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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, August 15, 1868, Image 2

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SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 15, 1868.
rOX PRESIDENT,
H0BATI0 SEYMOUR.
or NRW YORK.
TOR VICE PRESIDENT,
QEN. FRANCIS P. BLAIR,
M MISSOURI.
roa (HRRirr,
Jacob richardson,
FOR CORONKR.
LAWRENCE PENDEGRAS8.
The Political Mtutloa.
Thus far the presidential campaign has
been one of unusual calmness and qnict.
Tlière has been a total absence of the
customed excitement and political agitation
incident to such occasions. It probably
arises from the fact that the current of po
litical feeling runs too deep, at this time,
to display the ordinary surface agitations
seen only when the stream is shallow.
Men do not trifle in times of great peril.
Imminent danger stills the ebullition of
passion, and arouses all our faculties to
avert it. It awakens the indomitable will
and the firm resolve. It knits the brows,
compresses the lips, clenches the fists, and
shows the preparation to meet it, in every
lineament and feature. Such, now, is the
condition of the Democratic party. .It is
comparatively calm, but it is the calm of
conscious power, of resistless all-conquer
ing will, which is to impart to it such
mcntuiu as will bear down beneath it all
opposition.
The summer heat, perhaps, has had its
share in producing the apparent lethargic
condition of parties. The weather has
bees too hot for campaigning. But the
liest is subsiding, and as the mercury in
Fahrenheit declines, the mercury in the
political thermometer will rise. Kentuc
ky has expanded the bulb, and sent it up
with a rush several degrees. The demo
cratic majority there will reach one hun
dred thousand ! Grant stock has experi
enced a very heavy decline in that market.
Tidings of victory also reach us from far
off Montana. The democracy have
teen hundred majority, and a number of
counties yet to hear from which will swell
it to over two thousand.
The first gun from New York, booms
ominously for Grant. It breaks on the
of foundering radicalism like 41 the
minute gun at sea,
•rata it sounds like a feu de joie. The
•peciml election at Grafton, on the 11th
inst. exhibited a gain for the democrats,
which extending over the State in like
proportion, would give them over two
hundred thousand majority ! These are
indications of the political situation, alto
gether cheering to the democrats at this
early stage of the canvass, and we have an
abiding faith that the signs are to grow
mere and more propitious as the campaign
progresses.
ac
or
mo
ri,
seven
ear
while to the demo
We pablish elsewhere the proceedings
of the Democratic ratification meeting at
Townsend, on Saturday last. The meet
ing was addressed by Cspt. Jos. M. Barr,
J. B. Penington, Esq. and Major B. T.
Biggs. While the latter was speaking he
alluded to the prospect that the Democrats
would carry all three of the counties in the
State. Turning to Mr. Richardson, the
Democratic candidate for Sheriff, who
present, he said, "Richardson, hunt up
your sureties, we shall carry every Hun
dred in New Castle County, except, per
haps, Christiana and the City of Wilming
ton, and old Appoquinimink will take
«•re of Wilmington and balance her tnajor
. ity." Mr. Richardson replied that the
Democrats expected to carry Wilmington,
which would leave the Republicans only
Christiana. The. announcement was hail
ed with applause.
was
A gentleman from Philadelphia, with
whom we conversed a few days since, says
that the Democrats will carry that city at
the next election by seven thousand
jority. The Germans are united, active,
harmonious, and thoroughly organised
againat the Radicals. They are moved
and actuated by greater zeal and unanimity
than hare ever inspired them before.
Two thousand of them in one ward who
have heretofore voted with the Republican
party, have come out for Seymour and
Blair. Tho Radicals may expect to en
counter a perfect Waterloo defeat, which
will put them hors de combat, horse, foot,
and dragoon.
ma
The Democratic Convention to nominate
E candidate for Representative in Congress
from the Eastern Shore District, assembles
at Salisbury on the 9th of September. A
nomination if equivalent to on election.—
Each county, nearly, of the distriot will
present e candidate. Worcester will cast
her vote for Levin L. Diriekson, Somerset
for Levin L. Waters, Dorchester for Dan
iel M. Henry, Talbot for Samuel Harablc
ton, and Queen Anne's for Lloyd Tilgh
l Wicomico, Caroline, Kent and Ce
cil, have no one named.
The recent rise in gold has been attri
buted, by part it on effrontery, to the prob
abilities of a fresh revolution to be inau
gurated by the Democrats. As well might
it have been attributed to the Radical at
tempt to arm the negroes of the South,
and to distribute arms among the " loyal"
of the North, with ulterior purposes of
bloody revolution. It is more probable,
however, that the rise was occasioned by
the immense drain upon the country to
meet the balanoe of trade, which is very
heavy against us ; for we have little else
beside eoin, now, to pay our balance in
Europe with. The great staples of cot
ton, sugar, molasses. Ac. whioh used to
be exported in such quantities from the
South, are no longer produced in quanti
ties sufficient to meet our liabilities abroad ;
while the cereals are produced at bo high
a figure, on account of the high price of
labor and everything else, that American
produce cannot enter into successful com
petition with foreign, in the European
markets, unless in times of great scarcity.
In addition to these causes, the coin had
tobe handed over, ody a few days since,
to the amount of $7,200,000 for Al
aska. No wonder that gold should show
an upward tendency, when we consider
the immense demand for it, and that we
have scarcely anything else with which to
pay our indebtedness.
On
posed
trains
ton,
Going
8
days
ton
5.10;
6.25;
riveat
delays
trains
to
at
ner,
is
of
in
of
an
Six
ware
the
been
point
equal
tinue
Mr.
on
all
kets.
Two
were
nure
est
been
they
crop
the
Which is thk Rest Sewi.no Machine ?
—This question has puzzled the public
mind about as much, if not a little more,
than the inquiry as to " who struck Billy
Patterson," or " will saltpetre explode ?"
or the search after the "North West Pas
sage" to an open polar sea ; or the exist
ence of " Simms' Hole," or " which is
the best fertilizer V
question " has been solved at last. Wil
cox & Gibbs is now conceded to be the
best machine ever offered to the public.
Persons in want of a good machine should
send their orders to the Store of John A.
Reynolds A Sons. See advertisement.
But the 4 4 vexed
His
and
and
kets,
the
out
his
The Coming Elections. —Four State
elections oceur in September. ' Tennessee
votes on the 13th, Vermont on the 1st,
California on the 8th, and Maine on the
14th. Nebraska, Ohio, Indiana, Pennsyl
vania, Iowa and West Virginia, vote in
October. On the third of November, (the
day of the presidential election) New York,
New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Illinois,
Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Missou
ri, Kansas, Nevada and Massachusetts,
hold their elections. In the next twelve
weeks, therefore, we shall have not less
than twenty-three State elections.
feet,
farm
of
and
corn
of
and
ed
The Democratic County Convention will
be held at the Court House in New Castle
on Saturday, September 5th, at 12 o'clock
M. for the purpose of nominating candi
dates for a Senator and seven Representa
tives to represent New Castle County in
the General Assembly ; and also five can
didates for Levy Court Commissioners,
to be voted for at the approaching general
election.
Keep the Ball Rolling. —Appoquini
mink started the ball on Saturday last,
and St. Georges gives it fresh momentum
to-day. A hickory pole will be raised at
St. Georges this afternoon at 5 o'clock.
Maj. Biggs, Noble T. Biddle, and Albert
Constable, Esqrs. are announced as the
speakers. The Odessa Band will be in
attendance.
at
T.
he
the
the
up
per
take
the
only
hail
It
Death of Hon. Tiiaddeus Stevens.—
Hon. Thaddcus Stevens, Representative
in Congress from Lancaster District of
Pennsylvania, died in AVashington, at 12
o'clock, p. ra. on Tuesday, in the 76th
year of his age..
was
at
Central Park. —Central Park contains
not far from one thousand acres of land,
and is called by this name from its central
position on Manhattan Island, which is
roally the city of New York. It is, by far,
the largest and most perfect park in thiB
country ; and while there are parks in Eu
rope with larger area, and finer attractions
in the way- of foliage and natural curiosi
ties, all persons concede that there is no
where in the world a more enjoyable place
of publie resort. For the short period
which has elapsed since the first stone was
laid in any of the numercrous bridges, ed
ifices and walls with which the park
abounds, its perfection in all the elements
of a pleasure ground for the people is a
matter of universal surprise. There are
some ten utiles of superb driving road,
with equestrians and pedestrians almost
without extent. The surface is charmingly
irregular, giving all varieties of landscape,
including hills, valleys, rockB, lakes,
streams, water-falls, fountains, grottoes,
caves, lawns, woods, eto. etc.
with
says
at
who
and
en
which
foot,
ma
a
a
Over Mont CeniB by rail must be quite a
new sensation. You travel at twenty
miles an hour, at places wheae you can
look down 2,000 feet, only a foot of ma
sonry intervening between the abyss and
yourself.
A
will
cast
Dan
Tilgh
Ce
Gen. Sheridan has been fined $100 and
coat* for forcibly ejecting Postmaster
Dunn, of Leavenworth, Kansas, and sei
sing postage stamps and treasury notes,
when in command of that Department.
The grasshopper army, which hag de
vastated parta of Iowa for two years, has
turned westward again, and passed Conn
oil Binds on Wednesday, going toward the
setting sqn,
LOCAL AFFAIRS.
Mohr Rail Road Accommodation.—
On and after Monday next, 17th, it is pro
posed to run a passenger car on freight
trains between Wilmington and Harring
ton, eneh way, daily, Sundays excepted.
Going South—Trains leave Wilmington
8 a.m.; New Castle 3.50; Middletown 5.30;
Clayton 0.30; (connecting except on Mon
days with train from Smyrna) Dover 7.40;
Camden 8; Felton 8.40; due at Harring
ton at 9 a.m. Going North—Leave Har
rington 4 p. in.; Felton 4.25; Camden
5.10; Dover 5.40; Moortou 6; Clayton
6.25; Middletown 7.40; New Castle 9;
riveat Wilmington 9.30 p. m. subject to
delays incident to freight business. These
trains will not Btop specially to take up
passengers (when there is no freight work
to do) at any other station than the above
named, but will stop to let off passengers
at any stopping place except Hare's Cor
ner, State Road, Delaware Junction and
Dul'ont.
The
the
on
Mr.
to act
B.
speech
can
to
they
the
and
the
tions
have
Whig,
ocratic
true
that
the
a
real
with
ar
logical
duty
tution,
should
nied
to
dity
acts
could
in
State
any
showed
fects
two
the
it
receive.
orous
that
otic;
that
dent
her
would
able
a
made
taxed
their
the
men's
spent
stanced
had
ment
in
equality
abjured
vote
and
prevail.
many
his
ing
always
ing
and
day
tors
all
The peach season has fairly commenced.
Six hundred baskets passed up the Dela
ware Railroad on the 7th inst. all from
the lower part of the State. None hud
been shipped, up to that date, from any
point on the road above Bridgcville. An
average of four hundred boxes a day,
equal to eight hundred baskets, are now
passing over the road. Prices must con
tinue to rule high, owing to the scarcity.
Mr. Edward 0. Fenimore shipped 175
baskets of peaches from New Castle wharf
on Thursday, for New York, and will
continue to pick each day until his crop is
all sold. He will have some 0,000 bas
kets. perhaps the largest yield in tho State.
Two hundred and twenty-four baskets
were shipped from New Castle on that day.
As a fertilizer, Bowers Complete Ma
nure has gained a reputatiou of the high
est chaiacter, and we learn that it has
been in great request ; the time is fast ap
proaching when farmers should turn their
attention to the selection of the
they intend employing to insure a good
crop of Wheat. We recommend to them
the Complete Manure as being the best
adapted to produce the required results.
rn aim ro
Basket Marino. — A. C. Baldwin is
engaged in this business at Townsend.
His baskets are made of white oak slips,
and are smoothly and substantially put to
gether. He makes all sizes, from the
bushel basket down to the smallest in use,
and will fill all orders, either for peach bas
kets, or the ordinary f;, rm baskets. With
the assistance of anothor, he is able to turn
out 3,000 baskets per year. The price of
his bushel baskets is one dollar each.
Alexander Wilson, Esq. is erecting a
handsome new dwelling house, 28 by 46
feet, three stories high, frame, on his
farm at Wilson's Point, on the Sassafras
river, Kent county, Md. P,C. Strickland
of Elkton, contractor. Sir. Wilson is a
most successful farmer, and has made his
farm like a garden for thorough tillage
and fertility.
A violent storm passed over the region
about Mount Pleasant, on Friday after
noon of last week. The bail damaged the
corn fields considerably ; the rail road
track was overflowed, and the
detained half an hour by the mud and
other obstructions deposited upon the
track.
James Booth, confined by the judgment
of the Court in the insane department of
New Cnstle County Alms House, escaped
from that institution, one day last week,
and returned to New Castle,
arrested by Sheriff Herbert, and taken
back to his old quarters.
T. W. Eliason, Esq. has resigned tlic
Presidency of the Kent County Railroad,
and William Janvier, Esq. has been elect
ed in his place. Robert Nicholson, Esq.
has been eleoted a Director of said Com
pany, in the place of Hon. George Vickers
resigned.
gro
us
tliis
1.
the
York
2.
cars were
the
this
man
the
under
feel
tain
3.
of
him
but
whe
the
than
are
John
ed
He was re
On Thursday next, the 20th inst. the
Camp Meeting of the Smyrna Circuit near
Blackbird, in Mr. Jacob Hill's woods,
four ntiles from Smyrna, will commence.
It iB said there will
be over sixty tents
erected.
D. J. Nowland, Esq. residing near Lo
cust Grove, Kent county, Md. lost a val
uable horse, in the field, on the 7th inst.
The animal fell dead at the plow. It was
insured at $140.
About twelve miles of the Queen Anne's
Railroad have been graded. The work,
we understand, is progressing finely.
Mr. Horning will be absent from Mid
dletown for a week from next Thursday,
at the Smyrna Circuit Camp.
the
like
of
late
the
of
tiid
the
Curious Incident.— A very pretty and
curious incident illustrative of the reason
ing powers possessed by inferior animals,
recently occurred in the ease of a canary
bird. The door of the bird's oage was oc
casionally left' open, tliSt he might enjoy
the freedom of the room. One ds-y he hap
pened to light upon the mnntlo slien-wlicre
Ilere was a new discov
on was a mirror,
ery of the most profound interest. He
gazed long and curiously at himself, and
came to the conclusion that he had found
a mate. Going back to his cage he select
ed a seed from its box, and brought it in its
bill as an offering to the stranger. In vain
the canary exerted himself to make his
new friend partake, and becoming weary
of that, tried another tack. Stepping back
a few inches from the glass, lie poured
forth his sweetest notes, pausing now and
then for a reply. None came, and moody
and disgusted he flew back to his perch,
hanging his head in ahame and Bilence for
the rest of the day, and although the door
was repeatedly left open, he refused to
come out again.
to
of
a
Two thousand Germans In one ward in
Philadelphia, disgnsted with Radicalism,
Bay they will vote for Seymour and Blair.
at
Petroleum, it is stated by an English
paper, has been discovered in county Mon
aghan, Ireland.
Appoquinlmtnk Awake.
The first meeting of the campaign was held by
the Democrats of Appoquinimink and adjoining
Hundreds, in the beautiful Grove a t Townsend,
on Saturday, the 9th instant, when on motion of
Mr. Owen C. Crow, Samuel Townsend was called
to act as Chairman, and on motion of Janies
B. Hall, Esq. Isaiah Taylor was appointed Vice
President, and Nathuniel Williams, Secretary.
With a few preliminary remarkslthe Chairman
introduced Capt. J. M. Barr,*who in an eloquent
speech gave a history of the rise of the Republi
can party ; compared the principles they avowed
to induce men to fight for the Union, with those
they hold now when all is for the negro ; showed
the effects of military rule here during the
and of negro rule now at the South ; he read from
the speeches of Cl ivy and Webster these .predic
tions of the actions of the Abolitionists, that
have unfortunately proved so true. As an old
Whig, he demonstrated that the Whig and Dem
ocratic parties were'identical, as opposed to the
Republican party ; pointed out very clearly the
true standing of the officers of the government,
that they are not the rulers , but the servants of
the people; proved the nomination of Grant was
a hollow show ; that negro supremacy was the
real question and real candidate: and closed
with a stirring appeal for Liberty and Union.
John B. Penington, Esq. followed i
ing,
cese
city
from
net
for
ied
of
them,
the
been
the
is
the
and
rate
few
to
meet
the
until
day
it
the
the
herb
ed
has
ease,
ton,
liiglit
was
cided
and
ance.
ing
Polly
ed
in
over
She
;ets
ber
arc
that
ses,
and
ton,
en
the
a very
logical and argumentative address, showing the
duty of Americans in this great crisis; that for
issues were on questions within the Consti
tution, but the great issue now was whether we
should have a constitution or not. Mr. P. de
nied the right of secession; that there was no
recession, but a revolution—the revolution being
suppressed, the States should have been admitted
to their former standing : he exposed the absur
dity of the reconstruction laws, which required
acts to he done by the States, as such before they
could he entitled to thé rights of the States; he
denounced the infamous attempt now being made
in the South to elect Presidential electors by the
State Legislatures, which were not chosen for
any such purpose. Mr. P. gave a very clear
statement of the amount of the national debt, and
showed the corruption, and the demoralizing ef
fects of the system of taxation ; he compared the
two platforms on the question of the payment of
the debt ; he opposed repudiation, but would pay
it not only according to law, but according to
equity—as the bondholders gave so should they
receive. He held up the inconsistent and trait
orous eourse of the Republican party, showing
that President Johnson was consistent and patri
otic; he paid a high tribute to the firmness and
impartiality of Chief Justice Chase in the im
peachment case, and portrayed the greater evils
that would have come upon us, hud the Presi
dent been removed.
Complimenting Appoquinimink as the Banner
Hundred of the State, he exhorted her to increase
her majority, as the only battle in this Shite
would he in this County, and with a very favor
able picture of the prospect of the election of
Seymour aud Blair
Mr. Penington Concluded, and was followed in
a short speech by Muj. Benjamin T. Biggs, who
made a strong appeal to all tax payers,—those
taxed on their incomes as well as those taxed on
their sugar, muslin, and matches ,—to throw off
the yoke of the Republican party ; showed by
statements of the Superintendent of the Freed
men's Bureau how some of this raised money was
spent ; pointed out the effect of negro votes as in
stanced in South Caroliua, where the negroes
had the power, but no interest in the govern
ment ; he proved by the platform adopted by the
Republican party at Dover, and by recent events
in Wilmington, that not only political hut social
equality would be granted to the negroes. He
abjured all honest Republicans, in view of the
deceptions practiced on them by their leaders, to
vote the Democratic ticket, in order that peace
and prosperity, truth and justice, might again
prevail. The Major was particularly happy in
many of his hits, and the responses from some of
his hearers were equally so.
The Chairman presented and read the follow
ing resolutions :
The Democracy of Appoquinimink Hundred
always mindful of the rights of white men, hav
ing seen with abhorrence the attempts of the Re
publican party to blot out all lines of political
and social distinction between the races, do this
day unfurl the old banner that our white ances
tors fought and bled to establish ; and we invite
all honorable white men who
opposed to ne
gro franchise and negro equality, to rally with
us under that banner, and help hurl from power
tliis mongrel Republican party.
1. Resolved, That we heartily ratify and adopt
the platform of principles luid down by the New
York Democratic Convention.
2. Resolved, That
s fully ratify and cordially
endorse the nomination of Horatio Seymour, us
the Democratic caudidate for President, and
pledge to him the United Democratic support of
this Hundred, believing him to he the best states
man of all others for our standard-bearer in this
ccmpaign, and that the State of N
the strongest claim to the candidate ; therefore
under the lead of Seymour and New York we
feel sure the Democratic party will march to cer
tain victory in November.
3. Resolved , That we fully endorse the nomiation
of F. P. Blair of Mo. for Vice-President, believing
him to be both a statesman and a patriot, who
periled his life to
but who left and denounced the Republican party
whe they promulgated the doctrine of union with
the negro.
4. Resolved, That we ratify the nomination of
Jacob Richardson for Sheriff,
degrass for Coroner, of this County, and wc
pledge this Hundred to give a greater majority
than any other Hundred in the County.
5. Resolved, That the thunks of this meeting
are hereby tendered to Captain Joseph M. Barr,
John B. Penington, Esq. and Major Benjamin T.
Biggs for their able speeches delivered
casion.
6. Resolved, That these proceedings he publish
ed in all the Democratic papers of tlie State.
Which were unanimously adopted.
Un motion of Mr. Isaiah Taylor, the meeting
adjourned. SAM'L TUWNSKND, Chairman.
NATH'L WILLIAMS, Secretary.
.York bad
arc
■e the Union for white
and Lawrence Pen
in
this oc
"The War betwt
the States, its Causes
Character, Conduct and Results," ity Hon. Alex
ander H. Stephens, is tlie title of a valunlde'work,
the first volume of which we have just received
from the publishers.
Histories of the late civil wi
like mushrooms, and they can
nlraost by the hundreds, hut all who
of arriving at a correct understanding of tlie
causes, and a clear history of the events of the
late lamentable war, have felt the want of a reli
able hislory of the some from
point, by some
This want is about to be supplied by Alexander
Stephens. Mr. Stephens was a most earnest pro
testant against rebellion, and only succumbed at
the last moment, when his State, in spite of his
warning, committed the great error.
The bare announcement thut this distinguished
Statesman had determined to write a book, would
of itself, he sufficient to kindle ft lively and wide
spread interest in nil sections of the country ; but
when it is known that lie has chosen his theme
tiid one 30 fruitful as The Late American War,
the aljsof'ang interest of the subject, together
with the evident ,lm i singular fitness of tlie au
"akening a cu
have sprung up
be numbered
desirous
southern stand
representative man at the South
oc
He
and
its
his
and
for
to
thor for its treatment, imite iu
riosity entirely unparullcivtl Id the annals of
American literature.
It presents a careful political analysis of the
past, separating real from apparent causes of the
late unhappy conflict, and gives those interior
lights and shadows of the great war, only known
to those high officers, who watched the flood-field
of revolution from its fountain-springs, and which
were so accessible to Mr. Stephens from his posi
tion as a second officer of the Confederacy.
To a public that has been surfeited with appar
ently similar productions, it presents a change of
fare, both agreeable and salutary, and an intel
lectual treat of the highest order. The Great
American War has at last found a historian wor
thy of its importance, and at whose hands it re
ceives that moderate, candid, and impartial treat
ment which truth and justice so urgently de
mand.
This most valuable work is sold only by sub
scription. and the publishers want an agent in
every County.
in
Cotswold sheep are said to be in greater
demand in England now than ever before—
at a late sale fifty-five averaged $150 iu
gold.
Items of New«.
The Very Rev. Dr. Benedict J. Spald
ing, a brother of Archbishop Spalding of
Baltimore, and administrator of the Dio
cese of Louisville, Ky. died in the latter
city on the 4th inst. from injuries received
from the accidental burning of a mosquito
net on liis bed. Deceased was distinguish
for his learning, ability and piety.
The marshal of Huntsville, Crawford
county, Illinois, on last Friday, accompan
ied by a posse, attempted to arrest a gang
of four robbers. The robbers fired upon
them, killing one of the posse, whereupon
the marshal and his men rushed upon the
scoundrels aud killed all of them.
The telegraph Hues of England have
been purchased by the Government, and
the whole telegraph syBtcm of the island
is to bo transferred from private hands to
the control of the Government. The tel
egraph will be a part of the postal service,
and will be managed at a much cheaper
rate under the new arrangement.
A gentleman in Albany was arrested a
few days ago for following a lady on the
street. He claimed that a man had a right
to admire a handsome woman, let him
meet her where lie might. The court and
the lady herself agreed to this, and the
gentleman was discharged.
The Alabama Legislature lias adjournod
until the first Monday in November, the
day before the Presidential election, when
it will dispose of the Governor's veto of
the bill authorizing the Legislature to cast
the electoral vote of the State.
The mistake of a druggist in Waterloo,
Indiana, who gave a butcher a poisonous
herb when he applied for sage leaves witli
which to season some sausage meat, made
eighty-threo persons violently ill. The
prompt action of the physicians alone sav
ed many of them from death.
The Chicago Tribune of Saturday says :
"The cool weather of the past few days
has probably put a stop to the oattle dis
ease, which has undoubtedly been more
virulent this year than usual, in conse
quence of the greater intensity and longer
duration of the summer ht at."
The First National Bank of Bonnning
ton, Vermont, was robbed on Saturday
liiglit last. The lock of the vault
picked by burglars, and an unknown
amount of bonds belonging to different in
dividuals were stolen. Not much money
was obtained.
General Grant is at Galena, and has de
cided not to accompany the Peace Com
mission. He expects to leave Galena
somewhere about the middle of the month,
and to travel Eastward, reaching Wash
ington about the first of September.
A young woman in Ch'iago successfully
prosecuted a rejected admirer as a nuis
ance. His offence consisted in his teach
ing half a dozen parrots to screech out iu
chorus, "Homely Polly, homely Polly ;
Polly lives across the street."
A woman in Minnesota who had gather
ed a quantity of potato bugs, burned them
in her cooking stove, and while leaning
over the stove inhaled poisonous fumes.—
She fell to the floor insensible, and died in
about ten minutes.
Stephen H. Philips, formerly Attorney
General of Massachusetts, now holds the
same office in the Sandwich Islauds. He
;ets $10,000 a year in gold, and is a mem
ber ex officio of the Legislature.
The Nashville Banner says, the negroes
arc drilling, arming, and plundering, iu
that city. Gardens, fruit-trees, meat hou
ses, chicken coops, are stripped, aud locks
and bolts are no security.
A manufacturing company of Northamp
ton, Mass, has made eight thousand doz
en peach baskets since March, which by
the partial failure of the crop, arc still un
sold.
York,
of
have
It
work
have
upon
to
other
we
mand
the
lovers
the
have
book
has
ment
be
ity
will
the
made
favor
had
dent.
is
He
cal
ance
bill
tors
public
trict
have
to
the
tion
day
Rlair,
a
never
diana
are
The
a
way
that
their
the
67
ten
a
in
A
tlie
one
and
of
of
wc
T.
Nineteen hundred sheep, in one flock,
were recently driven front Oliid to Kansas,
where sheep-breeding and wool-growing
arc becoming more and more important.
Nearly 3,000 operatives in and around
Ellicott City, Mil. are out of employment,
owing to tlie destruction of factories and
mills by the recent flood.
The Paciiii Railroad is now built to a
It is said
point 750 miles west of Omaha,
the whole lino will be open for business to
the Pacific during 1869.
A man in Malboro', Mass, and two of
his sons, have each lost the use of their
right eye, tlie father by disease aud tlie
sons by accident.
The Emperor of Brazil, iu making his
country excursions from his summer pal
ace, rides in a carriage propelled by a
steam-engine.
Bayard Taylor will return from Europe
in a few weeks to attend the" golden wed
ding of his parents, in Chester county,
oc
in
the
Pa.
tlie
the
reli
pro
at
his
but
au
cu
Dunng the month of July twenty-five
hundred eases of cholera and nearly four
teen hundred deaths occurred in Havana.
A gentleman of Troy, N. Y. who bu
ried his fifth wife eleven months ago, mar
rice the sixth last Thursday.
From Spain wc have had
be
lar
tle
tle
in
in
up
reports of an
ticipated insurrections and of famine, aud
now a financial crisis is feared.
A large number of Swiss farmers are pre
paring to leave their native country in the
fall and emigrate to the United States.
General Butler was thrown from his
riage in Gloucester, Mass, on Sunday eve
ning and severely bruised.
Mike McCoole, the celebrated pugilist,
has married a daughter of Daniel Norton,
a wealthy contracter of St. Louis.
The alleged plot to burn Nashville
seems to have no more substantial founda
tion than the talk of a monomaniac.
The Philadelphia Methodists are build
ing a marble church on Arch street. It
will have a tower 230 feet high.
The Omaha (Nebraska) Republican,
late a leading Radical paper, has come out
for Seymour and Blair.
The disease among cattle is creating
much excitement in New York and Penn
sylvania.
Tlie St Louis barbers have resolved to
close their shops on Sunday hereafter.
Cape May is so crowded that high pri
paid to sleep on the piazza.
Chinese immigration to California
of
the
the
posi
of
intel
Great
wor
re
treat
de
sub
in
ces are
The
amonuts to 1,000 a month.
Clinton, Iowa, has a saw mill that
ploys one thousand men.
The London PostOffiee delivers 1,730,
000 letters per week.
• Tho profi ts of the Louden* Times last
year were £100,000. " "™
em
of
of
iu
Political Items.
The Courier des Etats Unis, of New
York, the organ of the French population
of this country, says: "The Radicals
have hod their day and done their work.
It is upon the Democratic party that' the
work devolves of rebuilding where they
have cast down, and of reconstituting
upon a solid basis the elements of social
reorganization which they havo sacrificed
to a narrow spirit of personal authority."
From one end of the country to the
other the cry goes up from the people that
we must have a change. The farmers de
mand a change; the merchants demand a
change ; the tax-payers demand a change ;
the laboring people demand a change ; the
lovers of the Constitution demand a change;
the white people say they must and will
have a change of administration.
The York Tribune says "the tribute
book to the memory of President Lincoln
has been printed at a cost to the govern
ment of $37. 50 per volume. A very large
edition bus been issued, and a copy is tu
be sent to every government and national
ity in the world." The cost of this job
will be over $200,000. This is the
the money goes.
General Butler mndo a speech in Glou
cester, Muss, on Saturday, in which he
made the usual denunciation of President
Johnson, and expressed himself still iu
favor of impeachment. He said that he
had become friends again with General
Grant, and would support him for Presi
dent.
way
The Chicago Times says General Blair
is a teetotaler, and has been for years.
He does not drink a drop of intoxicating
liquor. So much for an atrocious Radi
cal calumny. And yet Radical temper
ance men, so called, will vote for Grant in
preference.
The Florida Legislature has passed a
bill taking the vote for Presidential elec
tors from the people and giving it to the
Legislature. A bill was also passed pro
hibiting distinction on account of uolor iu
public conveyances.
The working men of tlie thirteenth dis
trict of Ohio have met in convention, and
have endorsed Gen. Morgan for re-election
to Congress, and Seymour and Blair for
President and Vice-President,
The negro Bradley, late a Senator in
Georgia, intends to run for Congress from
the same district. He resigned his Sena
torship rather than undergo an investiga
tion on a charge of felony.
The Radicals in Convention, on Satur
day last, to nominate a judge for the
Greenfield District, iu Ohio, broke up in a
regular riot. " Let us have peace."
Gen. Hancock has written a letter fully
endorsing the nomination of Seymour and
Rlair, and pledging himself to give them
a hearty support.
Wade's Cabinet is called second-hand
furniture. The vender, however, says the
Louisville Democrat, can claim that it has
never been used.
ic,
the
1'
Tike Cattle Disease.
There is danger that the new and fatal
malady prevailing to such a lamentable
extent among the cattle in Illinois and In
diana may extend eastwardly. Large
numbers of the diseased animals, it seems,
are being brought east by the railroads.—
The Pittsburg journals say that excitement
prevails there occasioned by the belief that
a number of cattle which bad died on the
way from Chicago to that plaoc had been
dressed and sold to the butchers there, and
that others had been killed to prevent
their dying of the disease, and also sold in
the market. The Chronicle says :
"On Friday last a drove of two hundred
cattle were shipped to this point by a pro
minent Illinois stock dealer, and of that
number 39 died on their way hither, and
67 perished in the East Liberty stock
yards. Of ft smaller drove shipped to
Pittsburg a number died on the way, and
ten fell victims to the fatal disease at East
Liberty on.Saturday last, while, with not
a single exception, the animals embraced
in tlie drove were more or less diseased.
A lot owned by Mr. Alexander, of Illi
nois, one of the heaviest stock raisers in
tlie West, arrived here yesterday, and in
one car only three beeves were living, the
remainder having died between this city
and Chicago."
a
At appears that three car loads of tho
specially affected lot of two hundred
sltipped cast before the railroad company
were apprised of the-true state of things.
Largo numbers of cattle continue to arrive
in the vicinity of New York daily from
Chicago, and there is some excitement in
the former eity about diseased stock. An
investigation by a Herald reporter of tlj :
slaughter houses at Communipaw, on Sat
urday, disclosed the fact that most of the
meat was diseased.
However, Professor
Gamgee, of Chicago, some time ago inves
tigated the cause of a disea e supposed to
be the Baute as tlie present one, and repor
ted that there was no danger in eating the
meat or drinking the milk. He was for
rly principal of tho Albert Veterinary
College of London,-and his investigations
were undertaken at the instance of the Chi
cago Packers Association. As this particu
lar cattle disease was supposed to have been
imported to the West by herds of beef cat
tle from Toxas, its ravages having hitherto
been confined to where these imported cat
tle have been domesticated, the Legisla
ture of Illinois lately passed a law in order
prevent the importation of cattle through
Kansas and Missouri. The Texas cattle
dealers therefore changed the route and
brought their herds by way of New Or
leans to Cairo and on other points on the
Mississippi and Ohio rivers. Wherever
these herds were landed and remained
rest from the journey the disease appeared
in a short time thereafter, so that there
hardly be any doubt that it originated
in Texas, and was imported thence.
married.
In Wilmington, on !''« ?""■ ult. „t the Par
Bonage of tlie Union M. E. Church, 314 West 1th
street, by Rev. W. fi. England, Henry C, Glan
den, of Summit Bridge, Delaware, aud Miss Ella
Look, of New Castle County, Del,
In Middletown, on Wednesday, the 12th, by
Rev. John Patton, Thomas Carty and Miss Lydia
DIED.
On Wednesday morning last, at the residence
of her son-in-law, Japtes A. Lewis, on Bohemia
Manor; Leal county, Mrs. Sarah Clayton, ...
of the late Thomas Clayton, Esq. aged about
years. ,
relict
80
SEWING MACHINES.
WILCOX & GIBBS'
TWISTED LOOP-STITCH
FAMILY SEWING MACHINES.
THE BENT FA SHI, Y SEWING MACHINES
IM THE WORLD.
r
OBVIOUS REASONS WHY THE
WILCOX & GIBBS
Family Sewing Machines
ARE BECOMING SO POPULAR:
FIRST, Because they make tho 11 Twistfd
I-oop-Stitch," which is the most Beautiful, Elast
ic, ami Durable Stitch known.
SECOND, Because they are adapted to the
Greatest Bange oi Work, and will ase either Cot
ton, Silk, or Einen Thread successfully.
THIRD, Because they are Perfectly Simple in
their Construction ; ami will Hem, Fell, Stitch
Bind, Cord, Tuck, Gallier, and Embroider, in
the most perfect manner.
FOURTH, Because they use but One Spool,
and are found Competent when all others Fail.
Read «he following Motrmrnia of Farts-■
Commendations of Individuals and of Ih.
Press In ICegard to the
WILCOX & GIBBS
Family Sewing Machines.
From the Superintendant of the Penn
sylvania Cen4ral Railroad. "
ALTOONA, Pa. Sept 14, 1805
One of y
my family for several y
mech
Sewing Machines lins been used in
enrs. For simplicity and
■y ot construction, I liave seen
Machine etjunl to it. n
with v hielt it does its work
icol lice
The speed and
are admin -
lûmes to give us entire
ENOCH LEW IS.
corrcclm ss
ble. H Im
satisfaction.
given and c
DOVEH, Sept. 12th, 1685.
.*—liar-.
Messrs.
ing hail eighteen
Wilcox ,(• (Jihhs .— (1 tilth
His' experienee with your
1' ainiiy Hewing Machine, 1 lake pleasure in say
ing that it lias given perfect satisfaction. It has
been the
ans of selling several in this locality.
D. F. BURTON.
SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN. Jan. 20th 1850_
"Tile simplicity anil
■curacy of its mechanism
prevent its dropping stitches, to which many oth
er machines are liable, ami which hits hitherto
brought the "chain stitch" into disrepute. One
cannot tint admire Hie beauty and accuracy of iia
■tits, and the entire absence of all noise,
it running nt tlie rate of 2000 stitches
and upward per minute. This alone must prove
ndation iu it. Another nierit is
unship. Tlie parts are mndc in
i that in tlie event of accident to.
an lie replaced, at a tri
lling cost. It is, indeed, a "mechanical wonder
—a household necessity t"
move
n wile
a gre
the poo«l work
UTchangeable,
the
y part c
PHILADELPHIA PRESS, i860.—"The un
paralleled success which has attended the intro
duction of the Wilcox k Gibbs Sewing Machm*
is a sure guarantee of its merits."
Nj
xn
b*

«
P3
P
0
8
<53
o
«
o
IPI",
-V>- " • t
w
-
REFERENCES.
w
The following? arc names of persons in this
neighborhood, whom we give ns references, who
have had the Wilcox & Gibbs Sewing .Machine»
in use for some time :
Misses Blnekiston. |Mrs. Bcnj. Armstrong
Green. Mrs. T. S. Bowers.
Mrs. J. B. Clarkson. IMrs. H. Vandcrford.
Mrs. R. A. Coehrun, Jr.!SIrs. S. M. Reynolds.
Mrs. Willi
CASH PRICES.
No. 1. Ornamental Iron Stand, Walnut
Top, (oiled.) with Hemmer and Fel
er,
$56
No. 2 . On Ornamental Iron Stand, Walnut
Top, with Drawer and Lock,
No. 3. On Oruaiuemtal Iron Stand, with
Polished Mahogany or Walnut Top
and Drawer, with Hemmer and Fel
56
1er.
58
No. 4. Walnut Half Case, (oiled,) with
Hemmer and Feller,
No. 5. Extra Half Cuse,
Box. Hemmer and Feller,
No. 6. Walnut Half Gase, (oiled,) w
Fancy Work Box, Hemmer and
Feller,
No. 7. Mahoganj' Half Case, (Polished,)
with Hemmer and Feller,
No. 8. Full Cabinet-Case, Mahogany
Walnut with Hemmer and Feller
65
"w-ith Work
68
ith
10
1ft
or
190
Those wishing a first eluss Sewing Machine,
would do well to cull and examine the
Wilcox & Gibbs
TWISTED loop-stitch
FAMILY SEWING MACHINES,
CONSTA N
HAND
SALE
TLY ON
AND FOR
BY
JOHN A. REYNOLDS k SONS,
Middletown, Dei.
August 15—ly

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