV in
and the Isles of Gr
1. vol. I61110, prie
fies a small volume of facile,
•sc, we commend him to these
*, yet entertaining pages."—
Turk
and G
:c. Ry
$1.75.
S. (
\V. Benjamin
" If anybody wi
graceful, mobile )
A eic Yury Indcpi
" The style of this book is that of an easy
rative. the sympathies are those of
id.
•r
right
si 1 a red
iudul Amcric
rtii, uud the predirtious ;
rilh intelligent observe
'ommoii
o e v
*."—Brooklyn Union.
The
th
account of Greece *ih not fftter
!»i it is true."— B.dtinwre E/ iscu
pul M: 7 i
i. THE DIARY OF A MILLINER.
By Belle Ulis. 1 vol. 16
" The diary is apparently truthfully
it indicates some very queer facts for the
aild ec
of which
self, ami is u me
, price $1. 25.
ritten ;
for
omist, some pli
ol fantili
popular
veils; might well avail him
kind of life about whirl
little."— Tra
il liner could tell
1
any people k
rij.t, Boston.
y a fine story.
•* Belle Otis," and that is ji>t
what she does. Her narrative has all the viva
city and piquancy which belongs to w
• it sends a keen shaft, and then foil
sally of exquisite humor ."—Albany Exj-m
A
art milliner i
7. THE OPEN POLAR SEA.
A Narrative of a
the North Pole, in the
By Dr. Isaac I. Hay
peditiou. Embellished
tmtions. d
Voyage of Discovery toward
schooner United States,
es, Commander of the Ex
ith six full-page ill ns
by Darley, White, and others,
from Dr. Hayes' .Sketches, three full-puge charts,
twenty-eight vignettes, uud a fine portrait of the
author, engraved on steel. 1 vol. bvo., price,
liait calf, $6.*
Bed the most significant facts, the
most picturesque seems the most dramatic and
pathetic incidents from this diurnal record
woven them into a consecutive, pleasing, und im
pressive history ."—Boston Transcript.
cloth, $3.
"He ha
d
8. OLD ENGLAND:
Its Scenery, Art, und People. By James M.
lloppin, Professor in Vale College, i vol. 16mo.
price, $2.
" It pleasantly revi
of England,
a more enjoyable
our rapid country
our choicest memories
ud suggests motives aud meuns for
mi instructive sojourn than
en usually devote to the lund
of their fathers."— Transcript , Boston.
9. HOMESPUN; OR, FIVE - AND - TWENTY
YEARS AGO.
By Thomas Lackland. 1 vol. 16mo. price, in
cloth, SI. 75.
"The description of the landscape on a rainy
day, the country Sabbath, the bubbling brook ut
even-tide, the rich glories of Summer, and the
mellow', softening beauties of autuiiin
gilt w ith exquisite skill."— Journal, Albany.
10. POEMS OF FAITH, HOPE, AND LOVE.
1 vol. ltinio. price, $1.50.
meet with a more satisfac
tory and comforting little collection of poems
than the unpretending volume just)juhlished by
Hurd à Houghton of the Phoebe Cary's Poems of
Faith, Hope, aud Love. They are utterances of
a truly chastened spirit, submissive hut not sad,
full ot hoj»e as well us acquiescence, of patience
rather than passive ness.' '— Republican , Spring
field.
By Phœbe Cary.
" We do not oftc
For sale by all Booksellers.
January 25.
LEND ME YOUR COUNTENANCE.
I F you want _
family call at
good likeness of yourself or
HORNING'S MAMMOTH CAR,
Middletown, Del.,
will get pictures from the beautiful
where y
little Pearl Ferrotype to the life-size Photography
All who wish a correct like
friends should embrace this opportunity and
call at
Particular attention paid to copyiug daguerro
types or ambrotypes of deceased iiersons into card
or large size Photographs.
A profile will be showu before the pictures
finished.
A good assortment of Rustic and other Frames
hand.
It will ufford
examine specimo
January 4—tf
of themselves
am
pleasure to have you call and
J. M. HORNING.
First Class Boarding House.
NO. 76 SHARP 8TRKET,
BALTIMORE.
»quartfrom the B. and O. R. R. Depot >
and three squares from the Eastern Shore
Steamboat Wharf.
M ILS. GüSTAVUS WRIGHT, late of Chestcr
town, Kent county, Maryland, informs her
friends and the public generally that she will
commodate, on reasonable terms. Transient, Per-»
ma nent
Located
d Table h
•ders.
J«»i, 4.—y v

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