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Middletown transcript. [volume] (Middletown, Del.) 1868-current, August 22, 1868, Image 1

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VOL. I.
MIDDLETOWN, NEW CASTLE COUNTY, DELAWARE, SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 22, 1868.
NO. 34.
NEW GOODS.
Spring anil Summer Opening!!
AT
J. A. Reynolds & Sons'
MIDDLETOWN.
H AVING replenished our Slock with a large
aud complete assortment of Spring and
Summer Goods, wc are now enabled to olfer
extra inducements to tho people of Middletown
and vicinity, ns the following list of prices of
some of our leading articles will show,
Calicoes at 10, 12} and 14 ccuts per yard.
B'd Muslins 10 12}, 15, 20 and 25 11 "
Unblôaehed do 10 12} 14, 10 nnd 20
B-4 Pillow* Case do
ll, and 37} "
Am'r and Russian Crash. 12}, 15. and 18 "
American Ginghams 12}, 15, and 2o "
Tickings 25, 35, and 45 "
DRESS GOODS.
American Lawns 20, 22. and' 25
Jaconet do 31, 37}, and 45
Plaid and Fig. Cambrics 22, 25 and 31 " "
American Delains 20, 22 and 25 " <<
Ali Wool do 37}, 45, and 50 " "
Black and Colored Alpacas 50 to 90 " "
Silk-Mixed & all Wool Poplins 75 to 1,25 " "
per yard.
Coatings and Cassimeres.
A splendid stock of G-4 Coatings and Cloak
Ings, consisting of Tricots, Piques, Doe-Ük
&e., in Black and Fancy Colors, ranging in
price from $1 50 to $0 00 per yard.
Fancv Cassimeres for Pants and Vest 90, $1
* 1 60, $1 75 and $2 00 per yurd.
NOTIONS, &c.
Spool Cotton 5, 8 and 10 cts per .Spool.*
Knitting do 62J, 75, aud 871 per Lb
Linen itdkfs' lo, 12J, 18, 25 and 35 cts each.
Ladles, Misses, and Children's White Cotton
Hose a 12}, 15, 25, 37} and 50 cents
Ladies and Misses Hoop Skirts
$1 25, $1 50 each.
25,
pair.
i?l 00
50
BOOTS AND SHOES.
Ladies' Lasting Gaiters a $1,25, $1,50, $2,00
nnd $2,50.per pair.
Misses' Lasling Gaiters n $1,00, $1,25, $1,50
and $1,75 per pair.
Gents' and Boys Lasting gaiters a $2,00, $2,50
$3,00 and $3,50 per pair.
Gents' Cull' Hoots $5,00 $5,50 nnd $6,00
per
pair.
GROCERIES.
Brown and White Sugars at 12}, 14, 15. 1G.
17, and 18 cents per lb.
ril? njTâ aUd U '° CüfRiCfi 25 ' 28 > ftnd 31 cts -
«Æ 1 ™ "S? nlack Teu3 S1 > 00 SI,25 $1,50 nnd
$2,00 per lb.
Brown
per lb.
,r> ®' ''■S' Ï5 nnd 05 cts. per gallon.
Please Cali and examine I
JOHN A. REYNOLDS & SONS.
April 25, 1868.
and White Soups at 6, 8 anil 10
cents
|
LEWIS' PURE WHITE LEAD,
IN 12J, 25, 50 AND 100 lb.
Black Paint, Prussian Blue,
CHROME GREEIV is.;ad YEIXOW,
Burnt and Raw limber,
BURNT AND RAW SIENNA,
Indian Red, Red Load,
VEN. BED, SPANISH BE0WN,
Yellow Ochre, Ohio Brown,
Dry and in Oil
IN 1 lb. TO 25 lb. CANS.
Putty, Linseed Oil, Turpentine,
JAPAN DRYING, COPAL VARNISH,
Glue, Gum Shellac,
LAMP BLACK, WINDOW GLASS,
besides a full assortment of
Paint Brushes and Sash Tools,
For Sale by
J. A. REYNOLDS & SONS.
Ma j 16, 18G8—3 in
KEGS.
BOWER'S
COMPLETE MANURE,
manufactured by
HENRY BOWER, CHEMIST,
PHILADELPHIA.
MADE
Super-Phosphate of Lime, Ammonia and
Potash,*
WARRANTED FREE FROM ADULTERATION.
CM
T HIS Manure contains nil the elements to pro
duce larf'e crops of ail kiuils, and is iiiehh*
recommended liy all who have used il, also liy
distinguished (Jbemisla who have, by analysis
tested its qualities.
Packed lu :
bags of 200 pounds each,
DIXUN, 8HARPLKSS & CO.
„ _ . „ SOI.E AC ENTS.
39 South Water and 40 South Delaware Avenue
PHILADELPHIA.
iFor sale by WM. EEYNÜLDS,
79 South Street,
Baltimore, Md.
Also by JOHN A. REYNOLDS & SONS,
Middletown, Del.
And by dealers generally throughout the
July 18, *08.
■try.
HARNESSJMAKING.
T HE undersigned having commenced Harness
making at
ODESSA, DEL.
Is prepared to furnish every article in 1Û3 line
on the most reasonable terms.
His experience in city and country jnstißes his
promise that
ALL IIIS WORK YVILL BE OF THE
JtSTBEST QUALITY., g#
And gives him confidence to solicit a share of the
public patronage.
^^-His Shop is on Main street, in the house
formerly occupied by Joseph Tawresv.
• YVM. T. GALLAHEB.
April 25—tf.
A Chance for a Bargain.
TlyfRS. S. M. HATCH. Middletown, Del. offers
lfl her entire stock of MILLINERY GOODS for
pale. Price $1,000. A First Glass Sewing Ma
chine will be included. This is a fine opportu
nity to secure a Good Business Stand and a Lu
crative Business Aug. 15—tf
j^tlrrt jJocJrtr.
AN OLD MAN'S DHF.AM.
HY OLIVER WENDEL HOLMES.
Oh, for an hour of youthful joy !
Give back my twentieth'Spring 1
I'd rather laugh n bright-haired hoy
Than reign a gray-haired king.
Off with the wrinkled spoils of age ; '
Away with learning's crown :
Tear out life's wisdom-written page,
Aud cast its trophies derm.
One moment let my life-blood stream
boyhood's fonut of fame;
one giddy, reeling dream
Of life, and love and fame.
My listening angel heard the prayer,
And calmly smiling said,
" If I hut touch thy silvered hair,
Thy hasty wish hud sped."
"But is there nothing in thy track
. To bid then fondly stay,
While the swift seasons hurry hack
To find tile wished-for day?''
Aii, truest soul of woman kind !
Without thee what were life ?
One bliss I cannot leave behind—
I'll bike my precious wife !
The angel took a sapphire pen,
And wrote in rainbow hue :
"The man would be a boy again,
And be a husband too 1"
Is there nothing yet unsaid
Before the change appears?"
Remember all these gifts have fled
With those dissolving years 1
" Why, yes, I would one favor more—
My fond paternal joys—
I could not bear to lose them all t
i'll take my girl:; and boys."
The smiling angel dropped his pen—
Why this will never do ;
The man would be a boy again,
And be a father too I
And so I laughed—my laughter woke
The household witli its noise,
I Wrote ray dream when morning broko
To please my fair-haired boys.
and
of
F
Gi
in
-
jopular Stales.
A THRILLING ADVENTURE.
I was a medical student in Paris at the
time the strange and startling adventure
happened which I am about to record.—
Tired with long lectures and hard study, 1
was out one evening for a walk in the
fresh air. It was a pleasant night in mid
winter, and the cold, bracing air, as it
touched my feverish brow, caused a grate
| fill sensation.
Passing through a rather lonely street
near the river, 1 was supprisod at meeting
a young and pretty girl, (at least so she
appeared in tho dim light of a distant
street lamp) who carried in her hand some
three or four bouquets, which she offered
for sale.
"Will Monsieur have a bouquet?" she
asked in a sweet musical tone, holding out
to mo a well arranged collection of beauti
ful flowers.
" They are very pretty," said I, taking
them iu my hand ; and then, somehow, I
could not help adding, as I fixed my eyes
upon her's, "and so, 1 think, are their fair
owner."
"Monsieur,-will buy and assist me?"
she said.
"Do you really need assistance, made
moiselle ?" .
' ' \Y by else should I ho here at this hour
of the night, monsieur ?"
"And why here at all?" quickly retur
ned I. "This street is little frequented,
and it is about the last iu the world, I
should havo selected for disposing of a lux
ury most suited to wealth aud fashion."
Hlic sighed and reached out her hand
for the bouquet, which I
"What is your price?"
"Five francs."
"A largo sum."
"Monsieur, will remember it is winter,
and flowers are not plenty."
"To aid you, I will purchase," returned
T, handing her the requisite silver coin ;
"for though I love flowers, I would oth
erwise hardly indulge in the luxury to
night at such an expense "
She thanked me, and seemed about to
me,
II retained.
pass on, hut hesitated, looked up to
mid said :
"Could monsieur direct me to the house
of a good physician, who will turn out to
night and sec a patient at a small recom
pense ?"
"Any friend of your's ill?"
"My mother," with a deep sigh and
downcast look ;
"Where does sho reside?"
"Only a short distance from here."
"YVhat is tho matter with her?"
"Sho has a high fever for one thing.
"When was Bhe taken?"
"She came down last night, and has
not left her fied since."
"Why did you not send for a doctor at
onoe ?" -
"YVe hoped she would get botter
and it is so expensive for poor people Jo
employ a physician."
"I am myself a medical student, with
considerable experience among tho sick of
the hospitals ; and if you are disposed to
trust tho case to me I am at your service
without charge," I rejoined, already feel
ing deejdy interested in the fair girl.
''Oh, how shall I thank monsieur !" she
exclaimed, with clasped hands, and an up
ward grateful look, "Pray, follow mo,
Monsieur lo Docteur.''
She turned at ocae, and moved off at a
rapid pace down the street, toward tho
river Seine, in the direction I was walking
when we met.
soon
In less than five minutos we had enter
cd a wretched quarter, among narrow
streets, old tottering buildings, and squal
id-looking inhabitants, some of whom
seemed to glare at us as wo passed along.
"Is it much further?" inquired I, be
gining to feel uneasy.
' ' Only a. step, monsieur ; it is just hero."
Almost immediately she turned into a
covered passage, which led in back among
habitations that I should never have vol
untarily visited in the broad light of day.
A distant light served to make the gloo
visible, till she suddenly stopped and ope
cd a door into total darkness.
"Your hand, Monsior le Docteur," i __
said, at the same time taking it and lead
ing me forward.
I was tempted to draw back and refuse
to go any farther, though I mechanically
followed her.
We now wont through a long
passage, in total darkness, and after two
or three short turns, began to * descend à
flight of creaking, rotten stairs.
"Is it possible you live in a place like
this ? ' said I, secretly wishing myself safe
ly out of it.
"In Paris beggars eanuot be choosers,"
replied the girl.
"but even in Paris it is not necessary
for the living to take up their abode in se
pulchers 1" I rejoined with some asperi
ty, being vexed at myself for suffering my
good nature to lead mo into a den from
which I might never come out alive.
To this my fair guide deigned no reply.
On reaching the foot of the stairs she
pushed open a door into a sma^l room, and
I followed her in with some secret misgiv
iugs. There was a bed in one comer, and
upon it appeared to be a human form lying
very still.
."I have brought a doctor, mother,"
said the girl as she closed behind
there was no reply to this she turned to
mo saying :
"\I ill Monsieur le Docteur please to be
seated a minute ? I think my mother i:
asleep."
"I bog that mademoiselle will bear in
mind that I can only spare a few moments
in this ease to-night, as I have another ted
call I wish.to make immediately," I re
turned feeling very anxious to depart from
that subterranean quarter as quick as pos
sible.
is
as
ti
site
narrow
of
the
I
on
as
was
mo. As
is
of
leys
Monsieur shall not he detained* long by
me," rejoined the girl, passing out of the
room by another door.
I did not sit down, hut walked over to
tho hod where the patient was lying very
still—so still indeed that I could not de
tect any breathing. A woman's cap was
on the head, nnd the end of a shoot con
cealed tho face. I ventured to turn this
down carefully, and beheld the eyeless
sockets and grinning tooth of a human
skull !
ted,
girl
to
I started hack in horror, and at the same
intent tho door by which the girl had
left was thrown open, and in marched one
after the other four tall human forms in
black gowns and masks. I knew at onoe,
then, that I was to be robbed, aud proba
bly murdered. I wore a heavy diamond
pin and ring, carried a very valuable gold
watch, and had in money about my person
some five hundred francs, but not a single
weapon of any kind—resistance being
therefore out of the question, I felt that
nty only chance—if, indeed, there were a
chance—whs to conciliate tho ruffians and
buy myself oft' Wi
is
of
the
gar
This
i a presence of mind,
for which I still take to myEclf considera
ble credit, T said at once :
"I understand it all, gentlemen, and
you will find me a very liberal person to
deal with. •'There is ono thing I value
very highly, because it is the only one I
have, and I cannot replace it—that is my
Everything else of mine is at your
service, even beyond what I havo with
me."
day
pies
ribly
their
litb.
I hey were undoubtedly surprised to
hear me speak in that cool, off-hand man
ner ; hut they marched forward and sur
rounded me before either returned a word.
"How much havo you witli you then ?"
inquired oue in a civil way, hut iu a low,
gruff tone.
1 immediately mentioned the different
articles of value and exact amount ofmon
ey, "ali of which I will he pleased to present
you with, if ono of you will be kind enough
to escort me to tho street above," I added.
"You said you had moro Monsieur."
"Yes, gentlemen, I have ton thousand
francs in the Bank of Franco, and I will
willingly add a check for one half that
amount."
"Checks don't answer our purpose very
well," said tlic second yoice.
"Then \ pledge.you my honor, that I
will to-morrow, draw out fivo thousand
francs and pay the amount over to any per
son who may approach with this bouquet
in his hand," said I, holding out tho flow
i I had purchased of the fair decoy..
"And havo him arrested the next min
ute, I suppose."
"Nopon ii)y.honor he shall depart un
harmed and unquestioned, and no other
human being shall be informed of tho tran
saction for a week, a month, or a year."
"Let us handle what you have hero,"
said the first speaker.
I immediately took out my pin, took off
m J riffg' Avow out my watch, produced
my pocket-book and purse, and placed
them in tho extended hand.
"You make us a present of those now ?"
ho said.
" Yes, on condition that opo of you
will forthwith conduct mo to the stpoot
abovo, I replied.
' ' Monsieur is a very liberal gentleman
indeed 1" was the response.
They then drew off together, scrutin
izing the articles by tho light of a smoky
lamp and conversod together iu low tones.
are
their
A
time,
a
A
fies
else.
the
of
ful,
wife
their
for
than
their
able
a
near
men
thing
ture,
ora
how
than
a
arms,
ted and fell,
The four
I felt they wore holding a consultation
that involved my life, and, to speak the
honest truth, it seemed as if every nerve
in me quivered ; and it was with difficulty
I could stand.
At length the principal spokesman
turned to mo and said, in a eool and
methodical manner :
" Monsieur has acted moro like a gen
tleman than auyothor person we ever had
dealings with, and if we could, _
tent with our business, oblige him,
would bo happy to do so; but, unfortu
nately, wo arc governed by a rule, which
is a law with us, that
tales, and we think it will not do to make
an exception in this case. Wo will, how
ever, in consideration of Monsieur's gou
tlemanly behaviour, be as mild and lenient
as possible in doing our duty, and grant
Monsieur five minutes for saying his
prayers."
"You have then resolved to murder
me ?" gasped I.
" Monsieur uses a very hard term, but
wo will let that,
consis
id men tell no
pass. You have five min
utes yet to live by this watch."
Tho villain then held my watch to the
light, and I felt indeed that my minutes
were numbered, and secretly began to
pray tor the salvation of my soul, be
lieving that I could not save my body.
A death like silence now reigned in
that gloomy apartment for some time, and
then one of the ruffians bent down aud
lifted a trap door, and from the dark pit
below issued a noisome smell, as might he,
of putrid bodies. I beheld my intended
grave, and shuddered and looked aspen.
But why stand here and die like a dog,
without a singlo attempt at escape ? At
the worst it could he hut death, and there
was a baro possibility I might get
I .fixed my eyo on the door which oponoi
on tho stairway, and with a single sudden
bound reached it hut it was looked. Then,
as the ruffians seized me with a murderous
intent, I uttered a wild shriek, tho door
was hurst in with a loud crash, nnd i._
moment tho room
Tf
I
I
To
away
in a
was filled with gond'
I saw that I was saved, and fain
ed
to
tell
"
mask«, tho fair decoy, and
some two or three others concerned in that
murderous don, were all secured that
night, and I subsequently had the pleasure
of giving in my evidence against them and
seeing them all condemned to the gal
leys for life.
Tho place had for sometime been
_ suspec
ted, and the decoy marked. On that
night a detective had secretly followed the
girl and myself, and after ascertaining
whither she had conducted mo, had has
tened to bring a body of gciel":
place. The delay of the' ruffians in their
murderous design had been ju
I scarcely need
never again volunteered to
distressed damsel
while I remained in Paris.
ns to the
sufficient
hi that I
to save me.
accompany a
a secret adventure
nn
Destroying the Ants.—T he following
is said to be a sure way of ridding houses
of these pests :
Procure a largo sponge, wash it well and
press it dry, which will leave tho colls
quite open ; then sprinkle over it some
white sugar and place it where ants
troublesome. They will soon collect upon
the sponge nnd take their abode in tho
It is only necessary to dip the
sponge in scalding hoi water, which will
wash them out —dead. Put on more su
gar and set the trap for another haul._
This process will soon clear the house of
every ant.
We hear
at
for
this
can
ing
are
cells.
great deal of complaint of
these miniature pests, and it was only a
day or two ago that wo overheard several
ladies taking on so about tho ants eating
pies and "getting into everything so ter
ribly !" They now have tile remedy in
their own hands. So says an exohango.
not
he
and
with
Intelligence the Charm. —Young men
are mistaken when they think good looks
their principal recommendation to women.
A tnoman admires a handsom man, for a
time, ; but it needs something more than
a good looking face to retain this feeling.
A woman is, as a general rule, more
strongly drawn by the intellectual quali
fies of the opposite sex than by anything
else. YVhat is above said is also true of
the gentler sex. A man frcqncntly says
of soipo belle, " Yes, she's very beauti
ful, hut I thank Heaven sho isn't my
wife !" Women like to bo admired for
their loveliness, and we do not blame them
for it; but jt requires something more
than mere beauty to enable them to retain
their influence over
lects
pay
ed
tials
for
can
have
of
men.
Marrying for "Shekels."—
Lawrence, tho distinguished Boston
chant, was strenuously opposed to any
marrying a fortune. Speaking of a desir
able match for a friend, he said : " My
objection to her is, that sho has a few
thousand dollars in cash. This, however,
might bo remedied ; for, after purchasing
a house, tho balance might bo given to
near connections, or to some publio insti
tution."
Women got married because thoy don't
consider it respectable to bo singlo ; and
men becauso thoy think a wife a good
thing to havo about the house, like furni
ture, to bo both useful qpd ornamental.
Mr. Amos
mer
man
Dr. Franklin used to soy, " No matter
how long a man has been married, he
should nover cease to court his wife."
A beau dressed out resembles tho cin
namon-tree—the bark is of greater value
than tho body.
jsMfrt JJoefrß.
From rooms of Faith, Hope and Chairiy.
TUE OLD MAN'S DARUNO.
So I'm 11 crazy," in loving a man of thrcc-scoce ;
Why, I never had come to my senses before,
But I'm doubtful of yours, if your're thinking
to prove
My insanity, just by. the fact of my lore.
You would like to know what are his wonder
ful wiles?
Only delicate praises, and flattering smile3 !
'Tis no spell of enchantment, no magical art,
But the way he says " darling," that goes to
my heart.
Yes, he's "sixty," I cannot dispute with you
there,
But you'd make him a hundred, I think, if you
d.
And I'm glad nil his folly of Prat love is past,
Siuce I'm sure, of the two, it is best to be lost.
"Iiis hair is as
say ;
bite as the snow-drift," you
:vor shall see it change slowly to gray ;
Bui I almost could wish, for his dear sake alone.
That my tresses w
Then I
nearer tin- 1
i ..rhis o,i
;" then I'll help him to see ami
er
of
of
bo
all
bo
to ll
Tf it'F needful, you know, T can Pit very near ;
Aud lie's young.enough yot. to interpret the t<
heart that is heating up close to his own.
Of
I "must aid him; n ah ! that is my pleasure
and pride,
I should love him for this if for nothing beside ;
And though I've more reasons than I can recall,
Yet the one that "he needs me" is strongest
of all. b
»So,* if I'm insane, 3*011 will own, I am
That the case is so hopeless i '
And, heside8| it is acting no __ t
To he treating the head for dise
And if any thing could make
That no dream can delude,
past any euro ;
wise part,
;e of tho heart
woman believe
aid no fancy de
cm vc :
That she nev
knew lover's enclin ntmeiit before
of three-score !
It's being tho darling of
Mit and Dunnn;.
Ax Equivocal Answer.—A certain lit
erary gentleman, wishing to be undisturb
ed one day, instructed his Irish servnnt to
admit no one, aud if any one inquired for
him to give him an " equivocal answer."
Night came, and the gentleman proceeded
to interrogate l'at as to his callers. "Did
anyone call?" " Yis, sur, wan gintle
inan." What did he say ?
was yer honor in.
tell him ?"
viklo ansur, sur.
" I axed hint was his grandmother a
monkey !"
The Palindrome —Is a lino that roads
alike, backward and forward. Une of the
host is Adam's first observation to Eve :
"Madam I'm Adam."
Another is the story that Napole
ion at St. Helena, being asked by an
Englishman if he could kayo sacked Lou
don, replied ;
"Able wax I «re I saw Elba.
" He axed
Well, what did you
" Sure, an' I gev him aquiv
" How was that?"
on,
The latter is the best palindrome, prob
ably, in the language. Another very
good one reads thus ;
Lewd did I live and evil I did dwell.
An indefinite postponement of religious
services was recently announced in church
at Saratoga Springs. Tho edifice was un
dergoing repairs and the congregation met
for worship in .the basement. During tho
morning service the worthy pastor made
this announcement :—" Our usual after
noon services will bo suspended until we
can meet iu the sanotuary above."
A lady asked lier little girl, on return
ing from church, if she remembered the
text. O yes, said sho, it was this:—"The
ladies' sowing society will meet at Mrs.
McCracken's house on Monday evening
next."
" Hero I can't pass you," said the door
keeper of a western theatre. " You need
not pass me," said the irrepressible dead
head whom he addressed; "just you stand
wlicro you arc, and I'll pass you.
he passed.
A lively urchin accosted a traveling pp
plo-mcrchaut in the street tho other day,
and cried, in an earnest voice : " Mr.——
please give me an apple ; my brother goes
with your sister 1" lie'll do.
Anil
it
No fathor isn't a drone, cither, said a
bright lad ; he's a philanthropist, aud col
lects money for tho heathen ip Africa to
pay for our houso and things.
That's what I call a repetition, exclaim
ed a wag, the other day. What is it, in
quired liis friend. Why, look at that sign
across the way.—J. E. YY'cller, jeweller.
The word debt is composed of the ini
tials of dun every body twice. Credit is
formed of the initials of—call regularly
every day, I'll trust.
In a game of cards a good deal depends
good playing, and good playing do
pond* on a good deal.
An old maid, being asked to subscribe
for a newspaper, refusod, saying sho al
ways mado her own news.
Don't havo your chairs covered with
plush or hairejoth, for in that ease thoy
can pever be satin.
Liyo within your means, if you would
have means to live with.
The oldest lunatic on record—Timo out
of mind.
LONG ENGAGEMENTS.
iu
has
if
so
to
be
he
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Tho practical spirit of tho age has dis
posed people to look with marked disfavor
upon long engagements, and for once the
spirit of the a.gc has invaded the domain of
domestic ethics without doing them any
hurt. Nearly everybody now approves of
matrimonial engagements being, like oth
ers of not quite so bloodless a character,
short, sharp-, and decisivo. Marriage is
one of those desperate experiments to which
Macbeth's famous words, used in tho half
sciiso in which alone they seem ever to be
employed, are peculiarly applicable—If the
thing . is to ho done at all, "thou '(.wore
well it wore done quickly." The old saw
abuut marrying in haste and repenting at
leisure can scarcely ho construed ns referr
ing to betrothals, siuce even the law on the
subject, which is by no means new, does
not contemplate such a process as repent
ance, and attaches a heavy penalty to in
dulgence iu it. Formerly, people who
were engaged wore considered to he as
good as married ; and the canon law as un
derstood at Borne, wo believe,
requires a
formal dispensation from sneh a pledge be
fore any other union is permissible. li
must, therefore, have been rather to enter
ing into engagements than to their natural
and final result, that the familiar waruiug
referred ; and to that extent, it was, per
haps, a sound one. Modern practice,
however, for tho most part, docs not pay
much heed to it, even when taken iu this
sense ; the fact being, that there is often
quite as much haste iu getting two
persons engaged as in getting
ried. A cynical writer has remarked that
a man cannot know too much about his
wife before marriage, or too little after it.
YY ithout accepting tiio disagreeable obser
vation, we may still allow that there is a
certain amount of perfectly inoffensive wis
dom in tho first. But it tells against has
ty engagements, rather than iu favor of
long ones ; and wore the former instead of
the latter our present inquiry, we think we
could show grave cause against a habit
which is becoming exceedingly
But it is not ; and wo iiave alluded to it
only because we are inclined to think that
a brief engagement finds its full justifica
tion only when it has not been a rich one.
But whether rash or the result of due
flection, when onoo entered upon, tho soon
er it is closed the better. When so very
fine a boundory separates an ardent couplu
from their mutually desired destiny, they
might as well "jump tho life to come," as
Macbeth again has it, witli happy des
patch : and, where matters are arrauged
with sagacity, any delay that may take
place is commonly due to artificial, rather
than natural obstructions,
vial postponement is, of course, inevitable,
aud is always accepted with good grace.
In tho first place, as everybody knows, a
marriago is not a marriage, or, at any rate,
it is not a wedding, unless the whole world
is there to see it, and how ean the whole
world be there unless it is properly appri
sed of the intended ceremonial i? It thus
becomes obviouB that consideration must
bo paid to the convenience of the specta
tors as well as the feelings of the principal
actors, and a severe penalty may be in
curred by neglecting this important point.
It is true that the uudieneo docs not pay
at the door of the building in which I he
spectacle is to be witnessed, hut tiie speci
ally invited portion of it is usually expec
ted to give a gratuity—and no slight one
—-for tho benefit of the chief performers.
For it must, furthermore, be remembered,
that the hrido and bridegroom, though the
chief are not the only performers ; and the
convenience of those who piay secondary,
but, nevertheless, indispensible parts, and
oven that of the supernumeraries, must
ikewise ha consulted. Next to the two
protagonists, the bride and her walking
gentleman, come those inferior but deser
ving characters, tho bridesmaids and the
best man. The engagements of the lat
ter are not usually of so pressing a charac
ter ns to make him stand in the way of
early arrangement. Ilis role requires ve
ry little poquing, and his wardrobe is al
ways more or less ready. Moreover, he
can always answer for himself, his
monts not being dependent upon those of
other people. But with the bridesmaids
Their time is not altogeth
their own : and the date, which may ho
perfectly agreeable to ope of them, or to
the maternal regulator of the movements
one of them, may completely clash with
the arrangements of the maternal regulator
tho movements of another of them. Of
course, the more numerous the bridesmaids
the more complex tho difficulties of this
discriptioR. Supposing these little pre
liminaries to ho got over smoothly, there is
still (ho grave question of costume to be
considered. Hero, however, it is the
wardrobe of tho prima donnq, and not of
tho subsidiary artistes, which governs tho
interval between engagement and uuion.
Tho time that is long enough for her is
more than long enough for them. Wc are
assured that six weeks is a short allowance
tho preparation of a trousseau —that is,
it understood, when it is onoo, ns the
feminines phrase it, put in hand. Taking
theso various matters into considera
tion, we shall arrive at thfl conclusion,
that the period of engagement oannot well
less than threo months, and that
tfiis brief interval must be regarded as in
serted rathor from noçessity than deliberate
choioo.
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Whenever an engagement is protraoted
much beyond this limit, it is seldom the
fault of the feminine obstruction. It is
not women who aro responsible for long
engagements and their accompanying
evils. Ono would havo thought, indeed,
that uoithe* would men do anything to
quor
lengthen so trying an ordeal; and no
doubt they never do when they can help
themselves. But the proverb femme le
veut. Dieu le veut, cannot be modified iq
favor of the sex that has less influence
with the higher powers. A man may de
sire a thing very ardently, and yot the
gods remain truly inexorable. lie is fet
tered by circumstances much more than
the objectif bis affections. Ilis love, at
least, is very rarely 1 ' free as air.
may say that it • never is, unless he bo
either very rich or entirely without occu.
pation. liven a thriving young banker
or a rising barrister can got away for the
indispensible lioney-moon only at fixed
seasons of the year, jjSid to take the case
of the latter, should he engage himself iu
the spriug, at the very period when
arc told that a young man's fancy lightly
turns to thoughts of love, how can ho
possibly go to the Tyrol or South Italy—■
iu other words, how can he possibly get
married—before the long vacation ? A
rival, or a pardonable impatience, may
have hurried him into the step; and the
consequence is that the engagement must
perforce be one of six months, instead of
the normal three which was the accurate
and conscientious calculation we just now
made. Even six months, however, though
long, no doubt, to a couple of lovers so
licitous to annihilate time, are in practico
tolerable, and certainly need not be sper
cially reprobated on the score of ethical ex=
pedioncy. But when it is a mattof of
twice six months, three times six months,
possibly with " perhaps" at the end of
them—when, in a word, the length of the
engagement becomes indefinite—the saga,
oious moralist has a right to step in and
shako his head. It i3 not often that he
has to do so, inasmuch as ho is now a-days
usually antirrpated by a person of at leo^t
equal sagacity, the young lady's mamma,
if not by the young lady herself, a most
natural proceeding, seeing that where a
lover pleads for so long a delay, lie does
so on the preprosterous plea of temporary
poverty, which is, of course, shortly to
disappear..
Sometimes, however, the plea is weakly
listened to, and then we have a genuine
instance of a long engagement. To thq
poor man himself, who has labored sq fiupfj
to obtain the concession, it eaBUQt fail tq
be a serious affliction of the flesh. Fop
he is, as it were, in the dock, and on his
trial the whole time IIo cannot help feel
ing oouscioua that all his acquaintances—
atjleast, all his female acquaintances—arq
perpetually on the point of saying to him,
and hut for consideration for his feelings
would say to him, " Wheu ure you goiug
to bo in a position to marry that poor
IIo knows that they think thé *
best days of her life are slipping away iq
wearisome waiting for his jiecqnjaj'y suu r
cess ; and at one or two states of mind be
must, pcrfoico, soon arrive. He must be
made either exceedingly irritable by, op
exoeedingly resigned to, the aituatioa.
On the first supposition he cannot well bq
very happy, nor on the second, a very fas«
cinating lover. Ho becomes either a bur
den to himself or to other people ; eitfier
as nervously anxious as a man who
has not yet been accepted, or as offensively
at homo and satisfied about tfie matter as
if ho were already a husband. But it is
tho girl who really deserves all our com
misseration. She is bound hand and foot,
and tied to a man who is neither alive nor
dead ; neither lover who draws her, nor q
husband whom she draws. She can think
of nobody aud nothing else, and yet she
thinks in vain. She is ruined as a daugh
ter and sister, and utterly spoiled as q
member of general Society ; and yet she
is not a wife or mistress of aJmf.delflJJSJjM
She has given up almost everything, and
she gets absolutely nolfliiug in return;
nothing, at least, but rebukes from her
parents for being absorbed iu vacancy ;ui;j
neglecting lier duties ; nothing hut jokes
from her brothers ; nothing hut lukewarm
invitations from her old friends. At homo
she feels that she is there ou sufferance ;
and abroad she is a superflous nondescript,
a situation that ought to ho sublime, aud
did commence by being, at any rate, pa
thetic, hut liefere very long is something
more than ridiculous. It is positively fun
ny ; and the sacred affections of the young
girl become the sport of every idle wag,
every merciless gossip. Even a short en
gagement is not the pleasantest position of
a woman's life ; but a long ouo must be
well nigh insufferable. When married
life docs come—if it ever does—its more
novel and delicato pleasures havo been
discounted, and at what a price! It seems
a bard doctrine that there must bo no lov«
where thorq is not sufficient money ; hut
we must take this world as wo find'it, and
a very limited experience is enough to
convince anybody that it was not mado
exclusively or expressly for love,
indulge in the pleasing hope that the next
one is. And ns we know, at least, that in
it there is no marrying or giving in mar
ringo, engagements can evidently there bo
as long as auybjdy could possibly desire.
of
of
Wo
wo
girl ?"
Let us
The Immortal Mind. —Dauiol Web«
ster penned the the following boautifuj
sentiment :
" If wo work upon marble, it will por
ish ; if we work upon brass, timo will cf
faco it; iî wo rear temples, thoy will
orumblo into dust ; but if we work qpqq
our immortal minds—if wc imbqe ti,cm
with .principles, with the jusftbiu of Go4
*nd love of our fellow-q)en—wo engravs
on those tablets something which wilj
brighten for all eternity."
If a man is given to liquor, lef no jj T
quor be given to him.

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